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[PMID]: 29514880
[Au] Autor:Musselman LP; Kühnlein RP
[Ad] Address:Department of Biological Sciences, Binghamton University, State University of New York, Binghamton, NY 13902, USA lmusselm@binghamton.edu.
[Ti] Title: as a model to study obesity and metabolic disease.
[So] Source:J Exp Biol;221(Pt Suppl 1), 2018 Mar 07.
[Is] ISSN:1477-9145
[Cp] Country of publication:England
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Excess adipose fat accumulation, or obesity, is a growing problem worldwide in terms of both the rate of incidence and the severity of obesity-associated metabolic disease. Adipose tissue evolved in animals as a specialized dynamic lipid storage depot: adipose cells synthesize fat (a process called lipogenesis) when energy is plentiful and mobilize stored fat (a process called lipolysis) when energy is needed. When a disruption of lipid homeostasis favors increased fat synthesis and storage with little turnover owing to genetic predisposition, overnutrition or sedentary living, complications such as diabetes and cardiovascular disease are more likely to arise. The vinegar fly (Diptera: Drosophilidae) is used as a model to better understand the mechanisms governing fat metabolism and distribution. Flies offer a wealth of paradigms with which to study the regulation and physiological effects of fat accumulation. Obese flies accumulate triacylglycerols in the fat body, an organ similar to mammalian adipose tissue, which specializes in lipid storage and catabolism. Discoveries in have ranged from endocrine hormones that control obesity to subcellular mechanisms that regulate lipogenesis and lipolysis, many of which are evolutionarily conserved. Furthermore, obese flies exhibit pathophysiological complications, including hyperglycemia, reduced longevity and cardiovascular function - similar to those observed in obese humans. Here, we review some of the salient features of the fly that enable researchers to study the contributions of feeding, absorption, distribution and the metabolism of lipids to systemic physiology.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE; REVIEW
[Em] Entry month:1803
[Cu] Class update date: 180308
[Lr] Last revision date:180308
[St] Status:In-Data-Review

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[PMID]: 29378051
[Au] Autor:Ott B; Skurk T; Lagkouvardos L; Fischer S; Büttner J; Lichtenegger M; Clavel T; Lechner A; Rychlik M; Haller D; Hauner H
[Ad] Address:Else Kröner-Fresenius-Center of Nutritional Medicine, ZIEL Institute for FOOD and Health, Chair of Analytical Food Chemistry, and Chair of Nutrition and Immunology, Technical University of Munich, Freising, Germany.
[Ti] Title:Short-Term Overfeeding with Dairy Cream Does Not Modify Gut Permeability, the Fecal Microbiota, or Glucose Metabolism in Young Healthy Men.
[So] Source:J Nutr;148(1):77-85, 2018 Jan 01.
[Is] ISSN:1541-6100
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Background: High-fat diets (HFDs) have been linked to low-grade inflammation and insulin resistance. Objective: The main purpose of the present study was to assess whether acute overfeeding with an HFD affects insulin sensitivity, gut barrier function, and fecal microbiota in humans. Methods: In a prospective intervention study, 24 healthy men [mean ± SD: age 23.0 ± 2.8 y, body mass index (in kg/m2) 23.0 ± 2.1] received an HFD (48% of energy from fat) with an additional 1000 kcal/d (as whipping cream) above their calculated energy expenditure for 7 d. Insulin sensitivity (hyperinsulinemic euglycemic clamp), gut permeability (sugar and polyethylene glycol absorption tests, plasma zonulin), and gut microbiota profiles (high-throughput 16S rRNA gene sequencing) were assessed before and after overfeeding, and 14 d after intervention. Additionally, inflammation markers such as high-sensitivity C-reactive protein, lipopolysaccharide-binding protein, leptin, high-molecular-weight adiponectin, calprotectin, regulated on activation normal, T cell expressed and secreted (RANTES), and monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 were measured in plasma by ELISA. Finally, lipid parameters were analyzed in serum by a laboratory service. Results: Although participants gained 0.9 ± 0.6 kg (P < 0.001) body weight, overnutrition was not associated with a significant change in insulin sensitivity (M value and glucose disposal). Overfeeding for 7 d resulted in elevated serum total (10.2%), LDL (14.6%) and HDL (14.8%) cholesterol concentrations (P < 0.01). In contrast, fasting plasma triglyceride significantly declined (29.3%) during overfeeding (P < 0.001). In addition, there were no significant changes in inflammatory markers. Urine excretion of 4 sugars and polyethylene glycol, used as a proxy for gut permeability, and plasma concentration of zonulin, a marker of paracellular gut permeability, were unchanged. Moreover, overfeeding was not associated with consistent changes in gut microbiota profiles, but marked alterations were observed in a subgroup of 6 individuals. Conclusions: Our findings suggest that short-term overfeeding with an HFD does not significantly impair insulin sensitivity and gut permeability in normal-weight healthy men, and that changes in dominant communities of fecal bacteria occur only in certain individuals. The study was registered in the German Clinical Trial Register as DRKS00006211.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1801
[Cu] Class update date: 180308
[Lr] Last revision date:180308
[St] Status:In-Data-Review
[do] DOI:10.1093/jn/nxx020

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[PMID]: 29333817
[Au] Autor:Lázaro Cuesta L; Rearte A; Rodríguez S; Niglia M; Scipioni H; Rodríguez D; Salinas R; Sosa C; Rasse S
[Ad] Address:Hospital Interzonal Especializado Materno Infantil (HIEMI) "Don Victorio Tetamanti", Mar del Plata, provincia de Buenos Aires. nutrilazarocuesta@yahoo.com.ar.
[Ti] Title:Estado nutricional antropométrico, bioquímico e ingesta alimentaria en niños escolares de 6 a 14 años, General Pueyrredón, Buenos Aires, Argentina. Anthropometric and biochemical assessment of nutritional status and dietary intake in school children aged 6-14 years, Province of Buenos Aires, Argentina.
[So] Source:Arch Argent Pediatr;116(1):e34-e46, 2018 Feb 01.
[Is] ISSN:1668-3501
[Cp] Country of publication:Argentina
[La] Language:eng; spa
[Ab] Abstract:INTRODUCTION: Childhood obesity is a global epidemic. School age and adolescence are critical stages for the implementation of eating and lifestyle habits. OBJECTIVE: To assess anthropometric and biochemical assessment of nutritional status and dietary intake in children, their relationship with socioeconomic factors and georeferencing. METHODS: Cross-sectional study in schoolchildren aged 6-14 years from the District of General Pueyrredon, during August-November 2013. Dietary intake was assessed using a 24-hour dietary recall interview, and georeferencing was done using the gvSIG software. RESULTS: A total of 1296 children were included for anthropometric and socioeconomic assessment. A sub-sample included 362 children for intake and biochemical parameters. Overweight was observed in42.97% (95% confidence interval [CI]: 40.3-45.7) and obesity, in 18.5% (95% CI: 16.320.5). Breakfast was related to a lower risk for overweight (OR: 0.7, 95% CI: 0.5-0.9) and obesity (OR: 0.7, 95% CI: 0.5-0.9). Attending high school was related to a lower prevalence of weight excess (OR: 0.45, 95% CI: 0.3-0.7); male sex posed a higher risk for obesity (OR: 1.7, 95% CI: 1.3-2.3). Also, 4.44% of participants had anemia; 19.6%, hypercholesterolemia; and 21.3%, hypertriglyceridemia. Lipid and saturated fat intake was high, whereas dietary cholesterol and fiber intake was low. Geographic distribution was homogeneous. CONCLUSIONS: The prevalence of overweight was high. The risk for obesity was higher among boys; breakfast appeared as a protective factor against overweight/obesity. A low-fiber and high-fat intake, and high blood cholesterol and triglyceride levels reveal that overnutrition is a prevalent public health problem.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1801
[Cu] Class update date: 180308
[Lr] Last revision date:180308
[St] Status:In-Data-Review
[do] DOI:10.5546/aap.2018.eng.e34

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[PMID]: 29496905
[Au] Autor:Chen J; Sun J; Doscas ME; Ye J; Williamson AJ; Li Y; Li Y; Prinz RA; Xu X
[Ad] Address:Institute of Comparative MedicineYangzhou University, Yangzhou, Jiangsu Province, China.
[Ti] Title:Control of hyperglycemia in male mice by leflunomide: mechanisms of action.
[So] Source:J Endocrinol;237(1):43-58, 2018 Apr.
[Is] ISSN:1479-6805
[Cp] Country of publication:England
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:p70 S6 kinase (S6K1) is a serine/threonine kinase that phosphorylates the insulin receptor substrate-1 (IRS-1) at serine 1101 and desensitizes insulin receptor signaling. S6K1 hyperactivation due to overnutrition leads to hyperglycemia and type 2 diabetes. Our recent study showed that A77 1726, the active metabolite of the anti-rheumatoid arthritis (RA) drug leflunomide, is an inhibitor of S6K1. Whether leflunomide can control hyperglycemia and sensitize the insulin receptor has not been tested. Here we report that A77 1726 increased AKT and S6K1 phosphorylation but decreased S6 and IRS-1 phosphorylation in 3T3-L1 adipocytes, C2C12 and L6 myotubes. A77 1726 increased insulin receptor tyrosine phosphorylation and binding of the p85 subunit of the PI-3 kinase to IRS-1. A77 1726 enhanced insulin-stimulated glucose uptake in L6 myotubes and 3T3-L1 adipocytes, and enhanced insulin-stimulated glucose transporter type 4 (GLUT4) translocation to the plasma membrane of L6 cells. Finally, we investigated the anti-hyperglycemic effect of leflunomide on and high-fat diet (HFD)-induced diabetes mouse models. Leflunomide treatment normalized blood glucose levels and overcame insulin resistance in glucose and insulin tolerance tests in and HFD-fed mice but had no effect on mice fed a normal chow diet (NCD). Leflunomide treatment increased AKT phosphorylation in the fat and muscle of mice but not in normal mice. Our results suggest that leflunomide sensitizes the insulin receptor by inhibiting S6K1 activity , and that leflunomide could be potentially useful for treating patients with both RA and diabetes.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1803
[Cu] Class update date: 180307
[Lr] Last revision date:180307
[St] Status:In-Data-Review
[do] DOI:10.1530/JOE-17-0536

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[PMID]: 29202465
[Au] Autor:Ersoy BA; Maner-Smith KM; Li Y; Alpertunga I; Cohen DE
[Ti] Title:Thioesterase-mediated control of cellular calcium homeostasis enables hepatic ER stress.
[So] Source:J Clin Invest;128(1):141-156, 2018 Jan 02.
[Is] ISSN:1558-8238
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:The incorporation of excess saturated free fatty acids (SFAs) into membrane phospholipids within the ER promotes ER stress, insulin resistance, and hepatic gluconeogenesis. Thioesterase superfamily member 2 (Them2) is a mitochondria-associated long-chain fatty acyl-CoA thioesterase that is activated upon binding phosphatidylcholine transfer protein (PC-TP). Under fasting conditions, the Them2/PC-TP complex directs saturated fatty acyl-CoA toward ß-oxidation. Here, we showed that during either chronic overnutrition or acute induction of ER stress, Them2 and PC-TP play critical roles in trafficking SFAs into the glycerolipid biosynthetic pathway to form saturated phospholipids, which ultimately reduce ER membrane fluidity. The Them2/PC-TP complex activated ER stress pathways by enhancing translocon-mediated efflux of ER calcium. The increased cytosolic calcium, in turn, led to the phosphorylation of calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II, which promoted both hepatic insulin resistance and gluconeogenesis. These findings delineate a mechanistic link between obesity and insulin resistance and establish the Them2/PC-TP complex as an attractive target for the management of hepatic steatosis and insulin resistance.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1712
[Cu] Class update date: 180303
[Lr] Last revision date:180303
[St] Status:In-Data-Review

  6 / 6455 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29408694
[Au] Autor:Jensen T; Abdelmalek MF; Sullivan S; Nadeau KJ; Green M; Roncal C; Nakagawa T; Kuwabara M; Sato Y; Kang DH; Tolan DR; Sanchez-Lozada LG; Rosen HR; Lanaspa MA; Diehl AM; Johnson RJ
[Ad] Address:Department of Medicine, University of Colorado Anschutz Medical Campus, Aurora, CO, United States. Electronic address: Thomas.Jensen@ucdenver.edu.
[Ti] Title:Fructose and sugar: A major mediator of non-alcoholic fatty liver disease.
[So] Source:J Hepatol;, 2018 Feb 02.
[Is] ISSN:1600-0641
[Cp] Country of publication:Netherlands
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is the hepatic manifestation of metabolic syndrome; its rising prevalence parallels the rise in obesity and diabetes. Historically thought to result from overnutrition and a sedentary lifestyle, recent evidence suggests that diets high in sugar (from sucrose and/or high-fructose corn syrup [HFCS]) not only increase the risk of NAFLD, but also non-alcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH). Herein, we review the experimental and clinical evidence that fructose precipitates fat accumulation in the liver, due to both increased lipogenesis and impaired fat oxidation. Recent evidence suggests that the predisposition to fatty liver is linked to the metabolism of fructose by fructokinase C, which results in ATP consumption, nucleotide turnover and uric acid generation that mediate fat accumulation. Alterations to gut permeability, the microbiome, and associated endotoxemia contribute to the risk of NAFLD and NASH. Early clinical studies suggest that reducing sugary beverages and total fructose intake, especially from added sugars, may have a significant benefit on reducing hepatic fat accumulation. We suggest larger, more definitive trials to determine if lowering sugar/HFCS intake, and/or blocking uric acid generation, may help reduce NAFLD and its downstream complications of cirrhosis and chronic liver disease.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE; REVIEW
[Em] Entry month:1802
[Cu] Class update date: 180302
[Lr] Last revision date:180302
[St] Status:Publisher

  7 / 6455 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29352304
[Au] Autor:Wang X; Luo R; Liu C; Zhang L; Yue A; Medina A; Rozelle S
[Ad] Address:Education Global Practices (East and South Africa), the World Bank Group, NW, Washington DC, United States of America.
[Ti] Title:Using daily text messages to improve adherence to infant micronutrient powder (MNP) packets in rural western China: A cluster-randomized controlled trial.
[So] Source:PLoS One;13(1):e0191549, 2018.
[Is] ISSN:1932-6203
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the effectiveness of daily text messages as a means to improve caregivers' adherence to infant micronutrient powder (MNP) in rural Shaanxi Province of China. METHODOLOGY: 638 infants aged 6-11 months in 234 villages were involved in a cluster-randomized controlled trial (RCT). All caregivers were given free infant MNP packets at baseline in April 2013 and the follow-up survey was in July 2013. We randomly assigned 318 infants in 117 villages to treatment group (receiving daily text message) and 320 infants in the other 117 villages as control group. RESULTS: On average, daily text messages increased the number of MNP packets fed (marginal effect = 4.63; 95% confidence interval (CI) = 0.16, 9.10). The text message is more likely to increase the consumption of MNP packets if the primary caregiver was the mother (marginal effect = 12.19; 95% CI = 0.69, 23.68). Receiving the text message appears to significantly increase the likelihood of full adherence when the primary caregiver can either check (odds ratio = 2.93; 95% CI = 1.34, 6.40) or knows how to send (odds ratio = 3.26; 95% CI = 1.53, 6.97) text messages. CONCLUSION: Daily text messages improved the consumption of infant MNP packets. However, the impact was not large enough to increase the probability of caregivers being fully adherent to the feeding instruction, which is to feed 5-7 packets per week as recommended. In addition, when the mother is the caregiver and when the caregiver can check or knows how to send text messages there is greater adherence by the primary caregivers. TRIAL REGISTRATION: http://www.isrctn.com/ISRCTN44149146.
[Mh] MeSH terms primary: Medication Adherence
Micronutrients/administration & dosage
Text Messaging
[Mh] MeSH terms secundary: Caregivers
China
Female
Humans
Infant
Infant Food
Infant Nutrition Disorders/prevention & control
Infant Nutritional Physiological Phenomena
Male
Medication Adherence/statistics & numerical data
Odds Ratio
Powders
Rural Population
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE; RANDOMIZED CONTROLLED TRIAL; RESEARCH SUPPORT, NON-U.S. GOV'T
[Nm] Name of substance:0 (Micronutrients); 0 (Powders)
[Em] Entry month:1802
[Cu] Class update date: 180226
[Lr] Last revision date:180226
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[Da] Date of entry for processing:180121
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.1371/journal.pone.0191549

  8 / 6455 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29272350
[Au] Autor:Jones AK; Hoffman ML; Pillai SM; McFadden KK; Govoni KE; Zinn SA; Reed SA
[Ad] Address:Department of Animal Science, University of Connecticut, Storrs, Connecticut, USA.
[Ti] Title:Gestational restricted- and over-feeding promote maternal and offspring inflammatory responses that are distinct and dependent on diet in sheep.
[So] Source:Biol Reprod;98(2):184-196, 2018 Feb 01.
[Is] ISSN:1529-7268
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Inflammation may be a mechanism of maternal programming because it has the capacity to alter the maternal environment and can persist postnatally in offspring tissues. This study evaluated the effects of restricted- and over-feeding on maternal and offspring inflammatory gene expression using reverse transcription (RT)-PCR arrays. Pregnant ewes were fed 60% (Restricted), 100% (Control), or 140% (Over) of National Research Council requirements beginning on day 30.2 ± 0.2 of gestation. Maternal (n = 8-9 ewes per diet) circulating nonesterified fatty acid (NEFA) and expression of 84 inflammatory genes were evaluated at five stages during gestation. Offspring (n = 6 per diet per age) inflammatory gene expression was evaluated in the circulation and liver at day 135 of gestation and birth. Throughout gestation, circulating NEFA increased in Restricted mothers but not Over. Expression of different proinflammatory mediators increased in Over and Restricted mothers, but was diet-dependent. Maternal diet altered offspring systemic and hepatic expression of genes involved in chemotaxis at late gestation and cytokine production at birth, but the offspring response was distinct from the maternal. In the perinatal offspring, maternal nutrient restriction increased hepatic chemokine (CC motif) ligand 16 and tumor necrosis factor expression. Alternately, maternal overnutrition increased offspring systemic expression of factors induced by hypoxia, whereas expression of factors regulating hepatocyte proliferation and differentiation were altered in the liver. Maternal nutrient restriction and overnutrition may differentially predispose offspring to liver dysfunction through an altered hepatic inflammatory microenvironment that contributes to immune and metabolic disturbances postnatally.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1712
[Cu] Class update date: 180222
[Lr] Last revision date:180222
[St] Status:In-Data-Review
[do] DOI:10.1093/biolre/iox174

  9 / 6455 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 28467927
[Au] Autor:Zhang Y; Reichel JM; Han C; Zuniga-Hertz JP; Cai D
[Ad] Address:Department of Molecular Pharmacology, Albert Einstein College of Medicine, Bronx, NY 10461, USA; Diabetes Research Center, Albert Einstein College of Medicine, Bronx, NY 10461, USA; Institute of Aging, Albert Einstein College of Medicine, Bronx, NY 10461, USA.
[Ti] Title:Astrocytic Process Plasticity and IKKß/NF-κB in Central Control of Blood Glucose, Blood Pressure, and Body Weight.
[So] Source:Cell Metab;25(5):1091-1102.e4, 2017 May 02.
[Is] ISSN:1932-7420
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Central regulation of metabolic physiology is mediated critically through neuronal functions; however, whether astrocytes are also essential remains unclear. Here we show that the high-order processes of astrocytes in the mediobasal hypothalamus displayed shortening in fasting and elongation in fed status. Chronic overnutrition and astrocytic IKKß/NF-κB upregulation similarly impaired astrocytic plasticity, leading to sustained shortening of high-order processes. In physiology, astrocytic IKKß/NF-κB upregulation resulted in early-onset effects, including glucose intolerance and blood pressure rise, and late-onset effects, including body weight and fat gain. Appropriate inhibition in astrocytic IKKß/NF-κB protected against chronic overnutrition impairing astrocytic plasticity and these physiological functions. Mechanistically, astrocytic regulation of hypothalamic extracellular GABA level and therefore BDNF expression were found partly accountable. Hence, astrocytic process plasticity and IKKß/NF-κB play significant roles in central control of blood glucose, blood pressure, and body weight as well as the central induction of these physiological disorders leading to disease.
[Mh] MeSH terms primary: Astrocytes/metabolism
Blood Glucose/metabolism
Blood Pressure
Hypothalamus/physiology
I-kappa B Kinase/metabolism
NF-kappa B/metabolism
[Mh] MeSH terms secundary: Animals
Astrocytes/pathology
Body Weight
Cells, Cultured
Fasting
Glucose Intolerance/metabolism
Glucose Intolerance/physiopathology
HEK293 Cells
Humans
Hypothalamus/physiopathology
Inflammation/metabolism
Inflammation/physiopathology
Mice
Mice, Inbred C57BL
Obesity/metabolism
Obesity/physiopathology
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Nm] Name of substance:0 (Blood Glucose); 0 (NF-kappa B); EC 2.7.11.10 (I-kappa B Kinase)
[Em] Entry month:1802
[Cu] Class update date: 180219
[Lr] Last revision date:180219
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[Da] Date of entry for processing:170504
[St] Status:MEDLINE

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[PMID]: 29433498
[Au] Autor:Du Plessis LM; McLachlan MH; Drimie SE
[Ad] Address:Division of Human Nutrition, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences, Stellenbosch University, PO Box 241, CAPE TOWN, 8000, South Africa. lmdup@sun.ac.za.
[Ti] Title:What does an enabling environment for infant and young child nutrition look like at implementation level? Perspectives from a multi-stakeholder process in the Breede Valley Sub-District, Western Cape, South Africa.
[So] Source:BMC Public Health;18(1):240, 2018 02 13.
[Is] ISSN:1471-2458
[Cp] Country of publication:England
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:BACKGROUND: Breede Valley is a sub-district of the Cape Winelands district, Western Cape Province, South Africa. The administrative capital of the district is situated in the semi-rural town Worcester. Findings of a baseline survey in Worcester revealed poor infant feeding practices and childhood under- and overnutrition, with particular concern over high levels of stunting and low dietary diversity. Maternal overweight and obesity was high. These characteristics made the site suitable to study multi-sectoral arrangements for infant and young child nutrition (IYCN). The purpose of this study was to explore elements of an enabling environment with key stakeholders aimed at improving IYCN at implementation level. METHODS: Focus group discussions and interviews were conducted with representatives from two vulnerable communities; local and district government; higher education institutions; business; and the media in the Breede Valley. Audio recordings were transcribed and data were analysed with the Atlas.TI software programme. RESULTS: The participants viewed knowledge and evidence about the first 1000 days of life as important to address IYCN. The impact of early, optimal nutrition on health and intellectual development resonated with them. The IYCN narrative in the Breede Valley could therefore be framed around nutrition's development impact in a well-structured advocacy campaign. Participants felt that capacity and resources were constrained by many competing agendas spreading public resources thinly, leaving limited scope for promotion and prevention activities. "People" were viewed as a resource, and building partnerships and relationships, could bridge some shortfalls in capacity. Conversations about politics and governance elicited strong opinions about what should be done through direct intervention, policy formulation and legislation. A lead government agency could not be identified for taking the IYCN agenda forward, due to its complexity. Participants proposed it should be referred to a local, informal, inter-governmental body where directors and senior managers meet to address issues of cross-cutting importance. CONCLUSION: The study illustrated that knowledge and evidence; politics and governance; and capacity and resources, elements of the international definition of an enabling environment, also apply at implementation level. In addition, our findings indicated that a people-centred approach is critical in shaping the enabling environment at this level.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE; RESEARCH SUPPORT, NON-U.S. GOV'T; RESEARCH SUPPORT, U.S. GOV'T, NON-P.H.S.; RESEARCH SUPPORT, U.S. GOV'T, P.H.S.
[Em] Entry month:1802
[Cu] Class update date: 180218
[Lr] Last revision date:180218
[St] Status:In-Process
[do] DOI:10.1186/s12889-018-5165-7


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