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[PMID]: 29283143
[Au] Autor:Ramakrishnan S; Mandlik K; Sathe TS; Gubert J; Krishnan T; Baskaran P
[Ad] Address:Department of Cornea and Refractive Surgery, Aravind Eye Hospital, Puducherry, India.
[Ti] Title:Ocular infections caused by : A case series.
[So] Source:Indian J Ophthalmol;66(1):137-140, 2018 Jan.
[Is] ISSN:1998-3689
[Cp] Country of publication:India
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:The aim of our retrospective study is to report a case series of ocular infections caused by a rare fungus, Scedosporium apiospermum, in a South Indian population. Thirteen cases of culture-positive S. apiospermum infections diagnosed between January 2011 and March 2016 were included in this study. The parameters evaluated were predisposing factors, treatment and final clinical outcome. The most common mode of presentation was keratitis (84.6%) followed by sclerokeratitis (15.3%). The predisposing factors involved were unspecified foreign body injury (30.7%), organic matter injury (15.3%), uncontrolled diabetes (7.6%), and recent manual small-incision cataract surgery (7.6%). Five cases (38.46%) had no predisposing factor. Of the 11 keratitis cases, nine (69.2%) responded well to combination medical therapy while one case (7.6%) required therapeutic keratoplasty. One case was lost to follow-up. Both cases which presented with sclerokeratitis showed no response to medico-surgical treatment progressing to panophthalmitis and evisceration.
[Pt] Publication type:CASE REPORTS
[Em] Entry month:1712
[Cu] Class update date: 180204
[Lr] Last revision date:180204
[St] Status:In-Data-Review
[do] DOI:10.4103/ijo.IJO_524_17

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[PMID]: 29256717
[Au] Autor:Pappuru RR; Dave VP; Pathengay A; Gangakhedkar S; Sharma S; Narayanan R; Tyagi M; Grzybowski A; Das T
[Ad] Address:a Smt. Kanuri Santhamma Center for Vitreoretinal Diseases , LV Prasad Eye Institute , Hyderabad , India.
[Ti] Title:Endophthalmitis Progressing to Panophthalmitis: Clinical Features, Demographic Profile, and Factors Predicting Outcome.
[So] Source:Semin Ophthalmol;:1-4, 2017 Dec 19.
[Is] ISSN:1744-5205
[Cp] Country of publication:England
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:PURPOSE: To describe clinical features, demographic profile and factors predicting outcome of endophthalmitis under care progressing to panophthalmitis at a tertiary eye institute. SETTING: Retrospective consecutive case series. METHODS: All cases diagnosed as endophthalmitis of any etiology and undergoing treatment which progressed to panophthalmitis from January 2005 to December 2015 were included. Case records of all patients coded as endophthalmitis and then panophthalmitis were included. Data were collected regarding the clinical features, demographic profile, and treatment outcomes of those cases. RESULTS: This study included 33 eyes of 33 patients. The mean age at presentation was 42.33 ± 21.66 years (median 40, range 5-75). The commonest etiology of endophthalmitis progressing to panophthalmitis was noted following open globe injury endophthalmitis, seen in 13/33 (39.4%) of eyes followed by endophthalmitis associated with microbial keratitis seen in 8/33 (27.3%) eyes. The time interval in days between the diagnosis of endophthalmitis and progression to panophthalmitis was 4.5 ± 3.88 days (median 3 days, range 1-14 days). Fifteen eyes denied perception of light (PL) at the time of diagnosing panophthalmitis. Culture was positive in 16 cases (48.4%), Streptococcus pneumoniae was the commonest species (4 cases) followed by Pseudomonas aeruginosa (3 cases) and Staphylococcus epidermidis (2 cases). Nine cases (27.27%) were additionally given systemic steroids along with the systemic antibiotics. The odds ratio of a favorable outcome was significantly higher when systemic steroids with antibiotics were administered (OR = 80.5, 95% C.I. 6.311026, p = 0.007), when the patient was of a younger age group (< 40 years) (OR 1.53, 95% C.I. 0.37.87, p = 0.6), when the presenting vision at diagnosis was at least light perception (OR 9.8, 95% C.I. 1.03692.7, p = 0.04), when the smear showed Gram-positive cocci (OR 6.66, 95% C.I. 1.0940.43, p = 0.03), if there was culture positivity (OR 10.5, 95% C.I. 1.1198.9, p = 0.03) and when intravenous antibiotics were administered (OR 21.43, 95% C.I. 1.11411.7, p = 0.04). CONCLUSIONS: Risk of progression of endophthalmitis to panophthalmitis is there even under care. Close observation and keen clinical examination for cases that do not respond well is essential. Intravenous antibiotics and systemic steroids should be considered in all cases of endophthalmitis that progress to panophthalmitis.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1712
[Cu] Class update date: 171219
[Lr] Last revision date:171219
[St] Status:Publisher
[do] DOI:10.1080/08820538.2017.1416411

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[PMID]: 29155693
[Au] Autor:Kancherla S; Ross A; Stefko ST; Martel JN
[Ad] Address:*Eye and Ear Institute, University of Pittsburgh Medical Center, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania; and†Scheie Eye Institute, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania.
[Ti] Title:CLOSTRIDIUM PERFRINGENS PANOPHTHALMITIS AFTER INTRAVITREAL ANTI-VASCULAR ENDOTHELIAL GROWTH FACTOR INJECTION.
[So] Source:Retin Cases Brief Rep;, 2017 Nov 16.
[Is] ISSN:1937-1578
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:PURPOSE: This report describes a fulminant infection with Clostridium perfringens after an intravitreal anti-vascular endothelial growth factor injection. METHODS: This is a retrospective case review. RESULTS: Our patient's rapid infection eventually led to enucleation, despite broad-spectrum antibiotic therapy. CONCLUSION: Reporting rare causes and common clinical findings of C. perfringens ocular infection may lead to earlier detection and intervention.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1711
[Cu] Class update date: 171120
[Lr] Last revision date:171120
[St] Status:Publisher
[do] DOI:10.1097/ICB.0000000000000655

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[PMID]: 28954020
[Au] Autor:Hime B; Isenberg J; Rocha G; Lowen M; Morales M; Fernandes BF; Belfort RN
[Ad] Address:Faculty of Medicine, Universidade Cidade de São Paulo, São Paulo, SP, Brazil.
[Ti] Title:Indications for eye removal over a 13-year period at an ophthalmology referral center in São Paulo, Brazil.
[So] Source:Arq Bras Oftalmol;80(4):220-223, 2017 Jul-Aug.
[Is] ISSN:1678-2925
[Cp] Country of publication:Brazil
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Purpose:: To analyze the indications and types of eye removal at Latin America's highest-volume ophthalmic reference center in São Paulo, Brazil. Methods:: A retrospective analysis was conducted of surgical pathological reports in the electronic database of the Ophthalmology Department of the Universidade Federal de São Paulo Hospital of patients who underwent eye-removal procedures between January 2000 and December 2012. Results:: A total of 412 cases met the inclusion criteria for this study. The most common indications for eye removal were ocular melanoma and retinoblastoma, representing 35.4% and 31.1% of the total cases, respectively. Other frequent indications included endophthalmitis (6.3%), nonspecific inflammation (4.1%), squamous cell carcinoma (3.6%), panophthalmitis (3.4%), and phthisis bulbi (1.2%). The remaining indications accounted for 14.8% of all cases, with each accounting for <1% of the total cases. Enucleation was the most common eye-removal procedure seen in our study. Conclusions:: The two most common indications for eye removal were ocular melanoma and retinoblastoma. Alternative treatment options are effective in limiting the need for eye removal but are constrained by our public center's so cioeconomic context.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1709
[Cu] Class update date: 170927
[Lr] Last revision date:170927
[St] Status:In-Process

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[PMID]: 28673337
[Au] Autor:Boonsopon S; Tesavibul N; Uiprasertkul M; Leeamornsiri S; Choopong P
[Ad] Address:Department of Ophthalmology, Faculty of Medicine, Siriraj Hospital, Mahidol University, 2 Wanglang Road, Bangkoknoi, Bangkok, 10700, Thailand.
[Ti] Title:Rare presentation of intractable tuberculous panophthalmitis with intraocular and intraorbital abscesses: a case report.
[So] Source:J Med Case Rep;11(1):180, 2017 Jul 04.
[Is] ISSN:1752-1947
[Cp] Country of publication:England
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:BACKGROUND: We report a rare presentation of extrapulmonary tuberculosis. CASE PRESENTATION: A 29-year-old Burmese woman with human immunodeficiency virus infection and known pulmonary tuberculosis who had been treated for 5 months presented to our hospital with unilateral progressive painful visual loss of 1 month's duration. She was diagnosed with tuberculous panophthalmitis with subretinal and intraorbital abscesses, conjunctival abscess, and extraocular muscle tuberculoma. The diagnosis was confirmed by a conjunctival pus swab with a positive result for acid-fast bacilli and a positive result for a mycobacterial culture. There was high suspicion of multidrug-resistant tuberculosis. Despite receiving ongoing aggressive treatment with conventional antituberculous medications, this patient required subtotal orbital exenteration to control her infection and prevent further progression. Second-line antituberculous medications were added to the first-line therapy, with satisfactory results achieved. CONCLUSIONS: Tuberculous panophthalmitis with intraocular and intraorbital abscesses is a rare presentation of extrapulmonary tuberculosis. Patients who do not respond to first-line antituberculous therapy might be infected with either single-drug or multidrug-resistant Mycobacterium tuberculosis. Patient compliance is one of the key factors that can alter the course of treatment. Careful patient monitoring can improve disease progression, outcome, and prognosis.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1707
[Cu] Class update date: 170714
[Lr] Last revision date:170714
[St] Status:In-Process
[do] DOI:10.1186/s13256-017-1353-9

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[PMID]: 28648168
[Au] Autor:Kyhl K; Hansen PB; Holm E; Á Steig T; Kollslíð R; Gaïni S
[Ad] Address:kasperkyhl@gmail.com.
[Ti] Title:[Mitral valve endocarditis diagnosed after panophthalmitis with Enterococcus faecalis].
[So] Source:Ugeskr Laeger;179(26), 2017 Jun 26.
[Is] ISSN:1603-6824
[Cp] Country of publication:Denmark
[La] Language:dan
[Ab] Abstract:An 86-year-old man underwent cataract surgery on the left eye, but suddenly he lost his vision three days after surgery. Topical treatments for panophthalmitis were started according to international guidelines. Later, a broad-range polymerase chain reaction showed Enterococcus faecalis in corpus vitreum, and IV antiobiotic treatment was initiated. To exclude endocarditis an echocardiography was performed, and this showed mitral regurgitation with a small mobile vegetation. Uncertainty concerning a possible causality between panophthalmitis and mitral valve endocarditis remains.
[Pt] Publication type:ENGLISH ABSTRACT; JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1706
[Cu] Class update date: 170626
[Lr] Last revision date:170626
[St] Status:In-Process

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[PMID]: 28573992
[Au] Autor:Sharma D; Mathur U; Gour A; Acharya M; Gupta N; Sapra N
[Ad] Address:Department of Cornea and Anterior Segment, Dr. Shroff's Charity Eye Hospital, New Delhi, India.
[Ti] Title: infection following intraocular surgery: Report of seven cases from a tertiary eye hospital.
[So] Source:Indian J Ophthalmol;65(5):371-375, 2017 May.
[Is] ISSN:1998-3689
[Cp] Country of publication:India
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:PURPOSE: To study the outcome of ocular nocardiosis following intraocular surgery. MATERIALS AND METHODS: A retrospective review of medical records of all postoperative cases of culture proven Nocardia infection over a period of 3 years, from October 2010 to September 2013, was performed. Microbiological analysis was performed for all cases and included smears and cultures. Fortified 2% amikacin eye drops were the mainstay of treatment. Surgical intervention was performed in case of nonresponse to medical therapy or suspected endophthalmitis. RESULTS: Seven cases of culture proven Nocardia infection were seen. All cases had been operated in a hospital surgical facility. Six followed phacoemulsification, and one followed a secondary intraocular lens implantation. Four patients were part of a cluster infection. The mean duration between the primary surgical procedure and presentation was 16.14 ± 9.82 days. Five patients had infiltrates at the site of the surgical incision. One each had endophthalmitis and panophthalmitis. Six eyes required surgical intervention. Infection was seen to resolve in four eyes. Two eyes went into phthisis, and one was eviscerated. Only two of the six eyes, where in surgical intervention was performed early, obtained a final visual acuity of 20/60. CONCLUSION: Early surgical intervention, before the involvement of the anterior chamber, may help preserve the anatomic and functional integrity of the eye.
[Mh] MeSH terms primary: Amikacin/administration & dosage
Endophthalmitis/microbiology
Eye Infections, Bacterial/microbiology
Nocardia Infections/microbiology
Nocardia/isolation & purification
Ophthalmologic Surgical Procedures/adverse effects
Surgical Wound Infection/microbiology
[Mh] MeSH terms secundary: Adult
Aged
Anti-Bacterial Agents/administration & dosage
Endophthalmitis/drug therapy
Eye Infections, Bacterial/diagnosis
Eye Infections, Bacterial/drug therapy
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Nocardia Infections/diagnosis
Nocardia Infections/drug therapy
Ophthalmic Solutions
Prognosis
Retrospective Studies
Surgical Wound Infection/diagnosis
Surgical Wound Infection/drug therapy
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Nm] Name of substance:0 (Anti-Bacterial Agents); 0 (Ophthalmic Solutions); 84319SGC3C (Amikacin)
[Em] Entry month:1709
[Cu] Class update date: 170919
[Lr] Last revision date:170919
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[Da] Date of entry for processing:170603
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.4103/ijo.IJO_564_16

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[PMID]: 28559724
[Au] Autor:Pushker N; Bajaj MS; Singh AK; Lokdarshi G; Bakhshi S; Kashyap S
[Ad] Address:Oculoplastic and Pediatric Ophthalmology Services, Dr. Rajendra Prasad Centre for Ophthalmic Sciences, All India Institute of Medical Sciences, Ansari Nagar, New Delhi 110029, India.
[Ti] Title:Intra-ocular medulloepithelioma as a masquerade for PHPV and Panophthalmitis: a Diagnostic Dilemma.
[So] Source:Saudi J Ophthalmol;31(2):109-111, 2017 Apr-Jun.
[Is] ISSN:1319-4534
[Cp] Country of publication:Saudi Arabia
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:A previously diagnosed child of persistent hyperplastic primary vitreous (PHPV) with painless blind eye remained clinically silent for about 3 years follow-up. The child suddenly presented as a case of orbital cellulitis and panopthalmitis with meningitis. No definite mass lesion was detected on ultrasonography, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and positron emission tomography (PET) scan. Histopathology of the enucleated eye revealed intra-ocular medulloepithelioma as the culprit of sterile panophthalmitis and orbital inflammation.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1706
[Cu] Class update date: 170816
[Lr] Last revision date:170816
[St] Status:PubMed-not-MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.1016/j.sjopt.2017.02.004

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[PMID]: 28482758
[Au] Autor:Baumgartner WA; Ford L; Hanson L
[Ad] Address:Departments of Pathobiology and Population Medicine (Baumgartner), College of Veterinary Medicine, Mississippi State University, Mississippi State, MS.
[Ti] Title:Lesions caused by virulent Aeromonas hydrophila in farmed catfish ( Ictalurus punctatus and I. punctatus × I. furcatus) in Mississippi.
[So] Source:J Vet Diagn Invest;29(5):747-751, 2017 Sep.
[Is] ISSN:1943-4936
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:In 2009, a virulent strain of Aeromonas hydrophila caused severe disease and high mortalities (motile aeromonad septicemia variant [MASv]) in farmed channel catfish ( Ictalurus punctatus) and hybrid catfish ( I. punctatus × I. furcatus) in eastern Mississippi and Alabama. As is common in MAS, there is severe hemorrhagic dermatitis with ulceration, as well as abdominal hyperemia, petechiation, and mild ascites. Additional findings in MASv cases include panophthalmitis and orbital cellulitis, leading to ocular rupture, and brains are often hyperemic with mild random acute hemorrhage. In MASv infections, there is consistently also marked hemorrhage and edema in the submucosa and muscularis of the stomach, with lymphangitis and a few bacteria, plus splenomegaly with infarcts. Microscopically, spleens have necrosis of ellipsoids with macrophage infiltration and small numbers of bacteria; however, large infarcts are filled with bacteria. Other organs, such as liver, kidneys, and intestine, which are typically associated with MAS caused by various aeromonad species, are less affected. The findings in the stomach have not been reported in MAS in farmed catfish, to our knowledge, and the splenic changes are highly characteristic of MAS compared to infection with other gram-negative bacteria, including Edwardsiella ictaluri and other aeromonad species and strains.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1705
[Cu] Class update date: 170901
[Lr] Last revision date:170901
[St] Status:In-Process
[do] DOI:10.1177/1040638717708584

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[PMID]: 28345567
[Au] Autor:Venkatesh P
[Ad] Address:Dr. Rajendra Prasad Centre for Ophthalmic Sciences, All India Institute of Medical Sciences, New Delhi, India.
[Ti] Title:Retina and the tubercle : Four decades of our journey and current understanding.
[So] Source:Indian J Ophthalmol;65(2):122-127, 2017 Feb.
[Is] ISSN:1998-3689
[Cp] Country of publication:India
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Tuberculosis continues to be a major pandemic with enormous public health implication. Involvement of ocular tissues in the form of tubercles, tuberculomas, panophthalmitis, and iris granulomas are well recognized as definitive manifestations of tuberculosis. For these lesions, confirmatory evidence is available in the form of demonstration of acid-fast Bacillus on Ziehl-Neelsen staining. For other retinochoroidal disorders such as central serous chorioretinopathy, retinal vasculitis, and presumed ocular tuberculosis, hard evidence about the role of Mycobacterium tuberculosis is lacking. In this review, work done at our center over the past four decades in the form of experimental animal studies, nucleic acid amplification assays and clinical studies regarding the above retinochoroidal pathologies and the tubercle Bacillus is presented. It is possible that revisiting experimental animal studies may be a way forward in the current scenario of ambiguity about the cause-effect relationship between M. tuberculosis and few of the retinochoroidal disorders.
[Mh] MeSH terms primary: Fluorescein Angiography/methods
Mycobacterium tuberculosis/isolation & purification
Retina/pathology
Tomography, Optical Coherence/methods
Tuberculosis, Ocular/diagnosis
[Mh] MeSH terms secundary: Animals
Biomedical Research
Disease Models, Animal
Fundus Oculi
Ophthalmology
Retina/microbiology
Tuberculosis, Ocular/microbiology
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE; REVIEW
[Em] Entry month:1708
[Cu] Class update date: 170816
[Lr] Last revision date:170816
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[Da] Date of entry for processing:170328
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.4103/ijo.IJO_864_16


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