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[PMID]: 29524490
[Au] Autor:Li Y; Guan S; Liu C; Chen X; Zhu Y; Xie Y; Wang J; Ji X; Li L; Li Z; Zhang Y; Zeng X; Li M
[Ad] Address:Department of Traditional Chinese Medicine, Shanghai Pudong Hopstital, Fudan University Pudong Medical Center, Shanghai 201399, China; Chuangchun University of Chinese Medicine, Changchun, Jilin 130117, China.
[Ti] Title:Neuroprotective effects of Coptis chinensis Franch polysaccharide on amyloid-beta (Aß)-induced toxicity in a transgenic Caenorhabditis elegans model of Alzheimer's disease (AD).
[So] Source:Int J Biol Macromol;, 2018 Mar 07.
[Is] ISSN:1879-0003
[Cp] Country of publication:Netherlands
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:This study aims to investigate the neuroprotective effects of Coptis chinensis Franch polysaccharide (CCP) on Aß transgenic CL4176 Caenorhabditis elegans, as well as its mechanism of action. The results in life span experiment showed that CCP could significantly increase the lifespan of C. elegans and the effect is in the descending order of 100 mg/L > 500 mg/L > 200 mg/L. The behavioral experiments also demonstrated that CCP at the concentration of 100 mg/L could delay the paralysis rate of C. elegans, which was significantly different from the control group. In terms of Aß toxicity in C. elegans, morphological observation using Thioflavin S staining method indicated that the deposition of Aß protein in the head area of the untreated C. elegans was much more than those in the CCP (100 mg/L)-treated CL4176. In line with this finding, fluorogenic quantitative real-time PCR confirmed that the transcriptional levels of HSP16.2 (Y46H3A.D) and HSP16.41 (Y46H3A.E) in C. elegans was 21 times and 79 times higher than those in untreated control. Thus, these data demonstrate that CCP could reduce Aß-induced toxicity by delaying the aging, decreasing the rate of paralysis, inhibiting the deposition of Aß, and increasing the expression levels of HSP genes in transgenic C. elegans.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1803
[Cu] Class update date: 180310
[Lr] Last revision date:180310
[St] Status:Publisher

  2 / 152548 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29522410
[Au] Autor:Penaloza CI; Alimardani M; Nishio S
[Ti] Title:Android Feedback-Based Training Modulates Sensorimotor Rhythms During Motor Imagery.
[So] Source:IEEE Trans Neural Syst Rehabil Eng;26(3):666-674, 2018 Mar.
[Is] ISSN:1558-0210
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:EEG-based brain computer interface (BCI) systems have demonstrated potential to assist patients with devastating motor paralysis conditions. However, there is great interest in shifting the BCI trend toward applications aimed at healthy users. Although BCI operation depends on technological factors (i.e., EEG pattern classification algorithm) and human factors (i.e., how well the person can generate good quality EEG patterns), it is the latter that is least investigated. In order to control a motor imagery-based BCI, users need to learn to modulate their sensorimotor brain rhythms by practicing motor imagery using a classical training protocol with an abstract visual feedback. In this paper, we investigate a different BCI training protocol using a human-like android robot (Geminoid HI-2) to provide realistic visual feedback. The proposed training protocol addresses deficiencies of the classical approach and takes the advantage of body-abled user capabilities. Experimental results suggest that android feedback-based BCI training improves the modulation of sensorimotor rhythms during motor imagery task. Moreover, we discuss how the influence of body ownership transfer illusion toward the android might have an effect on the modulation of event-related desynchronization/synchronization activity.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1803
[Cu] Class update date: 180309
[Lr] Last revision date:180309
[St] Status:In-Data-Review
[do] DOI:10.1109/TNSRE.2018.2792481

  3 / 152548 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29453966
[Au] Autor:Simone-Finstrom M; Aronstein K; Goblirsch M; Rinkevich F; de Guzman L
[Ad] Address:USDA-ARS, Honey Bee Breeding, Genetics and Physiology Laboratory, Baton Rouge, LA 70820, USA. Electronic address: michael.simonefinstrom@ars.usda.gov.
[Ti] Title:Gamma irradiation inactivates honey bee fungal, microsporidian, and viral pathogens and parasites.
[So] Source:J Invertebr Pathol;153:57-64, 2018 Feb 15.
[Is] ISSN:1096-0805
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Managed honey bee (Apis mellifera) populations are currently facing unsustainable losses due to a variety of factors. Colonies are challenged with brood pathogens, such as the fungal agent of chalkbrood disease, the microsporidian gut parasite Nosema spp., and several viruses. These pathogens may be transmitted horizontally from worker to worker, vertically from queen to egg and via vectors like the parasitic mite, Varroa destructor. Despite the fact that these pathogens are widespread and often harbored in wax comb that is reused from year to year and transferred across beekeeping operations, few, if any, universal treatments exist for their control. In order to mitigate some of these biological threats to honey bees and to allow for more sustainable reuse of equipment, investigations into techniques for the sterilization of hive equipment and comb are of particular significance. Here, we investigated the potential of gamma irradiation for inactivation of the fungal pathogen Ascosphaera apis, the microsporidian Nosema ceranae and three honey bee viruses (Deformed wing virus [DWV], Black queen cell virus [BQCV], and Chronic bee paralysis virus [CBPV]), focusing on the infectivity of these pathogens post-irradiation. Results indicate that gamma irradiation can effectively inactivate A. apis, N. ceranae, and DWV. Partial inactivation was noted for BQCV and CBPV, but this did not reduce effects on mortality at the tested, relatively high doses. These findings highlight the importance of studying infection rate and symptom development post-treatment and not simply rate or quantity detected. These findings suggest that gamma irradiation may function as a broad treatment to help mitigate colony losses and the spread of pathogens through the exchange of comb across colonies, but raises the question why some viruses appear to be unaffected. These results provide the basis for subsequent studies on benefits of irradiation of used comb for colony health and productivity.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1802
[Cu] Class update date: 180309
[Lr] Last revision date:180309
[St] Status:Publisher

  4 / 152548 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29386226
[Au] Autor:Wu F; Quinonez M; DiFranco M; Cannon SC
[Ad] Address:Department of Physiology, David Geffen School of Medicine, University of California, Los Angeles, Los Angeles, CA.
[Ti] Title:Stac3 enhances expression of human Ca 1.1 in oocytes and reveals gating pore currents in HypoPP mutant channels.
[So] Source:J Gen Physiol;, 2018 Jan 31.
[Is] ISSN:1540-7748
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Mutations of Ca 1.1, the pore-forming subunit of the L-type Ca channel in skeletal muscle, are an established cause of hypokalemic periodic paralysis (HypoPP). However, functional assessment of HypoPP mutant channels has been hampered by difficulties in achieving sufficient plasma membrane expression in cells that are not of muscle origin. In this study, we show that coexpression of Stac3 dramatically increases the expression of human Ca 1.1 (plus α -δ and ß subunits) at the plasma membrane of oocytes. In voltage-clamp studies with the cut-open oocyte clamp, we observe ionic currents on the order of 1 µA and gating charge displacements of ∼0.5-1 nC. Importantly, this high expression level is sufficient to ascertain whether HypoPP mutant channels are leaky because of missense mutations at arginine residues in S4 segments of the voltage sensor domains. We show that R528H and R528G in S4 of domain II both support gating pore currents, but unlike other R/H HypoPP mutations, R528H does not conduct protons. Stac3-enhanced membrane expression of Ca 1.1 in oocytes increases the throughput for functional studies of disease-associated mutations and is a new platform for investigating the voltage-dependent properties of Ca 1.1 without the complexity of the transverse tubule network in skeletal muscle.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1802
[Cu] Class update date: 180310
[Lr] Last revision date:180310
[St] Status:Publisher

  5 / 152548 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29377959
[Au] Autor:Figura M; Kusmierska K; Bucior E; Szlufik S; Koziorowski D; Jamrozik Z; Janik P
[Ad] Address:Department of Neurology, Faculty of Heath Sciences, Medical University of Warsaw, Warsaw, Poland.
[Ti] Title:Serum amino acid profile in patients with Parkinson's disease.
[So] Source:PLoS One;13(1):e0191670, 2018.
[Is] ISSN:1932-6203
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Amino acids play numerous roles in the central nervous system, serving as neurotransmitters, neuromodulators and regulators of energy metabolism. The free amino acid profile in serum of Parkinson's disease (PD) patients may be influenced by neurodegeneration, mitochondrial dysfunction, malabsorption in the gastroenteric tract and received treatment. The aim of our study was the evaluation of the profile of amino acid concentrations against disease progression. We assessed the amino acid profile in the serum of 73 patients divided into groups with early PD, late PD with dyskinesia and late PD without dyskinesia. Serum amino acid analysis was performed by high-pressure liquid chromatography with fluorescence detection. We observed some significant differences amongst the groups with respect to concentrations of alanine, arginine, phenylalanine and threonine, although no significant differences were observed between patients with advanced PD with and without dyskinesia. We conclude that this specific amino acid profile could serve as biochemical marker of PD progression.
[Mh] MeSH terms primary: Amino Acids/blood
Parkinson Disease/blood
[Mh] MeSH terms secundary: Chromatography, High Pressure Liquid
Humans
Spectrometry, Fluorescence
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE; RESEARCH SUPPORT, NON-U.S. GOV'T
[Nm] Name of substance:0 (Amino Acids)
[Em] Entry month:1803
[Cu] Class update date: 180309
[Lr] Last revision date:180309
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[Da] Date of entry for processing:180130
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.1371/journal.pone.0191670

  6 / 152548 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29345156
[Au] Autor:Svetel M; Tomic A; Kresojevic N; Kostic V
[Ad] Address:a Clinic of Neurology, Clinical Center of Serbia, Faculty of Medicine , University of Belgrade , Belgrade , Serbia.
[Ti] Title:Pharmacokinetic drug evaluation of opicapone for the treatment of Parkinson's disease.
[So] Source:Expert Opin Drug Metab Toxicol;14(3):353-360, 2018 Mar.
[Is] ISSN:1744-7607
[Cp] Country of publication:England
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:INTRODUCTION: Opicapone (OPC) is a novel, potent, reversible, and purely peripheral third-generation COMT inhibitor, which provides an enhancement in levodopa (L-Dopa) availability. It represents adjunctive therapy for L-Dopa treated patients with PD and motor fluctuations. Areas covered: The purpose of this study was to evaluate pharmacokinetic of OPC for the treatment of PD. Expert commentary: Oral OPC exhibits linear, dose-dependent absorption. However, following concomitant ingestion of a high-fat, high-calorie meal, the maximum plasma concentration will be decreased. A once-daily bedtime administration of OPC 1 h after the last daily L-Dopa/AADCi, are considered to avoid any interaction during the L-Dopa absorption phase. There are no clinically relevant effects of age (in adults), renal impairment or race on the pharmacokinetics of OPC. OPC dose adjustment is not needed in patients with mild to moderate chronic hepatic impairment. Opicapone exhibits the lowest potential for cytotoxicity in comparison with other COMT inhibitors. It significantly decreases COMT activity, with half-life of COMT inhibition in human erythrocytes of 61.6 h and increases systemic exposure to L-Dopa. This provides an enhancement in L-Dopa availability that translates into clinical benefit for PD patients in terms of significant decrease of OFF periods and increase in ON-time without troublesome dyskinesia.
[Mh] MeSH terms primary: Antiparkinson Agents/administration & dosage
Oxadiazoles/administration & dosage
Parkinson Disease/drug therapy
[Mh] MeSH terms secundary: Adult
Animals
Antiparkinson Agents/adverse effects
Antiparkinson Agents/pharmacokinetics
Catechol O-Methyltransferase Inhibitors/administration & dosage
Catechol O-Methyltransferase Inhibitors/pharmacokinetics
Dose-Response Relationship, Drug
Drug Therapy, Combination
Food-Drug Interactions
Half-Life
Humans
Levodopa/administration & dosage
Levodopa/pharmacokinetics
Oxadiazoles/adverse effects
Oxadiazoles/pharmacokinetics
Parkinson Disease/physiopathology
[Pt] Publication type:COMPARATIVE STUDY; JOURNAL ARTICLE; REVIEW
[Nm] Name of substance:0 (Antiparkinson Agents); 0 (Catechol O-Methyltransferase Inhibitors); 0 (Oxadiazoles); 46627O600J (Levodopa); Y5929UIJ5N (opicapone)
[Em] Entry month:1803
[Cu] Class update date: 180309
[Lr] Last revision date:180309
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[Da] Date of entry for processing:180119
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.1080/17425255.2018.1430138

  7 / 152548 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29522265
[Au] Autor:Salomone R; Jácomo AL; Nascimento SBD; Lezirovitz K; Hojaij FC; Costa HJZR; Bento RF
[Ad] Address:Department of Otorhinolaryngology, University of São Paulo Medical School, São Paulo, Brazil.
[Ti] Title:Polyethylene glycol fusion associated with antioxidants: A new promise in the treatment of traumatic facial paralysis.
[So] Source:Head Neck;, 2018 Mar 09.
[Is] ISSN:1097-0347
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:BACKGROUND: Recent studies in invertebrates have taught us that early cell membrane regeneration is determinant for axonal recovery and survival after trauma. Many authors obtained extraordinary results in neural regeneration using polyethylene glycol fusion protocols, which also involved microsutures and antioxidants. METHODS: Sixty rats were evaluated with functional and histological protocol after facial nerve neurotmesis. Groups A and B had their stumps coapted with microsuture after 24 hours of neurotmesis and groups C and D after 72 hours. In addition to the microstructure, groups B and D used the polyethylene glycol-fusion protocol for the modulation of the Ca . RESULTS: At the sixth week, the latency of group D and duration of group B was lower than groups A and C (P = .011). The axonal diameter of the groups that used polyethylene glycol-fusion was higher than those who did not use polyethylene glycol-fusion (P ≤ .001). CONCLUSION: Although not providing a functional improvement, polyethylene glycol-fusion slowed down demyelination.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1803
[Cu] Class update date: 180309
[Lr] Last revision date:180309
[St] Status:Publisher
[do] DOI:10.1002/hed.25122

  8 / 152548 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29522212
[Au] Autor:Roman A; Meftah S; Arthaud S; Luppi PH; Peyron C
[Ad] Address:Center for Research in Neuroscience of Lyon (CRNL), SLEEP team, CNRS, INSERM, LYON, France.
[Ti] Title:The Inappropriate Occurrence of REM Sleep in Narcolepsy is not due to a Defect in Homeostatic Regulation of REM Sleep.
[So] Source:Sleep;, 2018 Mar 07.
[Is] ISSN:1550-9109
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Narcolepsy type 1 is a disabling disorder with four primary symptoms: excessive-daytime-sleepiness, cataplexy, hypnagogic hallucinations and sleep paralysis. The three latter symptoms together with a short REM sleep latency have suggested impairment in REM sleep homeostatic regulation with an enhanced propensity for (i.e. tendency to enter) REM sleep. To test this hypothesis, we challenged REM sleep homeostatic regulation in a recognized model of narcolepsy, the orexin knock-out (Orex-KO) mice and their wild-type (WT) littermates. We first performed 48hrs of REM sleep deprivation using the classic small-platforms-over-water method. We found that narcoleptic mice are similarly REM sleep deprived to WT mice. Although they had shorter sleep latency, Orex-KO mice recovered similarly to WT during the following 10hrs of recovery. Interestingly, Orex-KO mice also had cataplexy episodes immediately after REM sleep deprivation, anticipating REM sleep rebound, at a time of day when cataplexy does not occur in baseline condition. We then evaluated REM sleep propensity using our new automated method of deprivation that performs a specific and efficient REM sleep deprivation. We showed that REM sleep propensity is similar during light phase in Orex-KO and WT mice. However, during the dark phase REM sleep propensity was not suppressed in Orex-KO mice when hypocretin/orexin neuropeptides are normally released. Altogether our data suggest that in addition to the well-known wake-promoting role of hypocretin/orexin, these neuropeptides would also suppress REM sleep. Therefore, hypocretin/orexin deficiency would facilitate the occurrence of REM sleep at any time of day in an opportunistic manner as seen in human narcolepsy.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1803
[Cu] Class update date: 180309
[Lr] Last revision date:180309
[St] Status:Publisher
[do] DOI:10.1093/sleep/zsy046

  9 / 152548 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29522149
[Au] Autor:Krekeler BN; Wendt E; Macdonald C; Orne J; Francis DO; Sippel R; Connor NP
[Ad] Address:Department of Communication Sciences and Disorders, University of Wisconsin, Madison.
[Ti] Title:Patient-Reported Dysphagia After Thyroidectomy: A Qualitative Study.
[So] Source:JAMA Otolaryngol Head Neck Surg;, 2018 Mar 08.
[Is] ISSN:2168-619X
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Importance: It is important that clinicians understand consequences of thyoridectomy on swallowing from the patient perspective to better care for this population. Objective: Using rigorous qualitative methodology, this study set out to characterize the effect of swallowing-related symptoms after thyroidectomy on patient quality of life and swallowing-related outcomes. Design, Setting, and Participants: Prospective, grounded theory analysis of interviews with 26 patients at 3 time points after thyroidectomy (2 weeks, 6 weeks, and 6 months) Data were collected from an ongoing clinical trial (NCT02138214), and outpatient interviews were conducted at the University of Wisconsin Hospital and Clinics. All participants were age 21 to 73 years with a diagnosis of papillary thyroid cancer without cervical or distant metastases and had undergone total thyroidectomy. Exclusion criteria were preexisting vocal fold abnormalities (eg, polyps, nodules), neurological conditions affecting the voice or swallowing ability, and/or development of new-onset vocal fold paresis or paralysis (lasting longer than 6 months) after total thyroidectomy. Interventions: Total thyroidectomy. Main Outcomes and Measures: Symptoms of dysphagia and related effects on quality of life elicited through grounded theory analysis of semistructured interviews with patients after thyroidectomy designed to foster an open-ended, patient-driven discussion. Results: Of the 26 patients included, 69% were women (n = 18); mean (SD) age, 46.4 (14.1) years; mean (SD) tumor diameter 2.2 (1.4) cm. Two weeks after thyroidectomy, 80% of participants (n = 20) reported at least 1 swallowing-related symptom when prompted by the interview cards; during the open interview, 53% of participants (n = 14) volunteered discussion of swallowing-related symptoms unprompted. However, only 8% of participants in this study (n = 2) qualified for a follow-up dysphagia evaluation, indicating that the majority of reported symptoms were subjective in nature. Six weeks and 6 months after thyroidectomy, 42% (n = 11) and 17% (n = 4) of participants, respectively, reported continued swallowing symptoms using the prompts; 12% (n = 3) discussed symptoms without prompting cards at both time points. Conclusions and Relevance: Swallowing symptoms after thyroidectomy are underreported in the literature. This study revealed that as many as 80% of patients who have thyroidectomy may experience swallowing-related symptoms after surgery, and many develop compensatory strategies to manage or reduce the burden of these symptoms. Considering the large number of individuals who may experience subjective dysphagia, preoperative counseling should include education and management of such symptoms.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1803
[Cu] Class update date: 180309
[Lr] Last revision date:180309
[St] Status:Publisher
[do] DOI:10.1001/jamaoto.2017.3378

  10 / 152548 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29519969
[Au] Autor:Yamashiro N; Nagasaka T; Ooishi N; Tsuchiya M; Takaki R; Kobayashi F; Shindo K; Takiyama Y
[Ad] Address:Department of Neurology, Faculty of Medicine, University of Yamanashi.
[Ti] Title:[An Autopsy Case of Meningoencephalitis and Cerebral Infarction that Developed with Ramsay Hunt Syndrome and Disseminated Herpes Zoster].
[So] Source:Brain Nerve;70(3):253-258, 2018 Mar.
[Is] ISSN:1881-6096
[Cp] Country of publication:Japan
[La] Language:jpn
[Ab] Abstract:We report here the clinical presentation and subsequent autopsy of a 90-year-old man who developed small papules with pain and swelling in his right ear. On admission, he exhibited right facial nerve paralysis, neck stiffness and Kernig's sign. The cell count was elevated and the varicella-zoster virus-PCR was positive in the CSF. Brain magnetic resonance imaging showed hyperintense lesions in the left pons and left temporal lobe, in FLAIR images. We diagnosed the patient with Ramsay Hunt syndrome and meningoencephalitis due to varicella-zoster virus. Although the symptoms of meningitis improved following treatment with intravenous acyclovir (750 mg/day initially, raised to 1,125 mg/day), 16 days after admission, he died suddenly due to gastrointestinal hemorrhage. The autopsy findings included lymphocytic infiltration of the leptomeninges and perivascular space of the cerebrum, and slight parenchyma in the left temporal lobe and insula, as the main histological features. Encephalitis due to varicella zoster virus has been recognized as a vasculopathy affecting large and small vessels. Pathological confirmation is rare in varicella zoster virus meningoencephalitis.
[Pt] Publication type:ENGLISH ABSTRACT; JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1803
[Cu] Class update date: 180309
[Lr] Last revision date:180309
[St] Status:In-Data-Review
[do] DOI:10.11477/mf.1416200990


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