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[PMID]: 29516437
[Au] Autor:Wei DY; Jensen RH
[Ad] Address:Headache Group, Department of Basic and Clinical Neuroscience, Institute of Psychiatry, Psychology and Neuroscience, King's College London, London, UK. Diana.wei@kcl.ac.uk.
[Ti] Title:Therapeutic Approaches for the Management of Trigeminal Autonomic Cephalalgias.
[So] Source:Neurotherapeutics;, 2018 Mar 07.
[Is] ISSN:1878-7479
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Trigeminal autonomic cephalalgia (TAC) encompasses 4 unique primary headache types: cluster headache, paroxysmal hemicrania, hemicrania continua, and short-lasting unilateral neuralgiform headache attacks with conjunctival injection and tearing and short-lasting unilateral neuralgiform headache attacks with cranial autonomic symptoms. They are grouped on the basis of their shared clinical features of unilateral headache of varying durations and ipsilateral cranial autonomic symptoms. The shared clinical features reflect the underlying activation of the trigeminal-autonomic reflex. The treatment for TACs has been limited and not specific to the underlying pathogenesis. There is a proportion of patients who are refractory or intolerant to the current standard medical treatment. From instrumental bench work research and neuroimaging studies, there are new therapeutic targets identified in TACs. Treatment has become more targeted and aimed towards the pathogenesis of the conditions. The therapeutic targets range from the macroscopic and structural level down to the molecular and receptor level. The structural targets for surgical and noninvasive neuromodulation include central neuromodulation targets: posterior hypothalamus and, high cervical nerves, and peripheral neuromodulation targets: occipital nerves, sphenopalatine ganglion, and vagus nerve. In this review, we will also discuss the neuropeptide and molecular targets, in particular, calcitonin gene-related peptide, somatostatin, transient receptor potential vanilloid-1 receptor, nitric oxide, melatonin, orexin, pituitary adenylate cyclase-activating polypeptide, and glutamate.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE; REVIEW
[Em] Entry month:1803
[Cu] Class update date: 180308
[Lr] Last revision date:180308
[St] Status:Publisher
[do] DOI:10.1007/s13311-018-0618-3

  2 / 2151 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29386181
[Au] Autor:Adelborg K; Szépligeti SK; Holland-Bill L; Ehrenstein V; Horváth-Puhó E; Henderson VW; Sørensen HT
[Ad] Address:Department of Clinical Epidemiology, Aarhus University Hospital, Denmark kade@clin.au.dk.
[Ti] Title:Migraine and risk of cardiovascular diseases: Danish population based matched cohort study.
[So] Source:BMJ;360:k96, 2018 01 31.
[Is] ISSN:1756-1833
[Cp] Country of publication:England
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:OBJECTIVE: To examine the risks of myocardial infarction, stroke (ischaemic and haemorrhagic), peripheral artery disease, venous thromboembolism, atrial fibrillation or atrial flutter, and heart failure in patients with migraine and in a general population comparison cohort. DESIGN: Nationwide, population based cohort study. SETTING: All Danish hospitals and hospital outpatient clinics from 1995 to 2013. PARTICIPANTS: 51 032 patients with migraine and 510 320 people from the general population matched on age, sex, and calendar year. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Comorbidity adjusted hazard ratios of cardiovascular outcomes based on Cox regression analysis. RESULTS: Higher absolute risks were observed among patients with incident migraine than in the general population across most outcomes and follow-up periods. After 19 years of follow-up, the cumulative incidences per 1000 people for the migraine cohort compared with the general population were 25 17 for myocardial infarction, 45 25 for ischaemic stroke, 11 6 for haemorrhagic stroke, 13 11 for peripheral artery disease, 27 18 for venous thromboembolism, 47 34 for atrial fibrillation or atrial flutter, and 19 18 for heart failure. Correspondingly, migraine was positively associated with myocardial infarction (adjusted hazard ratio 1.49, 95% confidence interval 1.36 to 1.64), ischaemic stroke (2.26, 2.11 to 2.41), and haemorrhagic stroke (1.94, 1.68 to 2.23), as well as venous thromboembolism (1.59, 1.45 to 1.74) and atrial fibrillation or atrial flutter (1.25, 1.16 to 1.36). No meaningful association was found with peripheral artery disease (adjusted hazard ratio 1.12, 0.96 to 1.30) or heart failure (1.04, 0.93 to 1.16). The associations, particularly for stroke outcomes, were stronger during the short term (0-1 years) after diagnosis than the long term (up to 19 years), in patients with aura than in those without aura, and in women than in men. In a subcohort of patients, the associations persisted after additional multivariable adjustment for body mass index and smoking. CONCLUSIONS: Migraine was associated with increased risks of myocardial infarction, ischaemic stroke, haemorrhagic stroke, venous thromboembolism, and atrial fibrillation or atrial flutter. Migraine may be an important risk factor for most cardiovascular diseases.
[Mh] MeSH terms primary: Cardiovascular Diseases/etiology
Migraine Disorders/complications
Myocardial Infarction/etiology
Stroke/etiology
[Mh] MeSH terms secundary: Adult
Atrial Fibrillation/epidemiology
Atrial Fibrillation/etiology
Body Mass Index
Cardiovascular Diseases/epidemiology
Cohort Studies
Comorbidity
Denmark/epidemiology
Female
Heart Failure/epidemiology
Heart Failure/etiology
Humans
Incidence
Intracranial Hemorrhages/epidemiology
Intracranial Hemorrhages/etiology
Male
Middle Aged
Migraine Disorders/diagnosis
Migraine Disorders/epidemiology
Myocardial Infarction/epidemiology
Outcome Assessment (Health Care)
Peripheral Arterial Disease/epidemiology
Peripheral Arterial Disease/etiology
Prospective Studies
Risk Factors
Smoking/epidemiology
Stroke/epidemiology
Venous Thromboembolism/epidemiology
Venous Thromboembolism/etiology
[Pt] Publication type:COMPARATIVE STUDY; JOURNAL ARTICLE; RESEARCH SUPPORT, NON-U.S. GOV'T
[Em] Entry month:1803
[Cu] Class update date: 180305
[Lr] Last revision date:180305
[Js] Journal subset:AIM; IM
[Da] Date of entry for processing:180202
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.1136/bmj.k96

  3 / 2151 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29381990
[Au] Autor:Zheng RW; Liu D; Eric TE; Ning YZ; Chen LL; Hu H; Ren Y
[Ad] Address:Department of Acupuncture and Moxibustion, Dongfang Hospital, The Second Affiliated Hospital of Beijing University of Chinese Medicine, Beijing, China.
[Ti] Title:A case study of Ramsay Hunt Syndrome in conjunction with cranial polyneuritis.
[So] Source:Medicine (Baltimore);96(47):e8833, 2017 Nov.
[Is] ISSN:1536-5964
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:RATIONALE: Ramsay Hunt syndrome in conjunction with cranial polyneuritis is not extensively documented, and is very easily misdiagnosed. PATIENT CONCERNS: A case of a 53-year-old male with Ramsay Hunt syndrome in conjunction with cranial polyneuritis is presented with early symptoms of vertigo, cephalalgia, and facial palsy, followed by zoster oticus 10 days later. DIAGNOSES: Diagnosis was challenging as this condition presents with multiple neuropathies, and attempting to diagnose based on clinical symptoms was often misleading. Polymerase chain reaction can be used to test for presence of the virus in the cerebrospinal fluid, followed by targeted drug therapy. INTERVENTIONS: Acupuncture, in conjunction with fire cupping, bloodletting around the afflicted region on the face, as well as oral consumption of herbal medicine and vitamins for nerve nourishment was given to treat this disease. OUTCOMES: Due to misdiagnosis resulting in delayed treatment, peripheral facial paralysis was left as the main sequelae, while other symptoms responded quickly to treatment. After a 6-month follow-up, facial palsy was still present. LESSONS: Considering that targeted antiviral therapy can be used to increase the effectiveness of treatment, early diagnosis, and timely use of medication is critical.
[Mh] MeSH terms primary: Cranial Nerve Diseases/diagnosis
Diagnostic Errors/adverse effects
Herpes Zoster Oticus/diagnosis
Neuritis/diagnosis
[Mh] MeSH terms secundary: Antiviral Agents/therapeutic use
Cranial Nerve Diseases/virology
Facial Paralysis/diagnosis
Facial Paralysis/virology
Headache/diagnosis
Headache/virology
Herpes Zoster Oticus/virology
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Neuritis/virology
Vertigo/diagnosis
Vertigo/virology
[Pt] Publication type:CASE REPORTS; JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Nm] Name of substance:0 (Antiviral Agents)
[Em] Entry month:1802
[Cu] Class update date: 180209
[Lr] Last revision date:180209
[Js] Journal subset:AIM; IM
[Da] Date of entry for processing:180201
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.1097/MD.0000000000008833

  4 / 2151 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29216286
[Au] Autor:Yang CP; Hsieh ML; Chiang JH; Chang HY; Hsieh VC
[Ad] Address:Departments of Neurology, Kuang Tien General Hospital, Taichung, Taiwan.
[Ti] Title:Migraine and risk of narcolepsy in children: A nationwide longitudinal study.
[So] Source:PLoS One;12(12):e0189231, 2017.
[Is] ISSN:1932-6203
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:BACKGROUND: The association between migraine and narcolepsy remains controversial. We aim to investigate whether migraine is associated with an increased risk of developing narcolepsy in children. METHODS: In this longitudinal study, nationwide medical-claims data of pediatric patients (0-17y) with migraine are identified using the National Health Insurance Research Database (NHIRD) between 1997 and 2010 in Taiwan. Two cohorts are selected: migraine cases (n = 8,923) and propensity score-matched non-migraine controls (n = 35,692). Children with previous history of narcolepsy or headache before the index date are excluded. Cohorts are followed until the end of 2012, their withdrawal from the NHI program, or incidence of narcolepsy (ICD-9-CM: 347). Cox proportional hazards regression models are used to estimate hazard ratios (HRs) and 95% confidence intervals of developing narcolepsy in children with migraine compared to their non-migraine controls. RESULTS: A total of 13 incident cases with narcolepsy are observed during follow-up, with incidence rates of 0.1915 and 0.0278 per 1,000 person-years in migraine and non-migraine children, respectively. After a mean follow-up period of 4.68 and 5.04 years in the case and control cohort, respectively, the former exhibited a greater risk of developing narcolepsy compared to the latter (adjusted hazard ratio (aHR) = 5.30, 95% confidence interval (CI): 1.61, 17.4; p = 0.006). This finding persisted after controlling for potential confounders like baseline comorbidities and concurrent medication uptake, and in our analyses with migraine subtypes. CONCLUSIONS: Migraine is an independent risk factor for narcolepsy development in children. Further studies are needed to validate our findings and to explore the exact pathophysiological mechanisms linking migraine and narcolepsy.
[Mh] MeSH terms primary: Migraine Disorders/complications
Narcolepsy/complications
[Mh] MeSH terms secundary: Adolescent
Child
Child, Preschool
Female
Humans
Infant
Infant, Newborn
Longitudinal Studies
Male
Proportional Hazards Models
Taiwan
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1801
[Cu] Class update date: 180122
[Lr] Last revision date:180122
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[Da] Date of entry for processing:171208
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.1371/journal.pone.0189231

  5 / 2151 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29281575
[Au] Autor:Sykes DB; Rosovsky RP; Singhal AB; Gonzalez RG; Moy AP
[Ad] Address:From the Departments of Medicine (D.B.S., R.P.R.), Neurology (A.B.S.), Radiology (R.G.G.), and Pathology (A.P.M.), Massachusetts General Hospital, and the Departments of Medicine (D.B.S., R.P.R.), Neurology (A.B.S.), Radiology (R.G.G.), and Pathology (A.P.M.), Harvard Medical School - both in Boston
[Ti] Title:Case 40-2017. A 32-Year-Old Woman with Headache, Abdominal Pain, Anemia, and Thrombocytopenia.
[So] Source:N Engl J Med;377(26):2581-2590, 2017 12 28.
[Is] ISSN:1533-4406
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Mh] MeSH terms primary: Headache/etiology
Hemoglobinuria, Paroxysmal/diagnosis
Venous Thrombosis/etiology
[Mh] MeSH terms secundary: Abdominal Pain/etiology
Adult
Anemia/etiology
Anemia, Hemolytic/diagnosis
Antibodies, Monoclonal, Humanized/adverse effects
Antibodies, Monoclonal, Humanized/therapeutic use
Bone Marrow Examination
Brain/diagnostic imaging
Cerebral Veins/diagnostic imaging
Disseminated Intravascular Coagulation/diagnosis
Female
Hemoglobinuria, Paroxysmal/complications
Hemoglobinuria, Paroxysmal/drug therapy
Humans
Radiography, Abdominal
Spleen/diagnostic imaging
Spleen/pathology
Thrombocytopenia/etiology
Tomography, X-Ray Computed
Venous Thrombosis/diagnostic imaging
Vision Disorders/etiology
[Pt] Publication type:CASE REPORTS; CLINICAL CONFERENCE; JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Nm] Name of substance:0 (Antibodies, Monoclonal, Humanized); A3ULP0F556 (eculizumab)
[Em] Entry month:1801
[Cu] Class update date: 180115
[Lr] Last revision date:180115
[Js] Journal subset:AIM; IM
[Da] Date of entry for processing:171228
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.1056/NEJMcpc1710566

  6 / 2151 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 28980712
[Au] Autor:Grangeon L; Moscatelli L; Zanin A; Rouille A; Maltete D; Guegan-Massardier E
[Ad] Address:Department of Neurology, Rouen University Hospital, Rouen, France.
[Ti] Title:Indomethacin-Responsive Paroxysmal Hemicrania in an Elderly Man: An Unusual Presentation of Pituitary Apoplexy.
[So] Source:Headache;57(10):1624-1626, 2017 Nov.
[Is] ISSN:1526-4610
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1710
[Cu] Class update date: 171110
[Lr] Last revision date:171110
[St] Status:In-Data-Review
[do] DOI:10.1111/head.13201

  7 / 2151 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 28980700
[Au] Autor:Miller S; Lagrata S; Watkins L; Matharu M
[Ad] Address:Headache Group, Institute of Neurology and The National Hospital for Neurology and Neurosurgery, Queen Square, London, United Kingdom.
[Ti] Title:Occipital Nerve Stimulation for Medically Refractory Chronic Paroxysmal Hemicrania.
[So] Source:Headache;57(10):1610-1613, 2017 Nov.
[Is] ISSN:1526-4610
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:OBJECTIVE: To describe the outcome of a patient with refractory chronic paroxysmal hemicrania (CPH) to occipital nerve stimulation (ONS). BACKGROUND: CPH is a primary headache disorder exquisitely sensitive to indomethacin. In patients unable to tolerate indomethacin, the therapeutic options are limited. ONS is a promising therapy for other refractory headache conditions. We report the first patient with medically refractory CPH treated with ONS. METHODS: Following implantation of the occipital nerve stimulator in 2006, the patient kept prospective headache diaries. Outcome was assessed by daily attack frequency. RESULTS: After a follow-up of over 10 years, the patient reported a sustained efficacy of more than 50% reduction in attack frequency and was pain-free at final follow-up. The patient was able to stop indomethacin completely. The patient had three successful pregnancies during follow-up. One system revision was undertaken alongside an expected battery replacement to treat unequal paresthesia and pain over the electrodes. CONCLUSION: ONS may offer an effective long-term treatment for CPH in patients where indomethacin cannot be tolerated.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1710
[Cu] Class update date: 171110
[Lr] Last revision date:171110
[St] Status:In-Process
[do] DOI:10.1111/head.13187

  8 / 2151 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 28942483
[Au] Autor:Barloese MCJ
[Ad] Address:Department of Clinical Physiology, Nuclear Medicine and PET, Rigshospitalet-Glostrup, University of Copenhagen, Copenhagen, Denmark. mads.christian.johannes.barloese@barloese.net.
[Ti] Title:The pathophysiology of the trigeminal autonomic cephalalgias, with clinical implications.
[So] Source:Clin Auton Res;, 2017 Sep 23.
[Is] ISSN:1619-1560
[Cp] Country of publication:Germany
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:The hallmark of primary headaches belonging to the group known as the trigeminal autonomic cephalalgias is unilateral headache accompanied by cranial autonomic symptoms. Being relatively rare and poorly understood, they represent a clinical challenge, leading to underdiagnosis and undertreatment. While the headache is the most obvious and disabling symptom, it is only part of a complex symptomatology which hints at the involved pathophysiological mechanisms. Activation of the trigeminal-autonomic reflex results in the aforementioned cranial autonomic symptoms, which are well understood; however, it is obvious that this brainstem reflex is regulated by higher centers that seemingly play a pivotal role in the attacks and the wide range of other symptoms indicating a homeostatic disturbance. These symptoms, as well as a number of well-validated findings, implicate the hypothalamus in the pathophysiology. over the course of the past 2-3 decades, novel therapies and technological advances have helped increase our knowledge of these clinical syndromes, and will likely continue to do so in the coming years as we witness the arrival of new drugs and neurostimulation options. In this review, the clinical presentation for cluster headache, paroxysmal hemicrania, short-lasting unilateral neuralgiform headache with conjunctival injection and tearing, and hemicrania continua is covered, along with our current understanding of the common pathophysiology and clinical manifestations.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE; REVIEW
[Em] Entry month:1709
[Cu] Class update date: 170924
[Lr] Last revision date:170924
[St] Status:Publisher
[do] DOI:10.1007/s10286-017-0468-9

  9 / 2151 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 28730562
[Au] Autor:Baraldi C; Pellesi L; Guerzoni S; Cainazzo MM; Pini LA
[Ad] Address:Medical Toxicology - Headache and Drug Abuse Centre, University of Modena and Reggio Emilia, Via del Pozzo 71, 41124, Modena, Italy. infocarlo.baraldi@gmail.com.
[Ti] Title:Therapeutical approaches to paroxysmal hemicrania, hemicrania continua and short lasting unilateral neuralgiform headache attacks: a critical appraisal.
[So] Source:J Headache Pain;18(1):71, 2017 Dec.
[Is] ISSN:1129-2377
[Cp] Country of publication:Italy
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:BACKGROUND: Hemicrania continua (HC), paroxysmal hemicrania (PH) and short lasting neuralgiform headache attacks (SUNCT and SUNA) are rare syndromes with a difficult therapeutic approach. The aim of this review is to summarize all articles dealing with treatments for HC, PH, SUNCT and SUNA, comparing them in terms of effectiveness and safety. METHODS: A survey was performed using the pubmed database for documents published from the 1st January 1989 onwards. All types of articles were considered, those ones dealing with symptomatic cases and non-English written ones were excluded. RESULTS: Indomethacin is the best treatment both for HC and PH. For the acute treatment of HC, piroxicam and celecoxib have shown good results, whilst for the prolonged treatment celecoxib, topiramate and gabapentin are good options besides indomethacin. For PH the best drug besides indomethacin is piroxicam, both for acute and prolonged treatment. For SUNCT and SUNA the most effective treatments are intravenous or subcutaneous lidocaine for the acute treatment of active phases and lamotrigine for the their prevention. Other effective therapeutic options are intravenous steroids for acute treatment and topiramate for prolonged treatment. Non-pharmacological techniques have shown good results in SUNCT and SUNA but, since they have been tried on a small number of patients, the reliability of their efficacy is poor and their safety profile mostly unknown. CONCLUSIONS: Besides a great number of treatments tried, HC, PH, SUNCT and SUNA management remains difficult, according with their unknown pathogenesis and their rarity, which strongly limits the studies upon these conditions. Further studies are needed to better define the treatment of choice for these conditions.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1707
[Cu] Class update date: 170803
[Lr] Last revision date:170803
[St] Status:In-Process
[do] DOI:10.1186/s10194-017-0777-3

  10 / 2151 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 28681219
[Au] Autor:Kingston W; Halker R
[Ad] Address:Mayo Clinic Arizona, Phoenix, AZ, USA. willkingston@gmail.com.
[Ti] Title:LASH: A Review of the Current Literature.
[So] Source:Curr Pain Headache Rep;21(8):36, 2017 Aug.
[Is] ISSN:1534-3081
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:PURPOSE OF REVIEW: The purpose of this review is to evaluate and explain our current understanding of a very rare disorder, long-lasting autonomic symptoms with associated hemicranias (LASH). RECENT FINDINGS: At present, there are four known cases in the literature of LASH. Its characteristics and reported response to indomethacin link it most closely to the trigeminal autonomic cephalalgias (TACs). Its pathophysiology and epidemiology remain unclear. Variance in the pain and autonomic symptom relationship in the existing TAC literature along with the reports of TAC sine headache suggests that LASH may represent a far end of the spectrum of TACs, with most similarities to paroxysmal hemicrania (PH) and hemicrania continua (HC).
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE; REVIEW
[Em] Entry month:1707
[Cu] Class update date: 170811
[Lr] Last revision date:170811
[St] Status:In-Process
[do] DOI:10.1007/s11916-017-0636-6


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