Database : MEDLINE
Search on : Pasteurella and Infections [Words]
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[PMID]: 29246635
[Au] Autor:Bajzert J; Gorczykowski M; Galli J; Stefaniak T
[Ad] Address:Department of Immunology, Pathophysiology and Veterinary Preventive Medicine, Wroclaw University of Environmental and Life Sciences, Poland. Electronic address: joanna.bajzert@upwr.edu.pl.
[Ti] Title:The evaluation of immunogenic impact of selected bacterial, recombinant Hsp60 antigens in DBA/2J mice.
[So] Source:Microb Pathog;115:100-111, 2017 Dec 12.
[Is] ISSN:1096-1208
[Cp] Country of publication:England
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Heat Shock Proteins (HSP) are highly conserved proteins that are widely spread throughout all organisms. They function in the cytoplasm as chaperones; however, they could be expressed on the cell surface. It has been shown that Hsp60 obtained from gram-negative bacteria are able to stimulate cells of the acquired and innate immune system. The aim of this study was the evaluation of the immunogenic properties of recombinant Hsp60 proteins derived from four common pathogenic bacteria: Escherichia coli, Histophilus somni, Pasteurella multocida and Salmonella Enteritidis. The analysis of the humoral immune response in DBA/2J mice hyperimmunized with selected rHsp60 revealed high levels of IgG rHsp60-antibody with the predominance of the IgG subclass, in the reaction with both homologous and heterologous antigens. The presence of IgG and IgG was also observed; however, no antibodies of subclass IgG were detected. The comparison of plasma IgG antibody reactivity of mice immunized with two different doses of rHsp60 (10/20 µg) showed that the lower dose was sufficient to induce a strong humoral response. The reactivity of the IgG rHsp60-antibody with whole bacterial cells showed a significantly higher reaction with H. somni compared with other pathogens. It was demonstrated that the addition of all rHsp60 with polymyxin B to the culture medium stimulated splenocytes isolated from hyperimmunized mice to release IL-1ß and IL-6. As a strong stimulator of the immune system, bacterial-origin Hsp60 seems to be an interesting potential component of subunit vaccines aimed at the development of protection for animals during infections caused by gram-negative bacteria.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1712
[Cu] Class update date: 180303
[Lr] Last revision date:180303
[St] Status:Publisher

  2 / 8504 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29497015
[Au] Autor:Kumar S; Hedrick V; Mattoo S
[Ad] Address:Department of Biological Sciences, Purdue University, 915 West State Street, West Lafayette, IN 47907, USA.
[Ti] Title:YopT domain of the PfhB2 toxin from Pasteurella multocida: protein expression, characterization, crystallization and crystallographic analysis.
[So] Source:Acta Crystallogr F Struct Biol Commun;74(Pt 3):128-134, 2018 Mar 01.
[Is] ISSN:2053-230X
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Pasteurella multocida causes respiratory-tract infections in a broad range of animals, as well as opportunistic infections in humans. P. multocida secretes a multidomain toxin called PfhB2, which contains a YopT-like cysteine protease domain at its C-terminus. The YopT domain of PfhB2 contains a well conserved Cys-His-Asp catalytic triad that defines YopT family members, and shares high sequence similarity with the prototype YopT from Yersinia sp. To date, only one crystal structure of a YopT family member has been reported; however, additional structural information is needed to help characterize the varied substrate specificity and enzymatic action of this large protease family. Here, a catalytically inactive C3733S mutant of PfhB2 YopT that provides enhanced protein stability was used with the aim of gaining structural insight into the diversity within the YopT protein family. To this end, the C3733S mutant of PfhB2 YopT has been successfully cloned, overexpressed, purified and crystallized. Diffraction data sets were collected from native crystals to 3.5 Šresolution and a single-wavelength anomalous data set was collected from an iodide-derivative crystal to 3.2 Šresolution. Data pertaining to crystals belonging to space group P3 , with unit-cell parameters a = 136.9, b = 136.9, c = 74.7 Šfor the native crystals and a = 139.2, b = 139.2, c = 74.7 Šfor the iodide-derivative crystals, are discussed.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1803
[Cu] Class update date: 180302
[Lr] Last revision date:180302
[St] Status:In-Data-Review
[do] DOI:10.1107/S2053230X18000857

  3 / 8504 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29481657
[Au] Autor:Sweeney MT; Lubbers BV; Schwarz S; Watts JL
[Ad] Address:Zoetis Global Therapeutics Research, Kalamazoo, MI, USA.
[Ti] Title:Applying definitions for multidrug resistance, extensive drug resistance and pandrug resistance to clinically significant livestock and companion animal bacterial pathogens.
[So] Source:J Antimicrob Chemother;, 2018 Feb 22.
[Is] ISSN:1460-2091
[Cp] Country of publication:England
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Standardized definitions for MDR are currently not available in veterinary medicine despite numerous reports indicating that antimicrobial resistance may be increasing among clinically significant bacteria in livestock and companion animals. As such, assessments of MDR presented in veterinary scientific reports are inconsistent. Herein, we apply previously standardized definitions for MDR, XDR and pandrug resistance (PDR) used in human medicine to animal pathogens and veterinary antimicrobial agents in which MDR is defined as an isolate that is not susceptible to at least one agent in at least three antimicrobial classes, XDR is defined as an isolate that is not susceptible to at least one agent in all but one or two available classes and PDR is defined as an isolate that is not susceptible to all agents in all available classes. These definitions may be applied to antimicrobial agents used to treat bovine respiratory disease (BRD) caused by Mannheimia haemolytica, Pasteurella multocida and Histophilus somni and swine respiratory disease (SRD) caused by Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae, P. multocida and Streptococcus suis, as well as antimicrobial agents used to treat canine skin and soft tissue infections (SSTIs) caused by Staphylococcus and Streptococcus species. Application of these definitions in veterinary medicine should be considered static, whereas the classification of a particular resistance phenotype as MDR, XDR or PDR could change over time as more veterinary-specific clinical breakpoints or antimicrobial classes and/or agents become available in the future.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1802
[Cu] Class update date: 180226
[Lr] Last revision date:180226
[St] Status:Publisher
[do] DOI:10.1093/jac/dky043

  4 / 8504 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29350071
[Au] Autor:Croville G; Foret C; Heuillard P; Senet A; Delpont M; Mouahid M; Ducatez MF; Kichou F; Guerin JL
[Ad] Address:a IHAP, Université de Toulouse, ENVT, INRA , Toulouse , France.
[Ti] Title:Disclosing respiratory coinfections: a broad-range panel assay for avian respiratory pathogens on a nanofluidic PCR platform.
[So] Source:Avian Pathol;:1-8, 2018 Feb 27.
[Is] ISSN:1465-3338
[Cp] Country of publication:England
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Respiratory syndromes (RS) are among the most significant pathological conditions in edible birds and are caused by complex coactions of pathogens and environmental factors. In poultry, low pathogenic avian influenza A viruses, metapneumoviruses, infectious bronchitis virus, infectious laryngotracheitis virus, Mycoplasma spp. Escherichia coli and/or Ornithobacterium rhinotracheale in turkeys are considered as key co-infectious agents of RS. Aspergillus sp., Pasteurella multocida, Avibacterium paragallinarum or Chlamydia psittaci may also be involved in respiratory outbreaks. An innovative quantitative PCR method, based on a nanofluidic technology, has the ability to screen up to 96 samples with 96 pathogen-specific PCR primers, at the same time, in one run of real-time quantitative PCR. This platform was used for the screening of avian respiratory pathogens: 15 respiratory agents, including viruses, bacteria and fungi potentially associated with respiratory infections of poultry, were targeted. Primers were designed and validated for SYBR green real-time quantitative PCR and subsequently validated on the Biomark high throughput PCR nanofluidic platform (Fluidigm©, San Francisco, CA, USA). As a clinical assessment, tracheal swabs were sampled from turkeys showing RS and submitted to this panel assay. Beside systematic detection of E. coli, avian metapneumovirus, Mycoplasma gallisepticum and Mycoplasma synoviae were frequently detected, with distinctive coinfection patterns between French and Moroccan flocks. This proof-of-concept study illustrates the potential of such panel assays for unveiling respiratory coinfection profiles in poultry.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1801
[Cu] Class update date: 180227
[Lr] Last revision date:180227
[St] Status:Publisher
[do] DOI:10.1080/03079457.2018.1430891

  5 / 8504 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29458548
[Au] Autor:Limelette A; Giusti D; Anuset D; Beaupuis C; Jacquier H; De Champs C; Bani-Sadr F; Guillard T; N'Guyen Y
[Ad] Address:2​EA4687, UFR Médecine, Université de Reims Champagne-Ardenne, 51100 Reims, France.
[Ti] Title:Amoxicillin-tolerant Pasteurella multocida strain isolated from chronic dermohypodermitis after suboptimal exposure to amoxicillin is not associated with reduced growth rate.
[So] Source:J Med Microbiol;, 2018 Feb 13.
[Is] ISSN:1473-5644
[Cp] Country of publication:England
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Pasteurella multocida is rarely observed in human chronic infections. A Pasteurella multocida strain was isolated from a skin biopsy of chronic dermohypodermitis in a 21-year-old woman without an immunocompromised state. As this strain was viable one month after a cat scratch despite treatment by amoxicillin-clavulanic acid, we compared this strain's growth rate, amoxicillin Minimal Inhibitory and Bactericidal Concentrations (MIC and MBC), resistance to serum and ability to activate neutrophil granulocytes with those of control strains isolated during acute infections in humans without previous antibiotics exposure. This particular strain was not more resistant to serum and did not induce a lower phagocytic activity than control strains. It did not grow more slowly than control strains even after suboptimal exposure to amoxicillin. This particular strain was tolerant to amoxicillin but tolerance did not appear sufficient alone for the induction of a chronic infection in a host without an immunocompromised state.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1802
[Cu] Class update date: 180220
[Lr] Last revision date:180220
[St] Status:Publisher
[do] DOI:10.1099/jmm.0.000692

  6 / 8504 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29451766
[Au] Autor:Nath A; Joshi SR
[Ti] Title:Endophytic fungi from tropical ethnoveterinary plants and their antibacterial efficacy against Pasteurella multocida Capsular Type A strain.
[So] Source:Rev Biol Trop;64(2):733-45, 2016 Jun.
[Is] ISSN:0034-7744
[Cp] Country of publication:Costa Rica
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Pasteurella multocida is an important veterinary pathogen causing infections in animals and birds. Nowadays, different reports have described the severity of infections, increasing resistance of micro-organisms to antibiotics, and the contribution of ethnoveterinary practices towards the treatment of various ailments of animals. The aim of the present study was to investigate the antibacterial efficacy of the ethanolic extracts of endophytic fungi against P. multocida Capsular Type A strains. A total of six endophytic fungi were isolated from two tropical ethnoveterinary plants: Garcinia xanthochymus H. and Polygonum chinense L. The ethanolic extracts of the endophytic fungi were subjected to in vitro antimicrobial activity by the well diffusion method. Besides, we evaluated the treatment of mice with the potent fungal extract and observed the effects in different organs under electron microscopy. Our results showed that four fungi had antimicrobial activity against the selected pathogen. The best antibacterial activity was showed by the extract of the endophytic fungi, Glomerella magna isolated from G. xanthochymus, with a minimum inhibitory concentration of 46.9 µg/mL and minimum bactericidal concentration of 750 µg/mL. Treatment of mice with the potent fungal extract caused a considerable inhibitory effect on the pathogen growth in vital organs, results that was also confirmed by histopathological studies made by scanning electron microscopy. The present findings indicated that the endophytic fungi G. magna has the potential to provide an effective treatment against infections caused by Pasteurella multocida. However, the isolation of bioactive components needs further investigation.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE; RESEARCH SUPPORT, NON-U.S. GOV'T
[Em] Entry month:1802
[Cu] Class update date: 180216
[Lr] Last revision date:180216
[St] Status:In-Process

  7 / 8504 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29221731
[Au] Autor:Han SJ; Glatman Zaretsky A; Andrade-Oliveira V; Collins N; Dzutsev A; Shaik J; Morais da Fonseca D; Harrison OJ; Tamoutounour S; Byrd AL; Smelkinson M; Bouladoux N; Bliska JB; Brenchley JM; Brodsky IE; Belkaid Y
[Ad] Address:Mucosal Immunology Section, Laboratory of Parasitic Diseases, National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, NIH, Bethesda, MD 20892, USA.
[Ti] Title:White Adipose Tissue Is a Reservoir for Memory T Cells and Promotes Protective Memory Responses to Infection.
[So] Source:Immunity;47(6):1154-1168.e6, 2017 Dec 19.
[Is] ISSN:1097-4180
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:White adipose tissue bridges body organs and plays a fundamental role in host metabolism. To what extent adipose tissue also contributes to immune surveillance and long-term protective defense remains largely unknown. Here, we have shown that at steady state, white adipose tissue contained abundant memory lymphocyte populations. After infection, white adipose tissue accumulated large numbers of pathogen-specific memory T cells, including tissue-resident cells. Memory T cells in white adipose tissue expressed a distinct metabolic profile, and white adipose tissue from previously infected mice was sufficient to protect uninfected mice from lethal pathogen challenge. Induction of recall responses within white adipose tissue was associated with the collapse of lipid metabolism in favor of antimicrobial responses. Our results suggest that white adipose tissue represents a memory T cell reservoir that provides potent and rapid effector memory responses, positioning this compartment as a potential major contributor to immunological memory.
[Mh] MeSH terms primary: Adipose Tissue, White/transplantation
CD4-Positive T-Lymphocytes/immunology
CD8-Positive T-Lymphocytes/immunology
Immunologic Memory
Toxoplasmosis/immunology
Yersinia pseudotuberculosis Infections/immunology
[Mh] MeSH terms secundary: Adipose Tissue, White/immunology
Animals
Bacterial Proteins/genetics
Bacterial Proteins/metabolism
CD4-Positive T-Lymphocytes/microbiology
CD4-Positive T-Lymphocytes/parasitology
CD8-Positive T-Lymphocytes/microbiology
CD8-Positive T-Lymphocytes/parasitology
Gene Expression
Genes, Reporter
Interferon-gamma/genetics
Interferon-gamma/immunology
Interleukin-17/genetics
Interleukin-17/immunology
Interleukin-5/genetics
Interleukin-5/immunology
Lipid Metabolism
Luminescent Proteins/genetics
Luminescent Proteins/metabolism
Mice
Mice, Inbred C57BL
Mice, Transgenic
Survival Analysis
Tissue Transplantation
Toxoplasma/immunology
Toxoplasmosis/genetics
Toxoplasmosis/mortality
Toxoplasmosis/parasitology
Tumor Necrosis Factor-alpha/genetics
Tumor Necrosis Factor-alpha/immunology
Yersinia pseudotuberculosis/immunology
Yersinia pseudotuberculosis Infections/genetics
Yersinia pseudotuberculosis Infections/microbiology
Yersinia pseudotuberculosis Infections/mortality
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Nm] Name of substance:0 (Bacterial Proteins); 0 (Interleukin-17); 0 (Interleukin-5); 0 (Luminescent Proteins); 0 (Tumor Necrosis Factor-alpha); 0 (yellow fluorescent protein, Bacteria); 82115-62-6 (Interferon-gamma)
[Em] Entry month:1712
[Cu] Class update date: 180210
[Lr] Last revision date:180210
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[Da] Date of entry for processing:171210
[St] Status:MEDLINE

  8 / 8504 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29369556
[Au] Autor:Afanas'ev MV; Balakhonov SV; Tokmakova EG; Polovinkina VS; Sidorova EA; Sinkov VV
[Ti] Title:[Analysis of complete sequence of cryptic plasmid pTP33 from Yersinia pestis isolated in Tuva natural focus of plague].
[So] Source:Genetika;52(9):1012-20, 2016 Sep.
[Is] ISSN:0016-6758
[Cp] Country of publication:Russia (Federation)
[La] Language:rus
[Ab] Abstract:This paper studies a full nucleotide sequence of cryptic plasmid pTP33, which was isolated from the typical plague strain of the Tuvinian natural focus, Yersinia pestis I-2638. Sequencing was carried out using the 454 GS Junior platform (Roche). In analysis using the software package GS De Novo Assembler v. 2.7 (Roche) and the algorithm Newbler v. 2.7, 1855 nucleotide reads, which contained 1101246 nucleotides, were assembled to a contig of 33 978 bp. The GC content of the obtained nucleotide sequence was 50.25%. During annotation, we found 56 open reading frames. Homologs of the predicted reading frames were sought in the BLAST databases. We detected 22 reading frames coding hypothetical proteins, 23 frames coding phagerelated proteins, and 11 frames coding proteins with known functions, including toxin­antitoxin system YefM-YoeB, nucleic acids and polysaccharides metabolism proteins (exopolysaccharide production protein ExoZ, exodeoxyribonuclease VIII), and replication proteins (ParA). Some predicted pTP33 proteins were found to be homologs (from 45 to 75%) with sequences of phage-related proteins of certain microorganisms­endosymbionts of insects (Sodalis glossinidius) and endosymbionts of entomopathogenic nematodes (Photorhabdus luminescens, P. asymbiotica, Xenorhabdus bovienii).
[Mh] MeSH terms primary: Bacterial Proteins/genetics
Plague/genetics
Plasmids/genetics
Yersinia pestis/genetics
[Mh] MeSH terms secundary: Siberia
Yersinia pestis/isolation & purification
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Nm] Name of substance:0 (Bacterial Proteins)
[Em] Entry month:1802
[Cu] Class update date: 180205
[Lr] Last revision date:180205
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[Da] Date of entry for processing:180126
[St] Status:MEDLINE

  9 / 8504 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29367585
[Au] Autor:Zarlasht F; Khan M
[Ad] Address:Department of Medicine, Our Lady of Lourdes Hospital, Binghamton, NY, USA.
[Ti] Title:A Case of Recurrent Pasteurella Bacteremia in an Immunocompetent Patient with No Animal Bite.
[So] Source:Am J Case Rep;19:95-98, 2018 Jan 25.
[Is] ISSN:1941-5923
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:BACKGROUND Pasteurella multocida is a gram negative-penicillin sensitive bacterium and is part of normal respiratory microbiota of animals (e.g., cats and dogs) and some birds. Various infections in humans, such as cellulitis, rarely bacteremia, endocarditis, meningitis, and septic arthritis, are a result of domestic cat or dog bites. These infections are rarely seen in an immunocompetent person, without an associated animal bite. CASE REPORT We present a case of refractory Pasteurella multocida bacteremia without any animal bite in an immunocompetent person. CONCLUSIONS Pasteurella multocida bacteremia has been seen in immunocompromised patients and mostly after a cat or dog bite or scratch but might also happen in immunocompetent humans with only pet licking rather than biting, which might increase hospital and emergency department visits or admissions in the future.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1801
[Cu] Class update date: 180204
[Lr] Last revision date:180204
[St] Status:In-Process

  10 / 8504 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29300731
[Au] Autor:Bonds MH; Ouenzar MA; Garchitorena A; Cordier LF; McCarty MG; Rich ML; Andriamihaja B; Haruna J; Farmer PE
[Ad] Address:Department of Global Health and Social Medicine, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts, United States of America.
[Ti] Title:Madagascar can build stronger health systems to fight plague and prevent the next epidemic.
[So] Source:PLoS Negl Trop Dis;12(1):e0006131, 2018 01.
[Is] ISSN:1935-2735
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Mh] MeSH terms primary: Epidemics/prevention & control
Plague/epidemiology
Plague/prevention & control
[Mh] MeSH terms secundary: Government Programs
Humans
Madagascar/epidemiology
Public Health/methods
Yersinia pestis/isolation & purification
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1801
[Cu] Class update date: 180130
[Lr] Last revision date:180130
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[Da] Date of entry for processing:180105
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.1371/journal.pntd.0006131


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