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[PMID]: 26228164
[Au] Autor:Bomyea J; Lang A; Craske MG; Chavira DA; Sherbourne CD; Rose RD; Golinelli D; Campbell-Sills L; Welch SS; Sullivan G; Bystritsky A; Roy-Byrne P; Stein MB
[Ad] Address:Department of Psychiatry, University of California, San Diego, La Jolla, CA, USA. Electronic address: bomyea@hotmail.com....
[Ti] Title:Course of symptom change during anxiety treatment: Reductions in anxiety and depression in patients completing the Coordinated Anxiety Learning and Management program.
[So] Source:Psychiatry Res;229(1-2):133-42, 2015 Sep 30.
[Is] ISSN:1872-7123
[Cp] Country of publication:Ireland
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:When treating anxious patients with co-occurring depression, research demonstrates that both types of symptoms independently improve. The current analyses examined how reductions in anxiety and depression may be interrelated both during treatment, as well as over time following treatment. Participants were 503 individuals with one or more DSM-IV anxiety disorders who completed a collaborative care anxiety management program. Anxiety and depression were assessed at each treatment session (i.e., session by session data) and also at 6, 12, and 18-month post-baseline assessments (i.e., long-term outcomes data). Mediation analyses examined changes in symptoms in session by session data and long-term outcomes data. Anxiety and depression changed reciprocally in session by session data; change in anxiety mediated change in depression to a greater extent than vice versa. In the long-term outcomes data, change in anxiety mediated change in depression. However, the reverse mediation model of the long-term outcomes period revealed that accounting for changes in depression altered the effect of time on anxiety. Thus, temporal change during active treatment may share similarities with those related to maintaining gains after treatment, although differences arose in the reverse mediation models. Limitations of the methodology and implications of anxiety treatment for depression outcomes are discussed.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1508
[Cu] Class update date: 150822
[Lr] Last revision date:150822
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[St] Status:In-Data-Review

  2 / 4225441 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 26184989
[Au] Autor:Silverstein SM; Elliott CM; Feusner JD; Keane BP; Mikkilineni D; Hansen N; Hartmann A; Wilhelm S
[Ad] Address:Department of Psychiatry and University Behavioral Health Care, Rutgers University, 151 Centennial Avenue, Piscataway, NJ 08854, USA. Electronic address: steven.silverstein@rutgers.edu....
[Ti] Title:Comparison of visual perceptual organization in schizophrenia and body dysmorphic disorder.
[So] Source:Psychiatry Res;229(1-2):426-33, 2015 Sep 30.
[Is] ISSN:1872-7123
[Cp] Country of publication:Ireland
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:People with schizophrenia are impaired at organizing potentially ambiguous visual information into well-formed shape and object representations. This perceptual organization (PO) impairment has not been found in other psychiatric disorders. However, recent data on body dysmorphic disorder (BDD), suggest that BDD may also be characterized by reduced PO. Similarities between these groups could have implications for understanding the RDoC dimension of visual perception in psychopathology, and for modeling symptom formation across these two conditions. We compared patients with SCZ (n=24) to those with BDD (n=20), as well as control groups of obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) patients (n=20) and healthy controls (n=20), on two measures of PO that have been reliably associated with schizophrenia-related performance impairment. On both the contour integration and Ebbinghaus illusion tests, only the SCZ group demonstrated abnormal performance relative to controls; the BDD group performed similarly to the OCD and CON groups. In addition, on both tasks, the SCZ group performed more abnormally than the BDD group. Overall, these data suggest that PO reductions observed in SCZ are not present in BDD. Visual processing impairments in BDD may arise instead from other perceptual disturbances or attentional biases related to emotional factors.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1508
[Cu] Class update date: 150822
[Lr] Last revision date:150822
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[St] Status:In-Data-Review

  3 / 4225441 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 26160197
[Au] Autor:Sabbag S; Prestia D; Robertson B; Ruiz P; Durand D; Strassnig M; Harvey PD
[Ad] Address:Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, University of Miami Miller School of Medicine, Miami, FL, USA....
[Ti] Title:Absence of bias in clinician ratings of everyday functioning among African American, Hispanic and Caucasian patients with schizophrenia.
[So] Source:Psychiatry Res;229(1-2):347-52, 2015 Sep 30.
[Is] ISSN:1872-7123
[Cp] Country of publication:Ireland
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:A substantial research literature implicates potential racial/ethnic bias in the diagnosis of schizophrenia and in clinical ratings of psychosis. There is no similar information regarding bias effects on ratings of everyday functioning. Our aims were to determine if Caucasian raters vary in their ratings of the everyday functioning of schizophrenia patients of different ethnicities, to find out which factors determine accurate self-report of everyday functioning in different ethnic groups, and to know if depression has similar effects on the way people of different ethnicities self-report their current functionality. We analyzed data on 295 patients with schizophrenia who provided their self-report of their everyday functioning and also had a Caucasian clinician rating their functionality. Three racial/ethnic groups (African American (AA), Hispanic and Caucasian) were studied and analyzed on the basis of neurocognition, functional capacity, depression and real-world functional outcomes. No differences based on racial/ethnic status in clinician assessments of patients' functionality were found. Differences between racial groups were found in personal and maternal levels of education. Severity of depression was significantly correlated with accuracy of self-assessment of functioning in Caucasians, but not in AAs. Higher scores on neurocognition and functional capacity scales correlated with reduced overestimation of functioning in AAs, but not in Hispanics. This data might indicate that measurement of everyday functionality is less subject to rater bias than measurement of symptoms of schizophrenia.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1508
[Cu] Class update date: 150822
[Lr] Last revision date:150822
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[St] Status:In-Data-Review

  4 / 4225441 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 26003507
[Au] Autor:De Nadai A; Nagpal PS; Piacentini J; Peris TS; Geffken GR; Geller DA; Murphy TK; Storch EA; Lewin AB
[Ad] Address:Department of Psychology, University of South Florida, 4202 East Fowler Ave, PCD 4118G Tampa, FL 33620, United States; Departments of Pediatrics and Psychiatry, Rothman Center for Neuropsychiatry, University of South Florida College of Medicine, 880 6th Street South, Suite 460, Saint Petersburg, FL ...
[Ti] Title:Contemporary models of pediatric obsessive-compulsive disorder: An evaluation with a large clinical sample.
[So] Source:Psychiatry Res;229(1-2):620-2, 2015 Sep 30.
[Is] ISSN:1872-7123
[Cp] Country of publication:Ireland
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:We evaluated the construct validity of the Child Yale-Brofwn Obsessive-Compulsive Scale (CYBOCS) in a large clinical sample (N=730) using confirmatory factor analysis. Results found inadequate fit for a priori models, though a model accounting for overlapping item content displayed good fit. Parallel obsessions/compulsions items may provide largely redundant information on the CYBOCS. Findings suggest modifying the CYBOCS to reduce burden on researchers, patients, and clinicians, and to more accurately measure pediatric obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD).
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1508
[Cu] Class update date: 150822
[Lr] Last revision date:150822
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[St] Status:In-Data-Review

  5 / 4225441 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 25981859
[Au] Autor:Studebaker A; Bondra K; Seum S; Shen C; Phelps DA; Chronowski C; Leasure J; Smith PD; Kurmasheva RT; Mo X; Fouladi M; Houghton PJ
[Ad] Address:Center for Childhood Cancer and Blood Diseases, Nationwide Children's Hospital, Columbus, Ohio....
[Ti] Title:Inhibition of MEK confers hypersensitivity to X-radiation in the context of BRAF mutation in a model of childhood astrocytoma.
[So] Source:Pediatr Blood Cancer;62(10):1768-74, 2015 Oct.
[Is] ISSN:1545-5017
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:PURPOSE: Curative therapy for childhood glioma presents challenges when complete resection is not possible. Patients with recurrent low-grade tumors or anaplastic astrocytoma may receive radiation treatment; however, the long-term sequellae from radiation treatment can be severe. As many childhood gliomas are associated with activation of BRAF, we have explored the combination of ionizing radiation with MEK inhibition in a model of BRAF-mutant anaplastic astrocytoma. EXPERIMENTAL DESIGN: The regulation of TORC1 signaling by BRAF was examined in BT-40 (BRAF mutant) and BT-35 (BRAF wild type) xenografts, in a cell line derived from the BT-40 xenograft and two adult BRAF mutant glioblastoma cell lines. The effect of MEK inhibition (selumetinib), XRT (total dose 10 Gy as 2 Gy daily fractions), or the combination of selumetinib and XRT was evaluated in subcutaneous BT-40 xenografts. RESULTS: Inhibition of MEK signaling by selumetinib suppressed TORC1 signaling only in the context of the BRAF-mutant both in vitro and in vivo. Inhibition of MEK signaling in BT-40 cells or in xenografts lead to a complete suppression of FANCD2 and conferred hypersensitivity to XRT in BT-40 xenografts without increasing local skin toxicity. CONCLUSIONS: Selumetinib suppressed TORC1 signaling in the context of BRAF mutation. Selumetinib caused a rapid downregulation of FANCD2 and markedly potentiated the effect of XRT. These data suggest the possibility of potentiating the effect of XRT selectively in tumor cells by MEK inhibition in the context of mutant BRAF or maintaining tumor control at lower doses of XRT that would decrease long-term sequelae. Pediatr Blood Cancer 2015;62:1768-1774. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1508
[Cu] Class update date: 150822
[Lr] Last revision date:150822
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[St] Status:In-Data-Review
[do] DOI:10.1002/pbc.25579

  6 / 4225441 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 25976292
[Au] Autor:Loh ML; Tasian SK; Rabin KR; Brown P; Magoon D; Reid JM; Chen X; Ahern CH; Weigel BJ; Blaney SM
[Ad] Address:Department of Pediatrics, UCSF Benioff Children's Hospital, San Francisco, California....
[Ti] Title:A phase 1 dosing study of ruxolitinib in children with relapsed or refractory solid tumors, leukemias, or myeloproliferative neoplasms: A Children's Oncology Group phase 1 consortium study (ADVL1011).
[So] Source:Pediatr Blood Cancer;62(10):1717-24, 2015 Oct.
[Is] ISSN:1545-5017
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:BACKGROUND: Ruxolitinib, an orally bioavailable JAK1/JAK2 inhibitor, may treat cancers with CRLF2 and/or JAK pathway mutations. PROCEDURE: A phase 1 trial of ruxolitinib was performed to determine the maximum tolerated or recommended phase 2 dose, dose-limiting toxicities (DLTs), pharmacokinetics (PK), and pharmacodynamics (PD) in children with recurrent/refractory solid tumors (STs). Ruxolitinib was administered twice daily (BID) in 28-day cycles at five dose levels (15, 21, 29, 39, and 50 mg/m(2) /dose). PK and PD studies were performed during cycle 1. Toxicity, preliminary efficacy, and PK/PD were also assessed in children with relapsed/refractory hematologic malignancies (HMs). RESULTS: Forty-nine patients were enrolled, 28 with STs (dose escalation cohort) and 21 with HMs. Ruxolitinib was well-tolerated with one DLT per cohort of six patients at dose levels (DLs) 2-5. One patient with an ST had grade 5 multi-organ failure at DL2. One patient each at DL3 and DL4 had a grade 4 neutropenia, and one patient at DL5 had a grade 4 creatinine phosphokinase elevation. No objective responses were observed in patients with STs. One patient with polycythemia vera achieved a partial response and received 18 cycles of ruxolitinib. The PK of ruxolitinib were similar to that in adults. Partial inhibition of phosphorylated JAK2, STAT5, and S6 was observed in in vitro plasma inhibitory activity PD assay. CONCLUSION: Ruxolitinib was well tolerated in children with refractory cancer. The recommended phase 2 dose for continuous BID oral administration is 50 mg/m(2) /dose. Subsequent evaluation of ruxolitinib in combination with cytotoxic chemotherapy in children, adolescents, and young adults with JAK-mutant leukemias is planned. Pediatr Blood Cancer 2015;62:1717-1724. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1508
[Cu] Class update date: 150822
[Lr] Last revision date:150822
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[St] Status:In-Data-Review
[do] DOI:10.1002/pbc.25575

  7 / 4225441 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 25946708
[Au] Autor:Getz KD; Li Y; Alonzo TA; Hall M; Gerbing RB; Sung L; Huang YS; Arnold S; Seif AE; Miller TP; Bagatell R; Fisher BT; Adamson PC; Gamis A; Keren R; Aplenc R
[Ad] Address:The Children's Hospital of Philadelphia, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania....
[Ti] Title:Comparison of in-patient costs for children treated on the AAML0531 clinical trial: A report from the Children's Oncology Group.
[So] Source:Pediatr Blood Cancer;62(10):1775-81, 2015 Oct.
[Is] ISSN:1545-5017
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:BACKGROUND: A better understanding of drivers of treatment costs may help identify effective cost containment strategies and prioritize resources. We aimed to develop a method for estimating inpatient costs for pediatric patients with acute myeloid leukemia (AML) enrolled on NCI-funded Phase III trials, compare costs between AAML0531 treatment arms (standard chemotherapy ± gemtuzumab ozogamicin (GMTZ)), and evaluate primary drivers of costs for newly diagnosed pediatric AML. PROCEDURE: Patients from the AAML0531 trial were matched on hospital, sex, and dates of birth and diagnosis to the Pediatric Health Information Systems (PHIS) database to obtain daily billing data. Inpatient treatment costs were calculated as adjusted charges multiplied by hospital-specific cost-to-charge ratios. Generalized linear models were used to compare costs between treatment arms and courses, and by patient characteristics. RESULTS: Inpatient costs did not differ by randomized treatment arm. Costs varied by course with stem cell transplant being most expensive, followed by Intensification II (cytarabine/mitoxantrone) and Induction I (cytarabine/daunorubicin/etoposide). Room/board and pharmacy were the largest contributors to inpatient treatment cost, representing 74% of the total cost. Higher AML risk group (P = 0.0003) and older age (P < 0.0001) were associated with significantly higher daily inpatient cost. CONCLUSIONS: Costs from external data sources can be successfully integrated into NCI-funded Phase III clinical trials. Inpatient treatment costs did not differ by GMTZ exposure but varied by chemotherapy course. Variation in cost by course was driven by differences in duration of hospitalization through room/board charges as well as increased clinical and pharmacy charges in specific courses. Pediatr Blood Cancer 2015;62:1775-1781. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1508
[Cu] Class update date: 150822
[Lr] Last revision date:150822
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[St] Status:In-Data-Review
[do] DOI:10.1002/pbc.25569

  8 / 4225441 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 25940061
[Au] Autor:Gururangan S; Robinson G; Ellison DW; Wu G; He X; Lu QR; McLendon R; Grant G; Driscoll T; Neuberg R
[Ad] Address:Preston Robert Tisch Brain Tumor Center, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina....
[Ti] Title:Gorlin syndrome and desmoplastic medulloblastoma: Report of 3 cases with unfavorable clinical course and novel mutations.
[So] Source:Pediatr Blood Cancer;62(10):1855-8, 2015 Oct.
[Is] ISSN:1545-5017
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:We present three cases of genetically confirmed Gorlin syndrome with desmoplastic medulloblastoma (DMB) in whom tumor recurred despite standard therapy. One patient was found to have a novel germline missense PTCH1 mutation. Molecular analysis of recurrent tumor using fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH) revealed PTEN and/ or PTCH1 loss in 2 patients. Whole exome sequencing (WES) of tumor in one patient revealed loss of heterozygosity of PTCH1 and a mutation of GNAS gene in its non-coding 3' -untranslated region (UTR) with corresponding decreased protein expression. While one patient died despite high-dose chemotherapy (HDC) plus stem cell rescue (ASCR) and palliative radiotherapy, two patients are currently alive for 18+ and 120+ months respectively following retrieval therapy that did not include irradiation. Infants with DMB and GS should be treated aggressively with chemotherapy at diagnosis to prevent relapse but radiotherapy should be avoided. The use of molecular prognostic markers for DMB should be routinely used to identify the subset of tumors that might have an aggressive course. Pediatr Blood Cancer 2015;62:1855-1858. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1508
[Cu] Class update date: 150822
[Lr] Last revision date:150822
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[St] Status:In-Data-Review
[do] DOI:10.1002/pbc.25560

  9 / 4225441 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 26026649
[Au] Autor:Bennett WL; Wang NY; Gudzune KA; Dalcin AT; Bleich SN; Appel LJ; Clark JM
[Ad] Address:Welch Center for Prevention, Epidemiology and Clinical Research, The Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, MD, USA; Department of Medicine, Division of General Internal Medicine, The Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD, USA. Electronic address: wendy.bennett@jhmi.edu....
[Ti] Title:Satisfaction with primary care provider involvement is associated with greater weight loss: Results from the practice-based POWER trial.
[So] Source:Patient Educ Couns;98(9):1099-105, 2015 Sep.
[Is] ISSN:1873-5134
[Cp] Country of publication:Ireland
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the association between the patient-provider relationship, satisfaction with primary care provider's (PCP) involvement and weight loss in a practice-based weight loss trial. METHODS: POWER was a practice-based randomized controlled behavioral weight loss trial. Participants completed questionnaires about patient-provider relationship and satisfaction with their PCPs' involvement in the trial. PCPs completed a demographics and practice survey. The main outcome was the mean weight change from baseline to 24 months. We created mixed-effect models, accounting for the random effects of patients clustering with the PCP and the repeated outcome assessments within patient over time, and adjusted for randomization assignment, age, gender, race and clinical site. RESULTS: 347 (of 415) were included. Mean age was 54.8 years, mean BMI was 36.3kg/m(2). Participants reported high quality patient-provider relationships (mean summary score=29.1 [range 14-32]). Patient-provider relationship quality was not associated weight loss in either the intervention or control groups. Among intervention participants, higher ratings of the helpfulness of the PCPs' involvement was associated with greater weight loss (p=0.005). CONCLUSION: Patient-provider relationship quality was not associated with weight loss in a practice-based weight loss trial but rating PCPs as helpful in the intervention was associated with weight loss. PRACTICE IMPLICATIONS: Partnering with PCPs to deliver weight loss programs may promote greater participant satisfaction and weight loss.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1508
[Cu] Class update date: 150822
[Lr] Last revision date:150822
[Js] Journal subset:N
[St] Status:In-Data-Review

  10 / 4225441 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 26021185
[Au] Autor:Beach MC; Roter DL; Saha S; Korthuis PT; Eggly S; Cohn J; Sharp V; Moore RD; Wilson IB
[Ad] Address:Berman Institute of Bioethics, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, USA; Department of Medicine, Johns Hopkins School of Medicine, Baltimore, USA; Department of Health, Behavior & Society, Bloomberg School of Public Health, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, USA; Welch Center for Prevention, E...
[Ti] Title:Impact of a brief patient and provider intervention to improve the quality of communication about medication adherence among HIV patients.
[So] Source:Patient Educ Couns;98(9):1078-83, 2015 Sep.
[Is] ISSN:1873-5134
[Cp] Country of publication:Ireland
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:INTRODUCTION: Medication adherence is essential in HIV care, yet provider communication about adherence is often suboptimal. We designed this study to improve patient-provider communication about HIV medication adherence. METHODS: We randomized 26 providers at three HIV care sites to receive or not receive a one-hour communication skills training based on motivational interviewing principles applied to medication adherence. Prior to routine office visits, non-adherent patients of providers who received the training were coached to discuss adherence with their providers. Patients of providers who did not receive the training providers were not coached. We audio-recorded and coded patient-provider interactions using the roter interaction analysis system (RIAS). RESULTS: There was more dialogue about therapeutic regimen in visits with intervention patients and providers (167 vs 128, respectively, p=.004), with the majority of statements coming from providers. These visits also included more brainstorming solutions to nonadherence (41% vs. 22%, p=0.026). Intervention compared with control visit providers engaged in more positive talk (44 vs. 38 statements, p=0.039), emotional talk (26 vs. 18 statements, p<0.001), and probing of patient opinion (3 vs. 2 statements, p=0.009). CONCLUSION: A brief provider training combined with patient coaching sessions, improved provider communication behaviors and increased dialogue regarding medication adherence.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1508
[Cu] Class update date: 150822
[Lr] Last revision date:150822
[Js] Journal subset:N
[St] Status:In-Data-Review


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