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[PMID]: 29520806
[Au] Autor:Bassir SH; Chase I; Paster BJ; Gordon LB; Kleinman ME; Kieran MW; Kim DM; Sonis A
[Ad] Address:Division of Periodontology, Department of Oral Medicine, Infection, and Immunity, Harvard School of Dental Medicine, Boston, Massachusetts, USA.
[Ti] Title:Microbiome at sites of gingival recession in children with Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome.
[So] Source:J Periodontol;, 2018 Feb 19.
[Is] ISSN:1943-3670
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:BACKGROUND: Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome (HGPS) is a rare premature aging disorder with significant oral and dental abnormalities. Clinical symptoms include various features of accelerated aging such as alopecia, loss of subcutaneous fat, bone abnormalities, and premature cardiovascular disease. In addition, children with HGPS have been observed to suffer from generalized gingival recession. Whether periodontal manifestations associated with this syndrome are the results of changes in the oral flora is unknown. The present study aimed to identify the microbial composition of subgingival sites with gingival recession in children with HGPS. METHODS: Nine children with HGPS were enrolled in this study. Plaque samples were collected from teeth with gingival recession. DNA samples were analyzed using the Human Oral Microbe Identification Microarray (HOMIM). Microbial profiles from HGPS children were compared with microbial profiles of controls from healthy individuals (n = 9) and subjects with periodontal disease (n = 9). RESULTS: Comparison of microbial compositions of HGPS samples with periodontal health samples demonstrated significant differences for 2 bacterial taxa; Porphyromonas catoniae and Prevotella oulora were present in children with HGPS, but not normal controls. There were statistically significant differences of 20 bacterial taxa between HGPS and periodontal disease groups. CONCLUSION: Typical periodontal pathogeneses were not present at sites with gingival recession in HGPS children. The microbial compositions of sites of gingival recession and attachment loss in HGPS were generally more similar to those of periodontal health than periodontal disease. Species other than typical periodontal pathogens may be involved in this recession. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1803
[Cu] Class update date: 180309
[Lr] Last revision date:180309
[St] Status:Publisher
[do] DOI:10.1002/JPER.17-0351

  2 / 6000 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29520791
[Au] Autor:Mehmood A; Abduljabbar T; Al-Hamoudi N; Gholamiazizi E; Kellesarian SV; Vohra F; Javed F
[Ad] Address:Department of Dentistry, Jinnah Postgraduate Medical Centre, Karachi, Pakistan.
[Ti] Title:Self-perceived oral symptoms and periodontal status among young intravenous heroin addicts: A cross-sectional case-control study.
[So] Source:J Periodontol;, 2018 Feb 19.
[Is] ISSN:1943-3670
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:BACKGROUND: It is hypothesized that (a) self-perceived oral symptoms (OSs) are worse in intravenous heroin addicts (IHA) than controls; and (b) clinical periodontal inflammatory parameters (plaque index [PI], bleeding on probing [BOP], PD and clinical attachment loss [AL]), number of missing teeth (MT) and radiographic marginal bone loss (MBL) are higher in IHA compared with controls. The aim was to compare the self-perceived OSs and periodontal parameters among young IHA and controls. METHODS: Sociodemographic data, self-perceived OSs and duration and daily frequency of intravenous heroin use was gathered using a structured questionnaire. Full-mouth PI, BOP, PD and clinical AL were measured and number of MT were recorded. Mesial and distal MBL on all teeth was measured on digital radiographs. Odds ratios (OR) with 95% confidence intervals (CI) were computed for self-perceived OSs and periodontal parameters were assessed using the Mann Whitney U-test and logistic regression analysis. Sample-size was estimated and level of significance was set at P < 0.05. RESULTS: OR (95% CI) for self-perceived loose teeth (P < 0.001), pain in teeth (P < 0.001), dry mouth (P < 0.001), burning sensation in mouth (P < 0.001), bleeding gums (P < 0.001) and pain during chewing (P < 0.001) were significantly higher in the test than control-group. Number of MT (P < 0.05), PI (P < 0.05), clinical AL (P < 0.05) and mesial (P < 0.05) and distal (P < 0.05) MBL were statistically significantly higher among individuals in the test-group compared with the control-group. CONCLUSION: Self-perceived OSs and periodontal inflammatory parameters were worse in IHA than controls. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1803
[Cu] Class update date: 180309
[Lr] Last revision date:180309
[St] Status:Publisher
[do] DOI:10.1002/JPER.17-0495

  3 / 6000 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29520772
[Au] Autor:Graziani F; Discepoli N; Gennai S; Karapetsa D; Nisi M; Bianchi L; Rosema NAM; Van der Velden U
[Ad] Address:Department of Surgical, Medical and Molecular Pathology and Critical Care Medicine, University of Pisa, Pisa, Italy.
[Ti] Title:The effect of twice daily kiwifruit consumption on periodontal and systemic conditions before and after treatment: A randomized clinical trial.
[So] Source:J Periodontol;, 2018 Feb 22.
[Is] ISSN:1943-3670
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:BACKGROUND: To assess the nutraceutical effects of twice/daily intake of kiwifruit on periodontal parameters and systemic health before and after initial periodontal treatment (IPT). METHODS: At baseline, participants were randomly assigned to test and control group, and either consumed two kiwifruits/day for 5 months or no kiwifruit. In the first 2 months, no periodontal treatment was delivered (2 M). Subsequently, a session of full-mouth IPT within 24 hours was performed. Participants were then re-assessed after 3 months (5 M). Blood samples, evaluating systemic biomarkers and vital signs, were also collected atbaseline, 2 M, and 5 M. RESULTS: Groups were balanced at baseline. At 2 M no within-groups differences could be detected for any parameter but the bleeding score, which decreased significantly in the kiwifruit group by 6.67% ± 11.90% (P < 0.01). Comparison of test and control group showed that 2 months of kiwifruit consumption resulted in significant lower values of bleeding, plaque, and attachment loss. After IPT both groups demonstrated substantial significant clinical benefits however the control group showed significant greater reductions of bleeding, plaque and attachment loss than the test group. Systemic biomarkers and vital signs did not show clinically relevant differences between test and control group. CONCLUSIONS: Kiwifruit consumption reduces gingival inflammation despite the lack of any periodontal instrumentation or patient's behavioral changes. No adjunctive effect to periodontal treatment of dietary intake of kiwifruit was noted. (NCT NCT03084484).
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1803
[Cu] Class update date: 180309
[Lr] Last revision date:180309
[Cl] Clinical Trial:ClinicalTrial
[St] Status:Publisher
[do] DOI:10.1002/JPER.17-0148

  4 / 6000 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29518672
[Au] Autor:Gusman DJR; Mello-Neto JM; Alves BES; Matheus HR; Ervolino E; Theodoro LH; de Almeida JM
[Ad] Address:Department of Surgery and Integrated Clinic, Division of Periodontics, São Paulo State University (Unesp), School of Dentistry, Araçatuba, São Paulo, Brazil.
[Ti] Title:Periodontal disease severity in subjects with dementia: A systematic review and meta-analysis.
[So] Source:Arch Gerontol Geriatr;76:147-159, 2018 Feb 27.
[Is] ISSN:1872-6976
[Cp] Country of publication:Netherlands
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVE: Despite clinical trials and reviews attempt to assess a possible relationship between dementia and periodontal disease, no meta-analysis has been performed and this issue remains undetermined. The aim of this study is to conduct a systematic review and meta-analysis to assess severity of periodontitis in subjects with dementia. METHODS: The search was conducted in Pubmed, Embase/MEDLINE. Two independent reviewers extracted data and assessed the risk bias (Newcastle-Ottawa scale). Meta-analyses were performed using the means of probing depth (PD) and clinical attachment loss (CAL) in patients with or without dementia. The mean difference were analyzed (P ≤ 0.05). RESULTS: Fourteen studies were included in the systematic review. In the qualitative analysis, most studies reported higher prevalence of periodontal disease in dementia patients. The studies had low risk of bias and two meta-analyses were performed for each parameter, including or not a cross-sectional study. The meta-analyses including the cross-sectional study demonstrated significant association between dementia and periodontal disease (mean difference: PD = 1.41; CAL = 1.40, P < 0.05), however, it wasn't confirmed when the cross-sectional study was removed (1.25 mm, P < 0.22) and CAL (1.20 mm, P < 0.22). CONCLUSION: Although the qualitative analysis have suggested worse periodontal conditions in dementia patients, due to different study types and the high heterogeneity among them, the meta-analysis does not support the association between dementia and severity of periodontal disease.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE; REVIEW
[Em] Entry month:1803
[Cu] Class update date: 180308
[Lr] Last revision date:180308
[St] Status:Publisher

  5 / 6000 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29342298
[Au] Autor:Michaud DS; Lu J; Peacock-Villada AY; Barber JR; Joshu CE; Prizment AE; Beck JD; Offenbacher S; Platz EA
[Ad] Address:Department of Public Health and Community Medicine, Tufts University School of Medicine, Boston, MA.
[Ti] Title:Periodontal Disease Assessed Using Clinical Dental Measurements and Cancer Risk in the ARIC Study.
[So] Source:J Natl Cancer Inst;, 2018 Jan 12.
[Is] ISSN:1460-2105
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Background: While evidence is increasingly consistent with a positive association between periodontitis and cancer risk, most studies have relied on self-reported periodontitis. In this study, we prospectively evaluated the association of periodontal disease severity with cancer risk in black and white older adults in a cohort study that included a dental examination. Methods: Included were 7466 participants in the Atherosclerosis Risk in Communities study cohort who at visit 4 (1996-1998) reported being edentulous or underwent the dental examination. Probing depth and gingival recession were measured at six sites on all teeth; these measurements were used to define periodontal disease severity. Incident cancers (n = 1648) and cancer deaths (n = 547) were ascertained during a median of 14.7 years of follow-up. All statistical tests were two-sided. Results: An increased risk of total cancer (hazard ratio [HR] = 1.24, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 1.07 to 1.44, Ptrend = .004) was observed for severe periodontitis (>30% of sites with attachment loss >3 mm) compared with no/mild periodontitis (<10% of sites with attachment loss >3 mm), adjusting for smoking and other factors. Strong associations were observed for lung cancer (HR = 2.33, 95% CI = 1.51 to 3.60, Ptrend < .001), and elevated risks were noted for colorectal cancer for severe periodontitis, which were significant among never smokers (HR = 2.12, 95% CI = 1.00 to 4.47). Associations were generally weaker, or not apparent among black participants, except for lung and colorectal cancers, where associations were similar by race. No associations were observed for breast, prostate, or hematopoietic and lymphatic cancer risk. Conclusions: This study provides additional evidence that cancer risk, especially for lung and colorectal cancer, is elevated in individuals with periodontitis. Additional research is needed to understand cancer site-specific and racial differences in findings.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1801
[Cu] Class update date: 180308
[Lr] Last revision date:180308
[St] Status:Publisher
[do] DOI:10.1093/jnci/djx278

  6 / 6000 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29508481
[Au] Autor:Almeida ML; Tôrres ACSP; de Oliveira KC; Calderon PDS; Carreiro ADFP; Gurgel BCV
[Ad] Address:Department of Dentistry, Federal University of Rio Grande do Norte- UFRN, Natal, Brazil.
[Ti] Title:Longitudinal Improvement in Periodontal Parameters between RPD Abutment Teeth with Direct and Indirect Retainers, after Periodontal Therapy.
[So] Source:J Prosthodont;, 2018 Mar 06.
[Is] ISSN:1532-849X
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:PURPOSE: To evaluate the effect of basic periodontal treatment on clinical periodontal parameters associated with abutment teeth of patients with mandibular Kennedy class I removable partial dentures (RPD) 18 months after treatment. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Thirty patients with periodontal disease were treated and evaluated according to the following periodontal parameters: visible plaque index (VPI), bleeding on probing (BOP), probing depth (PD), gingival recession (GR), clinical attachment loss (CAL), and keratinized mucosa (KM). These parameters were compared between abutment teeth with direct and indirect retainers at baseline, and after 6 and 18 months. Data were analyzed by Friedman Test and Wilcoxon Test for all variables. RESULTS: Most patients (n = 26; 86.7%) included in the study were female and had a mean age of 61 years (±7.54). Results showed that VPI and BOP decreased over time, and that VPI values were higher in abutment teeth with direct retainers (p = 0.001). There was a reduction in PD after 6 months, which was maintained up to 18 months. In general, abutment teeth with direct retainers had significantly higher values for PD, GR, and CAL (p = 0.029). Data also indicated that the parameters for VPI, BOP, and PD improved; however, abutment teeth with direct retainers presented smaller improvements, compared with abutment teeth with indirect retainers, which presented significant improvements for almost all variables. CONCLUSION: Periodontal treatment and oral hygiene care of patients were adequate for maintenance of adequate periodontal conditions, regardless of the use of prostheses.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1803
[Cu] Class update date: 180306
[Lr] Last revision date:180306
[St] Status:Publisher
[do] DOI:10.1111/jopr.12774

  7 / 6000 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29478448
[Au] Autor:Spolsky VW; Clague J; Murphy DA; Vitero S; Dye BA; Belin TR; Shetty V
[Ti] Title:Periodontal status of current methamphetamine users.
[So] Source:J Am Dent Assoc;149(3):174-183, 2018 Mar.
[Is] ISSN:1943-4723
[Cp] Country of publication:England
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:BACKGROUND: Methamphetamine (MA) use is associated with extensive dental caries. The purpose of this study was to determine the prevalence and severity of periodontal disease in a convenience sample of MA users. METHODS: In this cross-sectional survey, MA users were recruited with a combination of snowball sampling and street outreach techniques. Three dentists, trained and calibrated to the oral assessments used in the National Health and Nutrition Survey, measured and recorded the participants' attachment loss, probing depth, and gingival recession. Concomitant interviews elicited psychological, substance use, medication, and dietary habits associated with MA use. RESULTS: Periodontal assessments were completed on 546 adults. More than 69% were cigarette smokers, and more than 55% were medium to high MA users. Classifying prevalence by means of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and the American Academy of Periodontology definitions, cigarette smokers and medium to high MA users had a high prevalence of periodontal disease. The defining features of the participants were being 30 years and older (average, 42.2 years) and having severe and moderate periodontitis. CONCLUSION: This is the first study to the authors' knowledge to systematically examine periodontal disease in a large population of current MA users. MA users in a Los Angeles urban setting had a high prevalence and severity of destructive periodontal disease. The frequency of MA use had a minimal impact on the severity of periodontal disease. PRACTICAL IMPLICATIONS: An MA user can be at high risk of developing periodontal disease. Knowing that behavioral factors, such as smoking and consuming sugary beverages, are more important than MA use will assist the clinician in managing the treatment of MA users.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1802
[Cu] Class update date: 180303
[Lr] Last revision date:180303
[St] Status:In-Data-Review

  8 / 6000 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29482543
[Au] Autor:Tsobgny-Tsague NF; Lontchi-Yimagou E; Nana ARN; Tankeu AT; Katte JC; Dehayem MY; Bengondo CM; Sobngwi E
[Ad] Address:Department of periodontology, oral and maxillofacial surgery, Faculty of Medicine and Biomedical Sciences of The University of Yaoundé 1, Yaoundé, Cameroon.
[Ti] Title:Effects of nonsurgical periodontal treatment on glycated haemoglobin on type 2 diabetes patients (PARODIA 1 study): a randomized controlled trial in a sub-Saharan Africa population.
[So] Source:BMC Oral Health;18(1):28, 2018 Feb 26.
[Is] ISSN:1472-6831
[Cp] Country of publication:England
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:BACKGROUND: There is a burglar association between diabetes and periodontitis. Many studies has shown that periodontitis treatment can help improving glycemic control in diabetes patients but little evidence of non-surgical treatment benefit is available in sub Saharan african diabetes patients. We aimed to assess the effects of non-surgical periodontal treatment (NSPT) of chronic periodontitis on glycaemic control in poorly controlled type 2 diabetes patients (T2D) in a sub-Saharan Africa urban setting. METHODS: A total of 34 poorly controlled T2D patients with chronic periodontitis aged 51.4 ± 8.8 years (mean ± SD), with known duration of diabetes of 55.5 ± 42.6 months, and HbA1c of 9.3 ± 1.3% were randomly assigned to two groups. The treatment group (Group 1, n = 17) received immediate ultrasonic scaling, scaling and root planning along with subgingival 10% povidone iodine irrigation, whereas the control group (Group 2, n = 17) was assigned to receive delayed periodontal treatment 3 months later. Pharmacological treatment was unchanged and all participants received the same standardized education session on diabetes management and dental hygiene. The primary outcome was the 3-month change in HbA1c from baseline. Plaque index (PI), gingival bleeding index (GBI), pocket depth (PD), clinical attachment loss (CAL) were also assessed prior to, at 6 and 12 weeks after enrolment. RESULTS: Two subjects in each group were excluded from the study. Data were analyzed on thirty patients (15 per group). Non-surgical periodontal treatment with education for better dental hygiene (group 1) significantly improved all periodontal parameters whereas education only (group 2) improved only the plaque index among all periodontal parameters. Immediate non-surgical periodontal treatment induced a reduction of HbA1c levels by 3.0 ± 2.4 points from 9.7 ± 1.6% at baseline to 6.7 ± 2.0% 3 months after NSPT, (p Ë‚ 0.001) but the change was not significant in group 2, from mean 8.9 ± 0.9% at baseline vs 8.1 ± 2.6% after 3 months (p = 0.24). CONCLUSION: Non-surgical periodontal treatment markedly improved glycaemic control with an attributable reduction of 2.2 points of HbA1c in poorly controlled T2D patients in a sub Saharan setting. TRIAL REGISTRATION: ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT02745015 Date of registration: July 17, 2016 'Retrospectively registered'.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1802
[Cu] Class update date: 180302
[Lr] Last revision date:180302
[Cl] Clinical Trial:ClinicalTrial
[St] Status:In-Data-Review
[do] DOI:10.1186/s12903-018-0479-5

  9 / 6000 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29291254
[Au] Autor:Manresa C; Sanz-Miralles EC; Twigg J; Bravo M
[Ad] Address:Adult Comprehensive Dentistry, Dental School, University of Barcelona, Feixa LLarga s/n, Hospitalet de Llobregat, Barcelona, Spain, 08907.
[Ti] Title:Supportive periodontal therapy (SPT) for maintaining the dentition in adults treated for periodontitis.
[So] Source:Cochrane Database Syst Rev;1:CD009376, 2018 01 01.
[Is] ISSN:1469-493X
[Cp] Country of publication:England
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:BACKGROUND: Periodontitis is a bacterially-induced, chronic inflammatory disease that destroys the connective tissues and bone that support teeth. Active periodontal treatment aims to reduce the inflammatory response, primarily through eradication of bacterial deposits. Following completion of treatment and arrest of inflammation, supportive periodontal therapy (SPT) is employed to reduce the probability of re-infection and progression of the disease; to maintain teeth without pain, excessive mobility or persistent infection in the long term, and to prevent related oral diseases.According to the American Academy of Periodontology, SPT should include all components of a typical dental recall examination, and importantly should also include periodontal re-evaluation and risk assessment, supragingival and subgingival removal of bacterial plaque and calculus, and re-treatment of any sites showing recurrent or persistent disease. While the first four points might be expected to form part of the routine examination appointment for periodontally healthy patients, the inclusion of thorough periodontal evaluation, risk assessment and subsequent treatment - normally including mechanical debridement of any plaque or calculus deposits - differentiates SPT from routine care.Success of SPT has been reported in a number of long-term, retrospective studies. This review aimed to assess the evidence available from randomised controlled trials (RCTs). OBJECTIVES: To determine the effects of supportive periodontal therapy (SPT) in the maintenance of the dentition of adults treated for periodontitis. SEARCH METHODS: Cochrane Oral Health's Information Specialist searched the following databases: Cochrane Oral Health's Trials Register (to 8 May 2017), the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL) (the Cochrane Library, 2017, Issue 5), MEDLINE Ovid (1946 to 8 May 2017), and Embase Ovid (1980 to 8 May 2017). The US National Institutes of Health Trials Registry (ClinicalTrials.gov) and the World Health Organization International Clinical Trials Registry Platform were searched for ongoing trials. No restrictions were placed on the language or date of publication when searching the electronic databases. SELECTION CRITERIA: Randomised controlled trials (RCTs) evaluating SPT versus monitoring only or alternative approaches to mechanical debridement; SPT alone versus SPT with adjunctive interventions; different approaches to or providers of SPT; and different time intervals for SPT delivery.We excluded split-mouth studies where we considered there could be a risk of contamination.Participants must have completed active periodontal therapy at least six months prior to randomisation and be enrolled in an SPT programme. Trials must have had a minimum follow-up period of 12 months. DATA COLLECTION AND ANALYSIS: Two review authors independently screened search results to identify studies for inclusion, assessed the risk of bias in included studies and extracted study data. When possible, we calculated mean differences (MDs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) for continuous variables. Two review authors assessed the quality of evidence for each comparison and outcome using GRADE criteria. MAIN RESULTS: We included four trials involving 307 participants aged 31 to 85 years, who had been previously treated for moderate to severe chronic periodontitis. Three studies compared adjuncts to mechanical debridement in SPT versus debridement only. The adjuncts were local antibiotics in two studies (one at high risk of bias and one at low risk) and photodynamic therapy in one study (at unclear risk of bias). One study at high risk of bias compared provision of SPT by a specialist versus general practitioner. We did not identify any RCTs evaluating the effects of SPT versus monitoring only, or of providing SPT at different time intervals, or that compared the effects of mechanical debridement using different approaches or technologies.No included trials measured our primary outcome 'tooth loss'; however, studies evaluated signs of inflammation and potential periodontal disease progression, including bleeding on probing (BoP), clinical attachment level (CAL) and probing pocket depth (PPD).There was no evidence of a difference between SPT delivered by a specialist versus a general practitioner for BoP or PPD at 12 months (very low-quality evidence). This study did not measure CAL or adverse events.Due to heterogeneous outcome reporting, it was not possible to combine data from the two studies comparing mechanical debridement with or without the use of adjunctive local antibiotics. Both studies found no evidence of a difference between groups at 12 months (low to very low-quality evidence). There were no adverse events in either study.The use of adjunctive photodynamic therapy did not demonstrate evidence of benefit compared to mechanical debridement only (very low-quality evidence). Adverse events were not measured.The quality of the evidence is low to very low for these comparisons. Future research is likely to change the findings, therefore the results should be interpreted with caution. AUTHORS' CONCLUSIONS: Overall, there is insufficient evidence to determine the superiority of different protocols or adjunctive strategies to improve tooth maintenance during SPT. No trials evaluated SPT versus monitoring only. The evidence available for the comparisons evaluated is of low to very low quality, and hampered by dissimilarities in outcome reporting. More trials using uniform definitions and outcomes are required to address the objectives of this review.
[Mh] MeSH terms primary: Anti-Bacterial Agents/therapeutic use
Chronic Periodontitis/therapy
Periodontal Debridement/methods
Periodontics/methods
Photochemotherapy/methods
Tooth Loss/prevention & control
[Mh] MeSH terms secundary: Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Chronic Periodontitis/complications
Dental Plaque/therapy
Humans
Middle Aged
Randomized Controlled Trials as Topic
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE; META-ANALYSIS; RESEARCH SUPPORT, NON-U.S. GOV'T; REVIEW
[Nm] Name of substance:0 (Anti-Bacterial Agents)
[Em] Entry month:1802
[Cu] Class update date: 180226
[Lr] Last revision date:180226
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[Da] Date of entry for processing:180102
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.1002/14651858.CD009376.pub2

  10 / 6000 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29451591
[Au] Autor:Llanos AH; Silva CGB; Ichimura KT; Rebeis ES; Giudicissi M; Romano MM; Saraiva L
[Ad] Address:Department of Periodontology, School of Dentistry, Universidade de São Paulo, São Paulo, SP, Brazil.
[Ti] Title:Impact of aggressive periodontitis and chronic periodontitis on oral health-related quality of life.
[So] Source:Braz Oral Res;32:e006, 2018.
[Is] ISSN:1807-3107
[Cp] Country of publication:Brazil
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:The purpose of this cross-sectional study was to investigate the effect of different forms of periodontal diseases on Oral Health-Related Quality of Life (OHRQoL). Fifty-two patients with Aggressive Periodontitis (AP) or Chronic Periodontitis (CP) were included: nine patients with Localized Aggressive Periodontitis (LAP), thirty-three patients with Generalized Aggressive Periodontitis (GAP) and ten patients with Generalized Chronic Periodontitis (GCP). Oral Health Impact Profile questionnaires (OHIP-14) were distributed after a clinical examination that measured the following periodontal parameters: tooth loss, bleeding on probing (BoP), probing depth (PD), gingival recession (REC) and clinical attachment level (CAL). The global OHIP-14 score means were 10.6 for LAP, 16.5 for GAP, and 17.5 for GCP. A statistically significant difference (p < 0.01) was observed between the LAP group and the other two groups. There was significantly less bleeding and recession in the LAP group than in the patients with the generalized forms of periodontitis. LAP, GAP and GCP have an impact on patient quality of life when measured using the OHIP-14. Patients with GAP and GCP had poorer OHRQoL than LAP patients.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1802
[Cu] Class update date: 180216
[Lr] Last revision date:180216
[St] Status:In-Process


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