Database : MEDLINE
Search on : Periprosthetic and Fractures [Words]
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[PMID]: 29517952
[Au] Autor:Zhang C; Xu B; Liang G; Zeng X; Zeng D; Chen D; Ge Z; Yu W; Zhang X
[Ad] Address:1 Department of Joint Surgery, The Third Affiliated Hospital of Guangzhou Medical University, Liwan District, Guangzhou, Guangdong, China.
[Ti] Title:Optimizing stability in AO/OTA 31-A2 intertrochanteric fracture fixation in older patients with osteoporosis.
[So] Source:J Int Med Res;:300060518761504, 2018 Jan 01.
[Is] ISSN:1473-2300
[Cp] Country of publication:England
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Objectives To compare the functional and radiographic outcomes of InterTAN nail (IT) and proximal femoral nail anti-rotation (PFNA) for managing primary AO/OTA 31-A2 intertrochanteric hip fractures (IHFs) in older osteoporotic patients. Methods Patients aged 60 years or older who received surgical treatment for IHFs (AO/OTA 3.1A2.1-A2.3) with IT or PFNA were retrospectively evaluated. The primary outcome was the postoperative treatment failure rate. The secondary outcome was the Harris Hip Score (HHS). Results A total of 326 osteoporotic cases (326 hips: IT, n = 162; PFNA, n = 164) were assessed with a mean follow-up of 43.5 months (range, 38-48 months). For the entire cohort, the incidence of postoperative treatment failure (periprosthetic fracture and reoperation) was 29/326 (8.9%); the IT-treated cohort (7/162, 4.3%) had a significantly lower rate compared with the PFNA-treated cohort (22/165, 13.3%). The incidence of postoperative periprosthetic fractures was significantly lower in the IT-treated cohort than in the PFNA-treated cohort (2.5% vs 7.9%). The postoperative HHS at the final follow-up was not significantly different between the groups. Conclusion IT might show a better outcome in managing osteoporotic AO/OTA 31-A2 IHFs in terms of periprosthetic fracture and reoperation compared with PFNA.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1803
[Cu] Class update date: 180308
[Lr] Last revision date:180308
[St] Status:Publisher
[do] DOI:10.1177/0300060518761504

  2 / 1803 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29504054
[Au] Autor:Hernigou P; Auregan JC; Bastard C; Housset V; Flouzat-Lachaniette CH; Dubory A
[Ad] Address:Hôpital Henri Mondor, 94010, Creteil, France. philippe.hernigou@wanadoo.fr.
[Ti] Title:Higher prevalence of periprosthetic fractures with ceramic on polyethylene hip bearing compared with ceramic on ceramic on the contralateral side: a forty year experience with hip osteonecrosis.
[So] Source:Int Orthop;, 2018 Mar 04.
[Is] ISSN:1432-5195
[Cp] Country of publication:Germany
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:PURPOSE: It is unclear whether late THA periprosthetic femoral fractures are related to a mechanical mechanism that decreases strength of the femur (for example, loosening) or to a biological problem as osteolysis. It is also unknown if ceramic on ceramic bearing couples decrease the risk of late periprosthetic fractures as a result of the absence of wear and osteolysis. MATERIAL AND METHODS: We therefore asked whether the cumulative long-term fractures were different according to the couple of friction ceramic on ceramic or ceramic on polyethylene in 327 patients (654 hips) with bilateral THA (one ceramic-ceramic, and the contralateral ceramic-polyethylene) who had THA with cemented stems performed between from 1978 to 2000 for osteonecrosis. RESULTS: There were two intra-operative fractures (0.3%). The median follow-up was 22 years (range, 15-40 years), and at the most recent follow-up, the cumulative number of late (after 7 years of follow-up) post-operative fractures was 32 (5% of 654 hips). Fractures were unilateral, which means for the 327 patients, a 10% rate of fractures. Periprosthetic fractures increased in number with follow-up: seven fractures (1% of 654 hips) occurred within ten years of THA implantation, 20 (3%) within 20 years, 26 (4%) within 30 years, and 32 (5%) within 40 years. The risk of fracture was influenced (p < 0.001) by the bearing surfaces at the time of prosthetic implantation, low (0.3%) for ceramic on ceramic (1/32 fractures; 1/327 hips), high (10%) for ceramic on PE (31/32 fractures; 31/327 hips). CONCLUSION: In summary, when the contralateral hip of the same patient is the control, after 40 years of follow-up, post-operative fractures occur 30 times more often on the side with PE cup than on the side with ceramic/ceramic bearing.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1803
[Cu] Class update date: 180305
[Lr] Last revision date:180305
[St] Status:Publisher
[do] DOI:10.1007/s00264-018-3863-5

  3 / 1803 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29208310
[Au] Autor:Hoellwarth JS; Fourman MS; Crossett L; Goodman M; Siska P; Moloney GB; Tarkin IS
[Ad] Address:Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Division of Traumatology, University of Pittsburgh, 3471 Fifth Avenue, Pittsburgh, PA, 15213, USA, USA. Electronic address: drjsoon@gmail.com.
[Ti] Title:Equivalent mortality and complication rates following periprosthetic distal femur fractures managed with either lateral locked plating or a distal femoral replacement.
[So] Source:Injury;49(2):392-397, 2018 Feb.
[Is] ISSN:1879-0267
[Cp] Country of publication:Netherlands
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:INTRODUCTION: Management of distal femur fractures above total knee arthroplasty (TKA) remains challenging. Two common surgical options are locked lateral plating (LLP) and distal femoral arthroplasty (DFR). Unfortunately, approximately 30-50% of patients may die within one year of injury, require further surgery, or not regain prior mobility performance. We compared 87 LLP to 53 DFR patients - to our knowledge the largest comparative study - focusing on 90- and 365-day mortality, mobility maintenance, and further surgery. METHODS: We performed a retrospective review of patients at least 55 years old who sustained femur fractures near a primary TKA (essentially OTA-33 or Su types 1, 2, or 3) from 2000 to 2015 assigning cohort based on treatment: LLP or DFR. We excluded patients having prior care for the injury, whose surgery was not for fracture (e.g. loosening), or having other surgical intervention (e.g. intramedullary nail). RESULTS: Results Cohorts were similar based on body mass index and age adjusted Charlson Comorbidity Index (aaCCI). LLP was more common than DFR for fractures above and at the level of the implant, but similar for fractures within the implant for patients with aaCCI ≥ 5. LLP and DFR had similar mortality at 90 days (9% vs 4%) and 365 days (22% vs 10%), need for additional surgery (9% vs 3%), and survivors maintaining ambulation (77% vs 81%). Patients whose surgery occurred 3 or more days after presentation had similar mortality risk to those whose surgery was before 3days. The mean age of one year survivors was 77 whereas for patients who died it was 85. Neither surgical choice nor aaCCI was associated with increased risk in time to surgery. CONCLUSIONS: Fracture location, remaining bone stock, and patient's prior mobility and current comorbidities must guide treatment. Our study suggests that 90- and 365-day mortality, final mobility, and re-operation rate are not statistically different with LLP vs DFR management.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1712
[Cu] Class update date: 180304
[Lr] Last revision date:180304
[St] Status:In-Process

  4 / 1803 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29174454
[Au] Autor:Cooper HJ; Roc GC; Bas MA; Berliner ZP; Hepinstall MS; Rodriguez JA; Weiner LS
[Ad] Address:Division of Hip and Knee Reconstruction, Department of Orthopedic Surgery, Columbia University Medical Center, New York, NY, United States. Electronic address: hjc2008@cumc.columbia.edu.
[Ti] Title:Closed incision negative pressure therapy decreases complications after periprosthetic fracture surgery around the hip and knee.
[So] Source:Injury;49(2):386-391, 2018 Feb.
[Is] ISSN:1879-0267
[Cp] Country of publication:Netherlands
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:INTRODUCTION: Periprosthetic fractures (PPFXs) are becoming increasingly common following total hip arthroplasty (THA) and total knee arthroplasty (TKA). Patients sustaining PPFXs face considerable perioperative morbidity, with relatively increased rates of surgical site infection. We sought to evaluate the efficacy of closed-incision negative-pressure wound therapy (ciNPT) in decreasing perioperative wound complications following lower extremity periprosthetic fracture surgery. METHODS: We performed a retrospective review of 69 consecutive patients who underwent surgery to address lower extremity periprosthetic fractures around hip or knee implants performed over a 6.5-year period. The population was divided into two groups based on the surgical dressing used at the conclusion of the procedure: (1) a sterile, antimicrobial hydrofiber dressing, or (2) ciNPT. There were no baseline demographic differences between the two groups. Rates of wound complications, surgical site infection, and reoperation related to the surgical site were compared between groups. Continuous variables were analyzed using a student's t-test, and categorical variables using either chi-square or fisher's exact test. RESULTS: Patients treated with ciNPT developed fewer wound complications (4% vs. 35%; p=0.002), fewer deep infections (0% vs. 25%; p=0.004), and underwent fewer reoperations related to the surgical site (4% vs. 25%; p=0.021) compared to patients treated with standard of care. CONCLUSIONS: Our findings suggest that ciNPT may reduce wound complications, SSIs, and reoperations in patients undergoing lower extremity periprosthetic fracture surgery. This is the first study to investigate ciNPT as a treatment for periprosthetic fracture surgery, and has the potential to change the postoperative management of these patients.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1711
[Cu] Class update date: 180304
[Lr] Last revision date:180304
[St] Status:In-Process

  5 / 1803 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29479920
[Au] Autor:Bulatovic N; Kezunovic M; Vucetic C; Abdic N; Bencic I; Cengic T
[Ad] Address:Clinical Center of Montenegro, Clinical Department of Orthopedic Surgery and Traumatology, Podgorica, Montenegro.
[Ti] Title:Treatment of Periprosthetic Femoral Fractures after Total Hip Arthroplasty Vancouver Type B.
[So] Source:Acta Clin Croat;56(3):536-543, 2017 Sep.
[Is] ISSN:0353-9466
[Cp] Country of publication:Croatia
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:The rate of periprosthetic femoral fractures following total hip replacement has been growing steadily in the last 20 years and ranges from 0.1% to 2.1%. These fractures are mostly related to older patients with the presence of chronic diseases and frequently poor bone quality. The treatment is surgically very complex and demanding, followed by a series of complications. The evaluation in this retrospective study included 23 patients who were medically treated from January 2004 to December 2015 with the mean follow-up of 14.5 (range, 9-25) months. There were 17 patients with cement total hip arthroplasty (THA) and 6 with cementless THA. During treatment of fractures, different techniques were implemented including the use of wire cerclage, dynamic compression plates (DCP), a locking compression plate (LCP) system, and long revision stem. For the purpose of distinguishing fractures, we used the Vancouver classification by Duncan and Masri. For clinical evaluation, we used the modified Merle d'Aubigne score system and monitored complications during treatment. The aim is to show treatment results of the type B periprosthetic femoral fractures by using different operative treatment techniques. According to the Vancouver classification within type B, 10 (43.47%) patients had type B1 fractures, another 10 (43.47%) patients had type B2 fractures, and three (13.04%) patients had type B3 fractures. According to gender distribution, there were eight (34.8%) male and 15 (65.2%) female patients, mean age 59.5 (range, 47-86) years. Twelve (52.2%) and 11 (47.8%) patients had left- and right-sided fractures, respectively. The mean length of hospital stay was 16 (range, 9-26) days. According to the Merle d'Aubigne score system, 10 patients with type B1 fractures had the mean score of 11.5 points, which is poor result. Poor result was also recorded in patients with type B2 fractures, with the mean score of 10.6 points. The three patients with type B3 fractures had the mean score of 12 points, which is considered fair score. In conclusion, Vancouver classification has been widely accepted and using the protocols makes decision making during treatment much easier. During treatment of this type of fracture, we used various implants, wire cerclage, DCP and LCP, as well as long stem revision. In certain cases, we applied surgical techniques, implants that are not recommended by the Vancouver protocol by which we treated periprosthetic femoral fractures; in these case, we recorded nonunion bone, malunion and breaking of implants, which resulted in poor treatment outcome.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1802
[Cu] Class update date: 180226
[Lr] Last revision date:180226
[St] Status:In-Process
[do] DOI:10.20471/acc.2017.56.03.21

  6 / 1803 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29325184
[Au] Autor:Plath JE; Förch S; Haufe T; Mayr EJ
[Ad] Address:Abteilung für Unfallchirurgie, Orthopädie, Plastische und Handchirurgie.
[Ti] Title:Ellenbogenfraktur im Alter ­ Erhalt oder Ersatz? [Distal Humerus Fracture in the Elderly].
[So] Source:Z Orthop Unfall;156(1):30-40, 2018 Feb.
[Is] ISSN:1864-6743
[Cp] Country of publication:Germany
[La] Language:ger
[Ab] Abstract:Distal humerus fractures show increasing incidence with age. Due to preexisting osteoporosis, the surgeon is regularly confronted with complex comminuted intraarticular fractures. The maintenance of autonomy in daily life and avoidance of permanent care dependency is a dogma in the care of geriatric patients. Accordingly, a stable post-operative situation that allows early functional post-operative treatment is mandatory, especially in the elderly patient. Open reduction and stable internal fixation using double plate osteosynthesis are the current osteosynthetic standard of treatment. Modern precontoured systems with angular stability facilitate stable fixation and reduce surgery time. However, complication rates are high, despite the good functional outcomes in the few available studies which use modern plate systems in a geriatric patient population. Due to the high rate of primary stability, elbow arthroplasty has become an established treatment option for complex distal humerus fractures in elderly patients. Consequently arthroplasty registry data report a growing number of elbow replacements for fracture in recent decades. The standard implant design in the fractures in geriatric patients is the cemented "semi-constrained" total elbow arthroplasty. The disadvantages of total elbow replacement are the lifelong stringent weight restriction patients must adhere to, as well as potential long-term complications associated with arthroplasty, such as aseptic loosening and periprosthetic fractures. Comparative studies with short- and medium-term follow-up show overall comparable functional results for elbow arthroplasty and double plate osteosynthesis, with fewer complications and revisions as well as a shorter duration of surgery within the arthroplasty group. However, long-term outcome studies are necessary to identify potential long-term complications associated with arthroplasty and are pending. Therefore, in reconstruction of fractures of the distal humerus which allow stable fixation and early functional post-operative treatment, open reduction and double plate internal fixation with modern locking plate systems remains the gold standard even for geriatric patients.
[Pt] Publication type:ENGLISH ABSTRACT; JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1801
[Cu] Class update date: 180222
[Lr] Last revision date:180222
[St] Status:In-Data-Review
[do] DOI:10.1055/s-0043-121893

  7 / 1803 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29462121
[Au] Autor:Myers P; Laboe P; Johnson KJ; Fredericks PD; Crichlow RJ; Maar DC; Weber TG
[Ad] Address:OrthoIndy Trauma, St. Vincent Trauma Center, St. Vincent Orthopedics and Spine Center, Indianapolis, IN.
[Ti] Title:Patient Mortality in Geriatric Distal Femur Fractures.
[So] Source:J Orthop Trauma;32(3):111-115, 2018 Mar.
[Is] ISSN:1531-2291
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:OBJECTIVES: To estimate 1-year mortality rates in elderly patients who undergo operative treatment for distal femur fractures and identify potential risk factors for mortality. DESIGN: Retrospective chart review. SETTING: Level 1 and Level 2 trauma centers. PATIENTS/PARTICIPANTS: Two hundred eighty-three elderly patients (average age 76.0 years ± 9.8) who sustained distal femur fractures between 2002 and 2012. INTERVENTION: Fracture fixation of the distal femur. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURE: Survival up to 1 year after surgery. RESULTS: The 1-year mortality rate for distal femur fractures in elderly patients was 13.4%. There were no statistically significant differences in overall mortality between native bone and periprosthetic fractures, intramedullary nail or open reduction internal fixation, or across Orthopaedic Trauma Association fracture classifications. Overall patient mortality was significantly higher at 30 days (P = 0.036), 6 months (P = 0.019), and 1 year (P = 0.018), when surgery occurred more than 2 days from the injury. Mean Charlson Comorbidity Index scores were significantly lower in survivors versus nonsurvivors at all time intervals (30 days, P = 0.023; 6 months, P = 0.001 and 1 year P ≤ 0.001). A time to surgery of more than 2 days, regardless of baseline illness, did not result in improved survivability at 1 year. CONCLUSIONS: Overall mortality for distal femur fractures was 13.4% in the elderly population. A surgical treatment more than 2 days after injury was associated with increased patient mortality. LEVEL OF EVIDENCE: Prognostic Level III. See Instructions for Authors for a complete description of levels of evidence.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1802
[Cu] Class update date: 180220
[Lr] Last revision date:180220
[St] Status:In-Data-Review
[do] DOI:10.1097/BOT.0000000000001078

  8 / 1803 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29458200
[Au] Autor:Cohen S; Flecher X; Parratte S; Ollivier M; Argenson JN
[Ad] Address:Institut du Mouvement et de l'Appareil Locomoteur, UMR CNRS 7287 /AMU, Centre Hospitalo-Universitaire Sud, Hôpital Sainte Marguerite, Boulevard de Sainte Marguerite, 13009, Marseille, France.
[Ti] Title:Influence of treatment modality on morbidity and mortality in periprosthetic femoral fracture. A comparative study of 71 fractures treated by internal fixation or femoral implant revision.
[So] Source:Orthop Traumatol Surg Res;, 2018 Feb 16.
[Is] ISSN:1877-0568
[Cp] Country of publication:France
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:INTRODUCTION: The incidence of periprosthetic femoral fracture is constantly increasing, with high associated morbidity and mortality. Surgical treatment is guided by the Vancouver classification, but the influence of type of treatment on morbidity and mortality has been little analyzed. The theoretic advantage of implant revision over internal fixation is that it should allow earlier weight-bearing, although the impact of this on morbidity and mortality and autonomy has not been demonstrated. We conducted a case-control study, to assess the influence of type of treatment (implant revision or internal fixation) 1) on mobility and autonomy and 2) on morbidity and mortality. HYPOTHESIS: The study hypothesis was that clinical results and morbidity and mortality do not differ between these two types of treatment. METHODS: A retrospective study included 70 patients with a total of 71 femoral periprosthetic fractures treated between 2007 and 2014. Two treatment groups, comparable for mean age, gender and ASA and Parker scores, were studied. Mean age was 78±13.5 years (range, 23-95 years). Thirty-six fractures (50.7%) were treated by implant revision via a posterolateral approach, using a revision stem with (n = 11) or without cement (n = 25) (REVISION group); immediate postoperative weight-bearing was authorized. Thirty-five fractures (49.3%) were treated by open reduction and internal fixation, using a locking plate (ORIF group); weight-bearing was authorized only in the third month. Mean follow-up was 43±27 months (range, 0.75 -107 months). RESULTS: Autonomy on Parker score was reduced by 2 points at 1 year's follow-up. Mean preoperative scores were 7.32 ±1.79 (range, 3-9) and 7.43 ±1.79 (range, 4-9) in the REVISION and ORIF group, respectively, (p=0.8), falling to 5.06 ±2.6 (range, 0-9) and 4.5 ±2.01 (range, 0-9) respectively at follow-up (p=0.349). Sixteen patients in the REVISION group versus 13 in the ORIF group had made adaptations in their home or changed place of residence (p=0.2). At last follow-up, 18 patients (28.6%) had died: 12 (37.5%) in the ORIF and 6 (19.3%) in the REVISION group (p<0.05). Survival with death as endpoint at a mean 3.5 years was 88±11% in the REVISION group versus 51±11% in the ORIF group (p=0.02). Three implant replacements were performed in each group (p=0.83). Twelve medical or surgical complications occurred in the ORIF group (37.5%) and 11 in the REVISION group (34%) (p=0.9). CONCLUSION: Implant revision for periprosthetic femoral fracture showed significantly lower overall mortality than internal fixation, without difference in terms of treatment failure or complications requiring revision surgery.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1802
[Cu] Class update date: 180219
[Lr] Last revision date:180219
[St] Status:Publisher

  9 / 1803 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29328615
[Au] Autor:Radunovic A; Kosutic M; Vulovic M; Milev B; Janjusevic N; Ivosevic A; Krulj V
[Ti] Title:Ilizarov method as limb salvage in treatment of massive femoral defect after unsuccessful tumor arthroplasty.
[So] Source:Vojnosanit Pregl;73(8):779-82, 2016 Aug.
[Is] ISSN:0042-8450
[Cp] Country of publication:Serbia
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Introduction: Surgical management of massive bone defects is very challenging in terms of estimating possibilities of saving the extremity and adequate method that can make it possible. Selection of methods is additionally limited in the presence of infection at site of defect. Case report: The female patient, diagnosed with Ewing sarcoma was treated by segmental bone resection and implantation of Kotz modular tumor endoprosthesis. After 5 years the signs of infection occured and persisted with low grade intensity. After falling, 12 years following implantation, the patient acquired periprosthetic fracture. Then endoprosthesis was removed, all along with surgical debridement of wound and application of the Ilizarov apparatus. The apparatus was applied, osteotomy of callus and the tibia performed with transport of bone segments, untill reconstruction of defect and arthrodesis of the knee was achieved. Conclusion: The Ilizarov apparatus offered us huge possibilities for management of massive bone defects with natural bone which has superior biomechanical characteristics comparing to the implant. The most frequent complication of this method is a prolonged treatment period that demands good patient selection and preparation and wide surgical experience.
[Mh] MeSH terms primary: Femoral Neoplasms/surgery
Femur/surgery
Ilizarov Technique
Limb Salvage
Sarcoma, Ewing/surgery
[Mh] MeSH terms secundary: Adolescent
Female
Femoral Fractures/diagnosis
Humans
Periprosthetic Fractures/diagnosis
Prosthesis Implantation
Prosthesis-Related Infections/diagnosis
Treatment Outcome
[Pt] Publication type:CASE REPORTS; JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1802
[Cu] Class update date: 180213
[Lr] Last revision date:180213
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[Da] Date of entry for processing:180113
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.2298/VSP150419039R

  10 / 1803 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29174404
[Au] Autor:Sellan ME; Lanting BA; Schemitsch EH; MacDonald SJ; Vasarhelyi EM; Howard JL
[Ad] Address:Division of Orthopaedic Surgery, Western University, London Health Sciences Centre, University Hospital, London, Ontario, Canada.
[Ti] Title:Does Time to Surgery Affect Outcomes for Periprosthetic Femur Fractures?
[So] Source:J Arthroplasty;33(3):878-881, 2018 Mar.
[Is] ISSN:1532-8406
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:BACKGROUND: Periprosthetic femur fractures around total hip (THA) and total knee (TKA) arthroplasties are difficult complications to manage. With native hip fractures, delay to fixation has been correlated with an increase in postoperative mortality. The effect of time to definitive fixation of periprosthetic femur fractures around THA and TKA is not well established. The aim of our study is to evaluate the effect of time to definitive fixation on postoperative length of stay and mortality for patients with periprosthetic femur fractures around THA and TKA. METHODS: A review of 2537 arthroplasty patient charts yielded 235 patients who were diagnosed with a periprosthetic femur fracture at our institution from 2005 to 2014. Time to surgical management, length of stay, demographics, referral status, fracture classification, and fixation modality along with mortality was recorded for all patients. RESULTS: One hundred eighty patients met study inclusion (111 THAs, 69 TKAs). Average age was 79.2 years and 72.2% were female. The average time from admission to definitive fixation was 96.5 hours with 31.1% of patients having surgery within 48 hours after presenting to hospital. Postoperative length of stay and mortality were not affected by time to definitive fixation greater than 48 hours for either of the periprosthetic TKA or THA patient cohorts. Postoperative mortality within 1 year was 5.5% for all patients (6.3% THA, 4.3% TKA). CONCLUSION: The timing of fixation of periprosthetic femur fractures does not appear to affect postoperative length of stay or mortality within 1 year.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1711
[Cu] Class update date: 180211
[Lr] Last revision date:180211
[St] Status:In-Data-Review


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