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[PMID]: 29319715
[Au] Autor:Winkelmann A; Teßmann B
[Ad] Address:Institute of Anatomy, Medical School Brandenburg - Theodor Fontane, Fehrbelliner Str. 38, 16816 Neuruppin, Germany.
[Ti] Title:Identification and return of a skull from Tasmania in the Berlin anatomical collection.
[So] Source:Anthropol Anz;75(1):39-47, 2018 Feb 01.
[Is] ISSN:0003-5548
[Cp] Country of publication:Germany
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:ABSTRACT: Following a request by the Australian government, human remains of Australian origin were identified in the anatomical collection of Charité, the medical faculty of Berlin. We initiated an interdisciplinary provenance research on such remains to ensure their identity, elucidate their history, and prepare for a possible return to Australia. Here, we present results regarding a skull in the collection labeled as stemming from Tasmania. The non-invasive anthropological investigation revealed the skull to stem from a girl of about 15 years of age who most likely died of a massive otitis/petrositis with subsequent meningitis. These results match the historical findings, which started from an inscription on the frontal bone giving a first name ("Nanny"), an ancestry ("native of Kangaroo Island"), a collector ("Schayer"), and a location ("van Diemensland", i.e. Tasmania). The collector, Adolph Schayer, was a German sheep breeder and botanical/zoological collector living in north-western Tasmania from 1831 to 1843. In archival sources, a girl named Nanny Allan could be identified, who was a native of Kangaroo Island and died in Launceston/Tasmania in 1836 at the age of about 14 years. As there were no doubts that these remains stem from a Tasmanian individual, they were handed over to representatives of the Tasmanian Aboriginal Centre in July 2014.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1801
[Cu] Class update date: 180209
[Lr] Last revision date:180209
[St] Status:In-Data-Review
[do] DOI:10.1127/anthranz/2017/0721

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[PMID]: 28955030
[Au] Autor:Taklalsingh N; Falcone F; Velayudhan V
[Ad] Address:Department of Internal Medicine, State University of New York (SUNY) Downstate Medical Center, Brooklyn, NY, USA.
[Ti] Title:Gradenigo's Syndrome in a Patient with Chronic Suppurative Otitis Media, Petrous Apicitis, and Meningitis.
[So] Source:Am J Case Rep;18:1039-1043, 2017 Sep 28.
[Is] ISSN:1941-5923
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:BACKGROUND Gradenigo's syndrome includes the triad of suppurative otitis media, ipsilateral sixth (abducens) cranial nerve palsy and facial pain in the distribution of the fifth (trigeminal) cranial nerve. Gradenigo's syndrome is rare, and the diagnosis is easily overlooked. This case is the first to report Gradenigo's syndrome presenting with meningitis on a background of chronic suppurative otitis media (CSOM) and petrous apicitis (apical petrositis). CASE REPORT A 58-year-old male African American presented with headaches and confusion. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the head showed petrous apicitis with mastoiditis and abscess formation in the cerebellomedullary cistern (cisterna magna). The case was complicated by the development of palsy of the fourth (trochlear) cranial nerve, fifth (trigeminal) cranial nerve, and sixth (abducens) cranial nerve, with radiological changes indicating infection involving the seventh (facial) cranial nerve, and eighth (vestibulocochlear) cranial nerve. Cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) culture results were positive for Klebsiella pneumoniae, sensitive to ceftriaxone. The patient improved with surgery that included a left mastoidectomy and debridement of the petrous apex, followed by a ten-week course of antibiotics. Follow-up MRI showed resolution of the infection. CONCLUSIONS This report is of an atypical case of Gradenigo's syndrome. It is important to recognize that the classical triad of Gradenigo's syndrome, suppurative otitis media, ipsilateral sixth (abducens) cranial nerve palsy and facial pain in the distribution of the fifth (trigeminal) cranial nerve, may also involve chronic suppurative otitis media (CSOM), which may lead to involvement of other cranial nerves, petrous apicitis (apical petrositis), and bacterial meningitis.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1709
[Cu] Class update date: 171015
[Lr] Last revision date:171015
[St] Status:In-Process

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[PMID]: 28720403
[Au] Autor:Vitale M; Amrit M; Arora R; Lata J
[Ad] Address:McLaren Macomb Hospital, Department of Emergency Medicine. Electronic address: Matthew.Vitale1@mclaren.org.
[Ti] Title:Gradenigo's syndrome: A common infection with uncommon consequences.
[So] Source:Am J Emerg Med;35(9):1388.e1-1388.e2, 2017 Sep.
[Is] ISSN:1532-8171
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Acute otitis media is a common diagnosis encountered by emergency medicine providers. With appropriate antibiotic treatment, patients with otitis media, in general, have minimal long-term sequela from their underlying infection (Limb et al., 2017 [1]). However, untreated cases can develop life-threatening complications that require prompt intervention. We report a case of an 8-year-old that developed Gradenigo's syndrome, a condition characterized by the triad of otitis media, facial pain in the distribution of the trigeminal nerve, and abducens nerve palsy (Yeung and Lustig, 2016; Janjua et al., 2016; Kantas et al., 2010; Motamed and Kalan, n.d.; Vita Fooken Jensen et al., 2016 [2-6]). Signs and symptoms are often subtle, so a high-level of suspicion is required in order not to miss this potentially fatal process.
[Mh] MeSH terms primary: Abducens Nerve Diseases/microbiology
Anti-Bacterial Agents/therapeutic use
Mastoiditis/diagnostic imaging
Petrositis/diagnostic imaging
Pneumococcal Infections/drug therapy
[Mh] MeSH terms secundary: Child
Female
Humans
Magnetic Resonance Imaging
Petrositis/drug therapy
Petrositis/etiology
Streptococcus pneumoniae/isolation & purification
Trigeminal Nerve/microbiology
[Pt] Publication type:CASE REPORTS; JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Nm] Name of substance:0 (Anti-Bacterial Agents)
[Em] Entry month:1709
[Cu] Class update date: 170907
[Lr] Last revision date:170907
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[Da] Date of entry for processing:170720
[St] Status:MEDLINE

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[PMID]: 28589111
[Au] Autor:Kazemi T
[Ad] Address:Otolaryngology Research Center, School of Medicine, Shiraz University of Medical Sciences, Shiraz, Iran.
[Ti] Title:Acute Otitis Media-Induced Gradenigo Syndrome, a Dramatic Response to Intravenous Antibiotic.
[So] Source:Iran J Otorhinolaryngol;29(92):165-169, 2017 May.
[Is] ISSN:2251-7251
[Cp] Country of publication:Iran
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:INTRODUCTION: Petrositis is a rare but severe complication of acute otitis media and mastoiditis. Despite efficient antibiotic therapy, there are still reports of both intratemporal and intracranial complications of otitis media with the potential risk of high morbidity and mortality. Petrositis has traditionally been treated with surgery, but recent advances in imaging, with improved antibiotic treatment, allow more conservative management. CASE REPORT: In this case report we describe the clinical course and treatment of a 33-year-old man with petrous apicitis who presented with severe otalgia, retro-orbital pain, and sixth cranial nerve palsy Gradenigo syndrome. Our patient showed a dramatic response to intravenous antibiotics only, without need for any surgical intervention, even myringotomy. CONCLUSION: It seems that early detection and management of this syndrome before development of other intratemporal or intracranial complications may prevent the need for surgical intervention.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1706
[Cu] Class update date: 170816
[Lr] Last revision date:170816
[St] Status:PubMed-not-MEDLINE

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[PMID]: 28483232
[Au] Autor:Jensen PVF; Avnstorp MB; Dzongodza T; Chidziva C; von Buchwald C
[Ad] Address:Dept. of Otorhinolaryngology, Head and Neck Surgery and Audiology, Rigshospitalet, University of Copenhagen, Blegdamsvej 9, DK-2100, Copenhagen Ø, Denmark. Electronic address: pfooken@hotmail.com.
[Ti] Title:A fatal case of Gradenigo's syndrome in Zimbabwe and the Danish-Zimbabwean ENT collaboration.
[So] Source:Int J Pediatr Otorhinolaryngol;97:181-184, 2017 Jun.
[Is] ISSN:1872-8464
[Cp] Country of publication:Ireland
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:As a part of a bilateral educational exchange program two Danish ENT residents were invited to Zimbabwe in 2015. During this exchange a 9-year-old girl was admitted due to complications to acute otitis media (AOM). She developed Gradenigo's syndrome and later on a brain abscess leading to a fatal outcome. Life threatening complications to AOM are rare in developed countries today but are still a challenge in developing countries. We put forward this case from a developing country to bring focus to the fact that a fatal outcome is the consequence if specialist treatment is not accessible.
[Mh] MeSH terms primary: Brain Abscess/complications
Otitis Media/complications
Petrositis/complications
[Mh] MeSH terms secundary: Child
Developing Countries
Fatal Outcome
Female
Humans
Tomography, X-Ray Computed
Zimbabwe
[Pt] Publication type:CASE REPORTS; JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1707
[Cu] Class update date: 170713
[Lr] Last revision date:170713
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[Da] Date of entry for processing:170510
[St] Status:MEDLINE

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[PMID]: 28378370
[Au] Autor:Gadre AK; Chole RA
[Ad] Address:Department of Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery, Heuser Hearing Institute, University of Louisville, Louisville, Kentucky, U.S.A.
[Ti] Title:The changing face of petrous apicitis-a 40-year experience.
[So] Source:Laryngoscope;, 2017 Apr 05.
[Is] ISSN:1531-4995
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:OBJECTIVES/HYPOTHESIS: Petrous apicitis (PA) is a rare complication of otitis media. Gradenigo syndrome, with the classic triad of otitis, deep pain, and abducens paralysis, is rarer still. The objective of this study was to determine if clinical presentation and management has changed over time. STUDY DESIGN: Retrospective chart review. METHODS: Forty-four patients with PA over a 40-year period were studied. Symptoms, signs, and management outcomes were studied. Historical review, surgical anatomy and approaches, pathology, and microbiology, and an illustrative case are included as appendices. RESULTS: The classical Gradenigo triad of retro-orbital pain, otitis, and abducens palsy occurred in only six of 44 patients (13.6%). Over the 40-year observation period, those needing surgery has decreased. CONCLUSIONS: Antibiotics remain the primary treatment modality. Surgery is reserved for cases failing to respond to antibiotics. One of the 44 patients in this series died of his disease. Diagnosis and management algorithms based on these observations are suggested. LEVEL OF EVIDENCE: 4. Laryngoscope, 2017.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1704
[Cu] Class update date: 170405
[Lr] Last revision date:170405
[St] Status:Publisher
[do] DOI:10.1002/lary.26571

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[PMID]: 28349737
[Au] Autor:Tawfik KO; Ishman SL; Altaye M; Meinzen-Derr J; Choo DI
[Ad] Address:1 Department of Otolaryngology-Head & Neck Surgery, University of Cincinnati College of Medicine, Cincinnati, Ohio, USA.
[Ti] Title:Pediatric Acute Otitis Media in the Era of Pneumococcal Vaccination.
[So] Source:Otolaryngol Head Neck Surg;156(5):938-945, 2017 May.
[Is] ISSN:1097-6817
[Cp] Country of publication:England
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Objectives (1) Describe longitudinal trends in annual prevalence of hospital admission for pediatric acute otitis media (AOM) and complications of AOM (CAOM) since introduction of pneumococcal vaccination in 2000 and (2) describe the longitudinal trend of prevalence of hospital admission for pneumococcal meningitis in children with AOM-related diagnoses in the postvaccination era. Study Design Retrospective analysis of Kids' Inpatient Database from 2000 to 2012. Setting Community, nonrehabilitation hospitals. Subjects and Methods To determine annual prevalence of admission for AOM/CAOM, nationally weighted frequencies of children aged <21 years with acute suppurative otitis media, acute mastoiditis, suppurative labyrinthitis, and/or acute petrositis were collected. The frequency of coexisting pneumococcal meningitis diagnoses among these patients was also collected. Trend analysis of prevalences of admission for AOM/CAOM and for pneumococcal meningitis occurring in the setting of AOM/CAOM from 2000 to 2012 was performed. Results Between 2000 and 2012, annual prevalence of admission for AOM/CAOM decreased from 3.956 to 2.618 per 100,000 persons ( P < .0001) (relative risk reduction 34%). Declines in admission prevalence were most pronounced in children <1 year of age (from 22.647 to 8.715 per 100,000 persons between 2000 and 2012, P < .0001) and 1 to 2 years of age (from 13.652 to 5.554 per 100,000 persons between 2000 and 2012, P < .0001). For all ages, the admission prevalence for pneumococcal meningitis and concomitant AOM/CAOM decreased (from 1.760 to 0.717 per 1,000,000 persons, P < .0001) over the study period. Conclusions The prevalence of hospital admission for pediatric AOM/CAOM has declined since the advent of pneumococcal vaccination. Admission rates for pneumococcal meningitis with AOM/CAOM have similarly declined.
[Mh] MeSH terms primary: Hospitalization/statistics & numerical data
Otitis Media/microbiology
Pneumococcal Infections/prevention & control
Pneumococcal Vaccines/administration & dosage
Vaccination/statistics & numerical data
[Mh] MeSH terms secundary: Acute Disease
Adolescent
Age Factors
Child
Child, Preschool
Cross-Sectional Studies
Databases, Factual
Disease Progression
Female
Humans
Infant
Linear Models
Longitudinal Studies
Male
Meningitis, Pneumococcal/diagnosis
Meningitis, Pneumococcal/epidemiology
Meningitis, Pneumococcal/therapy
Otitis Media/diagnosis
Otitis Media/epidemiology
Otitis Media, Suppurative/diagnosis
Otitis Media, Suppurative/epidemiology
Otitis Media, Suppurative/microbiology
Prevalence
Prognosis
Retrospective Studies
Risk Assessment
Sex Factors
Streptococcus pneumoniae/immunology
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Nm] Name of substance:0 (Pneumococcal Vaccines)
[Em] Entry month:1708
[Cu] Class update date: 170816
[Lr] Last revision date:170816
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[Da] Date of entry for processing:170329
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.1177/0194599817699599

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[PMID]: 26979620
[Au] Autor:Jensen PV; Hansen MS; Møller MN; Saunte JP
[Ad] Address:a Department of Otolaryngology, Head and Neck Surgery , Copenhagen University Hospital , Rigshospitalet , Copenhagen , Denmark.
[Ti] Title:The Forgotten Syndrome? Four Cases of Gradenigo's Syndrome and a Review of the Literature.
[So] Source:Strabismus;24(1):21-7, 2016.
[Is] ISSN:1744-5132
[Cp] Country of publication:England
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:BACKGROUND: Gradenigo's Syndrome (GS) is defined as the clinical triad of acute otitis media, ipsilateral sixth nerve palsy, and pain in the distribution of the first and the second branches of the fifth nerve. The purpose of this study is to review the literature and report 4 cases of GS. METHODS: The study is a retrospective case series and a review of the literature. Four consecutive patients (aged 5-70 years) treated by otolaryngologists and ophthalmologists for GS in the Capital region of Denmark from 2003 to 2015 are presented. Diagnosis is based on the clinical triad, and in 3 of 4 patients, neuroimaging supports the diagnosis. Follow-up was continued until both the sixth nerve palsy and the ear infection had resolved. Diagnostic work-up and treatment profile are described. RESULTS: In 3 of our 4 reported patients, the presentation of GS was classic with a history of acute otitis media and ipsilateral sixth nerve palsy. One case presented as a chronic case with a sixth nerve palsy secondary to chronic suppurative otitis media (CSOM), with a relapse 6 years later. CONCLUSION: GS is a rare and potentially life-threatening complication to otitis media. GS can present in an acute and chronic form, and should be a differential diagnosis in the workup of unexplained sixth nerve palsy.
[Mh] MeSH terms primary: Petrositis/diagnostic imaging
[Mh] MeSH terms secundary: Adolescent
Aged
Anti-Bacterial Agents/therapeutic use
Child, Preschool
Diagnosis, Differential
Female
Humans
Magnetic Resonance Imaging
Male
Middle Aged
Otitis Media with Effusion/diagnosis
Otitis Media with Effusion/drug therapy
Otitis Media with Effusion/microbiology
Petrositis/drug therapy
Petrositis/microbiology
Retrospective Studies
Streptococcal Infections/diagnosis
Streptococcal Infections/drug therapy
Streptococcal Infections/microbiology
Tomography, X-Ray Computed
[Pt] Publication type:CASE REPORTS; JOURNAL ARTICLE; REVIEW
[Nm] Name of substance:0 (Anti-Bacterial Agents)
[Em] Entry month:1612
[Cu] Class update date: 161230
[Lr] Last revision date:161230
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[Da] Date of entry for processing:160317
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.3109/09273972.2015.1130067

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[PMID]: 26977573
[Au] Autor:Bogomil'sky MR; Polunin MM; Zelikovich EI; Soldatsky YL; Burova OV
[Ad] Address:Pirogov Russian National Research Medical University, Moscow, Russia, 117997.
[Ti] Title:[Apical petrositis, osteomyelitis of the base of the skull bones and of the first cervical vertebra in a 5 year-old children following chicken pox].
[So] Source:Vestn Otorinolaringol;81(1):61-63, 2016.
[Is] ISSN:0042-4668
[Cp] Country of publication:Russia (Federation)
[La] Language:rus
[Ab] Abstract:This publication was designed to describe a rare case of development of apicalpetrositis in a child presenting with acute otitis mediafollowing chicken pox experienced in the preceding period. We carried out the study with the use of computed tomography (CT) that demonstrated destruction of the temporal bone, bones of the base of the skull and of the first cervical vertebra. The treatment strategy chosen for the management of this condition that included antibiotic therapy and expectant observation proved justified and can be recommended as an algorithm of choice taking into consideration the difficulty of surgical approach to the apex of the petrous pyramid. However, this approach is associated with the high risk of disability arising from the potential injury to the craniocerebral nerves.
[Mh] MeSH terms primary: Cervical Atlas/diagnostic imaging
Chickenpox/complications
Osteomyelitis/etiology
Otitis Media/etiology
Skull Base/diagnostic imaging
[Mh] MeSH terms secundary: Acute Disease
Child, Preschool
Humans
Male
Osteomyelitis/diagnostic imaging
Petrositis/diagnostic imaging
Petrositis/etiology
Radiography
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1606
[Cu] Class update date: 170621
[Lr] Last revision date:170621
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[Da] Date of entry for processing:160316
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.17116/otorino201681161-63

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[PMID]: 26969363
[Au] Autor:Karunakaran T; Kaneshamoorthy M; Harris R
[Ad] Address:St George's Hospital, London, UK.
[Ti] Title:Clivus erosions following Gradenigo's syndrome-mastoiditis causing VI nerve palsy.
[So] Source:BMJ Case Rep;2016, 2016 Mar 11.
[Is] ISSN:1757-790X
[Cp] Country of publication:England
[La] Language:eng
[Mh] MeSH terms primary: Abducens Nerve Diseases/complications
Cranial Fossa, Posterior/pathology
Mastoiditis/complications
Petrositis/complications
[Mh] MeSH terms secundary: Adolescent
Humans
Inflammation
Male
Osteomyelitis/etiology
Otitis Media/complications
Petrositis/pathology
[Pt] Publication type:CASE REPORTS; JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1612
[Cu] Class update date: 161230
[Lr] Last revision date:161230
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[Da] Date of entry for processing:160313
[St] Status:MEDLINE


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