Database : MEDLINE
Search on : Phlebotomus and Fever [Words]
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[PMID]: 29409533
[Au] Autor:Calzolari M; Chiapponi C; Bellini R; Bonilauri P; Lelli D; Moreno A; Barbieri I; Pongolini S; Lavazza A; Dottori M
[Ad] Address:Istituto Zooprofilattico Sperimentale della Lombardia e dell'Emilia-Romagna "Bruno Ubertini", Brescia, Italy. mattia.calzolari@izsler.it.
[Ti] Title:Isolation of three novel reassortant phleboviruses, Ponticelli I, II, III, and of Toscana virus from field-collected sand flies in Italy.
[So] Source:Parasit Vectors;11(1):84, 2018 Feb 06.
[Is] ISSN:1756-3305
[Cp] Country of publication:England
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:BACKGROUND: Different phleboviruses are important pathogens for humans; most of these viruses are transmitted by sand flies. An increasing number of new phleboviruses have been reported over the past decade, especially in Mediterranean countries, mainly via their detection in sand flies. RESULTS: At least five different phleboviruses co-circulated in sand flies that were collected in three sites in Emilia-Romagna (Italy) in the summer of 2013. The well-known Toscana virus (TOSV) was isolated; three new, closely related phleboviruses differing in their M segments and tentatively named Ponticelli I, Ponticelli II and Ponticelli III virus, respectively, were isolated; a fifth putative phlebovirus, related to the sand fly fever Naples phlebovirus species, was also detected. The co-circulation, in a restricted area, of three viruses characterized by different M segments, likely resulted from reassortment events. According to the phylogenetic analysis of complete genome sequences, the TOSV belongs to clade A, together with other Italian isolates, while the Ponticelli viruses fall within the Salehabad phlebovirus species. CONCLUSIONS: Results highlight an unexpected diversity of phleboviruses that co-circulate in the same area, suggesting that interactions likely occur amongst them, that can present challenges for their correct identification. The co-circulation of different phleboviruses appears to be common, and the bionomics of sand fly populations seem to play a relevant role. Such a complex situation emphasizes the need for detailed investigations of the biology of these viruses to better characterize their pathogenic potential for mammals, including humans.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1802
[Cu] Class update date: 180216
[Lr] Last revision date:180216
[St] Status:In-Data-Review
[do] DOI:10.1186/s13071-018-2668-0

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[PMID]: 29324760
[Au] Autor:Poché DM; Garlapati RB; Mukherjee S; Torres-Poché Z; Hasker E; Rahman T; Bharti A; Tripathi VP; Prakash S; Chaubey R; Poché RM
[Ad] Address:Department of Vector Ecology, Genesis Laboratories, Inc., Wellington, United States of America.
[Ti] Title:Bionomics of Phlebotomus argentipes in villages in Bihar, India with insights into efficacy of IRS-based control measures.
[So] Source:PLoS Negl Trop Dis;12(1):e0006168, 2018 01.
[Is] ISSN:1935-2735
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:BACKGROUND: Visceral leishmaniasis (VL) is a deadly vector-borne disease. Approximately 90% of Indian VL cases occur in Bihar, where the sand fly, Phlebotomus argentipes, is the principal vector. Sand fly control in Bihar consists of indoor residual spraying (IRS), the practice of spraying the inner walls of village dwellings with insecticides. Prior researchers have evaluated success of IRS-control by estimating vector abundance in village houses, but the number of sampling periods (n = 2-3) were minimal, and outdoor-resting P. argentipes were neglected. We describe a large-scale field study, performed in 24 villages within two Bihari districts, during which P. argentipes were collected biweekly over 47-weeks, in cattle enclosures, houses, and outdoors in peri-domestic vegetation. The objectives of this study were to provide updated P. argentipes ecological field data, and determine if program-initiated IRS-treatment had led to noticeable differences in vector abundance. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: P. argentipes (n = 126,901) relative abundance was greatest during the summer months (June-August) when minimum temperatures were highest. P. argentipes were most frequently collected from cattle enclosures (~46% total; ~56% blood fed). Many sand flies were found to have taken blood from multiple sources, with ~81% having blood fed on humans and ~60% blood feeding on bovines. Nonparametric statistical tests were determined most appropriate for evaluating IRS-treatment. Differences in P. argentipes abundance in houses, cattle enclosures and vegetation were detected between IRS-treated and untreated villages in only ~9% of evaluation periods occurring during the peak period of human-vector exposure (June-August) and in ~8% of the total observations. No significant differences were detected between the numbers of P. argentipes collected in vegetation close to the experimental villages. CONCLUSION: The results of this study provide updated data regarding P. argentipes seasonal abundance, spatial distribution, and host preferances, and suggest vector abundance has not significantly declined in IRS-treated villages. We suggest that IRS be supplemented with vector control strategies targeting exophagic, exophilic P. argentipes, and that disease surveillance be accompanied by rigorous vector population monitoring.
[Mh] MeSH terms primary: Insect Control/methods
Insect Vectors/drug effects
Insecticides/pharmacology
Leishmaniasis, Visceral/prevention & control
Leishmaniasis, Visceral/transmission
Phlebotomus/drug effects
[Mh] MeSH terms secundary: Animals
Environment
Humans
India/epidemiology
Insect Vectors/parasitology
Leishmania donovani
Leishmaniasis, Visceral/epidemiology
Leishmaniasis, Visceral/parasitology
Phlebotomus/parasitology
Seasons
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE; RESEARCH SUPPORT, NON-U.S. GOV'T
[Nm] Name of substance:0 (Insecticides)
[Em] Entry month:1801
[Cu] Class update date: 180130
[Lr] Last revision date:180130
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[Da] Date of entry for processing:180112
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.1371/journal.pntd.0006168

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[PMID]: 29281639
[Au] Autor:Alkan C; Moin Vaziri V; Ayhan N; Badakhshan M; Bichaud L; Rahbarian N; Javadian EA; Alten B; de Lamballerie X; Charrel RN
[Ad] Address:UMR "Unité des Virus Emergents" (UVE Aix-Marseille Univ-IRD 190-Inserm 1207-EHESP), Marseille, France.
[Ti] Title:Isolation and sequencing of Dashli virus, a novel Sicilian-like virus in sandflies from Iran; genetic and phylogenetic evidence for the creation of one novel species within the Phlebovirus genus in the Phenuiviridae family.
[So] Source:PLoS Negl Trop Dis;11(12):e0005978, 2017 12.
[Is] ISSN:1935-2735
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Phlebotomine sandflies are vectors of phleboviruses that cause sandfly fever or meningitis with significant implications for public health. Although several strains of these viruses had been isolated in Iran in the late 1970's, there was no recent data about the present situation at the outset of this study. Entomological investigations performed in 2009 and 2011 in Iran collected 4,770 sandflies from 10 different regions. Based on morphological identification, they were sorted into 315 pools according to species, sex, trapping station and date of capture. A phlebovirus, provisionally named Dashli virus (DASHV), was isolated from one pool of Sergentomyia spp, and subsequently DASHV RNA was detected in a second pool of Phlebotomus papatasi. Genetic and phylogenetic analyses based on complete coding genomic sequences indicated that (i) DASHV is most closely related to the Iranian isolates of Sandfly fever Sicilian virus [SFSV], (ii) there is a common ancestor to DASHV, Sandfly fever Sicilian- (SFS) and SFS-like viruses isolated in Italy, India, Turkey, and Cyprus (lineage I), (iii) DASHV is more distantly related with Corfou and Toros viruses (lineage II) although common ancestry is supported with 100% bootstrap, (iii) lineage I can be subdivided into sublineage Ia including all SFSV, SFCV and SFTV except those isolated in Iran which forms sublineage Ib (DASHV). Accordingly, we suggest to approve Sandfly fever Sicilian virus species consisting of the all aforementioned viruses. Owing that most of these viruses have been identified in human patients with febrile illness, DASHV should be considered as a potential human pathogen in Iran.
[Mh] MeSH terms primary: Genome, Viral/genetics
Phlebovirus
Psychodidae/virology
RNA, Viral/genetics
[Mh] MeSH terms secundary: Animals
Base Sequence
Female
Humans
Insect Vectors/virology
Iran
Male
Phlebotomus Fever/transmission
Phlebotomus Fever/virology
Phlebovirus/classification
Phlebovirus/genetics
Phlebovirus/isolation & purification
Phylogeny
Sequence Analysis, RNA
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE; RESEARCH SUPPORT, NON-U.S. GOV'T
[Nm] Name of substance:0 (RNA, Viral)
[Em] Entry month:1801
[Cu] Class update date: 180130
[Lr] Last revision date:180130
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[Da] Date of entry for processing:171228
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.1371/journal.pntd.0005978

  4 / 862 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 27771421
[Au] Autor:Yared S; Gebresilassie A; Akililu E; Balkew M; Warburg A; Hailu A; Gebre-Michael T
[Ad] Address:Aklilu Lemma Institute of Pathobiology, Addis Ababa University, Addis Ababa, Ethiopia; Department of Biology, College of Natural and Computational Sciences, Jigjiga University, Jigjiga, Ethiopia. Electronic address: solyar2005@yahoo.com.
[Ti] Title:Habitat preference and seasonal dynamics of Phlebotomus orientalis in urban and semi-urban areas of kala-azar endemic district of Kafta Humera, northwest Ethiopia.
[So] Source:Acta Trop;166:25-34, 2017 Feb.
[Is] ISSN:1873-6254
[Cp] Country of publication:Netherlands
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Visceral leishmaniasis is a significant public health problem in northwest Ethiopia, particularly in Kafta Humera district. The study was designed to determine the species composition and population dynamics of sand flies in five villages representing urban and semi-urban areas of Kafta Humera district namely, Setit Humera, Mykadra, Rawyan, Bereket and Adebay. Sand flies were collected for two to three nights monthly from May 2011 to April 2012 using CDC light-traps and sticky traps. Traps were placed in villages, at periphery of villages and farm fields. Sticky traps were also used for sampling indoor active sand flies. In total, 13,097 sand fly specimens of eight Phlebotomus species and 91,949 Sergentomyia specimens were collected. Among the Phlebotomus, P. orientalis was the predominant species (58.1%) followed by P. papatasi (29.6%), P. lesleyae (5.6%), P. bergeroti (3.8%), P. duboscqi (2.1%), P. alexandri (0.4%), P. heischi (0.2%) and P. rodhaini (0.2%). Significantly, higher number of P. orientalis was caught in Adebay village and the least in Setit Humera town. Seasonal abundance of P. orientalis increased during the dry season (January-May) and dropped drastically in the wet season (late June-September). Significant positive correlation was found between monthly abundance of P. orientalis and the monthly average air and surface soil temperature, while a negative correlation was found with monthly average rainfall and relative humidity. Higher number of P. orientalis was collected outdoors, especially in the farm fields followed by periphery of villages. Thus, various observations strongly suggested P. orientalis to be the principal vector in the study areas, where farm lands and periphery of villages were identified as the most risky habitats, whereas the indoors were the least ones. Appropriate control methods should be designed and implemented according to the knowledge of P. orientalis habitat preferences and seasonal dynamics in the district.
[Mh] MeSH terms primary: Insect Vectors/classification
Leishmaniasis, Visceral/epidemiology
Phlebotomus/classification
[Mh] MeSH terms secundary: Animals
Ecosystem
Ethiopia/epidemiology
Female
Insect Vectors/physiology
Leishmaniasis, Visceral/transmission
Male
Phlebotomus/physiology
Population Dynamics
Seasons
Temperature
Urban Population
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1702
[Cu] Class update date: 171216
[Lr] Last revision date:171216
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[Da] Date of entry for processing:161025
[St] Status:MEDLINE

  5 / 862 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29214621
[Au] Autor:Downs JW; Flood DT; Orr NH; Constantineau JA; Caviness JW
[Ad] Address:Department of Preventive Medicine, Blanchfield Army Community Hospital, Fort Campbell, Kentucky.
[Ti] Title:Sandfly fever in Afghanistan-a sometimes overlooked disease of military importance: a case series and review of the literature.
[So] Source:US Army Med Dep J;(3-17):60-66, 2017 Oct-Dec.
[Is] ISSN:1946-1968
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Sandfly fever, sometimes known as pappataci fever or Phlebotomus fever, is a vector transmitted viral illness with a history of affecting naïve military formations that travel through or fight in areas in which the infection is endemic. We present a series of 4 hospitalized cases of sandfly fever (2 presumptive, 2 laboratory confirmed) that were admitted to a Role 3 hospital in Afghanistan for evaluation and treatment following medical evacuation from a forward area for marked fevers and malaise. Laboratory evaluation of these cases was significant for leukopenia and thrombocytopenia, consistent with historical descriptions of sandfly fever. In the correct geographic and clinical setting, the finding of mild leukopenia among a cluster of febrile patients should prompt the clinician to at least consider a diagnosis of sandfly fever. A cluster investigation conducted by preventive medicine personnel identified numerous other presumed cases of sandfly fever in this forward special operations camp. Response efforts emphasized enforcement of standard vector-borne disease control measures by operational leadership in order to limit effect on tactical operations. We review historical instances of sandfly fever affecting military operations, and present a review of clinical presentation, transmission, management, and prevention.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1712
[Cu] Class update date: 171207
[Lr] Last revision date:171207
[St] Status:In-Process

  6 / 862 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29149298
[Au] Autor:Semenza JC; Suk JE
[Ad] Address:European Centre for Disease Prevention and Control.
[Ti] Title:Vector-borne diseases and climate change: a European perspective.
[So] Source:FEMS Microbiol Lett;, 2017 Nov 15.
[Is] ISSN:1574-6968
[Cp] Country of publication:England
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Climate change has already impacted the transmission of a wide-range of vector-borne diseases in Europe, and it will continue to do so in the coming decades. Climate change has been implicated in the observed shift of ticks to elevated altitudes and latitudes, notably including the Ixodes ricinus tick species which is a vector for Lyme borreliosis and tick-borne encephalitis. Climate change is also thought to have been a factor in the expansion of other important disease vectors in Europe: Aedes albopictus (the Asian tiger mosquito), which transmits diseases such as Zika, dengue, and chikungunya, and Phlebotomus sandfly species, which transmits diseases including Leishmaniasis. In addition, highly elevated temperatures in the summer of 2010 have been associated with an epidemic of West Nile Fever in Southeast Europe and subsequent outbreaks have been linked to summer temperature anomalies.Future climate-sensitive health impacts are challenging to project quantitatively, in part due to the intricate interplay between non-climatic and climatic drivers, weather-sensitive pathogens, and climate change adaptation. Moreover, globalisation and international air travel contribute to pathogen and vector dispersion internationally. Nevertheless, monitoring forecasts of meteorological conditions can help detect epidemic precursors of vector-borne disease outbreaks and serve as early warning systems for risk reduction.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1711
[Cu] Class update date: 171117
[Lr] Last revision date:171117
[St] Status:Publisher
[do] DOI:10.1093/femsle/fnx244

  7 / 862 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29023446
[Au] Autor:Hirve S; Kroeger A; Matlashewski G; Mondal D; Banjara MR; Das P; Be-Nazir A; Arana B; Olliaro P
[Ad] Address:Global Influenza Programme, World Health Organization, Geneva, Switzerland.
[Ti] Title:Towards elimination of visceral leishmaniasis in the Indian subcontinent-Translating research to practice to public health.
[So] Source:PLoS Negl Trop Dis;11(10):e0005889, 2017 Oct.
[Is] ISSN:1935-2735
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:BACKGROUND: The decade following the Regional Strategic Framework for Visceral Leishmaniasis (VL) elimination in 2005 has shown compelling progress in the reduction of VL burden in the Indian subcontinent. The Special Programme for Research and Training in Tropical Diseases (TDR), hosted by the World Health Organization (WHO) and other stakeholders, has coordinated and financed research for the development of new innovative tools and strategies to support the regional VL elimination initiative. This paper describes the process of the TDR's engagement and contribution to this initiative. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Multiple databases were searched to identify 152 scientific papers and reports with WHO funding or authorship affiliation around the following 3 framework strategies: detection of new cases, morbidity reduction, and prevention of infection. TDR has played a critical role in the evaluation and subsequent use of the 39-aminoacid-recombinant kinesin antigen (rK39) rapid diagnostic test (RDT) as a confirmatory test for VL in the national program. TDR has supported the clinical research and development of miltefosine and single-dose liposomal amphotericin B as a first-line treatment against VL. TDR has engaged with in-country researchers, national programme managers, and partners to generate evidence-based interventions for early detection and treatment of VL patients. TDR evaluated the quality, community acceptance, and cost effectiveness of indoor residual spraying, insecticide-treated bed nets, insecticide-impregnated durable wall linings, insecticidal paint, and environmental management as tools for integrated vector management in reducing sandfly density. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: TDR's engagement with country policy makers, scientists, and clinicians in the development of effective diagnosis, treatment, case detection, and vector control represents an important example of TDR's stewardship toward the elimination of VL in the Indian subcontinent.
[Mh] MeSH terms primary: Disease Eradication
Leishmaniasis, Visceral/epidemiology
Leishmaniasis, Visceral/prevention & control
Public Health Practice
Translational Medical Research
[Mh] MeSH terms secundary: Animals
Humans
India/epidemiology
Insect Control/methods
Insect Vectors/parasitology
Insect Vectors/physiology
Insecticide-Treated Bednets
Insecticides
Leishmaniasis, Visceral/diagnosis
Leishmaniasis, Visceral/drug therapy
Phlebotomus/parasitology
Phlebotomus/physiology
World Health Organization
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE; REVIEW
[Nm] Name of substance:0 (Insecticides)
[Em] Entry month:1710
[Cu] Class update date: 171105
[Lr] Last revision date:171105
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[Da] Date of entry for processing:171013
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.1371/journal.pntd.0005889

  8 / 862 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 28934263
[Au] Autor:Benabid M; Ghrab J; Rhim A; Ben-Romdhane R; Aoun K; Bouratbine A
[Ad] Address:Department of Parasitology, Research Lab: LR 11-IPT-06, Pasteur Institute of Tunis, University Tunis El-Manar, Tunis, Tunisia.
[Ti] Title:Temporal dynamics and Leishmania infantum infection prevalence of Phlebotomus perniciosus (Diptera, Phlebotominae) in highly endemic areas of visceral leishmaniasis in Tunisia.
[So] Source:PLoS One;12(9):e0184700, 2017.
[Is] ISSN:1932-6203
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Phlebotomus perniciosus is one of the major vectors of Leishmania infantum in the Mediterranean basin. The aim of this work was (i) to provide information about abundance and temporal dynamics of this Larroussius species in a hot spot area of visceral leishmaniasis in Tunisia, (ii) to detect L. infantum DNA in wild caught female sandflies and (iii) to measure Phlebotomus perniciosus infection rate throughout the active season. Sandflies were collected monthly during one year using CDC miniature light-traps in house and in animal shelters. Male specimens were identified at species level according to morphological characters. Female specimens were conserved individually for molecular study. Leishmania infection was tested by kinetoplast DNA real-time PCR and ITS-1 PCR-sequencing. Subsequent sandfly species identification of infected specimens was done by mitochondrial cytochrome b sequencing. In one year period, overall 4,441 specimens (2230 males and 2211 females) were collected. Sandfly activity started in end-April and ended in early-November. Mean sandfly density in house was significantly lower than in animal shelters (51 ± 50 versus 504 ± 460 sandflies /CDC night, p<0.05). However, a higher proportion of females was found in house (58.4% versus 49.2%, p<0.001). Based on species identification of male specimens, Phlebotomus perniciosus was the dominant species (56% of the whole male sandfly fauna, p<0.0001). It showed two peaks of density in the active season, a sharp one in early May and a higher long lasting one from end-July to end-September. DNA was extracted from 190 female specimens randomly sampled and corresponding to 96 specimens from house and 94 from animal shelters. Twenty four female sandfly were infected by Leishmania infantum. All infected specimens were recognized as Phlebotomus perniciosus. Leishmania infantum infection rate in female sandflies was 2.3 fold higher in house than in animal shelters (17.7% versus 7.4%, p<0.05). In house, estimated number of infected specimens was the highest at the end of the active season. Abundance, dynamics of density and Leishmania infantum infection prevalence of Phlebotomus perniciosus in Tunisian hot spot of visceral leishmaniasis highlight the major role of this Phlebotominae species in L. infantum transmission.
[Mh] MeSH terms primary: Leishmania infantum
Leishmaniasis, Visceral/epidemiology
Phlebotomus/parasitology
[Mh] MeSH terms secundary: Animals
Cytochromes b/genetics
DNA, Protozoan
Endemic Diseases
Female
Housing
Housing, Animal
Leishmania infantum/genetics
Leishmaniasis, Visceral/transmission
Male
Seasons
Time Factors
Tunisia/epidemiology
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Nm] Name of substance:0 (DNA, Protozoan); 9035-37-4 (Cytochromes b)
[Em] Entry month:1710
[Cu] Class update date: 171018
[Lr] Last revision date:171018
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[Da] Date of entry for processing:170922
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.1371/journal.pone.0184700

  9 / 862 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 28851425
[Au] Autor:Ayhan N; Alten B; Ivovic V; Dvorák V; Martinkovic F; Omeragic J; Stefanovska J; Petric D; Vaselek S; Baymak D; Kasap OE; Volf P; Charrel RN
[Ad] Address:UMR "Emergence des Pathologies ViralesË® (EPV: Aix-Marseille Univ - IRD 190 - Inserm 1207 - EHESP - IHU Méditerranée Infection), Marseille, France.
[Ti] Title:Direct evidence for an expanded circulation area of the recently identified Balkan virus (Sandfly fever Naples virus species) in several countries of the Balkan archipelago.
[So] Source:Parasit Vectors;10(1):402, 2017 Aug 29.
[Is] ISSN:1756-3305
[Cp] Country of publication:England
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:BACKGROUND: Recently, Balkan virus (BALKV, family Phenuiviridae, genus Phlebovirus) was discovered in sand flies collected in Albania and genetically characterised as a member of the Sandfly fever Naples species complex. To gain knowledge concerning the geographical area where exposure to BALKV exists, entomological surveys were conducted in 2014 and 2015, in Croatia, Bosnia and Herzegovina (BH), Kosovo, Republic of Macedonia and Serbia. RESULTS: A total of 2830 sand flies were trapped during 2014 and 2015 campaigns, and organised as 263 pools. BALKV RNA was detected in four pools from Croatia and in one pool from BH. Phylogenetic relationships were examined using sequences in the S and L RNA segments. Study of the diversity between BALKV sequences from Albania, Croatia and BH showed that Albanian sequences were the most divergent (9-11% [NP]) from the others and that Croatian and BH sequences were grouped (0.9-5.4% [NP]; 0.7-5% [L]). The sand fly infection rate of BALKV was 0.26% in BH and 0.27% in Croatia. Identification of the species content of pools using cox1 and cytb partial regions showed that the five BALKV positive pools contained Phlebotomus neglectus DNA; in four pools, P neglectus was the unique species, whereas P. tobbi DNA was also detected in one pool. CONCLUSIONS: We report here (i) the first direct evidence that the Balkan virus initially described in coastal Albania has a much wider dissemination area than originally believed, (ii) two real-time RT-PCR assays that may be useful for further screening of patients presenting with fever of unknown origin that may be caused by Balkan virus infection, (iii) entomological results suggesting that Balkan virus is likely transmitted by Phlebotomus neglectus, and possibly other sand fly species of the subgenus Larroussius. So far, BALKV has been detected only in sand flies. Whether BALKV can cause disease in humans is unknown and remains to be investigated.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1708
[Cu] Class update date: 170902
[Lr] Last revision date:170902
[St] Status:In-Process
[do] DOI:10.1186/s13071-017-2334-y

  10 / 862 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 28820686
[Au] Autor:Silvas JA; Aguilar PV
[Ad] Address:Institute for Human Infection and Immunity, University of Texas Medical Branch, Galveston, Texas.
[Ti] Title:The Emergence of Severe Fever with Thrombocytopenia Syndrome Virus.
[So] Source:Am J Trop Med Hyg;97(4):992-996, 2017 Oct.
[Is] ISSN:1476-1645
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Severe fever with thrombocytopenia syndrome (SFTS) is a newly recognized hemorrhagic fever disease found throughout Asia with a case fatality rate between 12% and 30%. Since 2009, SFTS has been reported in China throughout 14 Chinese Provinces. In addition, SFTS has been recognized in South Korea and Japan with the first confirmed cases reported in 2012. A similar disease, caused by the closely related Heartland virus, was also reported in the United States in 2009. SFTS is caused by SFTS virus, a novel tick-borne virus in the family , genus . Unlike other mosquito- and sandfly-borne bunyaviruses, SFTS virus has not been extensively studied due to its recent emergence and many unknowns regarding its pathogenesis, life cycle, transmission, and options for therapeutics remains. In this review, we report the most current findings in SFTS virus research.
[Mh] MeSH terms primary: Bunyaviridae Infections/physiopathology
Communicable Diseases, Emerging/physiopathology
Phlebotomus Fever/physiopathology
Phlebovirus/physiology
Thrombocytopenia/physiopathology
Tick-Borne Diseases/physiopathology
Zoonoses/physiopathology
[Mh] MeSH terms secundary: Animals
Arthropod Vectors
Asia/epidemiology
Bunyaviridae Infections/epidemiology
Communicable Diseases, Emerging/epidemiology
Communicable Diseases, Emerging/virology
Humans
Tick-Borne Diseases/epidemiology
Ticks
Zoonoses/epidemiology
Zoonoses/virology
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE; REVIEW
[Em] Entry month:1710
[Cu] Class update date: 171025
[Lr] Last revision date:171025
[Js] Journal subset:AIM; IM
[Da] Date of entry for processing:170819
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.4269/ajtmh.16-0967


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