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[PMID]: 29512162
[Au] Autor:Kou L; Jiang L; Fu X; Dai X; Wang H; Li S
[Ad] Address:Qianyanzhou Ecological Research Station, Key Laboratory of Ecosystem Network Observation and Modeling, Institute of Geographic Sciences and Natural Resources Research, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing, 100101, China.
[Ti] Title:Nitrogen deposition increases root production and turnover but slows root decomposition in Pinus elliottii plantations.
[So] Source:New Phytol;, 2018 Mar 07.
[Is] ISSN:1469-8137
[Cp] Country of publication:England
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Fine roots of woody plants comprise multiple root orders, which can be functionally partitioned into two pools: absorptive fine roots (AFRs, orders 1, 2) and transport fine roots (TFRs, orders 3-5). However, the function-based fine-root dynamics and especially their responses to increased nitrogen (N) availability remain unclear. We explored dynamic responses of both AFRs and TFRs of Pinus elliottii to N addition in subtropical China based on a 4-yr minirhizotron experiment and a two-stage - early (0.5 yr) vs late (4 yr) - decomposition experiment. N addition increased the production, mortality, and turnover of AFRs but not TFRs. High rates of N persistently inhibited AFR decomposition but affected TFR decomposition differentially at the early (no effect) and late (negative effect) stages. The increased production of AFRs was driven by N-induced decrease in foliar and soil phosphorus (P) concentrations. The decreased decomposition of AFRs might be due to the increased acid-unhydrolyzable residues in decomposing roots. AFRs are the resource-acquiring module, the increased carbon allocation to AFRs may represent a P-acquiring strategy when N no longer limits growth of P. elliottii. Our results suggest that AFRs and TFRs respond differently to N deposition, both in terms of production, mortality, and turnover and in terms of decomposition.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1803
[Cu] Class update date: 180310
[Lr] Last revision date:180310
[St] Status:Publisher
[do] DOI:10.1111/nph.15066

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[PMID]: 29501841
[Au] Autor:Yi J; Cheng C; Li S; Wang D; Wang L; Wang Z
[Ad] Address:Harbin Institute of Technology, 73 Huanghe Road, Nangang District, Harbin 150090, PR China; School of Life Sciences, Zhengzhou University, Zhengzhou, Henan, PR China.
[Ti] Title:Preparation optimization and protective effect on Co-γ radiation damage of Pinus koraiensis pinecone polyphenols microspheres.
[So] Source:Int J Biol Macromol;113:583-591, 2018 Mar 01.
[Is] ISSN:1879-0003
[Cp] Country of publication:Netherlands
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Here, the chitosan and the glutaraldehyde (GA) were used to encapsulate pinecones polyphenols of Pinus koraiensis (P. koraiensis) by emulsification cross-linking technology. First, the prepared parameters (crosslinking agent amount, stirring speed, crosslinking temperature and emulsifying time) of the pinecones polyphenols microspheres (PPMs) were optimized by the response surface methodology (RSM). When chitosan concentration and crosslinking time were 2% and 80min, respectively, the optimal conditions were 7.91mL of crosslinking agent, stirring speed of 660.98r/min, crosslinking temperature of 41.18°C and emulsifying time of 198.65min. The prepared PPMs embedding rate was 73.57%. The optimized PPM possessed a distinct core-shell structure and uniform spherical distribution with a particle size value of 3.4µm. In addition, they had the excellent sustained-release characteristics in vitro. We also evaluated the radioprotective effects of PPMs against Co-γ radiation in vivo. PPMs improved significantly the activity of the antioxidant enzyme SOD and reduce MDA level in the plasma of irradiated mice. Accordingly, PPMs could also significantly enhance the immunomodulation activity by promoting the proliferation of splenocytes and monocyte phagocytosis of irradiated mice. These results suggested that PPMs exert effective protection against radiation-induced injury by improving the antioxidant and immunomodulation activities.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1803
[Cu] Class update date: 180310
[Lr] Last revision date:180310
[St] Status:Publisher

  3 / 8071 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29458099
[Au] Autor:Fahey LM; Nieuwoudt MK; Harris PJ
[Ad] Address:School of Biological Sciences, The University of Auckland, Private Bag 92019, Auckland 1142, New Zealand. Electronic address: lfah338@aucklanduni.ac.nz.
[Ti] Title:Using near infrared spectroscopy to predict the lignin content and monosaccharide compositions of Pinus radiata wood cell walls.
[So] Source:Int J Biol Macromol;113:507-514, 2018 Feb 17.
[Is] ISSN:1879-0003
[Cp] Country of publication:Netherlands
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Near infrared (NIR) spectroscopy coupled with partial least squares (PLS-1) regression was used to predict the lignin contents and monosaccharide compositions of milled wood of Pinus radiata. The effects of particle size and moisture content were investigated by collecting NIR spectra of four sample types: large (<0.422mm) and small (<0.178mm) particles, in both ambient and dry conditions. PLS-1 models were constructed using mixtures of compression wood (CW) and opposite wood (OW) that provided a linear range of cell-wall compositions. Our results show that lignin contents and monosaccharide compositions of pure CWs and OWs can be successfully predicted using NIR spectra of all four sample types. However, large particles in ambient conditions have the most efficient preparation and the standard error (SE) values for lignin (2.10%), arabinose (0.34%), xylose (1.33%), galactose (2.54%), glucose (6.98%), mannose (1.48%), galacturonic acid (0.22%), glucuronic acid (0.06%), and 4-O-methylglucuronic acid (0.25%) were achieved.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1802
[Cu] Class update date: 180310
[Lr] Last revision date:180310
[St] Status:Publisher

  4 / 8071 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29377926
[Au] Autor:Pan P; Zhao F; Ning J; Zhang L; Ouyang X; Zang H
[Ad] Address:College of Forestry, Jiangxi Agricultural University, Nanchang, China.
[Ti] Title:Impact of understory vegetation on soil carbon and nitrogen dynamic in aerially seeded Pinus massoniana plantations.
[So] Source:PLoS One;13(1):e0191952, 2018.
[Is] ISSN:1932-6203
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Understory vegetation plays a vital role in regulating soil carbon (C) and nitrogen (N) characteristics due to differences in plant functional traits. Different understory vegetation types have been reported following aerial seeding. While aerial seeding is common in areas with serious soil erosion, few studies have been conducted to investigate changes in soil C and N cycling as affected by understory vegetation in aerially seeded plantations. Here, we studied soil C and N characteristics under two naturally formed understory vegetation types (Dicranopteris and graminoid) in aerially seeded Pinus massoniana Lamb plantations. Across the two studied understory vegetation types, soil organic C was significantly correlated with all measured soil N variables, including total N, available N, microbial biomass N and water-soluble organic N, while microbial biomass C was correlated with all measured variables except soil organic C. Dicranopteris and graminoid differed in their effects on soil C and N process. Except water-soluble organic C, all the other C and N variables were higher in soils with graminoids. The higher levels of soil organic C, microbial biomass C, total N, available N, microbial biomass N and water-soluble organic N were consistent with the higher litter and root quality (C/N) of graminoid vegetation compared to Dicranopteris. Changes in soil C and N cycles might be impacted by understory vegetation types via differences in litter or root quality.
[Mh] MeSH terms primary: Carbon/metabolism
Nitrogen/metabolism
Pinus/metabolism
Plants/metabolism
Soil/chemistry
[Mh] MeSH terms secundary: Biomass
Carbon/chemistry
Nitrogen/chemistry
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE; RESEARCH SUPPORT, NON-U.S. GOV'T
[Nm] Name of substance:0 (Soil); 7440-44-0 (Carbon); N762921K75 (Nitrogen)
[Em] Entry month:1803
[Cu] Class update date: 180309
[Lr] Last revision date:180309
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[Da] Date of entry for processing:180130
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.1371/journal.pone.0191952

  5 / 8071 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29520880
[Au] Autor:Tegelberg R; Virjamo V; Julkunen-Tiitto R
[Ad] Address:Natural Product Research Laboratories, Department of Environmental and Biological Sciences, University of Eastern Finland, Joensuu, Finland.
[Ti] Title:Dry-air drying at room temperature - a practical pre-treatment method of tree leaves for quantitative analyses of phenolics?
[So] Source:Phytochem Anal;, 2018 Mar 09.
[Is] ISSN:1099-1565
[Cp] Country of publication:England
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:INTRODUCTION: In ecological experiments, storage of plant material is often needed between harvesting and laboratory analyses when the number of samples is too large for immediate, fresh analyses. Thus, accuracy and comparability of the results call for pre-treatment methods where the chemical composition remains unaltered and large number of samples can be treated efficiently. OBJECTIVE: To study if a fast dry-air drying provides an efficient pre-treatment method for quantitative analyses of phenolics. METHODOLOGY: Dry-air drying of mature leaves was done in a drying room equipped with dehumifier (10% relative humidity, room temperature) and results were compared to freeze-drying or freeze-drying after pre-freezing in liquid nitrogen. The quantities of methanol-soluble phenolics of Betula pendula Roth, Betula pubescens Ehrh., Salix myrsinifolia Salisb., Picea abies L. Karsten and Pinus sylvestris L. were analysed with HPLC and condensed tannins were analysed using the acid-butanol test. RESULTS: In deciduous tree leaves (Betula, Salix), the yield of most of the phenolic compounds was equal or higher in samples dried in dry-air room than the yield from freeze-dried samples. In Picea abies needles, however, dry-air drying caused severe reductions in picein, stilbenes, condensed tannin and (+)-catechin concentrations compared to freeze-drying. In Pinus sylvestris highest yields of neolignans but lowest yields of acetylated flavonoids were obtained from samples freeze-dried after pre-freezing. CONCLUSION: Results show that dry-air drying provides effective pre-treatment method for quantifying the soluble phenolics for deciduous tree leaves, but when analysing coniferous species, the different responses between structural classes of phenolics should be taken into account.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1803
[Cu] Class update date: 180309
[Lr] Last revision date:180309
[St] Status:Publisher
[do] DOI:10.1002/pca.2755

  6 / 8071 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29518723
[Au] Autor:Cacho JF; Youssef MA; Chescheir GM; Wayne Skaggs R; Appelboom TW; Leggett ZH; Sucre EB; Nettles JE; Arellano C
[Ad] Address:Department of Biological and Agricultural Engineering, NCSU, Raleigh, NC 27695, USA. Electronic address: jfcacho@ncsu.edu.
[Ti] Title:Effects of forest-based bioenergy feedstock production on shallow groundwater quality of a drained forest soil.
[So] Source:Sci Total Environ;631-632:13-22, 2018 Mar 05.
[Is] ISSN:1879-1026
[Cp] Country of publication:Netherlands
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Managed forests in southern U.S. are a potential source of lignocellulosic biomass for biofuel production. Changes in management practices to optimize biomass production may impact the quality of waters draining to nutrient-sensitive waters in coastal plain regions. We investigated shallow groundwater quality effects of intercropping switchgrass (Panicum virgatum L.) with managed loblolly pine (Pinus taeda L.) to produce bioenergy feedstock and quality sawtimber in a poorly drained soil of eastern North Carolina, U.S.A. Treatments included PINE (traditional pine production), PSWITCH (pine-switchgrass intercropped), SWITCH (switchgrass monoculture) and REF (mature loblolly pine stand). Each treatment was replicated three times on 0.8ha plots drained by parallel-open ditches, 1.0-1.2m deep and 100m apart. Water samples were collected monthly or more frequently after fertilizer application. Water samples were analyzed for organic nitrogen (ON), ammonium N (NH - N), and nitrite+nitrate N (NO + NO - N), ortohophosphate phosphorus (OP), and total organic carbon (TOC). Overall, PSWITCH did not significantly affect shallow groundwater quality relative to PINE and SWITCH. ON, NO + NO - N, and TOC concentrations in PSWITCH, PINE and SWITCH were substantially elevated during the two years after tree harvest and site establishment. The elevated nutrient concentrations at the beginning of the study were likely caused by a combination of rapid organic matter decomposition of the abundant supply of post-harvest residues, warming of exposed soil surfaces and reduction of plant nutrient uptake that can occur after harvesting, and pre-plant fertilization. Nutrient concentrations returned to background levels observed in REF during the third year after harvest.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1803
[Cu] Class update date: 180308
[Lr] Last revision date:180308
[St] Status:Publisher

  7 / 8071 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29302834
[Au] Autor:Roth M; Hussain A; Cale JA; Erbilgin N
[Ad] Address:4-42 Earth Science Building, Department of Renewable Resources, University of Alberta, Edmonton, Canada.
[Ti] Title:Successful Colonization of Lodgepole Pine Trees by Mountain Pine Beetle Increased Monoterpene Production and Exhausted Carbohydrate Reserves.
[So] Source:J Chem Ecol;44(2):209-214, 2018 Feb.
[Is] ISSN:1573-1561
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Lodgepole pine (Pinus contorta) forests have experienced severe mortality from mountain pine beetle (MPB) (Dendroctonus ponderosae Hopkins) in western North America for the last several years. Although the mechanisms by which beetles kill host trees are unclear, they are likely linked to pine defense monoterpenes that are synthesized from carbohydrate reserves. However, how carbohydrates and monoterpenes interact in response to MPB colonization is unknown. Understanding this relationship could help to elucidate how pines succumb to bark beetle attack. We compared concentrations of individual and total monoterpenes and carbohydrates in the phloem of healthy pine trees with those naturally colonized by MPB. Trees attacked by MPB had nearly 300% more monoterpenes and 40% less carbohydrates. Total monoterpene concentrations were most strongly associated with the concentration of sugars in the phloem. These results suggest that bark beetle colonization likely depletes carbohydrate reserves by increasing the production of carbon-rich monoterpenes, and other carbon-based secondary compounds. Bark beetle attacks also reduce water transport causing the disruption of carbon transport between tree foliage and roots, which restricts carbon assimilation. Reduction in carbohydrate reserves likely contributes to tree mortality.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1801
[Cu] Class update date: 180309
[Lr] Last revision date:180309
[St] Status:In-Process
[do] DOI:10.1007/s10886-017-0922-0

  8 / 8071 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29177514
[Au] Autor:Fox H; Doron-Faigenboim A; Kelly G; Bourstein R; Attia Z; Zhou J; Moshe Y; Moshelion M; David-Schwartz R
[Ad] Address:Institute of Plant Sciences, Volcani Center, ARO, Bet Dagan 50250, Israel.
[Ti] Title:Transcriptome analysis of Pinus halepensis under drought stress and during recovery.
[So] Source:Tree Physiol;38(3):423-441, 2018 Mar 01.
[Is] ISSN:1758-4469
[Cp] Country of publication:Canada
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Forest trees use various strategies to cope with drought stress and these strategies involve complex molecular mechanisms. Pinus halepensis Miller (Aleppo pine) is found throughout the Mediterranean basin and is one of the most drought-tolerant pine species. In order to decipher the molecular mechanisms that P. halepensis uses to withstand drought, we performed large-scale physiological and transcriptome analyses. We selected a mature tree from a semi-arid area with suboptimal growth conditions for clonal propagation through cuttings. We then used a high-throughput experimental system to continuously monitor whole-plant transpiration rates, stomatal conductance and the vapor pressure deficit. The transcriptomes of plants were examined at six physiological stages: pre-stomatal response, partial stomatal closure, minimum transpiration, post-irrigation, partial recovery and full recovery. At each stage, data from plants exposed to the drought treatment were compared with data collected from well-irrigated control plants. A drought-stressed P. halepensis transcriptome was created using paired-end RNA-seq. In total, ~6000 differentially expressed, non-redundant transcripts were identified between drought-treated and control trees. Cluster analysis has revealed stress-induced down-regulation of transcripts related to photosynthesis, reactive oxygen species (ROS)-scavenging through the ascorbic acid (AsA)-glutathione cycle, fatty acid and cell wall biosynthesis, stomatal activity, and the biosynthesis of flavonoids and terpenoids. Up-regulated processes included chlorophyll degradation, ROS-scavenging through AsA-independent thiol-mediated pathways, abscisic acid response and accumulation of heat shock proteins, thaumatin and exordium. Recovery from drought induced strong transcription of retrotransposons, especially the retrovirus-related transposon Tnt1-94. The drought-related transcriptome illustrates this species' dynamic response to drought and recovery and unravels novel mechanisms.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1711
[Cu] Class update date: 180309
[Lr] Last revision date:180309
[St] Status:In-Data-Review
[do] DOI:10.1093/treephys/tpx137

  9 / 8071 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29415209
[Au] Autor:Balzano A; Cufar K; Battipaglia G; Merela M; Prislan P; Aronne G; De Micco V
[Ad] Address:University of Naples Federico II, Department of Agricultural Sciences, Portici (Naples), Italy.
[Ti] Title:Xylogenesis reveals the genesis and ecological signal of IADFs in Pinus pinea L. and Arbutus unedo L.
[So] Source:Ann Bot;, 2018 Feb 03.
[Is] ISSN:1095-8290
[Cp] Country of publication:England
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Background and Aims: Mediterranean trees have patterns of cambial activity with one or more pauses per year, leading to intra-annual density fluctuations (IADFs) in tree rings. We analysed xylogenesis (January 2015-January 2016) in Pinus pinea L. and Arbutus unedo L., co-occurring at a site on Mt. Vesuvius (southern Italy), to identify the cambial productivity and timing of IADF formation. Methods: Dendrochronological methods and quantitative wood anatomy were applied and enabled IADF identification and classification. Key Results: We showed that cambium in P. pinea was productive throughout the calendar year. From January to March 2015, post-cambial (enlarging) earlywood-like tracheids were observed, which were similar to transition tracheids. The beginning of the tree ring was therefore not marked by a sharp boundary between latewood of the previous year and the new xylem produced. True earlywood tracheids were formed in April. L-IADFs were formed in autumn, with earlywood-like cells in latewood. In A. unedo, a double pause in cell production was observed, in summer and winter, leading to L-IADFs in autumn as well. Moreover, the formation of more than one IADF was observed in A. unedo. Conclusions: Despite having completely different wood formation models and different life strategies, the production of earlywood, latewood and IADF cells was strongly controlled by climatic factors in the two species. Such cambial production patterns need to be taken into account in dendroecological studies to interpret climatic signals in wood from Mediterranean trees.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1802
[Cu] Class update date: 180308
[Lr] Last revision date:180308
[St] Status:Publisher
[do] DOI:10.1093/aob/mcy008

  10 / 8071 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29361193
[Au] Autor:Ziaco E; Truettner C; Biondi F; Bullock S
[Ad] Address:DendroLab, Department of Natural Resources & Environmental Science, University of Nevada, Reno, NV, 89557, USA.
[Ti] Title:Moisture-driven xylogenesis in Pinus ponderosa from a Mojave Desert mountain reveals high phenological plasticity.
[So] Source:Plant Cell Environ;41(4):823-836, 2018 Apr.
[Is] ISSN:1365-3040
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Future seasonal dynamics of wood formation in hyperarid environments are still unclear. Although temperature-driven extension of the growing season and increased forest productivity are expected for boreal and temperate biomes under global warming, a similar trend remains questionable in water-limited regions. We monitored cambial activity in a montane stand of ponderosa pine (Pinus ponderosa) from the Mojave Desert for 2 consecutive years (2015-2016) showing opposite-sign anomalies between warm- and cold-season precipitation. After the wet winter/spring of 2016, xylogenesis started 2 months earlier compared to 2015, characterized by abundant monsoonal (July-August) rainfall and hyperarid spring. Tree size did not influence the onset and ending of wood formation, highlighting a predominant climatic control over xylem phenological processes. Moisture conditions in the previous month, in particular soil water content and dew point, were the main drivers of cambial phenology. Latewood formation started roughly at the same time in both years; however, monsoonal precipitation triggered the formation of more false rings and density fluctuations in 2015. Because of uncertainties in future precipitation patterns simulated by global change models for the Southwestern United States, the dependency of P. ponderosa on seasonal moisture implies a greater conservation challenge than for species that respond mostly to temperature conditions.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1801
[Cu] Class update date: 180308
[Lr] Last revision date:180308
[St] Status:In-Data-Review
[do] DOI:10.1111/pce.13152


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