Database : MEDLINE
Search on : Pneumovirus and Infections [Words]
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[PMID]: 29324996
[Au] Autor:Blackburn RM; Zhao H; Pebody R; Hayward AC; Warren-Gash C
[Ad] Address:Farr Institute of Health Informatics Research, UCL.
[Ti] Title:Laboratory-confirmed respiratory infections as predictors of hospital admission for myocardial infarction and stroke: time-series analysis of English data for 2004-2015.
[So] Source:Clin Infect Dis;, 2018 Jan 06.
[Is] ISSN:1537-6591
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Background: Acute respiratory infections are associated with increased risk of myocardial infarction (MI) and stroke, however, the role of different organisms is poorly characterised. Methods: We undertook a time-series analysis of English hospital admissions for MI and stroke (age-stratified: 45-64, 65-74, 75+ years), laboratory-confirmed viral respiratory infections and environmental data for 2004-2015. Weekly counts of admissions were modelled using multivariable Poisson regression with weekly counts of respiratory viruses (influenza, parainfluenza, rhinovirus, respiratory syncytial virus (RSV), adenovirus or human meta-pneumovirus (HMPV)) investigated as predictors. We controlled for seasonality, long-term trends and environmental factors. Results: Weekly hospital admissions in adults aged 45+ years averaged 1347 (IQR 1217-1541) for MI and 1175 (IQR 1023-1395) for stroke. Median numbers of respiratory infections ranged from 11 cases per week (IQR 5-53) for influenza to 55 (IQR 7-127) for rhinovirus. In the adjusted models, all viruses except parainfluenza were significantly associated with MI and ischaemic stroke admissions in those aged 75+. Among 65-74 year olds, adenovirus, rhinovirus and RSV were associated with MI but not ischaemic stroke admissions. Respiratory infections were not associated with MI or ischaemic stroke in people aged 45-64, nor with haemorrhagic stroke in any age group. An estimated 0.4-5.7% of MI and ischaemic stroke admissions may be attributable to respiratory infection, with greater excess burden during weeks with high circulating virus levels. Conclusions: We identified small but strongly significant associations in the timing of respiratory infection (with HMPV, RSV, influenza, rhinovirus and adenovirus) and MI or ischaemic stroke hospitalisations in the elderly. Registered at Clinicaltrials.gov: NCT02984280.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1801
[Cu] Class update date: 180308
[Lr] Last revision date:180308
[Cl] Clinical Trial:ClinicalTrial
[St] Status:Publisher
[do] DOI:10.1093/cid/cix1144

  2 / 1205 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29463336
[Au] Autor:Varghese BM; Dent E; Chilver M; Cameron S; Stocks NP
[Ad] Address:School of Public Health, The University of Adelaide,Adelaide 5000, South Australia,Australia.
[Ti] Title:Epidemiology of viral respiratory infections in Australian working-age adults (20-64 years): 2010-2013.
[So] Source:Epidemiol Infect;:1-8, 2018 Feb 21.
[Is] ISSN:1469-4409
[Cp] Country of publication:England
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Acute respiratory infections cause significant morbidity and mortality accounting for 5.8 million deaths worldwide. In Australia, influenza-like illness (ILI), defined as cough, fever and fatigue is a common presentation in general practice and results in reduced productivity and lost working days. Little is known about the epidemiology of ILI in working-age adults. Using data from the ASPREN influenza surveillance network in Australia (2010-2013) we found that working-age adults made up 45.2% of all ILI notifications with 55% of samples positive for at least one respiratory virus. Viruses most commonly detected in our study included influenza A (20.6%), rhinovirus (18.6%), influenza B (6.2%), human meta-pneumovirus (3.4%), respiratory syncytial virus (3.1%), para-influenza virus (2.6%) and adenovirus (1.3%). We also demonstrated that influenza A is the predominant virus that increases ILI (by 1.2% per month for every positive influenza A case) in working-age adults during autumn-winter months while other viruses are active throughout the year. Understanding the epidemiology of viral respiratory infections through a year will help clinicians make informed decisions about testing, antibiotic and antiviral prescribing and when the beginning of the 'flu season' can be more confidently predicted.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1802
[Cu] Class update date: 180221
[Lr] Last revision date:180221
[St] Status:Publisher
[do] DOI:10.1017/S0950268818000286

  3 / 1205 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29217660
[Au] Autor:Olmedillas E; Cano O; Martínez I; Luque D; Terrón MC; McLellan JS; Melero JA; Más V
[Ad] Address:Centro Nacional de Microbiología, Instituto de Salud Carlos III, Madrid, Spain.
[Ti] Title:Chimeric fusion proteins as immunogens to induce cross-neutralizing antibody responses.
[So] Source:EMBO Mol Med;10(2):175-187, 2018 Feb.
[Is] ISSN:1757-4684
[Cp] Country of publication:England
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Human respiratory syncytial virus (hRSV) and human metapneumovirus (hMPV), two members of the family, account for the majority of severe lower respiratory tract infections worldwide in very young children. They are also a frequent cause of morbidity and mortality in the elderly and immunocompromised adults. High levels of neutralizing antibodies, mostly directed against the viral fusion (F) glycoprotein, correlate with protection against either hRSV or hMPV However, no cross-neutralization is observed in polyclonal antibody responses raised after virus infection or immunization with purified F proteins. Based on crystal structures of hRSV F and hMPV F, we designed chimeric F proteins in which certain residues of well-characterized antigenic sites were swapped between the two antigens. The antigenic changes were monitored by ELISA with virus-specific monoclonal antibodies. Inoculation of mice with these chimeras induced polyclonal cross-neutralizing antibody responses, and mice were protected against challenge with the virus used for grafting of the heterologous antigenic site. These results provide a proof of principle for chimeric fusion proteins as single immunogens that can induce cross-neutralizing antibody and protective responses against more than one human pneumovirus.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1712
[Cu] Class update date: 180217
[Lr] Last revision date:180217
[St] Status:In-Data-Review
[do] DOI:10.15252/emmm.201708078

  4 / 1205 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 27771388
[Au] Autor:Martinez EC; Garg R; Shrivastava P; Gomis S; van Drunen Littel-van den Hurk S
[Ad] Address:Department of Microbiology and Immunology, College of Medicine, University of Saskatchewan, Saskatoon, Saskatchewan, 107 Wiggins Road, S7N 5E5, Canada; Vaccine and Infectious Disease Organization-International Vaccine Centre (VIDO-InterVac), University of Saskatchewan, Saskatoon, Saskatchewan, 120 V
[Ti] Title:Intranasal treatment with a novel immunomodulator mediates innate immune protection against lethal pneumonia virus of mice.
[So] Source:Antiviral Res;135:108-119, 2016 11.
[Is] ISSN:1872-9096
[Cp] Country of publication:Netherlands
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) is the leading cause of acute lower respiratory tract infections in infants and young children. There are no licensed RSV vaccines available, and the few treatment options for high-risk individuals are either extremely costly or cause severe side effects and toxicity. Immunomodulation mediated by a novel formulation consisting of the toll-like receptor 3 agonist poly(I:C), an innate defense regulator peptide and a polyphosphazene (P-I-P) was evaluated in the context of lethal infection with pneumonia virus of mice (PVM). Intranasal delivery of a single dose of P-I-P protected adult mice against PVM when given 24 h prior to challenge. These animals experienced minimal weight loss, no clinical disease, 100% survival, and reduced lung pathology. Similar clinical outcomes were observed in mice treated up to 3 days prior to infection. P-I-P pre-treatment induced early mRNA and protein expression of key chemokine and cytokine genes, reduced the recruitment of neutrophils and eosinophils, decreased virus titers in the lungs, and modulated the delayed exacerbated nature of PVM disease without any short-term side effects. On day 14 post-infection, P-I-P-treated mice were confirmed to be PVM-free. These results demonstrate the capacity of this formulation to prevent PVM and possibly other viral respiratory infections.
[Mh] MeSH terms primary: Immunity, Innate
Immunologic Factors/administration & dosage
Murine pneumonia virus/immunology
Organophosphorus Compounds/administration & dosage
Pneumovirus Infections/prevention & control
Poly I-C/administration & dosage
Polymers/administration & dosage
[Mh] MeSH terms secundary: Adjuvants, Immunologic
Administration, Intranasal
Animals
Cytokines/immunology
Immunologic Factors/chemistry
Immunologic Factors/immunology
Lung/virology
Mice
Mice, Inbred BALB C
Organophosphorus Compounds/immunology
Pneumovirus Infections/immunology
Poly I-C/immunology
Toll-Like Receptor 3/agonists
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE; RESEARCH SUPPORT, NON-U.S. GOV'T
[Nm] Name of substance:0 (Adjuvants, Immunologic); 0 (Cytokines); 0 (Immunologic Factors); 0 (Organophosphorus Compounds); 0 (Polymers); 0 (Toll-Like Receptor 3); 0 (poly(phosphazene)); O84C90HH2L (Poly I-C)
[Em] Entry month:1711
[Cu] Class update date: 180213
[Lr] Last revision date:180213
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[Da] Date of entry for processing:161108
[St] Status:MEDLINE

  5 / 1205 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29138299
[Au] Autor:Shepardson KM; Schwarz B; Larson K; Morton RV; Avera J; McCoy K; Caffrey A; Harmsen A; Douglas T; Rynda-Apple A
[Ad] Address:Department of Microbiology and Immunology, Montana State University, Bozeman, Montana, USA.
[Ti] Title:Induction of Antiviral Immune Response through Recognition of the Repeating Subunit Pattern of Viral Capsids Is Toll-Like Receptor 2 Dependent.
[So] Source:MBio;8(6), 2017 Nov 14.
[Is] ISSN:2150-7511
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Although viruses and viral capsids induce rapid immune responses, little is known about viral pathogen-associated molecular patterns (PAMPs) that are exhibited on their surface. Here, we demonstrate that the repeating protein subunit pattern common to most virus capsids is a molecular pattern that induces a Toll-like-receptor-2 (TLR2)-dependent antiviral immune response. This early antiviral immune response regulates the clearance of subsequent bacterial superinfections, which are a primary cause of morbidities associated with influenza virus infections. Utilizing this altered susceptibility to subsequent bacterial challenge as an outcome, we determined that multiple unrelated, empty, and replication-deficient capsids initiated early TLR2-dependent immune responses, similar to intact influenza virus or murine pneumovirus. These TLR2-mediated responses driven by the capsid were not dependent upon the capsid's shape, size, origin, or amino acid sequence. However, they were dependent upon the multisubunit arrangement of the capsid proteins, because unlike intact capsids, individual capsid subunits did not enhance bacterial clearance. Further, we demonstrated that even a linear microfilament protein built from repeating protein subunits (F-actin), but not its monomer (G-actin), induced similar kinetics of subsequent bacterial clearance as did virus capsid. However, although capsids and F-actin induced similar bacterial clearance, in macrophages they required distinct TLR2 heterodimers for this response (TLR2/6 or TLR2/1, respectively) and different phagocyte populations were involved in the execution of these responses Our results demonstrate that TLR2 responds to invading viral particles that are composed of repeating protein subunits, indicating that this common architecture of virus capsids is a previously unrecognized molecular pattern. Rapid and precise pathogen identification is critical for the initiation of pathogen-specific immune responses and pathogen clearance. Bacteria and fungi express common molecular patterns on their exteriors that are recognized by cell surface-expressed host pattern recognition receptors (PRRs) prior to infection. In contrast, viral molecular patterns are primarily nucleic acids, which are recognized after virus internalization. We found that an initial antiviral immune response is induced by the repeating subunit pattern of virus exteriors (capsids), and thus, induction of this response is independent of viral infection. This early response to viral capsids required the cell surface-expressed PRR TLR2 and allowed for improved clearance of subsequent bacterial infection that commonly complicates respiratory viral infections. Since the repeating protein subunit pattern is conserved across viral capsids, this suggests that it is not easy for a virus to change without altering fitness. Targeting this vulnerability could lead to development of a universal antiviral vaccine.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1711
[Cu] Class update date: 171119
[Lr] Last revision date:171119
[St] Status:In-Process

  6 / 1205 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29049206
[Au] Autor:Saraya T; Kimura H; Kurai D; Ishii H; Takizawa H
[Ad] Address:aKyorin University School of Medicine, Department of Respiratory Medicine, Mitaka City bInfectious Disease Surveillance Center, National Institute of Infectious Diseases, Tokyo, Japan.
[Ti] Title:The molecular epidemiology of respiratory viruses associated with asthma attacks: A single-center observational study in Japan.
[So] Source:Medicine (Baltimore);96(42):e8204, 2017 Oct.
[Is] ISSN:1536-5964
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Few reports have described the significance of viral respiratory infections (VRIs) in exacerbation of asthma in adult patients. The aim of this study was to elucidate the profiles of VRIs in adult patients with asthma along with their molecular epidemiology.A cross-sectional observational study was conducted at Kyorin University Hospital from August 2012 to May 2015. To identify respiratory pathogens in inpatients and outpatients suffering from asthma attacks, RT-PCR/sequencing/phylogenetic analysis methods were applied alongside conventional microbiological methods. Phylogenetic and pairwise distance analyses of 10 viruses were performed.A total of 106 asthma attack patients enrolled in this study in both inpatient (n = 49) and outpatient (n = 57) settings. The total 106 respiratory samples were obtained from nasopharyngeal swab (n = 68) or sputum (n = 38). Among these, patients with virus alone (n = 39), virus and bacterial (n = 5), and bacterial alone (n = 5) were identified. The ratio of virus-positive patients in inpatient or outpatient to the total cases were 31.1% (n = 33) and 10.4% (n = 11), respectively. The frequency of virus-positive patients was significantly higher in inpatients (75.3%, n = 33) than in outpatients (19.3%, n = 11). Major VRIs included human rhinovirus (HRV) (n = 24), human metapneumovirus (hMPV) (n = 9), influenza virus (Inf-V) (n = 8), and respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) (n = 3) infections with seasonal variations. HRV-A and HRV-C were the most commonly detected viruses, with wide genetic divergence on phylogenetic analysis.Asthmatic exacerbations in adults are highly associated with VRIs such as HRV-A or HRV-C, hMPV, RSV, and Inf-V infections with seasonal variations and genetic divergence, but similar frequencies of VRIs occurred in asthma attack patients throughout the seasons.
[Mh] MeSH terms primary: Asthma/virology
RNA Viruses/genetics
Respiratory Tract Infections/epidemiology
Virus Diseases/epidemiology
[Mh] MeSH terms secundary: Adult
Aged
Bacterial Infections/complications
Bacterial Infections/epidemiology
Cross-Sectional Studies
Female
Genotype
Humans
Inpatients/statistics & numerical data
Japan/epidemiology
Male
Metapneumovirus/genetics
Metapneumovirus/isolation & purification
Middle Aged
Nasopharynx/virology
Orthomyxoviridae/genetics
Orthomyxoviridae/isolation & purification
Outpatients/statistics & numerical data
Phylogeny
RNA Viruses/isolation & purification
Respiratory Syncytial Viruses/genetics
Respiratory Syncytial Viruses/isolation & purification
Respiratory Tract Infections/virology
Rhinovirus/genetics
Rhinovirus/isolation & purification
Seasons
Sputum/virology
Virus Diseases/complications
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE; OBSERVATIONAL STUDY
[Em] Entry month:1710
[Cu] Class update date: 171122
[Lr] Last revision date:171122
[Js] Journal subset:AIM; IM
[Da] Date of entry for processing:171020
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.1097/MD.0000000000008204

  7 / 1205 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 28934427
[Au] Autor:Tzannou I; Nicholas SK; Lulla P; Aguayo-Hiraldo PI; Misra A; Martinez CA; Machado AA; Orange JS; Piedra PA; Vera JF; Leen AM
[Ad] Address:Center for Cell and Gene Therapy, Baylor College of Medicine, Texas Children's Hospital, and Houston Methodist Hospital.
[Ti] Title:Immunologic Profiling of Human Metapneumovirus for the Development of Targeted Immunotherapy.
[So] Source:J Infect Dis;216(6):678-687, 2017 Sep 15.
[Is] ISSN:1537-6613
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Human metapneumovirus (hMPV) is a respiratory virus detected in ≥9% of allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplant (HSCT) recipients, in whom it can cause significant morbidity and mortality. Given the lack of effective antivirals, we investigated the potential for immunotherapeutic intervention, using adoptively transferred T cells. Thus, we characterized the cellular immune response to the virus and identified F, N, M2-1, M, and P as immunodominant target antigens. Reactive T cells were polyclonal (ie, they expressed CD4 and CD8), T-helper type 1 polarized, and polyfunctional (ie, they produced interferon γ, tumor necrosis factor α, granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor, and granzyme B), and they were able to kill autologous antigen-loaded targets. The detection of hMPV-specific T cells in HSCT recipients who endogenously controlled active infections support the clinical importance of T-cell immunity in mediating protective antiviral effects. Our results demonstrate the feasibility of developing an immunotherapy for immunocompromised patients with uncontrolled infections.
[Mh] MeSH terms primary: Immunotherapy, Adoptive
Metapneumovirus/immunology
Paramyxoviridae Infections/therapy
[Mh] MeSH terms secundary: Adult
Feasibility Studies
Female
Granulocyte-Macrophage Colony-Stimulating Factor/immunology
Granzymes/immunology
Humans
Immunity, Cellular
Immunocompromised Host/immunology
Immunodominant Epitopes/immunology
Interferon-gamma/immunology
Leukocytes, Mononuclear/virology
Male
Metapneumovirus/isolation & purification
Middle Aged
Paramyxoviridae Infections/immunology
T-Lymphocytes/virology
Tumor Necrosis Factor-alpha/immunology
Young Adult
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Nm] Name of substance:0 (Immunodominant Epitopes); 0 (Tumor Necrosis Factor-alpha); 82115-62-6 (Interferon-gamma); 83869-56-1 (Granulocyte-Macrophage Colony-Stimulating Factor); EC 3.4.21.- (Granzymes)
[Em] Entry month:1709
[Cu] Class update date: 170929
[Lr] Last revision date:170929
[Js] Journal subset:AIM; IM
[Da] Date of entry for processing:170922
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.1093/infdis/jix358

  8 / 1205 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 28838133
[Au] Autor:Moe N; Stenseng IH; Krokstad S; Christensen A; Skanke LH; Risnes KR; Nordbø SA; Døllner H
[Ad] Address:Department of Laboratory Medicine, Children's and Women's Health, Norwegian University of Science and Technology.
[Ti] Title:The Burden of Human Metapneumovirus and Respiratory Syncytial Virus Infections in Hospitalized Norwegian Children.
[So] Source:J Infect Dis;216(1):110-116, 2017 Jul 01.
[Is] ISSN:1537-6613
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Background: The burden of severe human metapneumovirus (HMPV) respiratory tract infections (RTIs) in European children has not been clarified. We assessed HMPV in Norwegian children and compared hospitalization rates for HMPV and respiratory syncytial virus (RSV). Methods: We prospectively enrolled children (<16 years old) hospitalized with RTI and asymptomatic controls (2006-2015). Nasopharyngeal aspirate samples were analyzed with polymerase chain reaction (PCR) tests for HMPV, RSV, and 17 other pathogens. We genotyped HMPV-positive samples and assessed shedding time in 32 HMPV-infected children. Results: In children with RTI, HMPV was detected in 7.3% (267 of 3650) and RSV in 28.7% (1048 of 3650). Among controls, 2.1% (7 of 339) had low HMPV levels detected by PCR, but all were culture negative. HMPV primarily occurred from January to April and in regular epidemics. At least 2 HMPV subtypes occurred each season. The average annual hospitalization rates in children <5 years old with lower RTI were 1.9/1000 (HMPV) and 10.4/1000 (RSV). Among children with RTI, the median HMPV shedding time by PCR was 13 days (range, 6-28 days), but all were culture negative (noninfectious) after 13 days. Conclusions: HMPV appears in epidemics in Norwegian children, with a hospitalization rate 5 times lower than RSV. Low levels of HMPV are rarely detected in healthy children.
[Mh] MeSH terms primary: Child, Hospitalized
Metapneumovirus/isolation & purification
Respiratory Syncytial Virus Infections/epidemiology
[Mh] MeSH terms secundary: Child, Preschool
Cost of Illness
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Infant
Male
Norway/epidemiology
Polymerase Chain Reaction
Prospective Studies
Respiratory Syncytial Virus, Human/isolation & purification
Respiratory Tract Infections/diagnosis
Respiratory Tract Infections/virology
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1709
[Cu] Class update date: 170912
[Lr] Last revision date:170912
[Js] Journal subset:AIM; IM
[Da] Date of entry for processing:170826
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.1093/infdis/jix262

  9 / 1205 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 28796690
[Au] Autor:Fuchs A; McLaren R; Saunders P; Karakash S; Minkoff H
[Ad] Address:Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology and Cardiothoracic Surgery, Maimonides Medical Center, Brooklyn, New York.
[Ti] Title:Human Metapneumovirus Infection and Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome During Pregnancy.
[So] Source:Obstet Gynecol;130(3):630-632, 2017 Sep.
[Is] ISSN:1873-233X
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:BACKGROUND: Human metapneumovirus has recently been recognized as an important cause of severe respiratory viral infections and of viral infections in patients admitted to intensive care units. Little is known about the course of this infection in pregnancy. CASE: A late-preterm primigravid woman was admitted to the intensive care unit for acute respiratory distress syndrome and subsequently diagnosed with human metapneumovirus. Because of worsening maternal respiratory status, she was intubated and a primary cesarean delivery was performed. The patient's respiratory status continued to decline postpartum, and she ultimately required extracorporeal membrane oxygenation. She was treated supportively until her respiratory status improved, at which time she was extubated and weaned off extracorporeal membrane oxygenation and subsequently discharged home. CONCLUSION: Human metapneumovirus can lead to severe respiratory illness during pregnancy.
[Mh] MeSH terms primary: Metapneumovirus/isolation & purification
Paramyxoviridae Infections/diagnosis
Pregnancy Complications, Infectious/diagnosis
Respiratory Distress Syndrome, Adult/diagnosis
[Mh] MeSH terms secundary: Adolescent
Cesarean Section
Diagnosis, Differential
Female
Humans
Infant, Newborn
Paramyxoviridae Infections/diagnostic imaging
Paramyxoviridae Infections/drug therapy
Pregnancy
Pregnancy Complications, Infectious/diagnostic imaging
Pregnancy Complications, Infectious/drug therapy
Prenatal Diagnosis
Respiratory Distress Syndrome, Adult/diagnostic imaging
Respiratory Distress Syndrome, Adult/drug therapy
[Pt] Publication type:CASE REPORTS; JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1709
[Cu] Class update date: 170908
[Lr] Last revision date:170908
[Js] Journal subset:AIM; IM
[Da] Date of entry for processing:170811
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.1097/AOG.0000000000002165

  10 / 1205 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 28704440
[Au] Autor:Horton KC; Dueger EL; Kandeel A; Abdallat M; El-Kholy A; Al-Awaidy S; Kohlani AH; Amer H; El-Khal AL; Said M; House B; Pimentel G; Talaat M
[Ad] Address:Global Disease Detection Center, U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Cairo, Egypt.
[Ti] Title:Viral etiology, seasonality and severity of hospitalized patients with severe acute respiratory infections in the Eastern Mediterranean Region, 2007-2014.
[So] Source:PLoS One;12(7):e0180954, 2017.
[Is] ISSN:1932-6203
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:INTRODUCTION: Little is known about the role of viral respiratory pathogens in the etiology, seasonality or severity of severe acute respiratory infections (SARI) in the Eastern Mediterranean Region. METHODS: Sentinel surveillance for SARI was conducted from December 2007 through February 2014 at 20 hospitals in Egypt, Jordan, Oman, Qatar and Yemen. Nasopharyngeal and oropharyngeal swabs were collected from hospitalized patients meeting SARI case definitions and were analyzed for infection with influenza, respiratory syncytial virus (RSV), adenovirus (AdV), human metapneumovirus (hMPV) and human parainfluenza virus types 1-3 (hPIV1-3). We analyzed surveillance data to calculate positivity rates for viral respiratory pathogens, describe the seasonality of those pathogens and determine which pathogens were responsible for more severe outcomes requiring ventilation and/or intensive care and/or resulting in death. RESULTS: At least one viral respiratory pathogen was detected in 8,753/28,508 (30.7%) samples tested for at least one pathogen and 3,497/9,315 (37.5%) of samples tested for all pathogens-influenza in 3,345/28,438 (11.8%), RSV in 3,942/24,503 (16.1%), AdV in 923/9,402 (9.8%), hMPV in 617/9,384 (6.6%), hPIV1 in 159/9,402 (1.7%), hPIV2 in 85/9,402 (0.9%) and hPIV3 in 365/9,402 (3.9%). Multiple pathogens were identified in 501/9,316 (5.4%) participants tested for all pathogens. Monthly variation, indicating seasonal differences in levels of infection, was observed for all pathogens. Participants with hMPV infections and participants less than five years of age were significantly less likely than participants not infected with hMPV and those older than five years of age, respectively, to experience a severe outcome, while participants with a pre-existing chronic disease were at increased risk of a severe outcome, compared to those with no reported pre-existing chronic disease. CONCLUSIONS: Viral respiratory pathogens are common among SARI patients in the Eastern Mediterranean Region. Ongoing surveillance is important to monitor changes in the etiology, seasonality and severity of pathogens of interest.
[Mh] MeSH terms primary: Respiratory Tract Infections/classification
Respiratory Tract Infections/virology
[Mh] MeSH terms secundary: Adenoviridae/classification
Adenoviridae/isolation & purification
Child
Child, Preschool
Female
Humans
Influenza A virus/classification
Influenza A virus/isolation & purification
Inpatients
Male
Mediterranean Region/epidemiology
Metapneumovirus/classification
Metapneumovirus/isolation & purification
Population Surveillance
Respiratory Syncytial Virus, Human/classification
Respiratory Syncytial Virus, Human/isolation & purification
Respiratory Tract Infections/epidemiology
Respirovirus/classification
Respirovirus/isolation & purification
Seasons
Severity of Illness Index
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1709
[Cu] Class update date: 170922
[Lr] Last revision date:170922
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[Da] Date of entry for processing:170714
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.1371/journal.pone.0180954


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