Database : MEDLINE
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[PMID]: 29254850
[Au] Autor:So E; Reb CW; Larson DR; Hyer CF
[Ad] Address:Resident, Grant Medical Center, Columbus, OH.
[Ti] Title:Medial Double Arthrodesis: Technique Guide and Tips.
[So] Source:J Foot Ankle Surg;57(2):364-369, 2018 Mar - Apr.
[Is] ISSN:1542-2224
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:The triple arthrodesis procedure remains the historical standard to treat complex hindfoot pathology. However, in recent data, the medial double arthrodesis has been documented to provide similar benefit with decreased complication rates compared with the triple arthrodesis. Therefore, increased interest in this procedure for the treatment of complex hindfoot pathologies has ensued. We describe the technical components of the medial double arthrodesis.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1712
[Cu] Class update date: 180226
[Lr] Last revision date:180226
[St] Status:In-Process

  2 / 910 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29451811
[Au] Autor:Bernasconi A; Sadile F; Welck M; Mehdi N; Laborde J; Lintz F
[Ad] Address:1 Department of Public Health, "Federico II" Naples University School of Medicine and Surgery, Trauma and Orthopaedic Unit, Napoli, Italy.
[Ti] Title:Role of Tendoscopy in Treating Stage II Posterior Tibial Tendon Dysfunction.
[So] Source:Foot Ankle Int;:1071100717746192, 2018 Feb 01.
[Is] ISSN:1944-7876
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:BACKGROUND: Stage II tibialis posterior tendon dysfunction (PTTD) resistant to conservative therapies is usually treated with invasive surgery. Posterior tibial tendoscopy is a novel technique being used in the assessment and treatment of posterior tibial pathology. The aims of this study were (1) to clarify the role of posterior tibial tendon tendoscopy in treating stage II PTTD, (2) to arthroscopically classify spring ligament lesions, and (3) to compare the arthroscopic assessment of spring ligament lesions with magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and ultrasonographic (US) data. METHODS: We reviewed prospectively collected data on 16 patients affected by stage II PTTD and treated by tendoscopy. We report the reoperation rate and functional outcomes evaluated by comparing pre- and postoperative visual analogic scale for pain (VAS-pain) and the Short-Form Health Survey (SF-36; with its physical [PCS] and mental [MCS] components). Postoperative satisfaction was assessed using a VAS-satisfaction scale. One patient was lost to follow-up. Spring ligament lesions were arthroscopically classified in 3 stages. Discrepancies between preoperative imaging and intraoperative findings were evaluated. RESULTS: At a mean of 25.6 months' follow-up, VAS-pain ( P < .001), SF-36 PCS ( P = .039), and SF-36 MCS ( P < .001) significantly improved. The mean VAS-satisfaction score was 75.3/100. Patients were relieved from symptoms in 80% of cases, while 3 patients required further surgery. MRI and US were in agreement with intraoperative data in 92% and 67%, respectively, for the tendon assessment and in 78% and 42%, respectively, for the spring ligament. CONCLUSIONS: Tendoscopy may be considered a valid therapeutic tool in the treatment of stage II PTTD resistant to conservative treatment. It provided objective and subjective encouraging results that could allow continued conservative therapy while avoiding more invasive surgery in most cases. MRI and US were proven more useful in detecting PT lesions than spring ligament tears. Further studies on PT could use this tendoscopic classification to standardize its description. LEVEL OF EVIDENCE: Level IV, therapeutic study, case series.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1802
[Cu] Class update date: 180216
[Lr] Last revision date:180216
[St] Status:Publisher
[do] DOI:10.1177/1071100717746192

  3 / 910 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29182826
[Au] Autor:Bojanic I; Dimnjakovic D; Mahnik A; Smoljanovic T
[Ti] Title:IS THERE ANY ROOM FOR TENDOSCOPY IN THE SURGICAL TREATMENT OF POSTERIOR TIBIAL TENDON INSUFFICIENCY?
[So] Source:Lijec Vjesn;138(5-6):144-151, 2016 May.
[Is] ISSN:0024-3477
[Cp] Country of publication:Croatia
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Posterior tibial tendon insufficiency (PTTI) is nowadays considered to be the main cause of adult-acquired flatfoot deformity (AAFD). The purpose of this study is to report the outcomes of tendoscopic treatment of tibialis poste- rior tendon (TP) in eleven patients with stage 1 or 2 PTTI and failed prior conservative treatment. Tendoscopy was carried out as a solitary procedure in 8 patients, while in 3 patients additional procedures such as ,,mini-open" tubularization of TP or anterior ankle arthroscopy were necessary. In a single patient transfer of flexor digitorum longus tendon was performed as a second stage surgery due to complete rupture of TP. Related with tendoscopic procedure, no complications were re- ported. TP tendoscopy is a useful and beneficial minimally invasive procedure to treat TP pathology at earlier stages of PTTI. It is a technically demanding procedure that requires extensive experience in arthroscopic management of small ioints and excellent knowledge of repional anatomy.
[Mh] MeSH terms primary: Arthroscopy/methods
Posterior Tibial Tendon Dysfunction
Tendons
[Mh] MeSH terms secundary: Adult
Ankle/diagnostic imaging
Ankle/surgery
Conservative Treatment/methods
Croatia
Female
Flatfoot/etiology
Flatfoot/therapy
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Minimally Invasive Surgical Procedures/methods
Patient Acuity
Posterior Tibial Tendon Dysfunction/complications
Posterior Tibial Tendon Dysfunction/diagnosis
Posterior Tibial Tendon Dysfunction/surgery
Tendons/diagnostic imaging
Tendons/surgery
Treatment Outcome
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1802
[Cu] Class update date: 180208
[Lr] Last revision date:180208
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[Da] Date of entry for processing:171129
[St] Status:MEDLINE

  4 / 910 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29413770
[Au] Autor:Viladot Voegeli A; Fontecilla Cornejo N; Serrá Sandoval JA; Alvarez Goenaga F; Viladot Pericé R
[Ad] Address:Tres Torres Clinic, Barcelona 08017, Spain. Electronic address: 9393avv@gmail.com.
[Ti] Title:Results of subtalar arthroereisis for posterior tibial tendon dysfunction stage IIA1. Based on 35 patients.
[So] Source:Foot Ankle Surg;24(1):28-33, 2018 Feb.
[Is] ISSN:1460-9584
[Cp] Country of publication:France
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:BACKGROUND: The aim of the study was to evaluate the clinical and radiological results obtained in the treatment of adult flexible flatfoot secondary to posterior tibial dysfunction with subtalar arthroereisis using a Kalix endorthesis. METHODS: 35 patients (37 feet) were studied, having been operated between January 2010 and January 2015 for reducible flatfoot secondary to posterior tibial tendon dysfunction stage IIA1 of Bluman. RESULTS: The average follow up was 47.52 months with a minimum of 14 months and a maximum of 75 months. The average age was 54.85, with an age range from 40 to 80 years old. In 74% of cases excellent or good results were obtained, according to our evaluation. The most common complication of this procedure was persistent pain in the sinus tarsi. 35% of cases in this group required implant removal for this reason. CONCLUSIONS: We believe that arthroereisis is valid for the treatment of flat foot secondary to posterior tibial tendon dysfunction at this stage, giving a high percentage of good and excellent results.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1802
[Cu] Class update date: 180207
[Lr] Last revision date:180207
[St] Status:In-Process

  5 / 910 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29381041
[Au] Autor:Michaudet C
[Ad] Address:University of Florida College of Medicine, PO Box 100237, Gainesville, FL 32610-0237.
[Ti] Title:Foot and Ankle Conditions: Pes Planus.
[So] Source:FP Essent;465:18-23, 2018 Feb.
[Is] ISSN:2159-3000
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Pes planus or pes planovalgus (ie, flatfoot) is a common condition among young children and also is encountered in adults. In children, congenital pes planus typically resolves with age as the foot musculature strengthens. Flexible pes planus is defined as a normal arch during non-weight-bearing activity or tiptoeing, with a flattening arch on standing. In rigid pes planus, the arch remains stiff and collapsed with or without weight bearing. Patients with rigid pes planus should be referred for subspecialist treatment. Patients with flexible pes planus, in the absence of signs of rheumatologic, neuromuscular, genetic, or collagen conditions, should be treated conservatively. Asymptomatic children should be monitored and maintenance of a healthy weight should be encouraged. Surgical intervention for refractory symptomatic pediatric pes planus may be considered but there is little evidence to support it. Several etiologies of acquired pes planus in adults have been identified. The most common is posterior tibial tendon dysfunction. Clinical and x-ray evaluation can assist in staging the condition and guiding treatment decisions.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1801
[Cu] Class update date: 180130
[Lr] Last revision date:180130
[St] Status:In-Data-Review

  6 / 910 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29362151
[Au] Autor:Albano D; Martinelli N; Bianchi A; Romeo G; Bulfamante G; Galia M; Sconfienza LM
[Ad] Address:Department of Radiology, Di.Bi.Med., University of Palermo, Via del Vespro 127, 90127, Palermo, Italy.
[Ti] Title:Posterior tibial tendon dysfunction: Clinical and magnetic resonance imaging findings having histology as reference standard.
[So] Source:Eur J Radiol;99:55-61, 2018 Feb.
[Is] ISSN:1872-7727
[Cp] Country of publication:Ireland
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:OBJECTIVE: To investigate the correlation between MRI, clinical tests, histopathologic features of posterior tibial tendon (PTT) dysfunction in patients with acquired adult flatfoot deformity surgically treated with medializing calcaneal osteotomy and flexor digitorum longus tendon transposition. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Nineteen patients (11 females; age: 46 ±â€¯15 year, range 18-75) were pre-operatively evaluated using the single heel rise (HR) and the first metatarsal rise (FMR) sign tests. Two reviewers graded the PTT tears on a I-III scale and measured the hindfoot valgus angle on the pre-operative MRI of the ankle. The specimens of the removed portion of PTT were histologically analysed by two pathologists using the Bonar and Movin score. Linear regression, Spearman's rank-order, and intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC) statistics were used. RESULTS: ICC for MRI was excellent (0.952). Correlation between FMR and HR tests was at limit of significance (r = 0.454; P = 0.051). The HR and FMR tests were significantly correlated to the Movin score (r = 0.581; P = 0.009 and r = 0.538; P = 0.018, respectively) and were not significantly correlated to the Bonar score (both with a r = 0.424; P = 0.070). PTT tendinopathy grading at MRI was significantly correlated to the FMR test (p = 0.041) but not to the hindfoot valgus angle (p = 0.496), the HR test (p = 0.943), the Bonar score (p = 0.937), and the Movin score (p = 0.436). The hindfoot angle was not correlated to any of the other variables (p > 0.264). CONCLUSION: For PTT dysfunction, there is high correlation between HR and FMR test and histology evaluated using the Movin score, while no correlation was seen for the Bonar score. Semiquantitative grading of PTT dysfunction at MRI only correlates to the FMR and not to histology. The hindfoot valgus angle is not correlated to any of the considered variables.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1801
[Cu] Class update date: 180124
[Lr] Last revision date:180124
[St] Status:In-Process

  7 / 910 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 28460254
[Au] Autor:Van de Velde M; Matricali GA; Wuite S; Roels C; Staes F; Deschamps K
[Ad] Address:KULeuven, Department of Rehabilitation Sciences, Musculoskeletal Rehabilitation Research Group, Belgium.
[Ti] Title:Foot segmental motion and coupling in stage II and III tibialis posterior tendon dysfunction.
[So] Source:Clin Biomech (Bristol, Avon);45:38-42, 2017 Jun.
[Is] ISSN:1879-1271
[Cp] Country of publication:England
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:BACKGROUND: Classification systems developed in the field of posterior tibialis tendon dysfunction omit to include dynamic measurements. Since this may negatively affect the selection of the most appropriate treatment modality, studies on foot kinematics are highly recommended. Previous research characterised the foot kinematics in patients with posterior tibialis tendon dysfunction. However, none of the studies analysed foot segmental motion synchrony during stance phase, nor compared the kinematic behaviour of the foot in presence of different posterior tibialis tendon dysfunction stages. Therefore, we aimed at comparing foot segmental motion and coupling in patients with posterior tibialis tendon dysfunction grade 2 and 3 to those of asymptomatic subjects. METHODS: Foot segmental motion of 11 patients suffering from posterior tibialis tendon dysfunction stage 2, 4 patients with posterior tibialis tendon dysfunction stage 3 and 15 asymptomatic subjects was objectively quantified with the Rizzoli foot model using an instrumented walkway and a 3D passive motion capture system. Dependent variables were the range of motion occurring at the different inter-segment angles during subphases of stance and swing phase as well as the cross-correlation coefficient between a number of segments. RESULTS: Significant differences in range of motion were predominantly found during the forefoot push off phase and swing phase. In general, both patient cohorts demonstrated a reduced range of motion compared to the control group. This hypomobility occurred predominantly in the rearfoot and midfoot (p<0.01). Significant differences between both posterior tibialis tendon dysfunction patient cohorts were not revealed. Cross-correlation coefficients highlighted a loss of joint coupling between rearfoot and tibia as well as between rearfoot and forefoot in both posterior tibialis tendon dysfunction groups. INTERPRETATION: The current evidence reveals considerable mechanical alterations in the foot which should be considered in the decision making process since it may help explaining the success and failure of certain conservative and surgical interventions.
[Mh] MeSH terms primary: Foot/physiopathology
Posterior Tibial Tendon Dysfunction/physiopathology
Tendons/physiopathology
Tibia/physiopathology
[Mh] MeSH terms secundary: Aged
Biomechanical Phenomena
Female
Humans
Imaging, Three-Dimensional
Male
Middle Aged
Range of Motion, Articular
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1801
[Cu] Class update date: 180118
[Lr] Last revision date:180118
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[Da] Date of entry for processing:170502
[St] Status:MEDLINE

  8 / 910 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29194449
[Au] Autor:Ross MH; Smith MD; Vicenzino B
[Ad] Address:School of Health and Rehabilitation Sciences, University of Queensland, Brisbane, Australia.
[Ti] Title:Reported selection criteria for adult acquired flatfoot deformity and posterior tibial tendon dysfunction: Are they one and the same? A systematic review.
[So] Source:PLoS One;12(12):e0187201, 2017.
[Is] ISSN:1932-6203
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:BACKGROUND: Posterior tibial tendon dysfunction (PTTD) and adult acquired flatfoot deformity (AAFD) are used interchangeably, although both suggest quite different pathological processes. OBJECTIVE: To investigate key differences in selection criteria used for inclusion into research studies. METHODS: An electronic database search was performed from inception to June 2016. All primary research articles with clear inclusion/diagnostic criteria for PTTD or AAFD were included in the review. All criteria were extracted and synthesised into one aggregate list. Frequencies of recurring criteria were calculated and reported for each stage of the conditions. RESULTS: Of the potentially eligible papers, 148 (65%) did not specify inclusion/selection criteria for PTTD or AAFD and were excluded. Eligibility criteria were reported 82 times in the 80 included papers, with 69 descriptions for PTTD and 13 for AAFD. After synthesis of criteria from all papers, there were 18 key signs and symptoms. Signs and symptoms were considered to be those relating to tendon pathology and those relating to structural deformity. The total number of individual inclusion/diagnostic criteria ranged from 2 to 9. The majority of articles required signs of both tendon dysfunction and structural deformity (84% for AAFD and 81% for PTTD). Across both groups, the most frequently reported criteria were abduction of the forefoot (11.5% of total criteria used), the presence of a flexible deformity (10.2%) and difficulty performing a single leg heel raise (10.0%). This was largely the case for the PTTD articles, whereas the AAFD articles were more focused on postural issues such as forefoot abduction, medial arch collapse, and hindfoot valgus (each 16.7%). CONCLUSION: As well as synthesising the available literature and providing reporting recommendations, this review has identified that many papers investigating PTTD/AAFD do not state condition-specific selection criteria and that this limits their clinical applicability. Key signs and symptoms of PTTD and AAFD appear similar, except in early PTTD where no structural deformity is present. We recommend that PTTD is the preferred terminology for the condition associated with signs of local tendon dysfunction with pain and/or swelling along the tendon and difficulty with inversion and/or single leg heel raise characterising stage I and difficulty with single leg heel raise and a flexible flatfoot deformity characterizing stage II PTTD. While AAFD may be useful as an umbrella term for acquired flatfoot deformities, the specific associated aetiology should be reported in studies to aid consolidation and implementation of research into practice. TRIAL REGISTRATION: Prospero ID: 42016046943.
[Mh] MeSH terms primary: Flatfoot/diagnosis
Tendons/physiopathology
Tibia/physiopathology
[Mh] MeSH terms secundary: Adult
Humans
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE; REVIEW
[Em] Entry month:1712
[Cu] Class update date: 171226
[Lr] Last revision date:171226
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[Da] Date of entry for processing:171202
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.1371/journal.pone.0187201

  9 / 910 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29144991
[Au] Autor:Wong DW; Wang Y; Leung AK; Yang M; Zhang M
[Ad] Address:Interdisciplinary Division of Biomedical Engineering, Faculty of Engineering, The Hong Kong Polytechnic University, Hong Kong, China; The Hong Kong Polytechnic University Shenzhen Research Institute, Shenzhen, China.
[Ti] Title:Finite element simulation on posterior tibial tendinopathy: Load transfer alteration and implications to the onset of pes planus.
[So] Source:Clin Biomech (Bristol, Avon);51:10-16, 2017 Nov 03.
[Is] ISSN:1879-1271
[Cp] Country of publication:England
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:BACKGROUND: Posterior tibial tendinopathy is a challenging foot condition resulting in pes planus, which is difficult to diagnose in the early stage. Prior to the deformity, abnormal internal load transfer and soft tissue attenuation are anticipated. The objective of this study was to investigate the internal load transfer and strain of the ligaments with posterior tibial tendinopathy, and the implications to pes planus and other deformities. METHODS: A three-dimensional finite element model of the foot and ankle was reconstructed from magnetic resonance images of a 28-year-old normal female. Thirty bones, plantar fascia, ligaments and tendons were reconstructed. With the gait analysis data of the model subject, walking stance was simulated. The onset of posterior tibial tendinopathy was resembled by unloading the tibialis posterior and compared to the normal condition. FINDINGS: The load transfer of the joints at the proximal medial column was weaken by posterior tibial tendinopathy, which was compromised by the increase along the lateral column and the intercuneiforms during late stance. Besides, the plantar tarsometatarsal and cuboideonavicular ligaments were consistently over-stretched during stance. Particularly, the maximum tensile strain of the plantar tarsometatarsal ligament was about 3-fold higher than normal at initial push-off. INTERPRETATION: Posterior tibial tendinopathy altered load transfer of the medial column and unbalanced the load between the proximal and distal side of the medial longitudinal arch. Posterior tibial tendinopathy also stretched the midfoot plantar ligaments that jeopardized midfoot stability, and attenuated the transverse arch. All these factors potentially contributed to the progress of pes planus and other foot deformities.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1711
[Cu] Class update date: 171117
[Lr] Last revision date:171117
[St] Status:Publisher

  10 / 910 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29073794
[Au] Autor:Moore SH; Carstensen SE; Burrus MT; Cooper T; Park JS; Perumal V
[Ad] Address:University of Virginia Medical Center, Charlottesville, Virginia.
[Ti] Title:Porous Titanium Wedges in Lateral Column Lengthening for Adult-Acquired Flatfoot Deformity.
[So] Source:Foot Ankle Spec;:1938640017735890, 2017 Oct 01.
[Is] ISSN:1938-7636
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Lateral column lengthening (LCL) is a common procedure for reconstruction of stage II flexible adult-acquired flatfoot deformity (AAFD). The recent development of porous titanium wedges for this procedure provides an alternative to allograft and autograft. The purpose of this study was to report radiographic and clinical outcomes achieved with porous titanium wedges in LCL. A retrospective analysis of 34 feet in 30 patients with AAFD that received porous titanium wedges for LCL from January 2011 to October 2014. Deformity correction was assessed using both radiographic and clinical parameters. Radiographic correction was assessed using the lateral talo-first metatarsal angle, the talonavicular uncoverage percentage, and the first metatarsocuneiform height. The hindfoot valgus angle was measured. Patients were followed from a minimum of 6 months up to 4 years (mean 16.1 months). Postoperative radiographs demonstrated significant correction in all 3 radiographic criteria and the hindfoot valgus angle. We had no cases of nonunion, no wedge migration, and no wedges have been removed to date. The most common complication was calcaneocuboid joint pain (14.7%). Porous titanium wedges in LCL can achieve good radiographic and clinical correction of AAFD with a low rate of nonunion and other complications. LEVELS OF EVIDENCE: Level IV: Case series.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1710
[Cu] Class update date: 171027
[Lr] Last revision date:171027
[St] Status:Publisher
[do] DOI:10.1177/1938640017735890


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