Database : MEDLINE
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[PMID]: 28929982
[Au] Autor:Bergink V; Pop VJM; Nielsen PR; Agerbo E; Munk-Olsen T; Liu X
[Ad] Address:Department of Psychiatry,Erasmus Medical Centre,Rotterdam,The Netherlands.
[Ti] Title:Comorbidity of autoimmune thyroid disorders and psychiatric disorders during the postpartum period: a Danish nationwide register-based cohort study.
[So] Source:Psychol Med;:1-9, 2017 Sep 20.
[Is] ISSN:1469-8978
[Cp] Country of publication:England
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:BACKGROUND: The postpartum period is well-known risk period for the first onset of autoimmune thyroid disorders (AITDs) as well as first onset of psychiatric disorders. These two disorders are some of the most prevalent medical conditions postpartum, often misdiagnosed and disabling if left untreated. Our study was designed to explore the possible bidirectional association between AITDs and psychiatric disorders during the postpartum period. METHODS: A population-based cohort study through linkage of Danish national registers, which comprised 312 779 women who gave birth to their first child during 1997-2010. We conducted Poisson regression analysis to estimate the incidence rate ratio (IRR) of psychiatric disorders among women with first-onset AITDs, the IRR of AITDs among women with first-onset psychiatric disorders as well as the overlap between these disorders using a comorbidity index. RESULTS: Women with first-onset AITDs postpartum were more likely to have first-onset psychiatric disorders than women who did not have postpartum AITDs (IRR = 1.88, 95% confidence interval (CI): 1.25-2.81). Women with first-onset postpartum psychiatric disorders had a higher risk of AITDs than women with no psychiatric disorders (IRR = 2.16, 95% CI: 1.45-3.20). The comorbidity index 2 years after delivery was 2.26 (95% CI: 1.61-2.90), indicating a comorbidity between first-onset AITDs and psychiatric disorders. CONCLUSIONS: First-onset AITDs and psychiatric disorders co-occur in the postpartum period, which has relevance to further studies on the etiologies of these disorders and why childbirth in particular triggers the onset.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1709
[Cu] Class update date: 170920
[Lr] Last revision date:170920
[St] Status:Publisher
[do] DOI:10.1017/S0033291717002732

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[PMID]: 28804518
[Au] Autor:Ide A; Amino N; Kudo T; Yoshioka W; Hisakado M; Nishihara E; Ito M; Fukata S; Nakamura H; Miyauchi A
[Ad] Address:Kuma Hospital, Centre for Excellence in Thyroid Care, 8-2-35 Shimoyamate-dori, Chuo-ku, Kobe, 650-0011 Japan.
[Ti] Title:Comparative frequency of four different types of pregnancy-associated thyrotoxicosis in a single thyroid centre.
[So] Source:Thyroid Res;10:4, 2017.
[Is] ISSN:1756-6614
[Cp] Country of publication:England
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:BACKGROUND: Pregnancy and delivery markedly influence thyroid function. However, the comparative prevalence of gestational thyrotoxicosis (GT), new onset of Graves' disease during pregnancy (GD during pregnancy), postpartum destructive thyrotoxicosis (PPT), and postpartum Graves' thyrotoxicosis (PPGD) has not yet been determined. METHODS: We prospectively registered and performed a review of 4127 consecutive non treated female patients with thyrotoxicosis, seen between August 2008 and December 2013 in our outpatient clinic of Kuma Hospital. 187 out of the 4127 women had new diagnosis of thyrotoxicosis during pregnancy or in the postpartum period. We investigated the prevalence of new diagnosis of GT, GD during pregnancy, PPT and PPGD and compared the characteristics of these types of thyrotoxicosis. The postpartum period is defined as twelve months after delivery. RESULTS: Out of 187 pregnant or postpartum women, we identified 30 (16.0%) with GT, 13 (7.0%) with GD during pregnancy, 42 (22.5%) with PPT, and 102 (54.5%) with PPGD. The onset time of thyrotoxicosis during pregnancy, i.e., both GT and GD during pregnancy, was delayed by a couple of weeks when hCG peaked at 10 gestational weeks. Seventy-six percent of patients with PPT developed thyrotoxicosis between delivery and 4 months postpartum; on the other hand, 83.3% of patients with PPGD developed thyrotoxicosis at 6 months postpartum or later. CONCLUSIONS: We named gestational thyrotoxicosis, new onset of Graves' disease during pregnancy, postpartum destructive thyrotoxicosis, and postpartum Graves' thyrotoxicosis as pregnancy-associated thyrotoxicosis. A clinically significant number of women developed Graves' disease in the postpartum period in a single thyroid centre.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1708
[Cu] Class update date: 170816
[Lr] Last revision date:170816
[St] Status:PubMed-not-MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.1186/s13044-017-0039-0

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[PMID]: 28751877
[Au] Autor:Di Bari F; Granese R; Le Donne M; Vita R; Benvenga S
[Ad] Address:Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, University of Messina, Messina, Italy.
[Ti] Title:Autoimmune Abnormalities of Postpartum Thyroid Diseases.
[So] Source:Front Endocrinol (Lausanne);8:166, 2017.
[Is] ISSN:1664-2392
[Cp] Country of publication:Switzerland
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:The year following parturition is a critical time for the appearance or exacerbation of autoimmune diseases, including autoimmune thyroid disease. The vast majority of postpartum thyroid disease consists of postpartum thyroiditis (PPT) and the minority by Graves' disease and non-autoimmune thyroiditis. PPT has a worldwide prevalence ranging from 1 to 22% and averaging 5% based on a review published in 2012. Several factors confer risk for the development of PPT. Typically, the clinical course of PPT is characterized by three phases: thyrotoxic, hypothyroid, and euthyroid phase. Approximately half of PPT women will have permanent hypothyroidism. The best humoral marker for predictivity, already during the first trimester of gestation, is considered positivity for thyroperoxidase autoantibodies (TPOAb), though only one-third to half of such TPOAb-positive pregnant women will develop PPT. Nutraceuticals (such as selenium) or omega-3-fatty acid supplements seem to have a role in prevention of PPT. In a recent study on pregnant women with stable dietary habits, we found that the fish consumers had lower rates of positivity (and lower serum levels) of both TPOAb and thyroglobulin Ab compared to meat eaters. Finally, we remind the reader of other diseases that can be observed in the postpartum period, either autoimmune or non-autoimmune, thyroid or non-thyroid.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE; REVIEW
[Em] Entry month:1707
[Cu] Class update date: 170730
[Lr] Last revision date:170730
[St] Status:PubMed-not-MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.3389/fendo.2017.00166

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[PMID]: 28290237
[Au] Autor:Hu S; Rayman MP
[Ad] Address:1 Department of Nutritional Sciences, Faculty of Health and Medical Sciences, University of Surrey , Guildford, United Kingdom .
[Ti] Title:Multiple Nutritional Factors and the Risk of Hashimoto's Thyroiditis.
[So] Source:Thyroid;27(5):597-610, 2017 May.
[Is] ISSN:1557-9077
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:BACKGROUND: Hashimoto's thyroiditis (HT) is considered to be the most common autoimmune disease. It is currently accepted that genetic susceptibility, environmental factors, and immune disorders contribute to its development. With regard to nutritional factors, evidence implicates high iodine intake and deficiencies of selenium and iron with a potential relevance of vitamin D status. To elucidate the role of nutritional factors in the risk, pathogenesis, and treatment of HT, PubMed and the Cochrane Library were searched for publications on iodine, iron, selenium, and vitamin D and risk/treatment of HT. SUMMARY: Chronic exposure to excess iodine intake induces autoimmune thyroiditis, partly because highly iodinated thyroglobulin (Tg) is more immunogenic. Recent introduction of universal salt iodization can have a similar, though transient, effect. Selenoproteins are essential to thyroid action. In particular, the glutathione peroxidases protect the thyroid by removing excessive hydrogen peroxide produced for Tg iodination. Genetic data implicate the anti-inflammatory selenoprotein S in HT risk. There is evidence from observational studies and randomized controlled trials that selenium/selenoproteins can reduce thyroid peroxidase (TPO)-antibody titers, hypothyroidism, and postpartum thyroiditis. Iron deficiency impairs thyroid metabolism. TPO, the enzyme responsible for the production of thyroid hormones, is a heme (iron-containing) enzyme which becomes active at the apical surface of thyrocytes only after binding heme. HT patients are frequently iron deficient, since autoimmune gastritis, which impairs iron absorption, is a common co-morbidity. Treatment of anemic women with impaired thyroid function with iron improves thyroid-hormone concentrations, while thyroxine and iron together are more effective in improving iron status. Lower vitamin D status has been found in HT patients than in controls, and inverse relationships of serum vitamin D with TPO/Tg antibodies have been reported. However, other data and the lack of trial evidence suggest that low vitamin D status is more likely the result of autoimmune disease processes that include vitamin D receptor dysfunction. CONCLUSIONS: Clinicians should check patients' iron (particularly in menstruating women) and vitamin D status to correct any deficiency. Adequate selenium intake is vital in areas of iodine deficiency/excess, and in regions of low selenium intake a supplement of 50-100 µg/day of selenium may be appropriate.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1703
[Cu] Class update date: 170502
[Lr] Last revision date:170502
[St] Status:In-Process
[do] DOI:10.1089/thy.2016.0635

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[PMID]: 28073128
[Au] Autor:Krysiak R; Szkróbka W; Okopien B
[Ad] Address:Department of Internal Medicine and Clinical Pharmacology, Medical University of Silesia, Katowice, Poland.
[Ti] Title:The Effect of Vitamin D on Thyroid Autoimmunity in Levothyroxine-Treated Women with Hashimoto's Thyroiditis and Normal Vitamin D Status.
[So] Source:Exp Clin Endocrinol Diabetes;125(4):229-233, 2017 Apr.
[Is] ISSN:1439-3646
[Cp] Country of publication:Germany
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Low vitamin D status is associated with autoimmune thyroid disease. Oral vitamin D supplementation was found to reduce titers of thyroid antibodies in levothyroxine-treated women with postpartum thyroiditis and low vitamin D status. The study included 34 women with Hashimoto's thyroiditis and normal vitamin D status (serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D levels above 30 ng/mL) who had been treated for at least 6 months with levothyroxine. On the basis of patient preference, women were divided into 2 groups, receiving (n=18) or not receiving (n=16) oral vitamin D preparations (2000 IU daily). Serum levels of thyrotropin, free thyroxine, free triiodothyronine and 25-hydroxyvitamin D, as well as titers of thyroid peroxidase and thyroglobulin antibodies were measured at the beginning of the study and 6 months later. There were no significant differences in baseline values between both study groups. 25-hydroxyvitamin D levels inversely correlated with titers of thyroid antibodies. No changes in hypothalamic-pituitary-thyroid axis activity and thyroid antibody titers were observed in vitamin-naïve patients. Vitamin D increased serum levels of 25-hydroxyvitamin D, as well as reduced titers of thyroid antibodies. This effect was more pronounced for thyroid peroxidase than for thyroglobulin antibodies and correlated with their baseline titers. Vitamin D preparations may reduce thyroid autoimmunity in levothyroxine-treated women with Hashimoto's thyroiditis and normal vitamin D status.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1701
[Cu] Class update date: 170426
[Lr] Last revision date:170426
[St] Status:In-Process
[do] DOI:10.1055/s-0042-123038

  6 / 584 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 28056690
[Au] Autor:Alexander EK; Pearce EN; Brent GA; Brown RS; Chen H; Dosiou C; Grobman WA; Laurberg P; Lazarus JH; Mandel SJ; Peeters RP; Sullivan S
[Ad] Address:1 Division of Endocrinology, Diabetes and Hypertension, Brigham and Women's Hospital and Harvard Medical School , Boston, Massachusetts.
[Ti] Title:2017 Guidelines of the American Thyroid Association for the Diagnosis and Management of Thyroid Disease During Pregnancy and the Postpartum.
[So] Source:Thyroid;27(3):315-389, 2017 Mar.
[Is] ISSN:1557-9077
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:BACKGROUND: Thyroid disease in pregnancy is a common clinical problem. Since the guidelines for the management of these disorders by the American Thyroid Association (ATA) were first published in 2011, significant clinical and scientific advances have occurred in the field. The aim of these guidelines is to inform clinicians, patients, researchers, and health policy makers on published evidence relating to the diagnosis and management of thyroid disease in women during pregnancy, preconception, and the postpartum period. METHODS: The specific clinical questions addressed in these guidelines were based on prior versions of the guidelines, stakeholder input, and input of task force members. Task force panel members were educated on knowledge synthesis methods, including electronic database searching, review and selection of relevant citations, and critical appraisal of selected studies. Published English language articles were eligible for inclusion. The American College of Physicians Guideline Grading System was used for critical appraisal of evidence and grading strength of recommendations. The guideline task force had complete editorial independence from the ATA. Competing interests of guideline task force members were regularly updated, managed, and communicated to the ATA and task force members. RESULTS: The revised guidelines for the management of thyroid disease in pregnancy include recommendations regarding the interpretation of thyroid function tests in pregnancy, iodine nutrition, thyroid autoantibodies and pregnancy complications, thyroid considerations in infertile women, hypothyroidism in pregnancy, thyrotoxicosis in pregnancy, thyroid nodules and cancer in pregnant women, fetal and neonatal considerations, thyroid disease and lactation, screening for thyroid dysfunction in pregnancy, and directions for future research. CONCLUSIONS: We have developed evidence-based recommendations to inform clinical decision-making in the management of thyroid disease in pregnant and postpartum women. While all care must be individualized, such recommendations provide, in our opinion, optimal care paradigms for patients with these disorders.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1701
[Cu] Class update date: 170303
[Lr] Last revision date:170303
[St] Status:In-Process
[do] DOI:10.1089/thy.2016.0457

  7 / 584 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 27910710
[Au] Autor:Perdomo CM; Árabe JA; Idoate MÁ; Galofré JC
[Ad] Address:a Department of Endocrinology and Nutrition , Clínica Universidad de Navarra, University of Navarra , Pamplona , Spain.
[Ti] Title:Management of a pregnant woman with thyrotropinoma: a case report and review of the literature.
[So] Source:Gynecol Endocrinol;33(3):188-192, 2017 Mar.
[Is] ISSN:1473-0766
[Cp] Country of publication:England
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:INTRODUCTION: Pituitary disorders during pregnancy are uncommon. The approach should include a close follow-up in order to reduce maternal and fetal risks associated with physiological changes during pregnancy or treatment side effects. MATERIALS AND METHODS: We report a 21-year-old woman with a thyroid-stimulating hormone-secreting pituitary macroadenoma and positive antithyroid antibodies. She was initially treated using transsphenoidal pituitary surgery. The patient relapsed 17-month post-surgery. Somatostatin analog therapy was started which rapidly controlled the hyperthyroidism. Eleven months later, while receiving octreotide, the patient reported to be pregnant and the medication was stopped. Gestation and delivery went well with a healthy full-term newborn. The patient developed a postpartum thyroiditis 15 weeks after giving birth. Twenty-eight months postpartum the patient remains euthyroid without medication. CONCLUSIONS: The overall positive outcomes of the four cases reported in literature, including this new case, suggest that pregnancy should not be absolutely contraindicated in women with thyrotropinomas. We emphasize the effectiveness of octreotide to control hyperthyroidism, as well as stopping medication when a patient is found to be pregnant. In our case, close observation following octreotide cessation had a positive outcome.
[Mh] MeSH terms primary: Adenoma/drug therapy
Pituitary Gland/drug effects
Pituitary Neoplasms/drug therapy
Pregnancy Complications, Neoplastic/drug therapy
[Mh] MeSH terms secundary: Adenoma/physiopathology
Adenoma/secretion
Adenoma/surgery
Adult
Antineoplastic Agents, Hormonal/administration & dosage
Antineoplastic Agents, Hormonal/adverse effects
Antineoplastic Agents, Hormonal/therapeutic use
Combined Modality Therapy/adverse effects
Drug Monitoring
Female
Humans
Hyperthyroidism/etiology
Hyperthyroidism/prevention & control
Neoplasm Recurrence, Local/drug therapy
Neoplasm Recurrence, Local/physiopathology
Neoplasm, Residual
Octreotide/administration & dosage
Octreotide/adverse effects
Octreotide/therapeutic use
Organ Sparing Treatments/adverse effects
Pituitary Gland/secretion
Pituitary Gland/surgery
Pituitary Neoplasms/physiopathology
Pituitary Neoplasms/secretion
Pituitary Neoplasms/surgery
Pregnancy
Pregnancy Complications, Neoplastic/physiopathology
Term Birth
Thyrotropin/secretion
Treatment Outcome
Young Adult
[Pt] Publication type:CASE REPORTS; JOURNAL ARTICLE; REVIEW
[Nm] Name of substance:0 (Antineoplastic Agents, Hormonal); 9002-71-5 (Thyrotropin); RWM8CCW8GP (Octreotide)
[Em] Entry month:1709
[Cu] Class update date: 170906
[Lr] Last revision date:170906
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[Da] Date of entry for processing:161203
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.1080/09513590.2016.1260110

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[PMID]: 29067240
[Au] Autor:Tingi E; Syed AA; Kyriacou A; Mastorakos G; Kyriacou A
[Ad] Address:Obstetrics and Gynaecology, St Mary's Hospital, Manchester, UK.
[Ti] Title:Benign thyroid disease in pregnancy: A state of the art review.
[So] Source:J Clin Transl Endocrinol;6:37-49, 2016 Dec.
[Is] ISSN:2214-6237
[Cp] Country of publication:Netherlands
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Thyroid dysfunction is the commonest endocrine disorder in pregnancy apart from diabetes. Thyroid hormones are essential for fetal brain development in the embryonic phase. Maternal thyroid dysfunction during pregnancy may have significant adverse maternal and fetal outcomes such as preterm delivery, preeclampsia, miscarriage and low birth weight. In this review we discuss the effect of thyroid disease on pregnancy and the current evidence on the management of different thyroid conditions in pregnancy and postpartum to improve fetal and neonatal outcomes, with special reference to existing guidelines on the topic which we dissect, critique and compare with each other. Overt hypothyroidism and hyperthyroidism should be treated appropriately in pregnancy, aiming to maintain euthyroidism. Subclinical hypothyroidism is often pragmatically treated with levothyroxine, although it has not been definitively proven whether this alters maternal or fetal outcomes. Subclinical hyperthyroidism does not usually require treatment and the possibility of non-thyroidal illness or gestational thyrotoxicosis should be considered. Autoimmune thyroid diseases tend to improve during pregnancy but commonly flare-up or emerge in the post-partum period. Accordingly, thyroid auto-antibodies tend to decrease with pregnancy progression. Postpartum thyroiditis should be managed based on the clinical symptoms rather than abnormal biochemical results.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE; REVIEW
[Em] Entry month:1710
[Cu] Class update date: 171029
[Lr] Last revision date:171029
[St] Status:PubMed-not-MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.1016/j.jcte.2016.11.001

  9 / 584 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 27784959
[Au] Autor:Freeman HJ
[Ad] Address:Hugh James Freeman, Department of Medicine (Gastroenterology), University of British Columbia, Vancouver, BC V6T 1W5, Canada.
[Ti] Title:Endocrine manifestations in celiac disease.
[So] Source:World J Gastroenterol;22(38):8472-8479, 2016 Oct 14.
[Is] ISSN:2219-2840
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Celiac disease (CD) is an autoimmune small intestinal mucosal disorder that often presents with diarrhea, malabsorption and weight loss. Often, one or more associated endocrine disorders may be associated with CD. For this review, methods involved an extensive review of published English-language materials. In children and adolescents, prospective studies have demonstrated a significant relationship to insulin-dependent or type 1 diabetes, whereas in adults, autoimmune forms of thyroid disease, particularly hypothyroidism, may commonly co-exist. In some with CD, multiple glandular endocrinopathies may also occur and complicate the initial presentation of the intestinal disease. In others presenting with an apparent isolated endocrine disorder, serological screening for underlying subclinical CD may prove to be positive, particularly if type 1 diabetes, autoimmune thyroid or other autoimmune endocrine diseases, such as Addison's disease are first detected. A number of reports have also recorded hypoparathyroidism or hypopituitarism or ovarian failure in CD and these may be improved with a strict gluten-free diet.
[Mh] MeSH terms primary: Celiac Disease/diagnosis
Endocrine System Diseases/diagnosis
[Mh] MeSH terms secundary: Adrenal Insufficiency/complications
Adrenal Insufficiency/diagnosis
Autoimmune Diseases/complications
Autoimmune Diseases/diagnosis
Autoimmune Diseases/epidemiology
Celiac Disease/complications
Celiac Disease/epidemiology
Diabetes Complications
Diabetes Mellitus/diagnosis
Endocrine System Diseases/complications
Endocrine System Diseases/epidemiology
Female
Humans
Hypopituitarism/complications
Hypopituitarism/diagnosis
Hypothyroidism/complications
Hypothyroidism/diagnosis
Infertility, Female/complications
Infertility, Female/diagnosis
Prevalence
Thyroiditis/complications
Thyroiditis/diagnosis
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE; REVIEW
[Em] Entry month:1706
[Cu] Class update date: 170627
[Lr] Last revision date:170627
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[Da] Date of entry for processing:161028
[St] Status:MEDLINE

  10 / 584 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 27741549
[Au] Autor:Sarkar S; Bischoff LA
[Ad] Address:Division of Diabetes, Endocrinology, and Metabolism, Vanderbilt University School of Medicine, Nashville, Tennessee.
[Ti] Title:Management of Hyperthyroidism during the Preconception Phase, Pregnancy, and the Postpartum Period.
[So] Source:Semin Reprod Med;34(6):317-322, 2016 Nov.
[Is] ISSN:1526-4564
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Hyperthyroidism can occur during pregnancy and the postpartum period, and the treatment of hyperthyroidism should be considered in the preconception phase. Pregnancy has multiple normal physiologic effects on thyroid hormone, which is a separate process distinct from syndromes such as transient hyperthyroidism of hyperemesis gravidarum. The rationale regarding antithyroid drug use during different stages of pregnancy is reviewed, including the literature regarding adverse neonatal outcomes such as aplasia cutis and methimazole embryopathy in the setting of first trimester maternal methimazole use. The use of treatment modalities for hyperthyroidism during pregnancy such as surgery is also discussed. Studies of maternal, fetal, and neonatal complications of hyperthyroidism are examined in this article. Moreover, the evidence regarding antithyroid drugs, specifically methimazole and propylthiouracil, during lactation is considered. Other disease conditions that can take place during pregnancy and the postpartum period such as hyperemesis gravidarum, subclinical hyperthyroidism, gestational trophoblastic disease, and postpartum thyroiditis and their treatments are also presented.
[Mh] MeSH terms primary: Antithyroid Agents/adverse effects
Hyperthyroidism/drug therapy
Methimazole/adverse effects
Pregnancy Complications/drug therapy
Propylthiouracil/adverse effects
Thyroid Hormones/physiology
[Mh] MeSH terms secundary: Antithyroid Agents/administration & dosage
Antithyroid Agents/therapeutic use
Birth Weight
Female
Humans
Hyperthyroidism/diagnosis
Infant, Newborn
Methimazole/administration & dosage
Postpartum Period
Preconception Care
Pregnancy
Premature Birth
Propylthiouracil/administration & dosage
Risk
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE; REVIEW
[Nm] Name of substance:0 (Antithyroid Agents); 0 (Thyroid Hormones); 554Z48XN5E (Methimazole); 721M9407IY (Propylthiouracil)
[Em] Entry month:1710
[Cu] Class update date: 171020
[Lr] Last revision date:171020
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[Da] Date of entry for processing:161015
[St] Status:MEDLINE


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