Database : MEDLINE
Search on : Precancerous and Conditions [Words]
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[PMID]: 29393434
[Au] Autor:Cao B; Zeng Y; Wu F; Liu J; Shuang Z; Xu X; Guo J
[Ad] Address:Department of Gynecology, Jiangxi Provincial Maternal and Child Health Hospital, Nanchang, Jiangxi 330006, P.R. China.
[Ti] Title:Novel TRERF1 mutations in Chinese patients with ovarian endometriosis.
[So] Source:Mol Med Rep;17(4):5435-5439, 2018 Apr.
[Is] ISSN:1791-3004
[Cp] Country of publication:Greece
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Endometriosis is an estrogen-dependent precancerous lesion exhibiting frequently perturbed level of steroid hormones and transcriptional­regulating factor 1 (TRERF1) has a crucial role in the production of steroid hormones including estrogen. Endometriosis has previously been revealed to be a precancerous lesion that harbors somatic mutations in cancer­associated genes. Therefore, the authors of the present study hypothesize that TRERF1 aberrations may be involved in the development of endometriosis. In the present study, endometriotic lesions and paired blood samples from 92 individuals with ovarian endometriosis were analyzed for the potential presence of TRERF1 mutations by sequencing the entire coding region and the corresponding intron­exon boundaries of the TRERF1 gene. Two heterozygous missense somatic mutations [c.3166A>C (p.K1056Q) and c.3187 G>A (p.G1063R)] in the TRERF1 gene were identified in two out of 92 ectopic endometria (2.2%), to the best of our knowledge, these mutations have not been previously reported. From the two samples with TRERF1 mutations, one sample was from a 42­year­old patient also diagnosed with uterine leiomyoma and the other mutation was identified in a 36­year­old woman exhibiting no other apparent gynecological conditions. The evolutionary conservation analysis and in silico prediction of these TRERF1 mutations suggested that they may be pathogenic. To the best of our knowledge, the present study was the first to identify 2 novel, potentially 'disease­causing' TRERF1 somatic mutations in the endometriotic lesions in 2 out of 92 patients with ovarian endometriosis; therefore, TRERF1 mutations may be involved in the pathogenesis of ovarian endometriosis.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1802
[Cu] Class update date: 180309
[Lr] Last revision date:180309
[St] Status:In-Process
[do] DOI:10.3892/mmr.2018.8510

  2 / 26794 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29516926
[Au] Autor:Nadendla LK; Tatikonda VK; Bangi BB; Bhayya H; Devulapally RV; Pokala A
[Ad] Address:Department of Oral Medicine and Radiology, Kamineni Institute of Dental Sciences, Nalgonda, Telangana, India.
[Ti] Title:Sonographic imaging of fibrosis of oral mucosa and its correlation with clinical staging in oral submucous fibrosis.
[So] Source:J Cancer Res Ther;14(2):394-397, 2018 Jan-Mar.
[Is] ISSN:1998-4138
[Cp] Country of publication:India
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Background and Objectives: To evaluate the efficacy of ultrasonography (USG) as a noninvasive tool in assessing the severity of oral submucous fibrosis (OSMF) by measuring the submucosal thickness and also to correlate the sonographic changes with clinical staging. Materials and Methods: The submucosal thickness of the upper and lower labial mucosa, anterior and posterior portions of the right and left buccal mucosa were measured using ultrasound in 64 patients comprising of 32 OSMF patients and 32 controls. Among the controls, 16 were with a habit of chewing gutkha and 16 were without any habit history. Results: In OSMF group, four patients were with Stage I, 13 were with Stage II, 11 were with Stage III, and four with Stage IV. Results were analyzed by one-way analysis of variance for the significance of difference among the groups in submucosal thickness. As the stages of OSMF advanced, there was an increase in submucosal thickness of the buccal mucosa in the study group when compared with controls (P< 0.005). Conclusion: USG is an effective noninvasive zero radiation tool for assessing the progression of OSMF.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1803
[Cu] Class update date: 180308
[Lr] Last revision date:180308
[St] Status:In-Process
[do] DOI:10.4103/0973-1482.183194

  3 / 26794 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29516923
[Au] Autor:Das L; Naskar S; Sarkar T; Maiti AK; Das S; Chatterjee J
[Ad] Address:Department of Medical Science and Technology, Indian Institute of Technology, Kharagpur; Department of Materials Engineering, Indian Institute of Science, Bangalore, Karnataka, India.
[Ti] Title:Immunohistochemical evaluation of prime molecules in cervical lesions towards assessment of malignant potentiality.
[So] Source:J Cancer Res Ther;14(2):377-381, 2018 Jan-Mar.
[Is] ISSN:1998-4138
[Cp] Country of publication:India
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Objective: A comparative immunohistochemical evaluation of p63, CD105, and E-cadherin expression pattern in histopathologically confirmed normal cervical epithelium (NCM), dysplastic cervical epithelium (DYS) and squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) of uterine cervix towards assessing malignant potentiality of the precancerous condition. Materials and Methods: The biopsies from cervical mucosa (normal, dysplasia, and cancer) were studied by routine hematoxylin and eosin (H and E) and by immunohistochemistry for p63, E-cadherin, and CD105 expression. The expressions of these molecules were assessed in a semiquantitative way by (i) counting p63 cell population and distribution, (ii) intensity scoring of E-cadherin along the expression path, and (iii) measuring CD105 expression density. Result: p63 cells were highest in carcinomas followed by dysplasia and normal. An abrupt increase in CD105 expression was observed through change of normal to dysplasia and cancer. A decrease in membranous E-cadherin expression was noticed in the transformation from normal to precancer and cancers. Conclusion: The malignant potential of the dysplastic conditions is likely to be correlated with upregulation in p63 and CD105 expression and a simultaneous downregulation of membranous E-cadherin.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1803
[Cu] Class update date: 180308
[Lr] Last revision date:180308
[St] Status:In-Process
[do] DOI:10.4103/0973-1482.158029

  4 / 26794 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29496039
[Au] Autor:Rock LD; Rosin MP; Zhang L; Chan B; Shariati B; Laronde DM
[Ad] Address:Department of Oral Biological and Medical Sciences, the University of British Columbia, 2199 Wesbrook Mall, Vancouver, BC V6T 1Z3, Canada; BC Oral Cancer Prevention Program, BC Cancer Agency, Vancouver, BC V5Z 1L3, Canada. Electronic address: leigha.rock@alumni.ubc.ca.
[Ti] Title:Characterization of epithelial oral dysplasia in non-smokers: First steps towards precision medicine.
[So] Source:Oral Oncol;78:119-125, 2018 Mar.
[Is] ISSN:1879-0593
[Cp] Country of publication:England
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:OBJECTIVES: Tobacco usage is the strongest risk factor in the development of oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC), which mandates careful screening for oral cancers in smokers. However, there are indications that oral potentially malignant lesions, such as oral epithelial dysplasia (OED), in non-smokers (NS) have a higher cancer risk than those in smokers. Without tobacco as an etiology, the development of these lesions in NS may suggest genetic susceptibility. The increasing incidence of OSCC in NS calls for a better understanding of the natural history of OED in NS as compared to that of smokers. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Patients from a population-based longitudinal study with more than 10 years of follow up were analyzed. Of the 455 patients with primary OED (233 mild and 212 moderate dysplasia), 139 were NS and 306 were smokers. Demographic and habit information, clinical information (lesion site, size and appearance; toluidine blue and fluorescent visualization), microsatellite analysis for loss of heterozygosity (LOH) and outcome (progression) were compared between the two groups. RESULTS AND CONCLUSIONS: The majority of patients with OED were smokers. Of these, more were males, non-Caucasians and heavy drinkers. A significantly higher number of OED in NS were in the tongue, whereas a significantly higher number of OED in smokers were in the floor of mouth (FOM). OED in NS showed a greater than 2-fold increase in cancer progression. Strikingly, OED located in the FOM in NS showed a 38-fold increase in cancer progression as compared to those in smokers.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1803
[Cu] Class update date: 180307
[Lr] Last revision date:180307
[St] Status:In-Data-Review

  5 / 26794 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 27775692
[Au] Autor:Aeffner F; Martin NT; Peljto M; Black JC; Major JK; Jangani M; Ports MO; Krueger JS; Young GD
[Ad] Address:Flagship Biosciences Inc., Westminster, CO, USA.
[Ti] Title:Quantitative assessment of pancreatic cancer precursor lesions in IHC-stained tissue with a tissue image analysis platform.
[So] Source:Lab Invest;96(12):1327-1336, 2016 12.
[Is] ISSN:1530-0307
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Tissue image analysis (tIA) is emerging as a powerful tool for quantifying biomarker expression and distribution in complex diseases and tissues. Pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) develops in a highly complex and heterogeneous tissue environment and, generally, has a very poor prognosis. Early detection of PDAC is confounded by limited knowledge of the pre-neoplastic disease stages and limited methods to quantitatively assess disease heterogeneity. We sought to develop a tIA approach to assess the most common PDAC precursor lesions, pancreatic intraepithelial neoplasia (PanIN), in tissues from Kras ; Trp53 ; Pdx-Cre (KPC) mice, a validated model of PDAC development. tIA profiling of training regions of PanIN and tumor microenvironment (TME) cells was utilized to guide identification of PanIN/TME tissue compartment stratification criteria. A custom CellMap algorithm implementing these criteria was applied to whole-slide images of KPC mice pancreata sections to quantify p53 and Ki-67 biomarker staining in each tissue compartment as a proof-of-concept for the algorithm platform. The algorithm robustly identified a higher percentage of p53-positive cells in PanIN lesions relative to the TME, whereas no difference was observed for Ki-67. Ki-67 expression was also quantified in a human pancreatic tissue sample available to demonstrate the translatability of the CellMap algorithm to human samples. Together, our data demonstrated the utility of CellMap to enable objective and quantitative assessments, across entire tissue sections, of PDAC precursor lesions in preclinical and clinical models of this disease to support efforts leading to novel insights into disease progression, diagnostic markers, and potential therapeutic targets.
[Mh] MeSH terms primary: Adenocarcinoma in Situ/diagnosis
Carcinoma, Pancreatic Ductal/diagnosis
Pancreas/pathology
Pancreatic Neoplasms/diagnosis
Precancerous Conditions/diagnosis
Tumor Suppressor Protein p53/metabolism
[Mh] MeSH terms secundary: Adenocarcinoma in Situ/diagnostic imaging
Adenocarcinoma in Situ/metabolism
Adenocarcinoma in Situ/pathology
Algorithms
Animals
Automation, Laboratory
Carcinoma, Pancreatic Ductal/diagnostic imaging
Carcinoma, Pancreatic Ductal/metabolism
Carcinoma, Pancreatic Ductal/pathology
Crosses, Genetic
Disease Models, Animal
Early Detection of Cancer/methods
Humans
Image Processing, Computer-Assisted
Immunohistochemistry
Ki-67 Antigen/metabolism
Mice, Mutant Strains
Mice, Transgenic
Pancreas/metabolism
Pancreatic Neoplasms/diagnostic imaging
Pancreatic Neoplasms/metabolism
Pancreatic Neoplasms/pathology
Precancerous Conditions/diagnostic imaging
Precancerous Conditions/metabolism
Precancerous Conditions/pathology
Software
Specific Pathogen-Free Organisms
Tissue Banks
Ultrasonography
[Pt] Publication type:COMPARATIVE STUDY; JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Nm] Name of substance:0 (Ki-67 Antigen); 0 (Tumor Suppressor Protein p53)
[Em] Entry month:1706
[Cu] Class update date: 180306
[Lr] Last revision date:180306
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[Da] Date of entry for processing:161025
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.1038/labinvest.2016.111

  6 / 26794 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29328386
[Au] Autor:Chen X; Hu Q; Wu T; Wang C; Xia J; Yang L; Cheng B; Chen X
[Ad] Address:Guanghua School of Stomatology, Hospital of Stomatology, Guangdong Provincial Key Laboratory of Stomatology, Sun Yat-sen University, Guangzhou, Guangdong 510060, P.R. China.
[Ti] Title:Proteomics-based investigation of multiple stages of OSCC development indicates that the inhibition of Trx-1 delays oral malignant transformation.
[So] Source:Int J Oncol;52(3):733-742, 2018 Mar.
[Is] ISSN:1791-2423
[Cp] Country of publication:Greece
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:The majority of cases of oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC) develop from oral potentially malignant disorders, which have been confirmed to be involved in chronic oxidative stimulation. However, no effective treatment approaches have been used to prevent the development of dysplasia into cancerous lesions thus far. In the present study, a well-established OSCC model was used to detect proteomics profiles at different stages during oral malignant transformation. Of the 15 proteins that were found to be upregulated in both the dysplasia and carcinoma stages, the oxidative stress-associated proteins, thioredoxin-1 (Trx-1), glutaredoxin-1 and peroxiredoxin-2 were note as the proteins with significant changes in expression Trx-1 was identified to be the most significantly upregulated protein in the precancerous stage. Validation experiments confirmed that Trx-1 was overexpressed both in dysplasia and cancerous tissue samples, and the inhibition of Trx-1 was able to promote the apoptosis of OSCC cells under hypoxic conditions. Furthermore, the experimental application of a Trx-1-specific inhibitory agent in an animal model led to a lower cancerization rate and a delay in tumor formation. The possible mechanisms were associated with the increased apoptosis via a reactive oxygen species (ROS)-dependent pathway. Taken together, our findings indicate that Trx-1 may be an important target for delaying oral malignant transformation, which provides a novel therapeutic strategy for the prevention and treatment of OSCC.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1801
[Cu] Class update date: 180228
[Lr] Last revision date:180228
[St] Status:In-Process
[do] DOI:10.3892/ijo.2018.4235

  7 / 26794 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29352278
[Au] Autor:Teame H; Addissie A; Ayele W; Hirpa S; Gebremariam A; Gebreheat G; Jemal A
[Ad] Address:Department of Public Health, College of Medicine and Health Sciences, Adigrat University, Adigrat, Ethiopia.
[Ti] Title:Factors associated with cervical precancerous lesions among women screened for cervical cancer in Addis Ababa, Ethiopia: A case control study.
[So] Source:PLoS One;13(1):e0191506, 2018.
[Is] ISSN:1932-6203
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:BACKGROUND: Cervical cancer is the second most prevalent cancer among women in the developing countries including Ethiopia. Precancerous lesions can be developed and risk to the development of cervical cancer over time. Early identification of the precancerous lesion and its risk factor is paramount in preventing cervical cancer. However, the determinants of cervical precancerous lesions are not well documented in Ethiopia. Therefore, this study is conducted to determine factors associated with cervical precancerous lesion among women screened for cervical cancer. METHODS: A hospital-based unmatched case-control study was conducted in selected health facilities in Addis Ababa from March to April 2016. Data were collected from 114 cases and 229 controls using an interviewer-administered questionnaire, entered to Epi Info version 7, and exported to SPSS version 20 for analysis. Odds ratios with its 95% confidence intervals and two-tailed P-value were calculated. Variables with P-value ≤ 0.2 in the bivariate analysis were included in the multivariate logistic regression model. RESULTS: Women aged 40-49 years had 2.4-fold higher odds of precancerous lesions compared to those aged 30-39 (Adjusted Odds Ratio = 2.4, 95% Confidence Interval: 1.27-4.54). Women having history of sexually transmitted infections were significantly associated with cervical precancerous lesion compared to their counterparts (Adjusted Odds Ratio = 3.20, 95% Confidence Interval: 1.26-8.10). Similarly, those women who had two or more lifetime sexual partners (Adjusted Odds Ratio = 2.17 95% Confidence Interval: 1.01-4.67), and women whose husbands had two or more lifetime sexual partners (Adjusted Odds Ratio = 3.03, 95% Confidence Interval: 1.25, 7.33) had higher odds of cervical precancerous lesions. CONCLUSIONS: Older age, history of multiple sexual partners and sexual transmitted infections were associated with increased risk of precancerous lesion. Therefore, women with higher risk of precancerous lesions should be encouraged to be screened more frequently for cervical cancer.
[Mh] MeSH terms primary: Precancerous Conditions/epidemiology
Uterine Cervical Neoplasms/epidemiology
[Mh] MeSH terms secundary: Acetic Acid
Adult
Age Factors
Case-Control Studies
Ethiopia/epidemiology
Female
Humans
Logistic Models
Mass Screening/methods
Middle Aged
Odds Ratio
Precancerous Conditions/diagnosis
Prevalence
Risk Factors
Sexual Behavior
Sexual Partners
Uterine Cervical Neoplasms/diagnosis
Young Adult
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE; RESEARCH SUPPORT, NON-U.S. GOV'T
[Nm] Name of substance:Q40Q9N063P (Acetic Acid)
[Em] Entry month:1802
[Cu] Class update date: 180226
[Lr] Last revision date:180226
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[Da] Date of entry for processing:180121
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.1371/journal.pone.0191506

  8 / 26794 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29372685
[Au] Autor:Fialkova V; Vidomanova E; Balharek T; Marcinek J; Kudela E; Hanysova S; Visnovsky J; Dobrota D; Hatok J
[Ad] Address:Department of Medical Biochemistry, Jessenius Faculty of Medicine in Martin, Comenius University in Bratislava, Martin, Slovakia. hatok@jfmed.uniba.sk.
[Ti] Title:DNA methylation as mechanism of apoptotic resistance development in endometrial cancer patients.
[So] Source:Gen Physiol Biophys;36(5):521-529, 2017 Dec.
[Is] ISSN:0231-5882
[Cp] Country of publication:Slovakia
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:DNA methylation is a significant epigenetic modification which plays a key role in regulation of gene expression and influences functional changes in endometrial tissue. Aberrant DNA methylation changes result in deregulation of important apoptotic proteins during endometrial carcinogenesis and apoptosis resistance development. Evading apoptosis is still a major problem in the successful treatment of endometrial cancer patients. The aim of our study was to examine the promoter DNA methylation changes in 22 apoptosis-associated genes in endometrioid endometrial cancer patients, precancerous lesions and healthy tissue from various normal menstrual cycle phases using a unique pre-designed methylation platform. We observed as the first a significant difference in promoter DNA methylation status in genes: BCL2L11 (p < 0.001), CIDEB (p < 0.03) and GADD45A (p < 0.05) during endometrial carcinogenesis and BIK gene (p < 0.03) in different phases of normal menstrual cycle. The results of our study indicate that deregulation of mitochondrial apoptotic pathway can considerably contributes to the apoptosis resistance development and may be helpful in identifying of new potent biomarkers in endometrial cancer.
[Mh] MeSH terms primary: Apoptosis Regulatory Proteins/genetics
Apoptosis/genetics
DNA Methylation/genetics
DNA, Neoplasm/genetics
Endometrial Neoplasms/genetics
Epigenesis, Genetic/genetics
Precancerous Conditions/genetics
[Mh] MeSH terms secundary: Adult
Aged
Carcinogenesis/genetics
Female
Genetic Predisposition to Disease/genetics
Humans
Middle Aged
Polymorphism, Single Nucleotide/genetics
Slovakia
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE; MULTICENTER STUDY
[Nm] Name of substance:0 (Apoptosis Regulatory Proteins); 0 (DNA, Neoplasm)
[Em] Entry month:1802
[Cu] Class update date: 180223
[Lr] Last revision date:180223
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[Da] Date of entry for processing:180127
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.4149/gpb_2017032

  9 / 26794 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29284780
[Au] Autor:Herrera-Covarrubias D; Coria-Avila G; Hernandez ME; Ismail N
[Ad] Address:School of Psychology, University of Ottawa, Ottawa K1N 6N5, ON, Canada.
[Ti] Title:Stress during puberty facilitates precancerous prostate lesions in adult rats.
[So] Source:Exp Oncol;39(4):269-275, 2017 Dec.
[Is] ISSN:1812-9269
[Cp] Country of publication:Ukraine
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Puberty can be a critical period for the long-term development of diseases, especially for stress-related disorders that depend on neuroendocrine and immune responses. Some organs like the prostate are prone to diseases that result from neuroendocrine or immune challenges, such as cancer. AIM: In the present study, we assessed the long-term effects of an acute pubertal stressor (immune-challenge) on the development of precancerous lesions in adult rats, and compared them with testosterone-induced prostatic lesions. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Pubertal male rats received a single injection of lipopolysaccharide (LPS) or saline during puberty (5 weeks old). At adulthood (8 weeks old) males were subcutaneously implanted with either an empty capsule or filled with testosterone propionate (100 mg/kg). This resulted in a total of five groups: 1) intact untreated, 2) saline-treated and implanted with a blank capsule, 3) saline-treated and implanted with a testosterone capsule, 4) LPS-treated and implanted with a blank capsule, 5) LPS-treated and implanted with a testosterone capsule. Four weeks later, the rats were sacrified and their prostates processed for histology (hematoxylin and eosin stain) and blood serum processed for hormone analysis (testosterone and corticosterone). RESULTS: Males treated with LPS (stressed during puberty via immune challenge) expressed epithelium dysplasia (specially in the ventral prostate), anisocytosis, presence of mononuclear cells, anisokariosis, non-basal polarity, abnormal nucleus-cytoplasm ratio, proplastic myoepithelium, and granular content in the lumen. These histological alterations were similar, but less severe than those observed in males implanted with testosterone during adulthood. CONCLUSION: These results indicate that pubertal exposure to an immune challenge (stress) facilitates the long-term development of prostatic lesions in adult male rats.
[Mh] MeSH terms primary: Precancerous Conditions
Prostatic Neoplasms
Sexual Maturation
Stress, Physiological
[Mh] MeSH terms secundary: Animals
Male
Precancerous Conditions/etiology
Precancerous Conditions/pathology
Prostatic Neoplasms/etiology
Prostatic Neoplasms/pathology
Rats
Rats, Wistar
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1802
[Cu] Class update date: 180223
[Lr] Last revision date:180223
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[Da] Date of entry for processing:171230
[St] Status:MEDLINE

  10 / 26794 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 28450390
[Au] Autor:East JE; Atkin WS; Bateman AC; Clark SK; Dolwani S; Ket SN; Leedham SJ; Phull PS; Rutter MD; Shepherd NA; Tomlinson I; Rees CJ
[Ad] Address:Translational Gastroenterology Unit, Nuffield Department of Medicine, University of Oxford, John Radcliffe Hospital, Oxford, UK.
[Ti] Title:British Society of Gastroenterology position statement on serrated polyps in the colon and rectum.
[So] Source:Gut;66(7):1181-1196, 2017 07.
[Is] ISSN:1468-3288
[Cp] Country of publication:England
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Serrated polyps have been recognised in the last decade as important premalignant lesions accounting for between 15% and 30% of colorectal cancers. There is therefore a clinical need for guidance on how to manage these lesions; however, the evidence base is limited. A working group was commission by the British Society of Gastroenterology (BSG) Endoscopy section to review the available evidence and develop a position statement to provide clinical guidance until the evidence becomes available to support a formal guideline. The scope of the position statement was wide-ranging and included: evidence that serrated lesions have premalignant potential; detection and resection of serrated lesions; surveillance strategies after detection of serrated lesions; special situations-serrated polyposis syndrome (including surgery) and serrated lesions in colitis; education, audit and benchmarks and research questions. Statements on these issues were proposed where the evidence was deemed sufficient, and re-evaluated modified via a Delphi process until >80% agreement was reached. The Grading of Recommendations, Assessment, Development and Evaluations (GRADE) tool was used to assess the strength of evidence and strength of recommendation for finalised statements. : we suggest that until further evidence on the efficacy or otherwise of surveillance are published, patients with sessile serrated lesions (SSLs) that appear associated with a higher risk of future neoplasia or colorectal cancer (SSLs ≥10 mm or serrated lesions harbouring dysplasia including traditional serrated adenomas) should be offered a one-off colonoscopic surveillance examination at 3 years ( ).
[Mh] MeSH terms primary: Colonic Polyps/diagnosis
Colonic Polyps/surgery
Polyps/diagnosis
Polyps/surgery
Rectal Diseases/diagnosis
Rectal Diseases/surgery
[Mh] MeSH terms secundary: Adenoma/diagnosis
Adenoma/genetics
Adenoma/surgery
Adenomatous Polyposis Coli/diagnosis
Benchmarking
Biomarkers/analysis
Cell Transformation, Neoplastic
Colitis/complications
Colonic Polyps/genetics
Colonoscopy
CpG Islands/genetics
DNA/isolation & purification
DNA Methylation
Feces/chemistry
Humans
Parasympatholytics/therapeutic use
Polyps/genetics
Precancerous Conditions/diagnosis
Precancerous Conditions/surgery
Rectal Diseases/genetics
Terminology as Topic
Watchful Waiting
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE; PRACTICE GUIDELINE; REVIEW
[Nm] Name of substance:0 (Biomarkers); 0 (Parasympatholytics); 9007-49-2 (DNA)
[Em] Entry month:1708
[Cu] Class update date: 180222
[Lr] Last revision date:180222
[Js] Journal subset:AIM; IM
[Da] Date of entry for processing:170429
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.1136/gutjnl-2017-314005


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