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[PMID]: 29392424
[Au] Autor:Shahkarami S; Mehrasa R; Younesian S; Yaghmaie M; Chahardouli B; Vaezi M; Rezaei N; Nikbakht M; Alimoghaddam K; Ghavamzadeh A; Tavakkoly-Bazzaz J; Ghaffari SH
[Ad] Address:Department of Medical Genetics, School of Medicine, Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, Iran.
[Ti] Title:Minimal residual disease (MRD) detection using rearrangement of immunoglobulin/T cell receptor genes in adult patients with acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL).
[So] Source:Ann Hematol;97(4):585-595, 2018 Apr.
[Is] ISSN:1432-0584
[Cp] Country of publication:Germany
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:MRD detection with allele-specific oligonucleotide-quantitative polymerase chain reaction (ASO-qPCR) and using clone-specific immunoglobulin/T cell receptor rearrangements is considered as a powerful prognostic factor in acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL). In the present study, we evaluated an ASO-qPCR assay for MRD quantification in peripheral blood (PB) samples of adult patients with ALL. DNA was isolated from PB samples of patients with newly diagnosed ALL. They were first investigated by multiplex-PCR assay to identify V/J usage. An ASO-qPCR technique was then applied for 2.5-year monthly MRD quantification for detection of patient-specific Ig/TCR receptor rearrangements as a molecular target. From 98 patients who were diagnosed as ALL, 72 (73.5%) were enrolled in the present study for MRD detection. MRD was successfully quantified in patients with 1-month interval time. MRD level at the end of induction therapy up to day 88 was the only significant prognostic factor. Regarding MRD level, patients were categorized into two groups of low and high-risk. 2.5-year OS in all three time points (days 28, 58 and 88) were significantly lower in high-risk group (P < 0.008). The results of the 2.5-year MRD detection indicate that MRD level at the end of induction up to about 6 months after the first diagnosis was associated with clinical outcome. This study may highlight the usefulness of PB and the definitions of cut-off level for early prediction of relapse and for stratifying ALL patients. Short-interval time points and frequent PB sampling to monitor MRD level is suggested for early clinical relapse prediction and clinical management of the disease.
[Mh] MeSH terms primary: Gene Rearrangement, T-Lymphocyte/drug effects
Induction Chemotherapy
Precursor Cell Lymphoblastic Leukemia-Lymphoma/diagnosis
[Mh] MeSH terms secundary: Adult
Alleles
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Hospitals, University
Humans
Iran
Male
Multiplex Polymerase Chain Reaction
Neoplasm Proteins/chemistry
Neoplasm Proteins/genetics
Neoplasm Proteins/metabolism
Neoplasm, Residual/diagnosis
Neoplasm, Residual/genetics
Neoplasm, Residual/metabolism
Neoplasm, Residual/pathology
Oligonucleotides/chemistry
Oligonucleotides/metabolism
Precursor Cell Lymphoblastic Leukemia-Lymphoma/drug therapy
Precursor Cell Lymphoblastic Leukemia-Lymphoma/genetics
Precursor Cell Lymphoblastic Leukemia-Lymphoma/pathology
Prognosis
Prospective Studies
Real-Time Polymerase Chain Reaction
Reverse Transcriptase Polymerase Chain Reaction
Risk Assessment
Survival Analysis
Tumor Burden/drug effects
[Pt] Publication type:EVALUATION STUDIES; JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Nm] Name of substance:0 (Neoplasm Proteins); 0 (Oligonucleotides)
[Em] Entry month:1803
[Cu] Class update date: 180309
[Lr] Last revision date:180309
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[Da] Date of entry for processing:180203
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.1007/s00277-018-3230-z

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[PMID]: 29429164
[Au] Autor:Zhang F; Luo DL; Chen Y; Wu HM; Yan JH; Luo XL; He J; Luo LQ; Liu YH
[Ad] Address:Department of Pathology, Guangdong General Hospital/Guangdong Academy of Medical Sciences, Guangzhou 510080, China.
[Ti] Title:[Expression of ßF1 and T cell receptor γ in T lymphoblastic lymphoma/leukemia].
[So] Source:Zhonghua Bing Li Xue Za Zhi;47(2):119-122, 2018 Feb 08.
[Is] ISSN:0529-5807
[Cp] Country of publication:China
[La] Language:chi
[Ab] Abstract:To evaluate the expression of ßF1 and T cell receptor (TCR)γ in T lymphoblastic lymphoma/leukemia(T-LBL/ALL), and investigate the clinicopathological features. Fifty-one cases of T-LBL/ALL were collected at Guangdong General Hospital from 2010 to 2016, the expression of ßF1 and TCRγ was assessed by immunohistochemistry. There were 13 cases of children and adolescents, and 38 cases of adults. The expression rates of ßF1 and TCRγ were 27.5%(14/51) and 15.7%(8/51) respectively. The proportion of adults in αß T-LBL/ALL, TCR-silent T-LBL/ALL and γδ T-LBL/ALL was 7/14, 79.3%(23/29)and 8/8 respectively, and the difference was significant ( =0.023). There was no statistical difference in sex, LDH, bone marrow involvement and Ann arbor stage among these three groups( >0.05). γδ T-LBL/ALLs included 6 cases of CD4(-)/CD8(-) phenotype, whereas αß T-LBL/ALL included 7 cases of CD4(+) /CD8(+) phenotype. There was significant difference in CD4/CD8 expression among these three groups( <0.01). γδ T-LBL/ALL occurred only in adults, with predominantly CD4(-)/CD8(-) phenotype. αß T-LBL/ALL occurred more common in children and adolescents, with predominantly CD4(+) /CD8(+) phenotype.
[Mh] MeSH terms primary: Lymphoma, T-Cell/metabolism
Precursor T-Cell Lymphoblastic Leukemia-Lymphoma/metabolism
Receptors, Antigen, T-Cell/metabolism
[Mh] MeSH terms secundary: Adolescent
Adult
Child
Humans
Immunohistochemistry
Phenotype
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Nm] Name of substance:0 (Receptors, Antigen, T-Cell)
[Em] Entry month:1803
[Cu] Class update date: 180306
[Lr] Last revision date:180306
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[Da] Date of entry for processing:180213
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.3760/cma.j.issn.0529-5807.2018.02.008

  3 / 25261 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29348612
[Au] Autor:Wiemels JL; Walsh KM; de Smith AJ; Metayer C; Gonseth S; Hansen HM; Francis SS; Ojha J; Smirnov I; Barcellos L; Xiao X; Morimoto L; McKean-Cowdin R; Wang R; Yu H; Hoh J; DeWan AT; Ma X
[Ad] Address:Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, University of California San Francisco, 1450 3rd Street, San Francisco, CA, 94158, USA. joe.wiemels@ucsf.edu.
[Ti] Title:GWAS in childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia reveals novel genetic associations at chromosomes 17q12 and 8q24.21.
[So] Source:Nat Commun;9(1):286, 2018 01 18.
[Is] ISSN:2041-1723
[Cp] Country of publication:England
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) (age 0-14 years) is 20% more common in Latino Americans than non-Latino whites. We conduct a genome-wide association study in a large sample of 3263 Californian children with ALL (including 1949 of Latino heritage) and 3506 controls matched on month and year of birth, sex, and ethnicity, and an additional 12,471 controls from the Kaiser Resource for Genetic Epidemiology Research on Aging Cohort. Replication of the strongest genetic associations is performed in two independent datasets from the Children's Oncology Group and the California Childhood Leukemia Study. Here we identify new risk loci on 17q12 near IKZF3/ZPBP2/GSDMB/ORMDL3, a locus encompassing a transcription factor important for lymphocyte development (IKZF3), and at an 8q24 region known for structural contacts with the MYC oncogene. These new risk loci may impact gene expression via local (four 17q12 genes) or long-range (8q24) interactions, affecting function of well-characterized hematopoietic and growth-regulation pathways.
[Mh] MeSH terms primary: Chromosomes, Human, Pair 17/genetics
Chromosomes, Human, Pair 8/genetics
Genetic Predisposition to Disease/genetics
Genome-Wide Association Study
Precursor Cell Lymphoblastic Leukemia-Lymphoma/genetics
[Mh] MeSH terms secundary: Adolescent
California
Child, Preschool
Female
Gene Frequency
Genetic Predisposition to Disease/ethnology
Hispanic Americans/genetics
Humans
Infant
Infant, Newborn
Male
Polymorphism, Single Nucleotide
Precursor Cell Lymphoblastic Leukemia-Lymphoma/ethnology
Risk Factors
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE; RESEARCH SUPPORT, N.I.H., EXTRAMURAL; RESEARCH SUPPORT, NON-U.S. GOV'T
[Em] Entry month:1803
[Cu] Class update date: 180306
[Lr] Last revision date:180306
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[Da] Date of entry for processing:180120
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.1038/s41467-017-02596-9

  4 / 25261 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29237521
[Au] Autor:Zhang PF; Feng XQ; Wu CL; Zhang YM
[Ad] Address:Department of Pediatrics, Nanfang Hospital, Southern Medical University, Guangzhou 510515, China. yumingzhang1966@hotmail.com.
[Ti] Title:[Clinical features of children with acute lymphoblastic leukemia complicated by pulmonary infection after chemotherapy].
[So] Source:Zhongguo Dang Dai Er Ke Za Zhi;19(12):1234-1238, 2017 Dec.
[Is] ISSN:1008-8830
[Cp] Country of publication:China
[La] Language:chi
[Ab] Abstract:OBJECTIVE: To examine the clinical features of children with acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) complicated by pulmonary infection after chemotherapy. METHODS: The clinical data of 108 ALL children (115 case-times) with post-chemotherapy pulmonary infection were retrospectively reviewed. The risk factors for pulmonary infection and the relationship between pathogens and chest CT findings were evaluated. RESULTS: The highest incidence (77.4% ) of pulmonary infection occurred during remission induction, peaking at 31-60 days after chemotherapy. Patients with neutropenia had the highest incidence rate of pulmonary infection (67.0%). Bacteria (36%) and fungi (41%) were the two most common pathogens in the 41 patients who were etiologically suspected of or diagnosed with pulmonary infection. There was no significant difference in chest CT findings between patients with bacterial and fungal infections. CONCLUSIONS: The children with ALL are most susceptible to pulmonary infection during remission induction, especially when they are neutropenic. Bacteria and fungi are the main pathogens of pulmonary infections in these patients. However, the changes in chest CT images are poor indicators of the nature of pulmonary infection.
[Mh] MeSH terms primary: Precursor Cell Lymphoblastic Leukemia-Lymphoma/drug therapy
Respiratory Tract Infections/etiology
[Mh] MeSH terms secundary: Adolescent
Child
Child, Preschool
Female
Humans
Infant
Male
Precursor Cell Lymphoblastic Leukemia-Lymphoma/complications
Respiratory Tract Infections/diagnostic imaging
Respiratory Tract Infections/epidemiology
Respiratory Tract Infections/microbiology
Retrospective Studies
Tomography, X-Ray Computed
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1803
[Cu] Class update date: 180306
[Lr] Last revision date:180306
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[Da] Date of entry for processing:171215
[St] Status:MEDLINE

  5 / 25261 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29187149
[Au] Autor:Meng Q; Catchpoole D; Skillicorn D; Kennedy PJ
[Ad] Address:School of Software, Faculty of Engineering and Information Technology and the Centre for Artificial Intelligence, University of Technology Sydney (UTS), PO Box 123, 15 Broadway, Ultimo, NSW, 2007, Australia. Qinxue.Meng@uts.edu.au.
[Ti] Title:DBNorm: normalizing high-density oligonucleotide microarray data based on distributions.
[So] Source:BMC Bioinformatics;18(1):527, 2017 Nov 29.
[Is] ISSN:1471-2105
[Cp] Country of publication:England
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:BACKGROUND: Data from patients with rare diseases is often produced using different platforms and probe sets because patients are widely distributed in space and time. Aggregating such data requires a method of normalization that makes patient records comparable. RESULTS: This paper proposed DBNorm, implemented as an R package, is an algorithm that normalizes arbitrarily distributed data to a common, comparable form. Specifically, DBNorm merges data distributions by fitting functions to each of them, and using the probability of each element drawn from the fitted distribution to merge it into a global distribution. DBNorm contains state-of-the-art fitting functions including Polynomial, Fourier and Gaussian distributions, and also allows users to define their own fitting functions if required. CONCLUSIONS: The performance of DBNorm is compared with z-score, average difference, quantile normalization and ComBat on a set of datasets, including several that are publically available. The performance of these normalization methods are compared using statistics, visualization, and classification when class labels are known based on a number of self-generated and public microarray datasets. The experimental results show that DBNorm achieves better normalization results than conventional methods. Finally, the approach has the potential to be applicable outside bioinformatics analysis.
[Mh] MeSH terms primary: Oligonucleotide Array Sequence Analysis/methods
Software
[Mh] MeSH terms secundary: Area Under Curve
Gene Expression Regulation, Neoplastic
Humans
Normal Distribution
Precursor Cell Lymphoblastic Leukemia-Lymphoma/genetics
Precursor Cell Lymphoblastic Leukemia-Lymphoma/pathology
Principal Component Analysis
ROC Curve
User-Computer Interface
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1803
[Cu] Class update date: 180306
[Lr] Last revision date:180306
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[Da] Date of entry for processing:171201
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.1186/s12859-017-1912-5

  6 / 25261 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 27778348
[Au] Autor:Barrington-Trimis JL; Cockburn M; Metayer C; Gauderman WJ; Wiemels J; McKean-Cowdin R
[Ad] Address:Department of Preventive Medicine, Keck School of Medicine, University of Southern California, Los Angeles, CA.
[Ti] Title:Trends in childhood leukemia incidence over two decades from 1992 to 2013.
[So] Source:Int J Cancer;140(5):1000-1008, 2017 Mar 01.
[Is] ISSN:1097-0215
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Incidence rates of childhood leukemia in the United States have steadily increased over the last several decades, but only recently have disparities in the increase in incidence been recognized. In the current analysis, Surveillance, Epidemiology and End Results (SEER) data were used to evaluate recent trends in the incidence of childhood leukemia diagnosed at age 0-19 years from 1992 to 2013, overall and by age, race/ethnicity, gender and histologic subtype. Hispanic White children were more likely than non-Hispanic White, non-Hispanic Black or non-Hispanic Asian children to be diagnosed with acute lymphocytic leukemia (ALL) from 2009 to 2013. From 1992 to 2013, a significant increase in ALL incidence was observed for Hispanic White children [annual percent change (APC) = 1.08, 95% CI: 0.59, 1.58]; no significant increase was observed for non-Hispanic White, Black or Asian children. ALL incidence increased by about 3% per year from 1992 to 2013 for Hispanic White children diagnosed from 15 to 19 years (APC = 2.67; 95% CI: 0.88, 4.49) and by 2% for those 10-14 years (APC = 2.09; 95% CI: 0.57, 3.63), while no significant increases in incidence were observed in non-Hispanic White, Black, or Asian children of the same age. Acute myeloid leukemia (AML) incidence increased among non-Hispanic White children under 1 year at diagnosis, and among Hispanic White children diagnosed at age 1-4. The increase in incidence rates of childhood ALL appears to be driven by rising rates in older Hispanic children (10-14, and 15-19 years). Future studies are needed to evaluate reasons for the increase in ALL among older Hispanic children.
[Mh] MeSH terms primary: Precursor Cell Lymphoblastic Leukemia-Lymphoma/epidemiology
[Mh] MeSH terms secundary: Adolescent
Age Distribution
Child
Child, Preschool
Ethnic Groups/statistics & numerical data
Female
Humans
Incidence
Infant
Infant, Newborn
Male
Morbidity/trends
Precursor Cell Lymphoblastic Leukemia-Lymphoma/ethnology
Retrospective Studies
SEER Program
United States/epidemiology
Young Adult
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1705
[Cu] Class update date: 180307
[Lr] Last revision date:180307
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[Da] Date of entry for processing:161026
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.1002/ijc.30487

  7 / 25261 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29184402
[Au] Autor:Wu X; Wang L; Qiu Y; Zhang B; Hu Z; Jin R
[Ad] Address:Department of Pediatrics, Union Hospital, Tongji Medical College, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan.
[Ti] Title:Cooperation of IRAK1/4 inhibitor and ABT-737 in nanoparticles for synergistic therapy of T cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia.
[So] Source:Int J Nanomedicine;12:8025-8034, 2017.
[Is] ISSN:1178-2013
[Cp] Country of publication:New Zealand
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:T cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia (T-ALL) is caused by clonal expansion of variant T cell progenitors and is considered as a high risk leukemia. Contemporary single chemotherapy has a limited effect due to dynamic and versatile properties of T-ALL. Here IRAK1/4 inhibitor and ABT-737 were co-encapsulated into polyethylene glycol modified poly (lactic-co-glycolic acid) nanoparticles (IRAK/ABT-NP) to enhance synergistic therapy of T-ALL. The formulation was optimized to achieve high drug loading using Box-Behnken design and response surface methodology. The optimal parameter comprised 2.98% polymer in acetonitrile, a ratio of oil phase to water phase of 1:8.33, and 2.12% emulsifier concentration. High drug loading and uniform spherical shape was achieved. In vitro release study showed sustained release of IRAK1/4 inhibitor for 72 hours as well as sustained release of ABT-737 for more than 120 hours. Uptake efficiency of IRAK/ABT-NP and induced apoptotic T-ALL fraction by IRAK/ABT-NP were much higher than the IRAK1/4 and ABT-737 combined solution. IC of IRAK/ABT-NP was two-fold lower than free drug combination in Jurkat cells. Additionally, we conducted in vivo experiments in which IRAK/ABT-NP exhibited greater cytotoxicity toward T-ALL cells, the capacity to significantly restore white blood cell number in peripheral blood, and improved survival time of T-ALL mouse model compared to the IRAK1/4 and ABT-737 combined solution.
[Mh] MeSH terms primary: Antineoplastic Combined Chemotherapy Protocols/pharmacology
Interleukin-1 Receptor-Associated Kinases/antagonists & inhibitors
Nanoparticles/chemistry
Precursor T-Cell Lymphoblastic Leukemia-Lymphoma/drug therapy
[Mh] MeSH terms secundary: Animals
Antineoplastic Combined Chemotherapy Protocols/administration & dosage
Biphenyl Compounds/administration & dosage
Biphenyl Compounds/pharmacology
Drug Liberation
Drug Synergism
Female
Humans
Jurkat Cells
Lactic Acid/chemistry
Mice
Nanoparticles/administration & dosage
Nitrophenols/administration & dosage
Nitrophenols/pharmacology
Piperazines/administration & dosage
Piperazines/pharmacology
Polyglycolic Acid/chemistry
Sulfonamides/administration & dosage
Sulfonamides/pharmacology
Xenograft Model Antitumor Assays
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Nm] Name of substance:0 (ABT-737); 0 (Biphenyl Compounds); 0 (Nitrophenols); 0 (Piperazines); 0 (Sulfonamides); 0 (polylactic acid-polyglycolic acid copolymer); 26009-03-0 (Polyglycolic Acid); 33X04XA5AT (Lactic Acid); EC 2.7.11.1 (IRAK1 protein, human); EC 2.7.11.1 (IRAK4 protein, human); EC 2.7.11.1 (Interleukin-1 Receptor-Associated Kinases)
[Em] Entry month:1803
[Cu] Class update date: 180305
[Lr] Last revision date:180305
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[Da] Date of entry for processing:171130
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.2147/IJN.S146875

  8 / 25261 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 28465412
[Au] Autor:Severson E; Arnett KL; Wang H; Zang C; Taing L; Liu H; Pear WS; Shirley Liu X; Blacklow SC; Aster JC
[Ad] Address:Department of Pathology, Brigham and Women's Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA 02115, USA.
[Ti] Title:Genome-wide identification and characterization of Notch transcription complex-binding sequence-paired sites in leukemia cells.
[So] Source:Sci Signal;10(477), 2017 May 02.
[Is] ISSN:1937-9145
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Notch transcription complexes (NTCs) drive target gene expression by binding to two distinct types of genomic response elements, NTC monomer-binding sites and sequence-paired sites (SPSs) that bind NTC dimers. SPSs are conserved and have been linked to the Notch responsiveness of a few genes. To assess the overall contribution of SPSs to Notch-dependent gene regulation, we determined the DNA sequence requirements for NTC dimerization using a fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) assay and applied insights from these in vitro studies to Notch-"addicted" T cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia (T-ALL) cells. We found that SPSs contributed to the regulation of about a third of direct Notch target genes. Although originally described in promoters, SPSs are present mainly in long-range enhancers, including an enhancer containing a newly described SPS that regulates expression. Our work provides a general method for identifying SPSs in genome-wide data sets and highlights the widespread role of NTC dimerization in Notch-transformed leukemia cells.
[Mh] MeSH terms primary: Enhancer Elements, Genetic
Gene Expression Regulation, Leukemic
Genome, Human
Precursor T-Cell Lymphoblastic Leukemia-Lymphoma/genetics
Receptors, Notch/metabolism
Transcription Factors/metabolism
[Mh] MeSH terms secundary: Animals
Gene Expression Profiling
Humans
Mice
Precursor T-Cell Lymphoblastic Leukemia-Lymphoma/metabolism
Promoter Regions, Genetic
Protein Binding
Receptors, Notch/genetics
Signal Transduction
Transcription Factors/genetics
Tumor Cells, Cultured
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Nm] Name of substance:0 (Receptors, Notch); 0 (Transcription Factors)
[Em] Entry month:1802
[Cu] Class update date: 180303
[Lr] Last revision date:180303
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[Da] Date of entry for processing:170504
[St] Status:MEDLINE

  9 / 25261 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29395041
[Au] Autor:Bertrand A; Favier B; Devaux Y; Goy F; Marcault-Derouard A; Veyet V; Cervos M; Schell M
[Ad] Address:Centre Léon-Bérard, hospitalisation à domicile pédiatrique, IHOPe, 1, place du Pr-J.-Renaut, 69373 Lyon cedex 08, France. Electronic address: amandine.bertrand@ihope.fr.
[Ti] Title:Chimiothérapie intraveineuse à domicile en cancérologie pédiatrique : une expérience monocentrique. [Intravenous chemotherapy at home: A pediatric monocentric experience].
[So] Source:Bull Cancer;105(2):155-161, 2018 Feb.
[Is] ISSN:1769-6917
[Cp] Country of publication:France
[La] Language:fre
[Ab] Abstract:INTRODUCTION: Our home care unit (HCU) developed the administration of IV chemotherapy at home for some pediatric oncologic patients. METHODS: We conducted a retrospective monocentric analysis, leading to identify patients with at least one sequence of chemotherapy at home in 2015. RESULTS: Two hundred and forty four sequences of home chemotherapy have been administered in 2015. We identified two situations for home IV chemotherapy. Pediatric oncologist of day hospital prescribes the sequence. The chemotherapy is delivered at hospital for the first day. HCU takes over for the next days at home. For a sequence replacing a conventional hospitalization, the attending physician examines the patient, and confirm the clinical validation. The pediatric oncologist of HCU checks lab exams, and prescribes the chemotherapy. For both situations, IV chemotherapy is prepared by our hospital pharmacy, delivers at home or at day hospital, and HCU team manages home material and organizes hospitalization. CONCLUSIONS: This kind of organization allows setting up home IV CT for more and more patients. It allows to limit daily hospitalization for some patients living far from the hospital, and whose therapies lead to several hospitalizations.
[Mh] MeSH terms primary: Antineoplastic Agents/administration & dosage
Home Care Services, Hospital-Based/organization & administration
Neoplasms/drug therapy
[Mh] MeSH terms secundary: Antineoplastic Agents/therapeutic use
Child
Cytarabine/administration & dosage
Eye Neoplasms/drug therapy
Female
Glioma/drug therapy
Health Services Accessibility
Hematologic Neoplasms/drug therapy
Humans
Injections, Intravenous/statistics & numerical data
Male
Oncology Nursing
Pediatric Nursing
Pediatricians
Precursor Cell Lymphoblastic Leukemia-Lymphoma/drug therapy
Retrospective Studies
Time Factors
Vinblastine/administration & dosage
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Nm] Name of substance:0 (Antineoplastic Agents); 04079A1RDZ (Cytarabine); 5V9KLZ54CY (Vinblastine)
[Em] Entry month:1802
[Cu] Class update date: 180228
[Lr] Last revision date:180228
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[Da] Date of entry for processing:180204
[St] Status:MEDLINE

  10 / 25261 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 28456746
[Au] Autor:Carretta M; de Boer B; Jaques J; Antonelli A; Horton SJ; Yuan H; de Bruijn JD; Groen RWJ; Vellenga E; Schuringa JJ
[Ad] Address:Department of Experimental Hematology, Cancer Research Centre Groningen, University Medical Centre Groningen, University of Groningen, Groningen, The Netherlands.
[Ti] Title:Genetically engineered mesenchymal stromal cells produce IL-3 and TPO to further improve human scaffold-based xenograft models.
[So] Source:Exp Hematol;51:36-46, 2017 07.
[Is] ISSN:1873-2399
[Cp] Country of publication:Netherlands
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Recently, NOD-SCID IL2Rγ (NSG) mice were implanted with human mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs) in the presence of ceramic scaffolds or Matrigel to mimic the human bone marrow (BM) microenvironment. This approach allowed the engraftment of leukemic samples that failed to engraft in NSG mice without humanized niches and resulted in a better preservation of leukemic stem cell self-renewal properties. To further improve our humanized niche scaffold model, we genetically engineered human MSCs to secrete human interleukin-3 (IL-3) and thrombopoietin (TPO). In vitro, these IL-3- and TPO-producing MSCs were superior in expanding human cord blood (CB) CD34 hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells. MLL-AF9-transduced CB CD34 cells could be transformed efficiently along myeloid or lymphoid lineages on IL-3- and TPO-producing MSCs. In vivo, these genetically engineered MSCs maintained their ability to differentiate into bone, adipocytes, and other stromal components. Upon transplantation of MLL-AF9-transduced CB CD34 cells, acute myeloid leukemia (AML) and acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) developed in engineered scaffolds, in which a significantly higher percentage of myeloid clones was observed in the mouse compartments compared with previous models. Engraftment of primary AML, B-cell ALL, and biphenotypic acute leukemia (BAL) patient samples was also evaluated, and all patient samples could engraft efficiently; the myeloid compartment of the BAL samples was better preserved in the human cytokine scaffold model. In conclusion, we show that we can genetically engineer the ectopic human BM microenvironment in a humanized scaffold xenograft model. This approach will be useful for functional study of the importance of niche factors in normal and malignant human hematopoiesis.
[Mh] MeSH terms primary: Cell Differentiation
Genetic Engineering
Interleukin-3
Mesenchymal Stromal Cells/metabolism
Stem Cell Niche
Thrombopoietin
Tissue Scaffolds/chemistry
[Mh] MeSH terms secundary: Animals
Disease Models, Animal
Heterografts
Humans
Interleukin-3/biosynthesis
Interleukin-3/genetics
Leukemia, Myeloid, Acute/genetics
Leukemia, Myeloid, Acute/metabolism
Mesenchymal Stem Cell Transplantation
Mice
Mice, Inbred NOD
Mice, SCID
Neoplasm Transplantation
Precursor B-Cell Lymphoblastic Leukemia-Lymphoma/genetics
Precursor B-Cell Lymphoblastic Leukemia-Lymphoma/metabolism
Thrombopoietin/biosynthesis
Thrombopoietin/genetics
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE; RESEARCH SUPPORT, NON-U.S. GOV'T
[Nm] Name of substance:0 (IL3 protein, human); 0 (Interleukin-3); 9014-42-0 (Thrombopoietin)
[Em] Entry month:1709
[Cu] Class update date: 180224
[Lr] Last revision date:180224
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[Da] Date of entry for processing:170501
[St] Status:MEDLINE


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