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[PMID]: 29385610
[Au] Autor:Kerth CR; Wall KR; Smith SB; Whitney TR; Glasscock JL; Sawyer JT
[Ad] Address:Department of Animal Science, Texas A&M University, College Station, TX.
[Ti] Title:Substituting ground woody plants for cottonseed hulls in lamb feedlot diets: carcass characteristics, adipose tissue fatty acid composition, and sensory panel traits.
[So] Source:J Anim Sci;96(2):487-497, 2018 Mar 06.
[Is] ISSN:1525-3163
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Effects of using ground woody plants in Rambouillet wether lamb (n = 48) feedlot diets on carcass characteristics, adipose tissue fatty acid composition, and sensory panel traits were evaluated. In a randomized design study with two feeding periods (period 1 = fed a 70% concentrate diet from days 0 to 27; period 2 = fed an 86% concentrate diet from days 28 to 57), lambs were individually fed six diets that differed only by roughage source (n = 8 animals/treatment; initial BW = 32.9 ± 3.2 kg): cottonseed hulls (CSH; control) or ground wood consisting of either redberry (RED), blueberry (BLUE), one-seed (ONE), or eastern red cedar (ERC) Juniperus spp., or Prosopis glandulosa (MESQ). After 57 d, the lambs were humanely harvested and after chilling (2 ± 1 oC) 24 h, carcasses were evaluated for carcass traits. At 48 h postmortem, the longissimus thoracis (LT) was removed from the left side of the carcass, and after freezing for no more than 3 mo, were thawed for 24 h, cooked, and evaluated by a trained sensory panel. Additionally, volatile aroma chemicals on the LT were determined by gas chromatograph/mass spectrometer/olfactory (GC/MS/OF, respectively) analyses. Lamb HCW was greater (P = 0.01) for lambs fed CSH compared with all other diets, but lambs had similar (P > 0.08) LM area, back fat thickness, leg circumference, and body wall. Neither adipose tissue fatty acid composition (P > 0.08) nor trained sensory panel evaluation (P > 0.18) was affected by finishing diet roughage source. Of the 81 volatile aroma compounds found in the grilled lamb chops, only seven were affected (P < 0.05) by dietary roughage source and included 1-pentanol (a sweet, pleasant aroma), heptenal (a fishy aroma), pentanal (fermented, bready aroma description), 1-(1H-pyrol-2yl)-ethanone (caramel-like), 2-heptanone (cheesy, banana, fruity aromatic), 6,7-dodecanedione (unknown aroma), and butanoic acid (a sweaty, rancid aroma). The addition of any of four species of juniper or mesquite may be substituted for CSH without negatively affecting carcass fat and muscling, fatty acid, or sensory traits.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1802
[Cu] Class update date: 180308
[Lr] Last revision date:180308
[St] Status:In-Process
[do] DOI:10.1093/jas/sky024

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[PMID]: 29329343
[Au] Autor:Liu Z; Dugan B; Masiello CA; Wahab LM; Gonnermann HM; Nittrouer JA
[Ad] Address:Department of Earth, Environmental, and Planetary Sciences, Rice University, Houston, Texas, United States of America.
[Ti] Title:Effect of freeze-thaw cycling on grain size of biochar.
[So] Source:PLoS One;13(1):e0191246, 2018.
[Is] ISSN:1932-6203
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Biochar may improve soil hydrology by altering soil porosity, density, hydraulic conductivity, and water-holding capacity. These properties are associated with the grain size distributions of both soil and biochar, and therefore may change as biochar weathers. Here we report how freeze-thaw (F-T) cycling impacts the grain size of pine, mesquite, miscanthus, and sewage waste biochars under two drainage conditions: undrained (all biochars) and a gravity-drained experiment (mesquite biochar only). In the undrained experiment plant biochars showed a decrease in median grain size and a change in grain-size distribution consistent with the flaking off of thin layers from the biochar surface. Biochar grain size distribution changed from unimodal to bimodal, with lower peaks and wider distributions. For plant biochars the median grain size decreased by up to 45.8% and the grain aspect ratio increased by up to 22.4% after 20 F-T cycles. F-T cycling did not change the grain size or aspect ratio of sewage waste biochar. We also observed changes in the skeletal density of biochars (maximum increase of 1.3%), envelope density (maximum decrease of 12.2%), and intraporosity (porosity inside particles, maximum increase of 3.2%). In the drained experiment, mesquite biochar exhibited a decrease of median grain size (up to 4.2%) and no change of aspect ratio after 10 F-T cycles. We also document a positive relationship between grain size decrease and initial water content, suggesting that, biochar properties that increase water content, like high intraporosity and pore connectivity large intrapores, and hydrophilicity, combined with undrained conditions and frequent F-T cycles may increase biochar breakdown. The observed changes in biochar particle size and shape can be expected to alter hydrologic properties, and thus may impact both plant growth and the hydrologic cycle.
[Mh] MeSH terms primary: Charcoal/chemistry
Soil/chemistry
[Mh] MeSH terms secundary: Ecosystem
Freezing
Hydrology
Particle Size
Pinus
Poaceae
Porosity
Prosopis
Sewage
Temperature
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE; RESEARCH SUPPORT, NON-U.S. GOV'T
[Nm] Name of substance:0 (Sewage); 0 (Soil); 0 (biochar); 16291-96-6 (Charcoal)
[Em] Entry month:1802
[Cu] Class update date: 180226
[Lr] Last revision date:180226
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[Da] Date of entry for processing:180113
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.1371/journal.pone.0191246

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[PMID]: 29476206
[Au] Autor:Román-Ponce B; Ramos-Garza J; Arroyo-Herrera I; Maldonado-Hernández J; Bahena-Osorio Y; Vásquez-Murrieta MS; Wang ET
[Ad] Address:Instituto Politécnico Nacional, Escuela Nacional de Ciencias Biológicas, Prolongación Carpio y Plan de Ayala s/n, Col. Santo Tomás, Del. Miguel Hidalgo, C.P. 11340, Mexico City, Mexico.
[Ti] Title:Mechanism of arsenic resistance in endophytic bacteria isolated from endemic plant of mine tailings and their arsenophore production.
[So] Source:Arch Microbiol;, 2018 Feb 23.
[Is] ISSN:1432-072X
[Cp] Country of publication:Germany
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Arsenic contamination is an important environmental problem around the world since its high toxicity, and bacteria resist to this element serve as valuable resource for its bioremediation. Aiming at searching the arsenic-resistant bacteria and determining their resistant mechanism, a total of 27 strains isolated from roots of Prosopis laevigata and Spharealcea angustifolia grown in a heavy metal-contaminated region in Mexico were investigated. The minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) and transformation abilities of arsenate (As ) and arsenite (As ), arsenophore synthesis, arsenate uptake, and cytoplasmatic arsenate reductase (arsC), and arsenite transporter (arsB) genes were studied for these strains. Based on these results and the 16S rDNA sequence analysis, these isolates were identified as arsenic-resistant endophytic bacteria (AREB) belonging to the genera Arthrobacter, Bacillus, Brevibacterium, Kocuria, Microbacterium, Micrococcus, Pseudomonas, and Staphylococcus. They could tolerate high concentrations of arsenic with MIC from 20 to > 100 mM for As and 10-20 mM for As . Eleven isolates presented dual abilities of As reduction and As oxidation. As the most effective strains, Micrococcus luteus NE2E1 reduced 94% of the As and Pseudomonas zhaodongensis NM2E7 oxidized 46% of As under aerobic condition. About 70 and 44% of the test strains produced arsenophores to chelate As and As , respectively. The AREB may absorb arsenate via the same receptor of phosphate uptake or via other way in some case. The cytoplasmic arsenate reductase and alternative arsenate reduction pathways exist in these AREB. Therefore, these AREB could be candidates for the bioremediation process.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1802
[Cu] Class update date: 180224
[Lr] Last revision date:180224
[St] Status:Publisher
[do] DOI:10.1007/s00203-018-1495-1

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[PMID]: 29461766
[Au] Autor:Bravo SJ; Pece M; del Corro F; Ojeda Brozovich F; Lepiscopo M
[Ti] Title:[Anatomical changes in roots and hypocotyls of Prosopis ruscifolia (Fabaceae) seedlings exposed to saline stress].
[So] Source:Rev Biol Trop;64(3):1007-17, 2016 Sep.
[Is] ISSN:0034-7744
[Cp] Country of publication:Costa Rica
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Prosopis ruscifolia is a pioneer tree species in flooding or saline areas. The aim of this work was to assess anatomical changes in roots and hypocotyls of P. ruscifolia seedlings induced to saline stress under controlled conditions. Seeds, collected in natural forests of Western Chaco region in Argentina, were sown on paper towels moisturized with saline solutions of 100, 200 and 300 mM of NaCl, and a control group with distilled water. Four repetitions of 50 seeds per treatment were sown, located in hermetic polystyrene boxes, and included in a seeding chamber, at 27 ºC and 12 hours photoperiod. Were studied 35 seedlings from each saline concentration; these seedlings were processed 12 days after sown to obtain microscopic samples. The anatomical variables measured in roots and hypocotyls were the following: main root diameter (µm), bark thickness (µm), number of cell strata in bark, central cylinder diameter (µm), pith diameter (µm), number of cell strata in the pericycle and the tangential diameter of vessels (µm). ANOVA analysis were performed with hypocotyl and root diameters as the dependent variable, and bark thickness (µm), number of cell strata in the bark, the central cylinder diameter (µm), the pith diameter (µm), number of cell strata in the pericycle, the tangential diameter of vessels and the saline concentration as independent variables. Results showed that the root diameter decreased with increasing saline concentrations (P < 0.0001). The bark thickness decreased at 100 mM (P < 0.0001) and the number of cell strata of bark increased to 300 mM (P < 0.0002). The central cylinder diameter decreased at 100 mM saline concentration (P < 0.0001) and the number of cell strata of the pericycle and the pith diameter reduced progressively until 300 mM. The tangential diameter of vessels decreased at 300 mM. These anatomical changes suggested alterations in the expansion and cell division caused by the salinity, and could limit lateral roots formation and reserves storage. Hypocotyls did not show significant anatomical changes in response to increasing salinity, with exception of stomata position and an increase of the hypodermis thickness. These changes indicated that the water stress imposed by low osmotic potential is caused by increasing saline concentration. The seedlings of P. ruscifolia experienced anatomical changes in response to tested saline concentrations in traits related to reserve storage, the absorption and conduction of water, and lateral roots formation.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1802
[Cu] Class update date: 180220
[Lr] Last revision date:180220
[St] Status:In-Process

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[PMID]: 29460196
[Au] Autor:Zafari S; Sharifi M; Chashmi NA
[Ad] Address:Department of Plant Biology, Faculty of Biological Sciences, Tarbiat Modares University, Tehran, 14115-154, Iran.
[Ti] Title:A comparative study of biotechnological approaches for producing valuable flavonoids in Prosopis farcta.
[So] Source:Cytotechnology;, 2018 Feb 19.
[Is] ISSN:0920-9069
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:The callus and hairy root cultures of Prosopis farcta were established to develop effective strategies to enhance its valuable and medicinally important flavonoid compounds. For callus induction, the hypocotyl, cotyledon and shoot explants were subjected to different plant hormones, naphthalene acetic acid (NAA), benzylaminopurine (BAP), kinetin and dichlorophenoxyacetic acid (2,4-D). Greater callus induction was obtained from hypocotyl explants on MS medium containing 3.0 mg L NAA + 2.0 mg L BAP. With the addition of 0.5 mg L asparagine to this medium, the maximum callus growth was achieved. Hairy root culture of P. farcta was performed using transformation of different explants with strains of Agrobacterium rhizogenes LBA9404, A4, AR15834. The AR15834 strain was more effective for hairy root induction where it caused hairy root formation on 59% of the infected cotyledon explants. We compared profiles of flavonoids isolated from seedling roots, hairy roots, and callus cultures of P. farcta. The colorimetric analysis showed that the content of total flavonoids of hairy roots was 1.54 and 2.52 times higher than in seedling roots and callus, respectively. The presence of flavonoids was verified by LC/MS in positive ion mode. The results showed that flavonoid composition was different in the roots and callus. Naringenin was the major constituent in callus, whereas resveratrol, quercetin and myricetin were the most abundant compounds found in hairy roots. The main objective of this research was to establish hairy roots in P. farcta to synthesize flavonoids at levels comparable to in vitro-grown roots. The present study also opens up a way to further improve the production of pharmaceutically valuable flavonoids and to produce desired metabolites using the hairy root culture system.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1802
[Cu] Class update date: 180220
[Lr] Last revision date:180220
[St] Status:Publisher
[do] DOI:10.1007/s10616-017-0143-y

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[PMID]: 29314069
[Au] Autor:Johnson DM; Domec JC; Carter Berry Z; Schwantes AM; McCulloh KA; Woodruff DR; Wayne Polley H; Wortemann R; Swenson JJ; Scott Mackay D; McDowell NG; Jackson RB
[Ad] Address:College of Natural Resources, University of Idaho, Moscow, ID, 83844, USA.
[Ti] Title:Co-occurring woody species have diverse hydraulic strategies and mortality rates during an extreme drought.
[So] Source:Plant Cell Environ;41(3):576-588, 2018 Mar.
[Is] ISSN:1365-3040
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:From 2011 to 2013, Texas experienced its worst drought in recorded history. This event provided a unique natural experiment to assess species-specific responses to extreme drought and mortality of four co-occurring woody species: Quercus fusiformis, Diospyros texana, Prosopis glandulosa, and Juniperus ashei. We examined hypothesized mechanisms that could promote these species' diverse mortality patterns using postdrought measurements on surviving trees coupled to retrospective process modelling. The species exhibited a wide range of gas exchange responses, hydraulic strategies, and mortality rates. Multiple proposed indices of mortality mechanisms were inconsistent with the observed mortality patterns across species, including measures of the degree of iso/anisohydry, photosynthesis, carbohydrate depletion, and hydraulic safety margins. Large losses of spring and summer whole-tree conductance (driven by belowground losses of conductance) and shallower rooting depths were associated with species that exhibited greater mortality. Based on this retrospective analysis, we suggest that species more vulnerable to drought were more likely to have succumbed to hydraulic failure belowground.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1801
[Cu] Class update date: 180209
[Lr] Last revision date:180209
[St] Status:In-Data-Review
[do] DOI:10.1111/pce.13121

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[PMID]: 29412931
[Au] Autor:Vasile FE; Judis MA; Mazzobre MF
[Ad] Address:Laboratorio de Industrias Alimentarias II, Universidad Nacional del Chaco Austral, Comandante Fernández 755, Presidencia Roque Sáenz Peña 3700, Chaco, Argentina; Consejo Nacional de Investigaciones Científicas y Técnicas (CONICET), Argentina. Electronic address: francovasile@uncaus.edu.ar.
[Ti] Title:Impact of Prosopis alba exudate gum on sorption properties and physical stability of fish oil alginate beads prepared by ionic gelation.
[So] Source:Food Chem;250:75-82, 2018 Jun 01.
[Is] ISSN:0308-8146
[Cp] Country of publication:England
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:This study was conducted to evaluate the effect of Prosopis alba exudate gum (G) as encapsulating matrix component on water-solid interactions, physical state, oxidative damage and appearance properties of alginate-chitosan encapsulates containing fish oil. With this purpose, water sorption isotherms were obtained at 25 °C. G increased the hygroscopicity of encapsulates, showing a higher monolayer water content (7.87 ±â€¯0.47% db.) than control (1.07 ±â€¯0.04% db.). G introduction reduced the plasticizing effect of water, increasing the a range (a < 0.45) at which samples were in amorphous state and providing the highest protection against lipid oxidation. Appearance properties (chromatic and optical) were affected by hydration and were better maintained in samples containing G at a > 0.52. These results allow considering Prosopis alba exudate gum, as a novel excipient to protect fish oil encapsulated in low moisture polyelectrolyte systems, with the added benefits of employing an undervalued natural resource.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1802
[Cu] Class update date: 180207
[Lr] Last revision date:180207
[St] Status:In-Process

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[PMID]: 29323781
[Au] Autor:Zhou Y; Boutton TW; Wu XB
[Ad] Address:Department of Ecosystem Science and Management, Texas A&M University, College Station, TX, USA.
[Ti] Title:Soil phosphorus does not keep pace with soil carbon and nitrogen accumulation following woody encroachment.
[So] Source:Glob Chang Biol;, 2018 Jan 11.
[Is] ISSN:1365-2486
[Cp] Country of publication:England
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Soil carbon, nitrogen, and phosphorus cycles are strongly interlinked and controlled through biological processes, and the phosphorus cycle is further controlled through geochemical processes. In dryland ecosystems, woody encroachment often modifies soil carbon, nitrogen, and phosphorus stores, although it remains unknown if these three elements change proportionally in response to this vegetation change. We evaluated proportional changes and spatial patterns of soil organic carbon (SOC), total nitrogen (TN), and total phosphorus (TP) concentrations following woody encroachment by taking spatially explicit soil cores to a depth of 1.2 m across a subtropical savanna landscape which has undergone encroachment by Prosopis glandulosa (an N fixer) and other woody species during the past century in southern Texas, USA. SOC and TN were coupled with respect to increasing magnitudes and spatial patterns throughout the soil profile following woody encroachment, while TP increased slower than SOC and TN in topmost surface soils (0-5 cm) but faster in subsurface soils (15-120 cm). Spatial patterns of TP strongly resembled those of vegetation cover throughout the soil profile, but differed from those of SOC and TN, especially in subsurface soils. The encroachment of woody species dominated by N -fixing trees into this P-limited ecosystem resulted in the accumulation of proportionally less soil P compared to C and N in surface soils; however, proportionally more P accrued in deeper portions of the soil profile beneath woody patches where alkaline soil pH and high carbonate concentrations would favor precipitation of P as relatively insoluble calcium phosphates. This imbalanced relationship highlights that the relative importance of biotic vs. abiotic mechanisms controlling C and N vs. P accumulation following vegetation change may vary with depth. Our findings suggest that efforts to incorporate effects of land cover changes into coupled climate-biogeochemical models should attempt to represent C-N-P imbalances that may arise following vegetation change.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1801
[Cu] Class update date: 180207
[Lr] Last revision date:180207
[St] Status:Publisher
[do] DOI:10.1111/gcb.14048

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[PMID]: 29241010
[Au] Autor:Hammond CM; Root RA; Maier RM; Chorover J
[Ad] Address:Department of Soil, Water, and Environmental Science, University of Arizona , 1177 East Fourth Street, Shantz 429, Tucson, Arizona 85721, United States.
[Ti] Title:Mechanisms of Arsenic Sequestration by Prosopis juliflora during the Phytostabilization of Metalliferous Mine Tailings.
[So] Source:Environ Sci Technol;52(3):1156-1164, 2018 Feb 06.
[Is] ISSN:1520-5851
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Phytostabilization is a cost-effective long-term bioremediation technique for the immobilization of metalliferous mine tailings. However, the biogeochemical processes affecting metal(loid) molecular stabilization and mobility in the root zone remain poorly resolved. The roots of Prosopis juliflora grown for up to 36 months in compost-amended pyritic mine tailings from a federal Superfund site were investigated by microscale and bulk synchrotron X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) and multiple energy micro-X-ray fluorescence imaging to determine iron, arsenic, and sulfur speciation, abundance, and spatial distribution. Whereas ferrihydrite-bound As(V) species predominated in the initial bulk mine tailings, the rhizosphere speciation of arsenic was distinctly different. Root-associated As(V) was immobilized on the root epidermis bound to ferric sulfate precipitates and within root vacuoles as trivalent As(III)-(SR) tris-thiolate complexes. Molar Fe-to-As ratios of root epidermis tissue were two times higher than the 15% compost-amended bulk tailings growth medium. Rhizoplane-associated ferric sulfate phases that showed a high capacity to scavenge As(V) were dissimilar from the bulk-tailings mineralogy as shown by XAS and X-ray diffraction, indicating a root-surface mechanism for their formation or accumulation.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1712
[Cu] Class update date: 180206
[Lr] Last revision date:180206
[St] Status:In-Data-Review
[do] DOI:10.1021/acs.est.7b04363

  10 / 517 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29222720
[Au] Autor:Yule KM; Bronstein JL
[Ad] Address:Department of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology, University of Arizona, 1041 E Lowell St, Tucson, AZ, 85721, USA. kyule@email.arizona.edu.
[Ti] Title:Reproductive ecology of a parasitic plant differs by host species: vector interactions and the maintenance of host races.
[So] Source:Oecologia;186(2):471-482, 2018 Feb.
[Is] ISSN:1432-1939
[Cp] Country of publication:Germany
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Parasitic plants often attack multiple host species with unique defenses, physiology, and ecology. Reproductive phenology and vectors of parasitic plant genes (pollinators and dispersers) can contribute to or erode reproductive isolation of populations infecting different host species. We asked whether desert mistletoe, Phoradendron californicum (Santalaceae tribe Visceae syn. Viscaceae), differs ecologically across its dominant leguminous hosts in ways affecting reproductive isolation. Parasite flowering phenology on one host species (velvet mesquite, Prosopis velutina) differed significantly from that on four others, and phenology was not predicted by host species phenology or host individual. Comparing mistletoe populations on mesquite and another common host species (catclaw acacia, Senegalia greggii) for which genetically distinct host races are known, we tested for differences in interactions with vectors by quantifying pollinator visitation, reward production, pollen receipt, and fruit consumption. Mistletoes on mesquite produced more pollinator rewards per flower (1.86 times the nectar and 1.92 times the pollen) and received ~ 2 more pollen grains per flower than those on acacia. Mistletoes on the two host species interacted with distinct but overlapping pollinator communities, and pollinator taxa differed in visitation according to host species. Yet, mistletoes of neither host showed uniformly greater reproductive success. Fruit set (0.70) did not differ by host, and the rates of fruit ripening and removal differed in contrasting ways. Altogether, we estimate strong but asymmetric pre-zygotic isolating barriers between mistletoes on the two hosts. These host-associated differences in reproduction have implications for interactions with mutualist vectors and population genetic structure.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1712
[Cu] Class update date: 180206
[Lr] Last revision date:180206
[St] Status:In-Data-Review
[do] DOI:10.1007/s00442-017-4038-6


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