Database : MEDLINE
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[PMID]: 29501675
[Au] Autor:Park E; Lee MY; Jeon WY; Seo CS; You S; Shin HK
[Ad] Address:K-herb Research Center, Korea Institute of Oriental Medicine, 1672 Yuseong-daero, Yuseong-gu, Daejeon 34054, Republic of Korea. Electronic address: eunsook@kiom.re.kr.
[Ti] Title:Paljung-San, a traditional herbal medicine, attenuates benign prostatic hyperplasia in vitro and in vivo.
[So] Source:J Ethnopharmacol;218:109-115, 2018 Mar 06.
[Is] ISSN:1872-7573
[Cp] Country of publication:Ireland
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:ETHNOPHARMACOLOGICAL RELEVANCE: Paljung-san is a traditional herbal medicine used widely for the treatment of urogenital diseases in East Asia. However, scientific evidence of the efficacy of Paljung-san and its mechanisms of action against benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) is not clearly established. AIM OF THE STUDY: We investigated the inhibitory effect of Paljung-san water extract (PSWE) and its mechanisms against BPH in vitro and in vivo. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Active compounds of PSWE were analyzed quantitatively by High-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). For in vitro study, PSWE treated BPH-1 cells were used to perform western blot analysis, cell cycle analysis and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. For in vivo BPH model, male rats were subcutaneously injected with 10 mg/kg of testosterone propionate (TP) every day for four weeks. 200 and 500 mg/kg of PSWE was administrated daily by oral gavage with s.c. injection of TP, respectively. RESULTS: HPLC revealed that PSWE contains 1.21, 1.18, 2.27, 3.56, 4.23, 3.00, 6.78, and 0.004 mg/g of gallic acid, 5-caffeoylquinic acid, chlorogenic acid, geniposide, liquiritin apioside, liquiritin, glycyrrhizin, and chrysophanol components, respectively. In human BPH-1 cells, PSWE treatment reduced cell proliferation through arresting the cell cycle in the DNA synthesis phase. Moreover, PSWE suppressed prostaglandin E production with reduced cyclooxygenase-2 expression. In TP -induced BPH rat model, PSWE administration showed reduced prostate weights and dihydrotestosterone levels and led to a restoration of normal prostate morphology. PSWE also decreased TP-induced Ki-67 and cyclin D1 protein levels in the prostatic tissues. Decreased glutathione reductase activity and increased malondialdehyde levels in the BPH groups were reversed by PSWE administration. CONCLUSION: PSWE attenuates the progression of BPH through anti-proliferative, anti-inflammatory and anti-oxidant activities in vitro and in vivo. Therefore, these data provide the scientific evidence of pharmacological efficacy of PSWE against BPH.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1803
[Cu] Class update date: 180310
[Lr] Last revision date:180310
[St] Status:Publisher

  2 / 14085 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29376600
[Au] Autor:Biktimirov RG; Martov AG; Biktimirov TR; Kaputovskii AA
[Ad] Address:Federal Clinical Center for High Medical Technologies FMBA of Russia, Moscow Region, Khimki, Russia.
[Ti] Title:[The role of extraperitoneoscopic adenomectomy in the management of benign prostatic hyperplasia greater than 80 cm3].
[So] Source:Urologiia;(6):76-81, 2017 Dec.
[Is] ISSN:1728-2985
[Cp] Country of publication:Russia (Federation)
[La] Language:rus
[Ab] Abstract:INTRODUCTION: The current standard of surgery for benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) greater than 80 cm3 includes open adenomectomy and holmium enucleation. Transurethral resection and laser vaporization are second line interventions, while the role of laparoscopic extraperitoneal adenomectomy is not fully understood. AIM: To evaluate the role of laparoscopic technique as a surgical modality for BPH greater than 80 cm3. MATERIALS AND METHODS: This study retrospectively evaluated the results of 79 patients (mean age 68 years) who underwent transcapsular extraperitoneoscopic adenomectomy from 2011 to 2016. RESULTS: The mean operative time was 206 (100-450) min; the prostate volume was 134 (80-300) cm3, blood loss was 256 (30-1200) ml. The I-PSS score after surgery decreased by an average of 18.3 points, the maximum urinary flow rate increased by 12 ml/s, the residual urine volume reduced from 147 to 28 ml. 35 (44%) patients underwent simultaneous operations (inguinal hernioplasty, cystolithotomy, etc.). There was one intraoperative complication, and 10 (12.6%) patients had postoperative complications. There were no conversions to open surgery. Incidental prostate cancer was detected in one patient. None of the patients required repeat surgery for infravesical obstruction. CONCLUSION: Extraperitoneoscopic adenomectomy is efficient, safe and reproducible surgical modality able to take the place of open surgery. There is a need for an evidence base to support the optimal choice between various minimally invasive techniques. Currently, laparoscopic procedure is more justified in patients with concomitant diseases, which can be simultaneously corrected.
[Mh] MeSH terms primary: Laparoscopy/methods
Prostatic Hyperplasia/surgery
Urologic Surgical Procedures, Male/methods
[Mh] MeSH terms secundary: Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Prostatic Hyperplasia/diagnostic imaging
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1803
[Cu] Class update date: 180309
[Lr] Last revision date:180309
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[Da] Date of entry for processing:180130
[St] Status:MEDLINE

  3 / 14085 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29376596
[Au] Autor:Krivoborodov GG; Efremov NS; Bolotov AD
[Ad] Address:Department of Urology and Andrology, Medical Faculty of N.I. Pirogov RNRMU of Minzdrav of Russia, Moscow, Russia.
[Ti] Title:[Transabdominal and transrectal ultrasound assessment of intravesical prostatic protrusion].
[So] Source:Urologiia;(6):55-58, 2017 Dec.
[Is] ISSN:1728-2985
[Cp] Country of publication:Russia (Federation)
[La] Language:rus
[Ab] Abstract:RELEVANCE: Benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) is one of the most common urological diseases among men. Despite the noticeable positive effects of pharmacotherapy on the quality of urination in BPH, the presence of an intravesical obstruction (IVO) leads to discontinuation of conservative treatment in favor of surgical interventions. One of the features of prostate enlargement is the degree of its intravesical growth (intravascular prostatic protrusion, IPP). According to some studies, IPP value of 10 mm or more is indicative of IVO in virtually all men. AIM: To compare transabdominal and transrectal ultrasound measurement of IPP in men with BPH. MATERIALS AND METHODS: The study comprised 108 men aged 69+/-10 years (43 to 93 years) with lower urinary tract symptoms and BPH. Patients underwent a standard urological examination. The shape of the prostate, prostate volume and the measurements of the IPP were assessed using transabdominal and transrectal ultrasound. RESULTS: The IPP measurements obtained using transabdominal and transrectal ultrasound were 9.8+/-5.7 mm (1.1 to 28 mm) and 9.3+/-5.3 mm (0.5 to 26 mm), respectively. The IPP measurements evaluated by transabdominal and transrectal ultrasound were found comparable regardless of the prostate volume. CONCLUSION: Similar results in assessing PPI by both ultrasound modalities allow them to be used equally effectively.
[Mh] MeSH terms primary: Prostatic Hyperplasia/diagnostic imaging
[Mh] MeSH terms secundary: Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Ultrasonography/methods
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1803
[Cu] Class update date: 180309
[Lr] Last revision date:180309
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[Da] Date of entry for processing:180130
[St] Status:MEDLINE

  4 / 14085 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29520019
[Au] Autor:Magli A; Moretti E; Tullio A; Giannarini G; Tonetto F; Urpis M; Crespi M; Foti C; Prisco A; Polsinelli M; De Giorgi G; Bravo G; Scalchi P; Trov M
[Ad] Address:Department of Radiation Oncology, University Hospital of Udine, ASUIUD - piazzale S.M della Misericordia 15, 33100, Udine, Italy. alessandro.magli@asuiud.sanita.fvg.it.
[Ti] Title:Hypofractionated simultaneous integrated boost (IMRT-SIB) with pelvic nodal irradiation and concurrent androgen deprivation therapy for high-risk prostate cancer: results of a prospective phase II trial.
[So] Source:Prostate Cancer Prostatic Dis;, 2018 Mar 08.
[Is] ISSN:1476-5608
[Cp] Country of publication:England
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:OBJECTIVE: The approach for treating high-risk prostate cancer still presents different unresolved issues. We report the safety and efficacy of a radiation therapy strategy based on the combination of moderate hypofractioned simultaneous integrated boost (SIB) and Image Guidance. MATERIALS AND METHODS: In this phase II trial of patients with high-risk prostate cancer, Image Guided SIB-IMRT plans (Simultaneous Intensity Modulated - Intensity Modulated Radiotherapy) were delivered between 2009 and 2012. All patients enrolled (41) received in 25 fractions a total dose of 67.5 Gy (2.7 Gy/fraction) to the prostatic volume, 56.25 Gy (2.25 Gy/fraction) to the seminal vescicles, and 50 Gy (2.0 Gy/fraction) to the pelvic lymph nodes (LN) chains with concurrent androgen deprivation therapy (ADT). The image-guided radiotherapy (IGRT) procedure was performed using three gold seeds. RTOG late gastrointestinal and genitourinary toxicities and 6-year biochemical relapse-free survival (BRFS) were assessed in combination of their statistical correlation with clinical factors and dosimetric parameters. RESULTS: Rate of late genitourinary toxicity grade 2 was 9.8%, while rates of late gastrointestinal toxicity were 14.6% and 2.4%, for grade 1 and 2, respectively. Diabetes and maximum doses to rectum appeared to be statistically relevant risk factors for late rectal toxicity. Five-year BRFS was 95.1%. CONCLUSIONS: In our study, we observed positive results in terms of toxicity and good efficacy in a cohort of high-risk prostate cancer patients treated with a multimodality therapy approach comprising hypofractionation, irradiation of pelvic nodes (common iliac nodes included), and concurrent ADT. These favorable results may merit further investigation in a phase III randomized trial to confirm that whole pelvic radiation therapy (WPRT) combined with moderate hypofractionation and ADT could be performed safely and effectively.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1803
[Cu] Class update date: 180309
[Lr] Last revision date:180309
[St] Status:Publisher
[do] DOI:10.1038/s41391-018-0034-0

  5 / 14085 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29489699
[Au] Autor:Qiu Y; Liu Y; Ren W; Ren J
[Ad] Address:Department of General Practice, the First Affiliated Hospital, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou, Zhejiang, China.
[Ti] Title:Prostatic cyst in general practice: A case report and literature review.
[So] Source:Medicine (Baltimore);97(9):e9985, 2018 Mar.
[Is] ISSN:1536-5964
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:RATIONALE: Prostatic cyst is a rare disease of the prostate especially in general practice. As it is often asymptomatic, how to manage it is still unfamiliar with, general practitioners (GPs). PATIENT CONCERNS: The 24-year-old man presented with left back discomfort for 1 week without severe pain, dysuria, or fever. DIAGNOSES: Ultrasonography revealed the presence of a 1414 mm cystic lesion. INTERVENTIONS: The patient was given the medicine and regular follow-up. OUTCOMES: Several days later, he recovered without lower back discomfort. LESSONS: Patients with prostatic cyst of small size and no symptom should be follow-up regularly. Although prostatic cyst of progressive symptoms, large size (2.5 cm or larger), or high serum prostate-specific antigen (PSA) should be timely referred to urological specialists.
[Mh] MeSH terms primary: Cysts/complications
General Practice/methods
Low Back Pain/etiology
Prostatic Diseases/complications
[Mh] MeSH terms secundary: Cysts/diagnostic imaging
Humans
Low Back Pain/diagnostic imaging
Male
Prostatic Diseases/diagnostic imaging
Ultrasonography
Young Adult
[Pt] Publication type:CASE REPORTS; JOURNAL ARTICLE; REVIEW
[Em] Entry month:1803
[Cu] Class update date: 180307
[Lr] Last revision date:180307
[Js] Journal subset:AIM; IM
[Da] Date of entry for processing:180301
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.1097/MD.0000000000009985

  6 / 14085 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 27779203
[Au] Autor:Villalobos-Hernandez A; Bobbala D; Kandhi R; Khan MG; Mayhue M; Dubois CM; Ferbeyre G; Saucier C; Ramanathan S; Ilangumaran S
[Ad] Address:Immunology Division, Department of Pediatrics, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences, University of Sherbrooke, Sherbrooke, Quebec, Canada.
[Ti] Title:SOCS1 inhibits migration and invasion of prostate cancer cells, attenuates tumor growth and modulates the tumor stroma.
[So] Source:Prostate Cancer Prostatic Dis;20(1):36-47, 2017 Mar.
[Is] ISSN:1476-5608
[Cp] Country of publication:England
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:BACKGROUND: The suppressor of cytokine signaling 1 (SOCS1) gene is repressed in prostate cancer (PCa) by epigenetic silencing and microRNA miR30d. Increased expression of the SOCS1-targeting miR30d correlates with higher biochemical recurrence, suggesting a tumor suppressor role of SOCS1 in PCa, but the underlying mechanisms are unclear. We have shown that SOCS1 inhibits MET receptor kinase signaling, a key oncogenic pathway in cancer progression. Here we evaluated the role of SOCS1 in attenuating MET signaling in PCa cells and tumor growth in vivo. METHODS: MET-overexpressing human DU145 and PC3 PCa cell lines were stably transduced with SOCS1, and their growth, migration and invasion of collagen matrix were evaluated in vitro. Cells expressing SOCS1 or the control vector were evaluated for tumor growth in NOD.scid.gamma mice as xenograft or orthotopic tumors. RESULTS: HGF-induced MET signaling was attenuated in SOCS1-expressing DU145 and PC3 cells. Compared with vector control cells, SOCS1-expressing cells showed reduced proliferation and impaired migration following HGF stimulation. DU145 and PC3 cells showed marked ability to invade the collagen matrix following HGF stimulation and this was attenuated by SOCS1. As xenografts, SOCS1-expressing PCa cells showed significantly reduced tumor growth compared with vector control cells. In the orthotopic tumor model, SOCS1 reduced the growth of primary tumors and metastatic spread. Intriguingly, the SOCS1-expressing DU145 and PC3 tumors showed increased collagen deposition, associated with increased frequency of myofibroblasts. CONCLUSIONS: Our findings support the tumor suppressor role of SOCS1 in PCa and suggest that attenuation of MET signaling is one of the underlying mechanisms. SOCS1 in PCa cells also appears to prevent the tumor-promoting functions of cancer-associated fibroblasts.
[Mh] MeSH terms primary: Prostatic Neoplasms/metabolism
Prostatic Neoplasms/pathology
Stromal Cells/metabolism
Suppressor of Cytokine Signaling 1 Protein/metabolism
[Mh] MeSH terms secundary: Animals
Cell Line, Tumor
Cell Movement
Cell Proliferation
Cell Transformation, Neoplastic/genetics
Cell Transformation, Neoplastic/metabolism
Collagen/metabolism
DNA Methylation
Disease Models, Animal
Epigenesis, Genetic
Gene Expression
Hepatocyte Growth Factor/metabolism
Heterografts
Humans
Male
Mice
Neoplasm Invasiveness
Neoplasm Metastasis
Prostatic Neoplasms/genetics
Proto-Oncogene Proteins c-met/metabolism
Signal Transduction
Stromal Cells/pathology
Suppressor of Cytokine Signaling 1 Protein/genetics
Tumor Burden
Tumor Microenvironment
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Nm] Name of substance:0 (HGF protein, human); 0 (SOCS1 protein, human); 0 (Suppressor of Cytokine Signaling 1 Protein); 67256-21-7 (Hepatocyte Growth Factor); 9007-34-5 (Collagen); EC 2.7.10.1 (Proto-Oncogene Proteins c-met)
[Em] Entry month:1803
[Cu] Class update date: 180305
[Lr] Last revision date:180305
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[Da] Date of entry for processing:161026
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.1038/pcan.2016.50

  7 / 14085 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 27779202
[Au] Autor:Moschini M; Soria F; Briganti A; Shariat SF
[Ad] Address:Department of Urology, Comprehensive Cancer Center, Medical University of Vienna, Vienna General Hospital, Vienna, Austria.
[Ti] Title:The impact of local treatment of the primary tumor site in node positive and metastatic prostate cancer patients.
[So] Source:Prostate Cancer Prostatic Dis;20(1):7-11, 2017 Mar.
[Is] ISSN:1476-5608
[Cp] Country of publication:England
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:BACKGROUND: Surgical treatment of the primary tumor in patients with metastatic prostate cancer (mPCa) is gaining traction. We discuss the biological rational and the existing literature on this approach. METHODS: We reviewed the literature regarding surgical management of advanced and mPCa disease. RESULTS: Surgical removal of the primary tumor despite metastases is becoming a standard in an increasing number of malignancies. Basic science data support the use of surgical removal of the prostate in metastatic PCa. In addition, durable long-term survival has been reported in patients with node-positive PCa treated with radical prostatectomy (RP) as mono or multimodal approach. Based on these data, several groups have demonstrated the feasibility and safety of RP in the metastatic setting. Retrospective series have also reported an improvement in survival for metastatic patients treated with RP in addition to systemic treatment. CONCLUSIONS: Although no level I data exist at this time to support the use of RP in clinically node-positive or mPCa patients, retrospective data together with basic research data and experience from other malignancies suggest that treatment of the primary tumor, in form of a RP, is safe and could improve long-term quality of life and survival. However, prospective evaluations are requested to validate these findings before including in the standard clinical practice.
[Mh] MeSH terms primary: Prostatectomy
Prostatic Neoplasms/diagnosis
Prostatic Neoplasms/surgery
[Mh] MeSH terms secundary: Animals
Combined Modality Therapy
Disease Management
Humans
Male
Models, Animal
Neoplasm Metastasis
Neoplasm Staging
Prostatectomy/methods
Prostatic Neoplasms/mortality
Prostatic Neoplasms/therapy
Treatment Outcome
Tumor Burden
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE; META-ANALYSIS; REVIEW
[Em] Entry month:1803
[Cu] Class update date: 180305
[Lr] Last revision date:180305
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[Da] Date of entry for processing:161026
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.1038/pcan.2016.52

  8 / 14085 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29500572
[Au] Autor:Kalalahti I; Huotari K; Lahdensuo K; Tarkka E; Santti H; Rannikko A; Ptri-Sampo A
[Ad] Address:Department of Urology, University of Helsinki and Helsinki University Hospital, Helsinki, Finland. inari.kalalahti@hus.fi.
[Ti] Title:Rectal E. coli above ciprofloxacin ECOFF associate with infectious complications following prostate biopsy.
[So] Source:Eur J Clin Microbiol Infect Dis;, 2018 Mar 02.
[Is] ISSN:1435-4373
[Cp] Country of publication:Germany
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Transrectal prostate biopsies carry the risk of infection. By using non-selective culture plates, instead of commonly used ciprofloxacin (CIP)-containing plates, we analyzed the association between Escherichia coli CIP minimal inhibitory concentration (MIC) and post-biopsy infectious complications. A pre-biopsy rectal swab was taken from 207 consecutive men, scheduled for transrectal 12-core prostate biopsy with CIP 750mg as the mostly used prophylaxis. CIP MIC of rectal Gram-negative bacilli was determined from a chromogenic agar. Rectal E. coli were categorized to resistant (R) and intermediate (I) isolates together (R + I, MIC > 0.25mg/l) and to sensitive (S, MIC ≤ 0.25mg/l) using EUCAST clinical breakpoints. In addition, epidemiological cutoff (ECOFF R, MIC > 0.064mg/l) was used for categorization. Eighteen (8.7%) men showed CIP R + I E. coli by the EUCAST breakpoints and 41 (19.8%) using the ECOFF R criteria. During follow-up, 15 (7.2%) men had infectious symptoms, of which 9 (4.3%) were culture-confirmed infections. Only 4 (26.7%) of these 15 patients showed R + I E. coli in the rectal swab according to EUCAST, but 10 (66.7%) using the ECOFF cutoff. Rectal E. coli CIP R + I by the EUCAST clinical breakpoints associated with infectious complications with OR 5.7 (95% CI 1.5-21.8, P = 0.005) and ECOFF R E. coli by OR 10.7 (95% CI 3.0-37.6, P < 0.001). Men carrying rectal E. coli with moderately lowered CIP susceptibility (MIC > ECOFF 0.064mg/l) were identified and, interestingly, they showed a high risk of developing infectious symptoms after the biopsy. This explains why some men develop infectious complications despite appropriate antibiotics before prostatic biopsies. TRIAL REGISTRATION: NCT02140502.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1803
[Cu] Class update date: 180303
[Lr] Last revision date:180303
[Cl] Clinical Trial:ClinicalTrial
[St] Status:Publisher
[do] DOI:10.1007/s10096-018-3217-7

  9 / 14085 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29497024
[Au] Autor:Niradiz R; Ines B; Juan R; Oscar C; Jan G
[Ad] Address:Department of Basic Sciences, School of Medicine, University of Cartagena, Cartagena, Colombia.
[Ti] Title:Atypical chemokine receptor CCRL2 is overexpressed in prostate cancer cells.
[So] Source:J Biomed Res;, 2017 Nov 01.
[Is] ISSN:1674-8301
[Cp] Country of publication:China
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Atypical chemokine receptors have recently emerged as important molecular players in health and diseases; they affect chemokine availability and function and impact a multitude of pathophysiological events, including the tumorigenesis process. This family of atypical receptors comprises five members: ACKR1/DARC, ACKR2/D6, ACKR3/CXCR7, ACKR4/CCRL1, and ACKR5/CCRL2. This work evaluated the differential expression of these receptors in prostate cancer using quantitative PCR. Further evaluation of CCRL2 at the protein level confirmed its overexpression in a metastatic cell line and in malignant prostatic tissues from patients. CCRL2, a presumed member of the atypical chemokine receptor family, plays a key role in lung dendritic cell trafficking to peripheral lymph nodes. Recent studies have reported the expression of CCRL2 in different human cancer cell lines and tissues. However, its function and expression in prostate cancer has not been previously addressed.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1803
[Cu] Class update date: 180302
[Lr] Last revision date:180302
[St] Status:Publisher
[do] DOI:10.7555/JBR.32.20170057

  10 / 14085 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29382326
[Au] Autor:Chen X; Wu RZ; Zhu YQ; Ren ZM; Tong YL; Yang F; Dai GH
[Ad] Address:Institute of Basic Medicine, Zhejiang Academy of Traditional Chinese Medicine, No. 132, Tianmushan Road, Xihu District, Hangzhou, Zhejiang, China.
[Ti] Title:Study on the inhibition of Mfn1 by plant-derived miR5338 mediating the treatment of BPH with rape bee pollen.
[So] Source:BMC Complement Altern Med;18(1):38, 2018 Jan 30.
[Is] ISSN:1472-6882
[Cp] Country of publication:England
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:BACKGROUND: Recent studies have found that plant derived microRNA can cross-kingdom regulate the expression of genes in humans and other mammals, thereby resisting diseases. Can exogenous miRNAs cross the blood-prostate barrier and entry prostate then participate in prostate disease treatment? METHODS: Using HiSeq sequencing and RT-qPCR technology, we detected plant miRNAs that enriched in the prostates of rats among the normal group, BPH model group and rape bee pollen group. To forecast the functions of these miRNAs, the psRobot software and TargetFinder software were used to predict their candidate target genes in rat genome. The qRT-PCR technology was used to validate the expression of candidate target genes. RESULTS: Plant miR5338 was enriched in the posterior lobes of prostate gland of rats fed with rape bee pollen, which was accompanied by the improvement of BPH. Among the predicted target genes of miR5338, Mfn1 was significantly lower in posterior lobes of prostates of rats in the rape bee pollen group than control groups. Further experiments suggested that Mfn1 was highly related to BPH. CONCLUSIONS: These results suggesting that plant-derived miR5338 may involve in treatment of rat BPH through inhibiting Mfn1 in prostate. These results will provide more evidence for plant miRNAs cross-kingdom regulation of animal gene, and will provide preliminary theoretical and experimental basis for development of rape bee pollen into innovative health care product or medicine for the treatment of BPH.
[Mh] MeSH terms primary: Membrane Proteins/antagonists & inhibitors
MicroRNAs/pharmacology
Mitochondrial Proteins/antagonists & inhibitors
Pollen
Prostate/drug effects
Prostatic Hyperplasia/metabolism
RNA, Plant/pharmacology
[Mh] MeSH terms secundary: Animals
Bees
Body Weight/drug effects
Male
Membrane Proteins/metabolism
Mitochondrial Proteins/metabolism
Organ Size/drug effects
RNA, Plant/pharmacokinetics
Rats
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Nm] Name of substance:0 (Membrane Proteins); 0 (MicroRNAs); 0 (Mitochondrial Proteins); 0 (RNA, Plant); 0 (mitofusin 1 protein, rat)
[Em] Entry month:1803
[Cu] Class update date: 180301
[Lr] Last revision date:180301
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[Da] Date of entry for processing:180201
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.1186/s12906-018-2107-y


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