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[PMID]: 29496811
[Au] Autor:Kratz RJ; Nguyen CT; Walton JN; MacDonald D
[Ad] Address:Dr. Kratz is a Prosthodontist in Victoria, BC, Canada; Dr. Nguyen is Assistant Professor, Division of Prosthodontics and Dental Geriatrics, Department of Oral Health Sciences, University of British Columbia Faculty of Dentistry and Provincial Practice Leader in Prosthodontics, Department of Dentistr
[Ti] Title:Dental Students' Interpretations of Digital Panoramic Radiographs on Completely Edentate Patients.
[So] Source:J Dent Educ;82(3):313-321, 2018 Mar.
[Is] ISSN:1930-7837
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:The ability of dental students to interpret digital panoramic radiographs (PANs) of edentulous patients has not been documented. The aim of this retrospective study was to compare the ability of second-year (D2) dental students with that of third- and fourth-year (D3-D4) dental students to interpret and identify positional errors in digital PANs obtained from patients with complete edentulism. A total of 169 digital PANs from edentulous patients were assessed by D2 (n=84) and D3-D4 (n=85) dental students at one Canadian dental school. The correctness of the students' interpretations was determined by comparison to a gold standard established by assessments of the same PANs by two experts (a graduate student in prosthodontics and an oral and maxillofacial radiologist). Data collected were from September 1, 2006, when digital radiography was implemented at the university, to December 31, 2012. Nearly all (95%) of the PANs were acceptable diagnostically despite a high proportion (92%) of positional errors detected. A total of 301 positional errors were identified in the sample. The D2 students identified significantly more (p=0.002) positional errors than the D3-D4 students. There was no significant difference (p=0.059) in the distribution of radiographic interpretation errors between the two student groups when compared to the gold standard. Overall, the category of extragnathic findings had the highest number of false negatives (43) reported. In this study, dental students interpreted digital PANs of edentulous patients satisfactorily, but they were more adept at identifying radiographic findings compared to positional errors. Students should be reminded to examine the entire radiograph thoroughly to ensure extragnathic findings are not missed and to recognize and report patient positional errors.
[Mh] MeSH terms primary: Mouth, Edentulous/diagnostic imaging
Radiography, Dental, Digital
Radiography, Panoramic
Students, Dental/statistics & numerical data
[Mh] MeSH terms secundary: Clinical Competence/statistics & numerical data
Diagnostic Errors/statistics & numerical data
Humans
Retrospective Studies
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1803
[Cu] Class update date: 180309
[Lr] Last revision date:180309
[Js] Journal subset:D; IM
[Da] Date of entry for processing:180303
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.21815/JDE.018.033

  2 / 9914 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29496804
[Au] Autor:Watkins RT; Conn LJ; Gellin RG; Gonzales TS; Hamil LM; Cayouette MJ; Schmidt MG
[Ad] Address:Dr. Watkins is Assistant Dean for Dental Education and Informatics, East Carolina University School of Dental Medicine; Dr. Conn is Associate Professor and Chair, Department of General Dentistry, East Carolina University School of Dental Medicine; Dr. Gellin is Professor and Chair, Department of Sto
[Ti] Title:Analyzing Dental Students' Clinic Production Using Time-Based Relative Value Units: Ten-Year Cross-Cohort Mapping.
[So] Source:J Dent Educ;82(3):260-268, 2018 Mar.
[Is] ISSN:1930-7837
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:The analysis of dental students' clinical production/participation has been used to assess whether a prospective graduate is capable of unsupervised and independent practice (that is, competent to perform that practice). This method and others have inherent biases that may not accurately reflect whether the student has mastered the associated concepts and techniques required for dentistry. The aim of this study was to assess an informatics system that assigned curriculum meta-tags with time-based relative educational value units (ReVUs) to each clinical procedure performed by Medical University of South Carolina (MUSC) students. The system has been used since 1998, but for this study the complete data sets for the MUSC graduating classes of 2007 through 2016 were mapped using microcompetency codes for the dental procedures. In total, 421,494 procedures were formatted and analyzed using software developed to aggregate disparate data sets from clinical activities into a common format for evaluation. The results showed that the ten classes (cohorts) were very consistent with cohort high ReVUs averaging 7,317.1 points, cohort mean ReVUs being 5,180.2 points, and cohort low ReVUs averaging 3,381 points. A detailed analysis of student effort by dental subspecialty found that preventive activities represented 13.4%, patient assessment 32.6%, periodontology 2.8%, restorative dentistry 16.3%, prosthodontics 21.9%, endodontics 6.7%, and oral surgery 5.7% of the total points in the clinical part of the curriculum. In this system, point thresholds can be easily generated to monitor students' progress towards competence for each defined competency and thus assess their progress towards acquiring the skills required for unsupervised, independent practice.
[Mh] MeSH terms primary: Students, Dental/statistics & numerical data
[Mh] MeSH terms secundary: Clinical Competence/standards
Clinical Competence/statistics & numerical data
Cohort Studies
Curriculum/statistics & numerical data
Dental Care/standards
Dental Care/statistics & numerical data
Educational Measurement/methods
Humans
Time Factors
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1803
[Cu] Class update date: 180309
[Lr] Last revision date:180309
[Js] Journal subset:D; IM
[Da] Date of entry for processing:180303
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.21815/JDE.018.025

  3 / 9914 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29522288
[Au] Autor:Mourshed B; Samran A; Alfagih A; Samran A; Abdulrab S; Kern M
[Ad] Address:Department of Prosthodontics, Al-Farabi Dental College, Riyadh, Saudi Arabia.
[Ti] Title:Anterior Cantilever Resin-Bonded Fixed Dental Prostheses: A Review of the Literature.
[So] Source:J Prosthodont;27(3):266-275, 2018 Mar.
[Is] ISSN:1532-849X
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:PURPOSE: This review evaluated the survival rate of single retainer anterior resin-bonded fixed dental prostheses (RBFDPs) to determine whether the choice of material affects their clinical outcome. MATERIALS AND METHODS: An electronic search of the English peer-reviewed dental literature in PubMed was conducted to identify all publications reporting on cantilever RBFDPs until May 2016. Study information extraction and methodological quality assessments were accomplished by two reviewers independently. The searched keywords were as follows: "resin-bonded, single retainer, all-ceramic resin-bonded fixed dental prostheses (RBFDPs), all-ceramic RBFDPs, cantilever resin, RBFDPs, cantilever resin-bonded bridge, two units cantilevered, two-unit cantilevered, metal-ceramic cantilever, and metal-ceramic." Furthermore, the ''Related Articles'' feature of PubMed was used to identify further references of interest within the primary search. The bibliographies of the obtained references were used to identify pertinent secondary references. Review articles were also used to identify relevant articles. After the application of exclusion criteria, the definitive list of articles was screened to extract the qualitative data, and the results were analyzed. RESULTS: Overall 2588 articles were dedicated at the first review phase; however, only 311 studies were left after the elimination of duplicates and unrelated studies. Seventeen studies passed the second review phase. Five studies were excluded because they were follow-up studies of the same study cohort. Twelve studies were finally selected. CONCLUSIONS: The use of cantilever RBFDPs showed promising results and high survival rates.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1803
[Cu] Class update date: 180309
[Lr] Last revision date:180309
[St] Status:In-Process
[do] DOI:10.1111/jopr.12555

  4 / 9914 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29522289
[Ti] Title:Meetings of Interest.
[So] Source:J Prosthodont;27(3):317, 2018 Mar.
[Is] ISSN:1532-849X
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1803
[Cu] Class update date: 180309
[Lr] Last revision date:180309
[St] Status:In-Data-Review
[do] DOI:10.1111/jopr.12785

  5 / 9914 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29522269
[Au] Autor:Fang Y; Fang JH; Jeong SM; Choi BH
[Ad] Address:Department of Dentistry, Yonsei University Wonju College of Medicine, Wonju, South Korea.
[Ti] Title:A Technique for Digital Impression and Bite Registration for a Single Edentulous Arch.
[So] Source:J Prosthodont;, 2018 Mar 09.
[Is] ISSN:1532-849X
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Few studies have reported the application of digital technology for the process of impression and interocclusal recordings in edentulous patients. This article describes a digitizing system for generating digital edentulous models with a jaw relationship by taking direct digital impressions and a virtual bite registration using intraoral digital scanning. A specialized scan retractor was used to make digital impressions of edentulous jaws in patients' mouths using an intraoral scanner. Virtual bite registration was obtained with optical scanning of the buccal surfaces of both jaws at the occlusal vertical dimension. The registration was then used as a reference for aligning both jaws. Digital edentulous models that include the jaw relationship would be clinically beneficial for the fabrication of complete dentures in edentulous patients.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1803
[Cu] Class update date: 180309
[Lr] Last revision date:180309
[St] Status:Publisher
[do] DOI:10.1111/jopr.12786

  6 / 9914 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29522263
[Au] Autor:Marvin JC; Gallegos SI; Parsaei S; Rodrigues DC
[Ad] Address:Department of Bioengineering, University of Texas at Dallas, Richardson, TX.
[Ti] Title:In Vitro Evaluation of Cell Compatibility of Dental Cements Used with Titanium Implant Components.
[So] Source:J Prosthodont;, 2018 Mar 09.
[Is] ISSN:1532-849X
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:PURPOSE: To evaluate the biocompatibility of five dental cement compositions after directly exposing human gingival fibroblast (HGF) and MC3T3-E1 preosteoblast cells to cement alone and cement applied on commercially pure titanium (cpTi) specimens. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Nanostructurally integrated bioceramic (NIB), resin (R), resin-modified glass ionomer (RMGIC), zinc oxide eugenol (ZOE), and zinc phosphate (ZP) compositions were prepared according to the respective manufacturer's instructions. Samples were prepared in cylindrical Teflon molds or applied over the entire surface of polished cpTi discs. All samples were cured for 0.5, 1, 12, or 24 hours post-mixing. Direct contact testing was conducted according to ISO 10993 by seeding 6-well plates at 350,000 cells/well. Plates were incubated at 37°C in a humidified atmosphere with 5% CO for 24 hours before individually plating samples and cpTi control discs. Plates were then incubated for an additional 24 hours. Microtetrazolium (MTT) cell viability assays were used to measure sample cytotoxicity. RESULTS: For samples that cured for 24 hours prior to direct contact exposure, only NIB and ZP cements when cemented on cpTi demonstrated cell viability percentages above the minimum biocompatibility requirement (≥70%) for both the investigative cell lines. R, RMGIC, and ZOE cements exhibited moderate to severe cytotoxic effects on both cell lines in direct contact and when cemented on cpTi specimens. For HGF cells, ZOE cemented-cpTi specimens exhibited significantly decreased cytotoxicity, whereas RMGIC cemented-cpTi specimens exhibited significantly increased cytotoxicity. CONCLUSIONS: Despite previous studies that showed enhanced cpTi corrosion activity for fluoride-containing compositions (NIB and ZP), there was no significant difference in cytotoxicity between cement alone and cemented-cpTi. In general, the MC3T3-E1 preosteoblast cells were more sensitive than HGF cells to cement composition. Ultimately, cement composition played a significant role in maintaining host cell compatibility. Results of this work help illustrate the impact of different cement formulations on host cell health and emphasize the need for understanding material properties when selecting certain formulations of dental cements, which can ultimately influence the survival of dental implant systems.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1803
[Cu] Class update date: 180309
[Lr] Last revision date:180309
[St] Status:Publisher
[do] DOI:10.1111/jopr.12784

  7 / 9914 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29521461
[Au] Autor:Sikora CL; Alfaro MF; Yuan JC; Barao VA; Sukotjo C; Mathew MT
[Ad] Address:Department of Restorative Dentistry, College of Dentistry, University of Illinois at Chicago, IL.
[Ti] Title:Wear and Corrosion Interactions at the Titanium/Zirconia Interface: Dental Implant Application.
[So] Source:J Prosthodont;, 2018 Mar 09.
[Is] ISSN:1532-849X
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:PURPOSE: Dental implants have been shown to have predictable success, but esthetic complications often arise. To reduce tissue shadowing from titanium, zirconia abutments may be used; however, the literature suggests that the use of zirconia leads to greater destruction of the implant interface that may result in biological complications such as titanium tattoos and heavy metal toxicity. Previous studies have examined the mechanical aspects of this implant/abutment relationship, but they have not accounted for the corrosive degradation that also takes place in the dynamic environment of the oral cavity. This study investigated the combined effect of both wear and corrosion on the materials at the implant and abutment interface. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Using a simulated oral tribocorrosive environment, titanium (Ti) and zirconia (Zr) abutment materials were slid against titanium and Roxolid implant alloys. The four couplings (Ti/Ti, Ti/Rox, Zr/Ti, Zr/Rox) were selected for the tribocorrosion tests (N = 3). The testing was conducted for 25K cycles, and the coefficient of friction (CoF) and voltage evolution were recorded simultaneously. Following the tribocorrosion assays, the wear volume loss was calculated, and surface characterization was performed. Statistical analysis was completed using a one-way ANOVA followed by post-hoc Bonferroni comparisons. RESULTS: Zr/Ti groups had the highest CoF (1.1647), and Ti/Ti had the lowest (0.5033). The Zr/Ti coupling generated significantly more mechanical damage than the Ti/Ti group (p = 0.021). From the corrosion aspect, the Ti/Ti groups had the highest voltage drop (0.802 V), indicating greater corrosion susceptibility. In comparison, the Zr/Roxolid group had the lowest voltage drop (0.628 V) and significantly less electrochemical degradation (p = 0.019). Overall, the Ti/Ti group had the largest wear volume loss (15.1 × 10 µm ), while the Zr/Ti group had the least volume loss (2.26 × 10 µm ). Both zirconia couplings had significantly less wear volume than the titanium couplings (p < 0.001). CONCLUSIONS: This study highlights the synergistic interaction between wear and corrosion, which occurs when masticatory forces combine with the salivary environment of the oral cavity. Overall, the zirconia groups outperformed the titanium groups. In fact, the titanium groups generated 5 to 6 times more wear to the implant alloys as compared with the zirconia counterparts. The best performing group was Zr/Ti, and the worst performing group was Ti/Ti.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1803
[Cu] Class update date: 180309
[Lr] Last revision date:180309
[St] Status:Publisher
[do] DOI:10.1111/jopr.12769

  8 / 9914 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29520956
[Au] Autor:Chamaria A; Aras MA; Chitre V; Rajagopal P
[Ad] Address:Department of Prosthodontics and Crown & Bridge, Goa Dental College and Hospital, Bambolim, Goa, India.
[Ti] Title:Effect of Chemical Disinfectants on the Color Stability of Maxillofacial Silicones: An In Vitro Study.
[So] Source:J Prosthodont;, 2018 Mar 08.
[Is] ISSN:1532-849X
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:PURPOSE: To evaluate the effect of chemical disinfection on the color stability of room temperature vulcanizing (RTV) maxillofacial silicone elastomer with and without pigment addition. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Sixty specimens were obtained from a RTV maxillofacial silicone. The specimens were randomly divided into 6 groups according to pigments and disinfectant to be used (n = 10). NP-DW-nonpigmented silicone specimens to be immersed in distilled water (control). NP-S- nonpigmented silicone specimens to be rubbed with an anti-bacterial soap. NP-CHX-nonpigmented silicone specimens to be immersed in chlorhexidine gluconate solution (2%). P-DW-pigmented silicone specimens to be immersed in distilled water (control). P-S-pigmented silicone specimens to be rubbed with antibacterial soap. P-CHX-pigmented silicone specimens to be immersed in chlorhexidine gluconate solution (2%). Disinfection was conducted 6 times a day for 60 days simulating 1 year of usage. Color was evaluated after 60 days (disinfection period) using a reflectance spectrophotometer. Color alterations were calculated by the CIE L a b system. Data were analyzed by t-test, one-way ANOVA, and Tukey test (α = 0.05). RESULTS: NP-S and P-S exhibited the highest color alterations, whereas NP-DW and P-DW the lowest color alterations. CONCLUSION: Disinfection procedures affect the color stability of maxillofacial silicone. Chlorhexidine gluconate solution (2%) can be effectively used as a chemical disinfectant for maxillofacial prostheses. Antibacterial soap produced clinically unacceptable color changes in the silicone, hence is not advisable as a disinfectant.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1803
[Cu] Class update date: 180309
[Lr] Last revision date:180309
[St] Status:Publisher
[do] DOI:10.1111/jopr.12768

  9 / 9914 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29520468
[Au] Autor:Teichmann M; Wienert AL; Rückbeil M; Weber V; Wolfart S; Edelhoff D
[Ad] Address:Department of Prosthodontics and Biomaterials, Center of Implantology, Medical Faculty, RWTH Aachen University, Pauwelsstr. 30, 52074, Aachen, Germany. mteichmann@ukaachen.de.
[Ti] Title:Ten-year survival and chipping rates and clinical quality grading of zirconia-based fixed dental prostheses.
[So] Source:Clin Oral Investig;, 2018 Mar 08.
[Is] ISSN:1436-3771
[Cp] Country of publication:Germany
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:OBJECTIVES: To prospectively evaluate the clinical long-term outcome of 3- to 6-unit fixed dental prostheses (FDPs) made of hot isostatic pressed (HIP) zirconia frameworks, veneered with a synthetic sintering glass-ceramic. MATERIALS AND METHODS: A total of 27 different restorations were cemented in 21 patients. FDPs were examined with regard to biological and technical complications/failures. Additionally, clinical quality was assessed based on (i) the California Dental Association (CDA) criteria, (ii) the patient's viewpoint according to Hickel, and (iii) periodontal parameters. Descriptive statistics were computed. The Kaplan-Meier estimator was used for the survival and chipping-free rates. Wilcoxon signed ranks test (ordinal/continuous data) or the McNemar test (binary data) was used to describe the periodontal outcome of abutment teeth versus that of the respective control teeth. RESULTS: After a mean observation period of 10.0 ± 2.1 years, the dataset comprised 15 patients with 20 (mainly posterior) FDPs. The 10-year survival rate and 10-year chipping-free rate were 95.0% (CI 86.0-100%) and 78.8% (CI 62.2-99.7%), respectively. Evaluation based on the CDA criteria yielded satisfactory (excellent or acceptable) results for all categories. This was also confirmed by the high level of patient satisfaction. The periodontal health of tissues adjacent to the study teeth was clinically acceptable, but inferior to the ones of control teeth. CONCLUSIONS: FDPs made from CAD/CAM-fabricated HIP zirconia ceramic frameworks have a favorable survival rate. However, because damage to the surface texture showed a disproportionate increase after long-term usage, additional long-term studies are required. CLINICAL RELEVANCE: The outstanding mechanical properties of zirconia-based systems have contributed to the belief that all-ceramics are a reliable material for prosthetic restorations. However, only long-term reports (such as this one) provide more detailed information on actual clinical efficacy.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1803
[Cu] Class update date: 180309
[Lr] Last revision date:180309
[St] Status:Publisher
[do] DOI:10.1007/s00784-018-2378-1

  10 / 9914 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29518813
[Au] Autor:Pesce P; Pera F; Setti P; Menini M
[Ti] Title:Precision and Accuracy of a Digital Impression Scanner in Full-Arch Implant Rehabilitation.
[So] Source:Int J Prosthodont;31(2):171-175, 2018 Mar/Apr.
[Is] ISSN:0893-2174
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:PURPOSE: To evaluate the accuracy and precision of a digital scanner used to scan four implants positioned according to an immediate loading implant protocol and to assess the accuracy of an aluminum framework fabricated from a digital impression. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Five master casts reproducing different edentulous maxillae with four tilted implants were used. Four scan bodies were screwed onto the low-profile abutments, and a digital intraoral scanner was used to perform five digital impressions of each master cast. To assess trueness, a metal framework of the best digital impression was produced with computer-aided design/computer-assisted manufacture (CAD/CAM) technology and passive fit was assessed with the Sheffield test. Gaps between the frameworks and the implant analogs were measured with a stereomicroscope. To assess precision, three-dimensional (3D) point cloud processing software was used to measure the deviations between the five digital impressions of each cast by producing a color map. The deviation values were grouped in three classes, and differences were assessed between class 2 (representing lower discrepancies) and the assembled classes 1 and 3 (representing the higher negative and positive discrepancies, respectively). RESULTS: The frameworks showed a mean gap of < 30 µm (range: 2 to 47 µm). A statistically significant difference was found between the two groups by the 3D point cloud software, with higher frequencies of points in class 2 than in grouped classes 1 and 3 (P < .001). CONCLUSION: Within the limits of this in vitro study, it appears that a digital impression may represent a reliable method for fabricating full-arch implant frameworks with good passive fit when tilted implants are present.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1803
[Cu] Class update date: 180308
[Lr] Last revision date:180308
[St] Status:In-Data-Review
[do] DOI:10.11607/ijp.5535


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