Database : MEDLINE
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[PMID]: 29524701
[Au] Autor:Jiang X; Chen Y; Zhou Z; Luo L; Hu W; Zheng H; Zhu Z; Wang J; Chen Z
[Ad] Address:Department of Neurosurgery, Sun Yat-sen University Cancer Center, State Key Laboratory of Oncology in South China; Collaborative Innovation Center for Cancer Medicine, Guangzhou 510060, China.
[Ti] Title:Surgical resection of pineal epidermoid cyst contributed to relieving schizophrenia symptoms.
[So] Source:World Neurosurg;, 2018 Mar 07.
[Is] ISSN:1878-8769
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:BACKGROUND: The pineal gland has been demonstrated to be involved in the development of mood and psychotic disorders. However, few studies have looked at the relationship between pineal region tumors and psychiatric disorders. Intracranial epidermoid cysts usually arise in cerebellopontine angle area, and are extremely rare in the pineal region. The case of pineal epidermoid cyst presenting as schizophrenia has never been reported before. CASE PRESENTATION: We described the case of a 23-year old man who presented to hospital with symptoms suggestive of schizophrenia. During work-up, he was found to have a pineal lesion on brain MRI. Total resection of the tumor was subsequently performed, and pathology confirmed an epidermoid cyst. One month after surgery, the patient's psychotic symptoms significantly improved free of drug, and fully returned to work 3 months post-operatively. CONCLUSIONS: This case highlights the importance of including mass lesions of the pineal region in the differential diagnosis of psychotic disorders. It also provides further support that the pineal region may play a role in the pathophysiology of psychiatric diseases, although more studies will be needed to elucidate this interesting connection.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1803
[Cu] Class update date: 180310
[Lr] Last revision date:180310
[St] Status:Publisher

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[PMID]: 29285652
[Au] Autor:Åberg M; Nyberg J; Robertson J; Kuhn G; Schiöler L; Nissbrandt H; Waern M; Torén K
[Ad] Address:Department of Public Health and Community Medicine/Primary Health Care, Institute of Medicine, Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, Box 454, 405 30, Gothenburg, Sweden. maria.aberg@gu.se.
[Ti] Title:Risk factors in Swedish young men for amyotrophic lateral sclerosis in adulthood.
[So] Source:J Neurol;265(3):460-470, 2018 Mar.
[Is] ISSN:1432-1459
[Cp] Country of publication:Germany
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Recent research suggests that the incidence of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) may be on the rise. Since ALS becomes predominant in later life, most studies on causal factors are conducted in middle-aged or older populations where potentially important influences from early life can usually not be adequately captured. We aimed to investigate predictors in young Swedish men for ALS in adulthood. Therefore, we performed a prospective cohort study of young men (aged 16-25, n = 1,819,817) who enlisted 1968-2005 and took part in comprehensive conscription examinations. Incident cases of ALS (n = 526) during up to 46 years of follow-up were identified in the National Hospital Register and Swedish Cause of Death Register. Those who developed ALS had lower BMI (body mass index) at conscription than their peers (p = 0.03). The risk of ALS during follow-up was calculated with Cox proportional hazards models. No associations were found with physical fitness, erythrocyte sedimentation rate, or non-psychotic mental disorders. Low overall muscle strength compared to high overall muscle strength [hazard ratio (HR) 1.36; 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.01-1.83] and low BMI (a one-unit increase HR 0.96; 95% CI 0.93-0.99) and lower erythrocyte volume fraction (a one-unit increase HR 0.96; 95% CI 0.92-0.998) were the statistically significant predictors for ALS in adjusted models. These findings provide novel epidemiologic evidence of a prospective association between low overall muscle strength and erythrocyte volume fraction in young men and ALS risk.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1712
[Cu] Class update date: 180311
[Lr] Last revision date:180311
[St] Status:In-Process
[do] DOI:10.1007/s00415-017-8719-1

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Menezes, Paulo Rossi
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[PMID]: 29214289
[Au] Autor:Jongsma HE; Gayer-Anderson C; Lasalvia A; Quattrone D; Mulè A; Szöke A; Selten JP; Turner C; Arango C; Tarricone I; Berardi D; Tortelli A; Llorca PM; de Haan L; Bobes J; Bernardo M; Sanjuán J; Santos JL; Arrojo M; Del-Ben CM; Menezes PR; Velthorst E; Murray RM; Rutten BP; Jones PB; van Os J; Morgan C; Kirkbride JB; European Network of National Schizophrenia Networks Studying Gene-Environment Interactions Work Package 2 (EU-GEI WP2) Group
[Ad] Address:Department of Psychiatry, University of Cambridge, Cambridge, England.
[Ti] Title:Treated Incidence of Psychotic Disorders in the Multinational EU-GEI Study.
[So] Source:JAMA Psychiatry;75(1):36-46, 2018 Jan 01.
[Is] ISSN:2168-6238
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Importance: Psychotic disorders contribute significantly to the global disease burden, yet the latest international incidence study of psychotic disorders was conducted in the 1980s. Objectives: To estimate the incidence of psychotic disorders using comparable methods across 17 catchment areas in 6 countries and to examine the variance between catchment areas by putative environmental risk factors. Design, Setting, and Participants: An international multisite incidence study (the European Network of National Schizophrenia Networks Studying Gene-Environment Interactions) was conducted from May 1, 2010, to April 1, 2015, among 2774 individuals from England (2 catchment areas), France (3 catchment areas), Italy (3 catchment areas), the Netherlands (2 catchment areas), Spain (6 catchment areas), and Brazil (1 catchment area) with a first episode of nonorganic psychotic disorders (International Statistical Classification of Diseases and Related Health Problems, Tenth Revision [ICD-10] codes F20-F33) confirmed by the Operational Criteria Checklist. Denominator populations were estimated using official national statistics. Exposures: Age, sex, and racial/ethnic minority status were treated as a priori confounders. Latitude, population density, percentage unemployment, owner-occupied housing, and single-person households were treated as catchment area-level exposures. Main Outcomes and Measures: Incidence of nonorganic psychotic disorders (ICD-10 codes F20-F33), nonaffective psychoses (ICD-10 codes F20-F29), and affective psychoses (ICD-10 codes F30-F33) confirmed by the Operational Criteria Checklist. Results: A total of 2774 patients (1196 women and 1578 men; median age, 30.5 years [interquartile range, 23.0-41.0 years]) with incident cases of psychotic disorders were identified during 12.9 million person-years at risk (crude incidence, 21.4 per 100 000 person-years; 95% CI, 19.4-23.4 per 100 000 person-years). A total of 2183 patients (78.7%) had nonaffective psychotic disorders. After direct standardization for age, sex, and racial/ethnic minority status, an 8-fold variation was seen in the incidence of all psychotic disorders, from 6.0 (95% CI, 3.5-8.6) per 100 000 person-years in Santiago, Spain, to 46.1 (95% CI, 37.3-55.0) per 100 000 person-years in Paris, France. Rates were elevated in racial/ethnic minority groups (incidence rate ratio, 1.6; 95% CI, 1.5-1.7), were highest for men 18 to 24 years of age, and were lower in catchment areas with more owner-occupied homes (incidence rate ratio, 0.8; 95% CI, 0.7-0.8). Similar patterns were observed for nonaffective psychoses; a lower incidence of affective psychoses was associated with higher area-level unemployment (incidence rate ratio, 0.3; 95% CI, 0.2-0.5). Conclusions and Relevance: This study confirmed marked heterogeneity in risk for psychotic disorders by person and place, including higher rates in younger men, racial/ethnic minorities, and areas characterized by a lower percentage of owner-occupied houses.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1712
[Cu] Class update date: 180311
[Lr] Last revision date:180311
[St] Status:In-Data-Review
[do] DOI:10.1001/jamapsychiatry.2017.3554

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[PMID]: 29188295
[Au] Autor:Richardson L; Hameed Y; Perez J; Jones PB; Kirkbride JB
[Ad] Address:PsyLife Group, Division of Psychiatry, University College London, London, England.
[Ti] Title:Association of Environment With the Risk of Developing Psychotic Disorders in Rural Populations: Findings from the Social Epidemiology of Psychoses in East Anglia Study.
[So] Source:JAMA Psychiatry;75(1):75-83, 2018 Jan 01.
[Is] ISSN:2168-6238
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Importance: Social determinants are important risk factors for the development of first-episode psychosis (FEP); their effects in rural areas are largely unknown. Objective: To investigate neighborhood-level factors associated with FEP in a large, predominantly rural population-based cohort. Design, Setting, and Participants: This study extracted data on referrals for treatment of potential FEP at 6 Early-Intervention Psychosis services from the Social Epidemiology of Psychoses in East Anglia naturalistic cohort study data set, which covered a population of more than 2 million people in a rural area in the East of England for a period of 3.5 years. All individuals aged 16 to 35 years who presented to Early-Intervention Psychosis services and met diagnostic criteria for first episodes of nonaffective psychoses and affective psychoses (International Statistical Classification of Diseases and Related Health Problems, Tenth Revision diagnostic codes F20-33) were included (n = 631). Persons whose disorders had an organic basis (diagnostic codes F06.X) and those meeting the criteria for substance-induced psychosis (diagnostic codes F1X.5) were excluded. We derived 4 neighborhood-level exposures from a routine population data set using exploratory factor analysis (racial/ethnic diversity, deprivation, urbanicity, and social isolation) and investigated intragroup racial/ethnic density and fragmentation. Main Outcomes and Measures: Multilevel Poisson regression was performed to determine associations between incidence rates and neighborhood-level factors, after adjustment for individual factors. Results were reported as incidence rate ratios (IRRs). Results: The study included 631 participants who met criteria for FEP and whose median age at first contact was 23.8 years (interquartile range, 19.6-27.6 years); 416 of 631 (65.9%) were male. Crude incidence of FEP was calculated as 31.2 per 100 000 person-years (95% CI, 28.9-33.7). Incidence varied significantly between neighborhoods after adjustment for age, sex, race/ethnicity, and socioeconomic status. For nonaffective psychoses, incidence was higher in neighborhoods that were more economically deprived (IRR, 1.13; 95% CI, 1.06-1.20) and socially isolated (IRR, 1.11; 95% CI, 1.04-1.19). It was lower in more racially/ethnically diverse neighborhoods (IRR, 0.94; 95% CI, 0.87-1.00). Higher intragroup racial/ethnic density (IRR, 0.97; 95% CI, 0.94-1.00) and lower intragroup racial/ethnic fragmentation (IRR, 0.98; 95% CI, 0.96-1.00) were associated with a reduced risk of affective psychosis. Conclusions and Relevance: Spatial variation in the incidence of nonaffective and affective psychotic disorders exists in rural areas. This suggests that the social environment contributes to psychosis risk across the rural-urban gradient.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1712
[Cu] Class update date: 180311
[Lr] Last revision date:180311
[St] Status:In-Data-Review
[do] DOI:10.1001/jamapsychiatry.2017.3582

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[PMID]: 29523913
[Au] Autor:Steiner J; Prüß H; Köhler S; Hasan A; Falkai P
[Ad] Address:Klinik für Psychiatrie und Psychotherapie, Otto-von-Guericke-Universität Magdeburg, Leipziger Str. 44, 39120, Magdeburg, Deutschland. johann.steiner@med.ovgu.de.
[Ti] Title:Autoimmunenzephalitis mit psychotischer Symptomatik : Diagnostik, Warnhinweise und praktisches Vorgehen. [Autoimmune encephalitis with psychotic symptoms : Diagnostics, warning signs and practical approach].
[So] Source:Nervenarzt;, 2018 Mar 09.
[Is] ISSN:1433-0407
[Cp] Country of publication:Germany
[La] Language:ger
[Ab] Abstract:Despite intensive research, a precise cause of schizophrenic and schizoaffective disorders has not yet been identified. Therefore, psychiatric diagnoses are still made based on clinical ICD-10/DSM­5 criteria and not on any objective markers; however, various causes or pathophysiological processes may ultimately lead to similar symptoms. An important task for the future of psychiatry is to identify disease subtypes with a distinct pathophysiology to develop more specific and causally acting therapies. A new diagnostic entity has become established in clinical neurology and psychiatry in recent years: autoimmune encephalitis with psychotic symptoms caused by specific antineuronal antibodies has been identified as a rare but potentially treatable cause of psychotic disorders; however, these inflammatory brain diseases are not reliably detected by routine psychiatric diagnostics. Therefore, this qualitative review is intended to provide structured support for clinical practice, which, guided by clinical warning signals, enables a rapid and reliable diagnosis as well as the initiation of immunotherapy. In the case of psychiatric symptoms, the additional onset of focal neurological signs, disturbances of consciousness and orientation, autonomic instability or epileptic seizures and electroencephalograph (EEG) abnormalities should always be followed by a more specific cerebrospinal fluid analysis with determination of antineuronal autoantibodies. Although the scientific evidence indicates that only a small subgroup of patients is affected, the swift and correct diagnosis is of high therapeutic and prognostic relevance for the affected individuals.
[Pt] Publication type:ENGLISH ABSTRACT; JOURNAL ARTICLE; REVIEW
[Em] Entry month:1803
[Cu] Class update date: 180310
[Lr] Last revision date:180310
[St] Status:Publisher
[do] DOI:10.1007/s00115-018-0499-z

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[PMID]: 29523870
[Au] Autor:Chouinard VA; Henderson DC; Dalla Man C; Valeri L; Gray BE; Ryan KP; Cypess AM; Cobelli C; Cohen BM; Öngür D
[Ad] Address:Psychotic Disorders Division, McLean Hospital, Belmont, MA, USA. vchouinard@mclean.harvard.edu.
[Ti] Title:Impaired insulin signaling in unaffected siblings and patients with first-episode psychosis.
[So] Source:Mol Psychiatry;, 2018 Mar 09.
[Is] ISSN:1476-5578
[Cp] Country of publication:England
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Patients with psychotic disorders are at high risk for type 2 diabetes mellitus, and there is increasing evidence that patients display glucose metabolism abnormalities before significant antipsychotic medication exposure. In the present study, we examined insulin action by quantifying insulin sensitivity in first-episode psychosis (FEP) patients and unaffected siblings, compared to healthy individuals, using a physiological-based model and comprehensive assessment battery. Twenty-two unaffected siblings, 18 FEP patients, and 15 healthy unrelated controls were evaluated using a 2-h oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT), with 7 samples of plasma glucose and serum insulin concentration measurements. Insulin sensitivity was quantified using the oral minimal model method. Lipid, leptin, free fatty acids, and inflammatory marker levels were also measured. Anthropometric, nutrient, and activity assessments were conducted; total body composition and fat distribution were determined using whole-body dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry. Insulin sensitivity significantly differed among groups (F = 6.01 and 0.004), with patients and siblings showing lower insulin sensitivity, compared to controls (P = 0.006 and 0.002, respectively). Body mass index, visceral adipose tissue area (cm ), lipids, leptin, free fatty acids, inflammatory markers, and activity ratings were not significantly different among groups. There was a significant difference in nutrient intake with lower total kilocalories/kilogram body weight in patients, compared to siblings and controls. Overall, the findings suggest that familial abnormal glucose metabolism or a primary insulin signaling pathway abnormality is related to risk for psychosis, independent of disease expression and treatment effects. Future studies should examine underlying biological mechanisms of insulin signaling abnormalities in psychotic disorders.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1803
[Cu] Class update date: 180310
[Lr] Last revision date:180310
[St] Status:Publisher
[do] DOI:10.1038/s41380-018-0045-1

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[PMID]: 29523114
[Au] Autor:Toner S; Cassidy M; Chevalier A; Farreny A; Leverton M; da Costa MP; Priebe S
[Ad] Address:Unit for Social and Community Psychiatry (WHO Collaborating Centre for Mental Health Service Development), Newham Centre for Mental Health, Queen Mary University of London, London, UK.
[Ti] Title:Preferences for befriending schemes: a survey of patients with severe mental illness.
[So] Source:BMC Psychiatry;18(1):64, 2018 Mar 09.
[Is] ISSN:1471-244X
[Cp] Country of publication:England
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:BACKGROUND: Befriending has become a widely used method for tackling social isolation in individuals with severe mental illness (SMI), and evidence exists to support its effectiveness. However, patient preferences for befriending remain unclear. We aimed to determine whether patients with SMI want a volunteer befriender and, if so, the volunteer characteristics and character of the relationship they would prefer. METHODS: A survey of outpatients was conducted across London-based community mental health teams, for individuals diagnosed with affective or psychotic disorders. Questions consisted of measures of demographic characteristics, befriending preferences and social context, including measures of time spent in activities, number of social contacts, loneliness and subjective quality of life (SQOL). Binary logistic regressions were used to investigate potential predictors of willingness to participate in befriending. RESULTS: The sample comprised of 201 participants with a mean age of 43 years. The majority (58%) of the sample indicated willingness to participate in befriending. In univariable analyses this was associated with less time spent in activities in the previous week, higher level of loneliness and lower SQOL. When all three variables were tested as predictors in a multivariable analysis, only lower SQOL remained significantly associated with willingness to take part in befriending. Relative to other options presented, large proportions of participants indicated preference for weekly (44%), 1-hour (39%) meetings with a befriender, with no limits on the relationship duration (53%). Otherwise, patient preferences exhibited great variability in relation to other characteristics of befriending schemes. CONCLUSIONS: A substantial number of patients with SMI appear willing to take part in a befriending scheme. Patients with lower SQOL are more likely to accept befriending, so that befriending schemes may be a realistic option to help patients with particularly low SQOL. The large variability in preferences for different types of befriending suggests that there is no one-size-fits-all formula and that schemes may have to be flexible and accommodate different individual preferences.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1803
[Cu] Class update date: 180310
[Lr] Last revision date:180310
[St] Status:In-Data-Review
[do] DOI:10.1186/s12888-018-1643-9

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[PMID]: 29522947
[Au] Autor:Lorenzo-Luaces L; Zimmerman M; Cuijpers P
[Ad] Address:Indiana University, Department of Psychological and Brain Sciences, 1101 E 10th St, Bloomington, IN 47405, United States. Electronic address: lolorenz@indiana.edu.
[Ti] Title:Are studies of psychotherapies for depression more or less generalizable than studies of antidepressants?
[So] Source:J Affect Disord;234:8-13, 2018 Feb 27.
[Is] ISSN:1573-2517
[Cp] Country of publication:Netherlands
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:BACKGROUND: The generalizability of findings from studies exploring the efficacy of psychotherapy and antidepressants has been called into question in part because studies exclude many patients. Despite this, the frequency with which psychotherapy and antidepressant studies use specific inclusion and exclusion criteria has never been compared. We explored the exclusion criteria used in psychotherapy and pharmacotherapy studies from 1995 to 2014. METHOD: Systematic literature searches were conducted in PubMed, Medline, PsycINFO, and Embase of published randomized controlled trials (RCTs) of the treatment of major depressive disorder (MDD) in adults with either antidepressants (vs. placebos) or psychotherapy (vs. placebos, treatments as usual, or other controls). RESULTS: Most psychotherapy (81%) and antidepressant (100%) trials excluded patients with milder symptoms as well as patients with elevated suicidal risk (56-75%), psychotic symptoms (84-88%), or substance misuse (75-81%). Psychotherapy studies were less likely to exclude patients on the basis of brief episode duration (0% vs. 48%) and co-morbid Axis I disorders (6% vs. 27%). However, psychotherapy studies excluded patients with more severe symptoms more frequently (38%) than antidepressant studies (8%). CONCLUSIONS: Overall, psychotherapy studies appear somewhat more inclusive than antidepressant studies. On average, antidepressant studies appear to target patients with more chronic and severe, as well as more purely depressive presentations.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1803
[Cu] Class update date: 180309
[Lr] Last revision date:180309
[St] Status:Publisher

  9 / 55584 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29522634
[Au] Autor:De Ciervo F; Willimburgh V; Finvarb G
[Ad] Address:Hospital de Niños "Dr. Ricardo Gutiérrez", Ciudad de Buenos Aires. facundo.dc@hotmail.com.
[Ti] Title:Encefalitis por anticuerpos contra el receptor N-metil-D-aspartato: presentación clínica en un adolescente y revisión de la literatura. ¿Cómo manejar los síntomas neuropsiquiátricos? [N-Methyl-D-Aspartate receptor encephalitis: An adolescent case report and literature review. How to manage neuropsychiatric symptoms].
[So] Source:Vertex;XXVIII(132):128-135, 2017 Mar.
[Is] ISSN:0327-6139
[Cp] Country of publication:Argentina
[La] Language:spa
[Ab] Abstract:Anti-N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor encephalitis was described as a clinical entity in 2007. The present case report aims to describe the signs and symptoms, differential diagnosis, treatment and course of a sixteen-year-old boy with this disorder who was hospitalized for almost two months. In addition, we will expose the therapeutic management and the diffculties presented in the handling of neuropsychiatric symptoms, considering the complex context of heterogeneous clinical manifestations caused by this disorder. The authors conducted a PubMed, LILACS and Cochrane search and added supplementary methods to compile the major quantity of evidence to support the clinical decisions. To date no systematic reviews or clinical guidelines about the management of psychiatric symptoms in adolescents with this condition were found. Only case reports and series of cases are available. The quality of evidence is poor as long as there are not analytic studies available. The adolescent presented to the emergency department with confusion, speech disturbances and right brachio-crural hemiparesis. During the course of hospitalization he developed a catatonic syndrome, several episodes of psychomotor agitation, sleep disorders and psychotic symptoms. He received successive immunomodulatory therapy for autoimmune encephalitis and psychiatric medication. He was discharged with recovery almost ad integrum. In conclusion, the diagnosis of anti-rNMDA encephalitis should be suspected in previously healthy adolescents with no psychopathological antecedents who suddenly present psychiatric and neurological symptoms. The evolution and prognosis depend on the early initiation of immunomodulating therapy. Psychiatrists should be aware and suspect this entity rapidly and play an important role as consultants for the management of psychiatric and behavioral disturbances.
[Pt] Publication type:ENGLISH ABSTRACT; JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1803
[Cu] Class update date: 180309
[Lr] Last revision date:180309
[St] Status:In-Data-Review

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[PMID]: 29522633
[Au] Autor:Rebok F
[Ad] Address:Servicio de Emergencia, Hospital "Dr. Braulio A. Moyano". federicorebok@gmail.com.
[Ti] Title:Psicosis agudas y crónicas con cenestopatías y/o síntomas hipocondríacos. [Acute and chronic psychoses with cenestopathies and/or hypochondriacal symptoms].
[So] Source:Vertex;XXVIII(132):121-127, 2017 Mar.
[Is] ISSN:0327-6139
[Cp] Country of publication:Argentina
[La] Language:spa
[Ab] Abstract:Both cenestopathies (abnormal body sensations) and hypochondriac symptoms can occur in both acute and chronic psychotic disorders. The present article will brie?y describe some psychotic pictures that may accompanied with cenestopathies and/ or hypochondriacal symptoms. All descriptions will be illustrated with clinical examples to facilitate the understanding and delimitation of these diseases.
[Pt] Publication type:ENGLISH ABSTRACT; JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1803
[Cu] Class update date: 180309
[Lr] Last revision date:180309
[St] Status:In-Data-Review


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