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[PMID]: 27235020
[Au] Autor:Jena AK; Vasisht K; Sharma N; Kaur R; Dhingra MS; Karan M
[Ad] Address:University Institute of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Panjab University, Chandigarh 160014, India.
[Ti] Title:Amelioration of testosterone induced benign prostatic hyperplasia by Prunus species.
[So] Source:J Ethnopharmacol;190:33-45, 2016 Aug 22.
[Is] ISSN:1872-7573
[Cp] Country of publication:Ireland
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:ETHNOPHARMACOLOGICAL RELEVANCE: Benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) is a common urological disorder of men. The ethnomedicinal use of an African plant Prunus africana (Hook.f.) Kalkman (Pygeum) in treating men's problems made it a popular remedy all over the globe for the treatment of BPH and related disorders. However, rampant collections made from the wild in Africa have pushed the plant to Appendix II of CITES demanding conservation of the species. AIM OF THE STUDY: In the present study, the aim was to unearth the protective effect of bark of different species of Prunus against BPH. The five selected Indian plants of family Rosaceae viz. Prunus amygdalus Stokes, Prunus armeniaca L., Prunus cerasoides Buch.-Ham. ex D. Don, Prunus domestica L. and Prunus persica (L.) Batsch were evaluated against P. africana (Hook.f.) Kalkman for a suitable comparison of efficacy as antiBPH agents. MATERIALS AND METHODS: The antiBPH activity was evaluated in testosterone (2mg/kg/day, s.c, 21 days) induced BPH in Wistar rats. The parameters studied were body weights; histopathological examination, immunohistochemistry (PCNA) and biochemical estimations of the prostate; supported by prostatic index, testicular index, creatinine, testosterone levels; antioxidant and anti-inflammatory evaluation. The study also included chemical profiling using three markers (ß-sitosterol, docosyl ferulate and ursolic acid) and estimation of ß-sitosterol content through GC. RESULTS: The Prunus species showed the presence of all the three markers in their TLC fingerprint profile and maximum amount of ß-sitosterol by GC was observed in P. domestica. Interestingly, all the species exhibited significant amelioration in testosterone induced parameters with P. domestica showing the most encouraging effect as indicated from histopathological examination, immunohistochemistry and biochemical studies. The Prunus species further showed remarkable anti-inflammatory and antioxidant activity signifying their role in interfering with various possible factors involved in BPH. CONCLUSIONS: These findings are suggestive of a meaningful inhibitory effect of testosterone induced BPH by the bark of different species of Prunus in the order of P. domestica, P. persica, P. amygdalus, P. cerasoides and P. armeniaca with an efficacy of P. domestica comparable to P. africana and can be used as the potential backup of Pygeum for the management of BPH.
[Mh] MeSH terms primary: Plant Extracts/pharmacology
Prostate/drug effects
Prostatic Hyperplasia/prevention & control
Prunus armeniaca/chemistry
Prunus domestica/chemistry
Prunus dulcis/chemistry
Prunus persica/chemistry
Testosterone
Urological Agents/pharmacology
[Mh] MeSH terms secundary: Animals
Anti-Inflammatory Agents/isolation & purification
Anti-Inflammatory Agents/pharmacology
Antioxidants/isolation & purification
Antioxidants/pharmacology
Biomarkers/metabolism
Chromatography, Gas
Chromatography, Thin Layer
Disease Models, Animal
Inflammation Mediators/metabolism
Male
Oxidative Stress/drug effects
Phytotherapy
Plant Bark
Plant Extracts/isolation & purification
Plants, Medicinal
Prostate/metabolism
Prostate/pathology
Prostatic Hyperplasia/chemically induced
Prostatic Hyperplasia/metabolism
Prostatic Hyperplasia/pathology
Rats, Wistar
Sitosterols/isolation & purification
Sitosterols/pharmacology
Triterpenes/isolation & purification
Triterpenes/pharmacology
Urological Agents/isolation & purification
[Pt] Publication type:COMPARATIVE STUDY; JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Nm] Name of substance:0 (Anti-Inflammatory Agents); 0 (Antioxidants); 0 (Biomarkers); 0 (Inflammation Mediators); 0 (Plant Extracts); 0 (Sitosterols); 0 (Triterpenes); 0 (Urological Agents); 3XMK78S47O (Testosterone); 5LI01C78DD (gamma-sitosterol); P3M2575F3F (ursolic acid)
[Em] Entry month:1704
[Cu] Class update date: 170418
[Lr] Last revision date:170418
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[Da] Date of entry for processing:160902
[St] Status:MEDLINE

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[PMID]: 27180172
[Au] Autor:Keehn A; Taylor J; Lowe FC
[Ad] Address:Department of Urology, Albert Einstein College of Medicine, Bronx, NY, USA.
[Ti] Title:Phytotherapy for Benign Prostatic Hyperplasia.
[So] Source:Curr Urol Rep;17(7):53, 2016 Jul.
[Is] ISSN:1534-6285
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:INTRODUCTION: The use of complementary and alternative medications for symptomatic benign prostatic hyperplasia is a lucrative business in the USA with revenues reaching close to US$6.4 billion in sales for the 2014 fiscal year. Yet, despite its popularity, the evidence supporting the continued use of phytotherapy for symptomatic benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) is questionable and a topic worth investigation given its wide spread use. METHODS: A comprehensive literature search utilizing Medline and PubMed was conducted to identify literature pertaining to phytotherapy for the management of BPH. Agents with at least modest clinical data were selected for in-depth review including Seronoa repens, Pygeum africanum, Secale cereale, and Hypoxis rooperi. RESULTS: Early clinical trials for each of the agents demonstrated mixed efficacy results with many studies pointing to a possible benefit for phytotherapy. On further examination of these studies, significant confounders such as poor product standardization, study design, and follow-up duration were identified. More recent, larger and more soundly constructed studies found no significant benefit for the use of phytotherapy in the treatment of BPH. CONCLUSIONS: Twenty years ago, the urologic community was encouraged by trial results that suggested phytotherapy could effectively treat symptomatic benign prostatic hyperplasia. Since that time, several well-constructed studies have consistently demonstrated that these agents are no more efficacious than placebo, despite being largely safe for ingestion.
[Mh] MeSH terms primary: Phytotherapy
Prostatic Hyperplasia/drug therapy
[Mh] MeSH terms secundary: Clinical Trials as Topic
Humans
Male
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE; REVIEW
[Em] Entry month:1612
[Cu] Class update date: 161230
[Lr] Last revision date:161230
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[Da] Date of entry for processing:160516
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.1007/s11934-016-0609-z

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[PMID]: 26631758
[Au] Autor:Cunningham A; Anoncho VF; Sunderland T
[Ad] Address:School of Plant Biology, University of Western Australia, 35 Stirling Highway, Crawley Perth, Western Australia 6009, Australia. Electronic address: tonyc05@bigpond.net.au.
[Ti] Title:Power, policy and the Prunus africana bark trade, 1972-2015.
[So] Source:J Ethnopharmacol;178:323-33, 2016 Feb 03.
[Is] ISSN:1872-7573
[Cp] Country of publication:Ireland
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:ETHNOPHARMACOLOGICAL RELEVANCE: After almost 50 years of international trade in wild harvested medicinal bark from Africa and Madagascar, the example of Prunus africana holds several lessons for both policy and practice in the fields of forestry, conservation and rural development. Due to recent CITES restrictions on P. africana exports from Burundi, Kenya and Madagascar, coupled with the lifting of the 2007 European Union (EU) ban in 2011, Cameroon's share of the global P. africana bark trade has risen from an average of 38% between 1995 and 2004, to 72.6% (658.6 metric tons) in 2012. Cameroon is therefore at the center of this international policy arena. METHODS AND MATERIALS: This paper draws upon several approaches, combining knowledge in working with P. africana over a 30-year period with a thorough literature review and updated trade data with "ground-truthing" in the field in 2013 and 2014. This enabled the construction of a good perspective on trade volumes (1991-2012), bark prices (and value-chain data) and the gaps between research reports and practice. Two approaches provided excellent lenses for a deeper understanding of policy failure and the "knowing-doing gap" in the P. africana case. A similar approach to Médard's (1992) analyses of power, politics and African development was taken and secondly, studies of commodity chains that assess the power relations that coalesce around different commodities (Ribot, 1998; Ribot and Peluso, 2003). RESULTS: Despite the need to conserve genetically and chemically diverse P. africana, wild populations are vulnerable, even in several "protected areas" in Burundi, Cameroon, the Democratic Republic of Congo and in the forest reserves of Madagascar. Secondly, hopes of decentralized governance of this forest product are misplaced due to elite capture, market monopolies and subsidized management regimes. At the current European price, for P. africana bark (US$6 per kg) for example, the 2012 bark quota (658.675t) from Cameroon alone was worth over US$3.9 million, with the majority of this accruing to a single company. In contrast to lucrative bark exports, the livelihood benefits and financial returns to local harvesters from wild harvest are extremely low. For example, in 2012, the 48 active harvesters working within Mount Cameroon National Park (MCNP) received less than 1US$ per day from bark harvests, due to a net bark price of 0.33 US$ per kg (or 43% of the farm gate price for wild harvested bark). In addition, the costs of inventory, monitoring and managing sustainable wild harvests are far greater than the benefits to harvesters. CONCLUSION: Without the current substantial international donor subsidies, sustainable harvest cannot be sustained. What is required to supply the current and future market is to develop separate, traceable P. africana bark supply chains based on cultivated stocks. On-farm production would benefit thousands of small-scale farmers cultivating P. africana, including local women, for whom wild harvesting is too onerous. This change requires CITES and EU support and would catalyze P. africana cultivation in across several montane African countries and Madagascar, increasing farm-gate prices to harvesters compared to economic returns from wild harvest.
[Mh] MeSH terms primary: Commerce/economics
Commerce/legislation & jurisprudence
Plant Bark/growth & development
Plant Extracts/economics
Plants, Medicinal/growth & development
Prunus africana/growth & development
[Mh] MeSH terms secundary: Africa
Cameroon
Conservation of Natural Resources/economics
Humans
Madagascar
Plant Extracts/therapeutic use
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE; RESEARCH SUPPORT, NON-U.S. GOV'T; RESEARCH SUPPORT, U.S. GOV'T, NON-P.H.S.
[Nm] Name of substance:0 (Plant Extracts)
[Em] Entry month:1610
[Cu] Class update date: 161230
[Lr] Last revision date:161230
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[Da] Date of entry for processing:160125
[St] Status:MEDLINE

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[PMID]: 26497340
[Au] Autor:Keehn A; Lowe FC
[Ad] Address:Department of Urology, Albert Einstein College of Medicine, Bronx, New York, USA.
[Ti] Title:Complementary and alternative medications for benign prostatic hyperplasia.
[So] Source:Can J Urol;22 Suppl 1:18-23, 2015 Oct.
[Is] ISSN:1195-9479
[Cp] Country of publication:Canada
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:INTRODUCTION: The use of complementary and alternative medications has become a multi-million dollar business in the United States and comprises more than half of all filled prescriptions for benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) in Europe. For the practicing urologist, understanding the phytotherapeutic agents available, their proposed mechanism of action, the research supporting their use, and their safety profiles has become increasingly important as more patients inquire into their use. MATERIALS AND METHODS: A comprehensive literature search was conducted to identify pertinent articles pertaining to alternative and complementary treatment options for the management of BPH. Treatments demonstrating adequate clinical data, including Serona repens, Pygeum africanum, and Secale cereal, were selected for in depth review. RESULTS: Small clinical trials for each of the agents demonstrated mixed results while larger more soundly constructed studies found no significant benefit for the use of phytotherapy in the treatment of BPH. CONCLUSIONS: Based on the available literature, there is no evidence that phytotherapy significantly improves symptoms of BPH against placebo, despite being largely safe for ingestion. In patients with mild BPH symptoms who are reluctant to take standard pharmaceutical medications may try these agents provided that the patient understands their current limitations. Those with moderate or severe BPH should be discouraged from alternative and complementary treatments.
[Mh] MeSH terms primary: Phytotherapy/methods
Plant Extracts/therapeutic use
Prostatic Hyperplasia/diagnosis
Prostatic Hyperplasia/drug therapy
Quality of Life
[Mh] MeSH terms secundary: Aged
Clinical Trials as Topic
Complementary Therapies/methods
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Male
Prostatic Hyperplasia/psychology
Prunus africana
Secale
Severity of Illness Index
Treatment Outcome
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE; REVIEW
[Nm] Name of substance:0 (Plant Extracts)
[Em] Entry month:1608
[Cu] Class update date: 151027
[Lr] Last revision date:151027
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[Da] Date of entry for processing:151027
[St] Status:MEDLINE

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[PMID]: 26492588
[Au] Autor:Belcaro G; Dugall M; Luzzi R; Ledda A; Pellegrini L; Hosoi M; Errichi BM; Francis S; Cornelli U
[Ad] Address:Department of Biomedical Sciences, Irvine3 Labs, Circulation Sciences, Chieti-Pescara University, Italy - cardres@abol.it.
[Ti] Title:Supplementary management of benign prostatic hypertrophy with Prostaquil. An 8-week registry.
[So] Source:Minerva Gastroenterol Dietol;, 2015 Oct 22.
[Is] ISSN:1827-1642
[Cp] Country of publication:Italy
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:The aim of this registry was to evaluate the management of initial symptoms of benign prostatic hyperthrophy (BPH) in otherwise healthy subjects, using Prostaquil® (Alchem) in a 8-week registry. Prostaquil was used at the dosage of 200 mg/day. The product includes Pygeum extract (100 mg) and Saw palmetto oil (35 mg). The two resulting groups standard management and supplement) were comparable. RESULTS: No side effects or comparability problems were observed and compliance was optimal with more than 95% of the capsules correctly used. Empting, frequency, intermittency, urgency, weak flow, straining, nocturia were all significantly improved with Prostaquil (p<0.05) and the improvement - globally and evaluating any single item - was significantly superior to the one observed in controls (p<0.05). Quality of life with the supplement was also significantly better in comparison with controls (p<0.05). The residual vescical volume was 94.7;5,8 ml in the supplement group at inclusion and decreased to 39.3;5 ml (p<0.05) at 8 weeks. This decrease was equivalent to a reduction of 58.5%(vs a decrease of 27.9% in controls)(p<0.05; ANOVA). In conclusion, the most common symptoms of BPH are controlled by Prostaquil a new standardized supplement including Pygeum.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1510
[Cu] Class update date: 151023
[Lr] Last revision date:151023
[St] Status:Publisher

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[PMID]: 26337762
[Au] Autor:Swaroop A; Bagchi M; Kumar P; Preuss HG; Bagchi D
[Ad] Address:a Cepham Research Center , Piscataway , NJ , USA .
[Ti] Title:Safety and efficacy of a novel Prunus domestica extract (Sitoprin, CR002) on testosterone-induced benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) in male Wistar rats.
[So] Source:Toxicol Mech Methods;25(9):653-64, 2015.
[Is] ISSN:1537-6524
[Cp] Country of publication:England
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:The efficacy of a novel Prunus domestica bark extract (Sitoprin, CR002) was investigated on testosterone propionate (TP)-induced benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) in male Wistar rats. BPH was induced by daily subcutaneous administration of TP (3.0 mg/kg) over a period of 15 days (interim sacrifice group) and for an additional 21 days (terminal sacrifice group). We evaluated the dose-dependent efficacy (0, 50, 100 and 200 mg/kg body weight/day) of CR002 and a control group against BPH, and compared with a reference standard Prunus africana extract (CR001). Extensive clinical examinations were carried out on days 1, 7, 14, 21, 28 and 35 of treatment period to determine the onset, duration and severity of clinical signs. Clinical pathology, hematology, biochemistry and histopathology were performed on days 15 and 35, prior to necropsy. Animals were fasted overnight prior to blood collection. Prostate glands and tissues were examined. On day 36, histopathology of ventral prostrate of control rats demonstrates single layer of columnar mucin secreting epithelial cells along with a lumen occupied with eosinophilic secretion. In contrast, CR002 and CR001 groups (100 and 200 mg/kg/day) exhibited no hyperplasia and proliferation of epithelial cells. Prostate histopathology of these treated groups was comparable with control rats. The hyperplasia and hypertrophy of prostrate was reduced to single-layered cell indicating the efficacy of CR002 and CR001. Overall, results demonstrate that CR002 exhibits therapeutic efficacy/activity in TP-induced BPH in rats, which is comparable to CR001.
[Mh] MeSH terms primary: Plant Bark/chemistry
Plant Extracts/toxicity
Plant Extracts/therapeutic use
Prostatic Hyperplasia/drug therapy
Prunus domestica/chemistry
Testosterone/toxicity
[Mh] MeSH terms secundary: Animals
Female
Male
Mutagenicity Tests
Organ Size/drug effects
Plant Extracts/isolation & purification
Prostate/drug effects
Prostate/pathology
Prostatic Hyperplasia/chemically induced
Prostatic Hyperplasia/pathology
Rats, Sprague-Dawley
Rats, Wistar
Salmonella typhimurium/drug effects
Salmonella typhimurium/genetics
Toxicity Tests, Acute
Toxicity Tests, Subchronic
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Nm] Name of substance:0 (Plant Extracts); 3XMK78S47O (Testosterone)
[Em] Entry month:1609
[Cu] Class update date: 151116
[Lr] Last revision date:151116
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[Da] Date of entry for processing:151116
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.3109/15376516.2015.1077362

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[PMID]: 25703069
[Au] Autor:Allkanjari O; Vitalone A
[Ad] Address:Department of Physiology and Pharmacology, Sapienza University of Rome, Piazzale Aldo Moro 5, 00185 Rome, Italy.
[Ti] Title:What do we know about phytotherapy of benign prostatic hyperplasia?
[So] Source:Life Sci;126:42-56, 2015 Apr 01.
[Is] ISSN:1879-0631
[Cp] Country of publication:Netherlands
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) is one of the most common urological diseases in aging men. Because of its long latency, BPH is a good target for prevention. The aim of the study has been to review the various options of treatment, currently available, in the field of phytotherapy. Watchful waiting, pharmacological therapy, and surgery are also helpful, depending on the severity of the disease. Although drug therapy (alpha1-blockers, 5alpha-reductase inhibitors) and surgery (prostatectomy, transurethral resection, etc.) seem to be most effective for patients with moderate-severe BPH, herbal medicines (i.e., Serenoa repens, Pygeum africanum, Urtica dioica) are also commonly used in patients with mild-moderate symptoms. On the basis of preclinical studies several mechanisms of action have been postulated, including 5alpha-reductase inhibition, alpha-adrenergic antagonism, dihydrotestosterone and estrogen receptor inhibition. Randomized clinical trials indicate significant efficacy in improving urinary symptoms and mild adverse effects for some phytotherapeutic agents, while further clinical evidence is needed for others (e.g., Epilobium spp., Secale cereale, Roystonea regia). Healthcare professionals should be constantly informed about BPH phytotherapy, taking into account the risk/benefit profile of the use of medicinal plants in the management of BPH.
[Mh] MeSH terms primary: Phytotherapy/methods
Plant Preparations/therapeutic use
Plants, Medicinal/chemistry
Prostatic Hyperplasia/drug therapy
[Mh] MeSH terms secundary: Animals
Humans
Male
Plant Preparations/chemistry
Prostatic Hyperplasia/pathology
Severity of Illness Index
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE; RESEARCH SUPPORT, NON-U.S. GOV'T; REVIEW
[Nm] Name of substance:0 (Plant Preparations)
[Em] Entry month:1505
[Cu] Class update date: 150317
[Lr] Last revision date:150317
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[Da] Date of entry for processing:150317
[St] Status:MEDLINE

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[PMID]: 25611711
[Au] Autor:Pearson R; Williams PM
[Ad] Address:Kaiser Permanente, Folsom, CA, USA.
[Ti] Title:Common questions about the diagnosis and management of benign prostatic hyperplasia.
[So] Source:Am Fam Physician;90(11):769-74, 2014 Dec 01.
[Is] ISSN:1532-0650
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) is a common condition that increases in prevalence with age. A history should include onset, duration, and severity of lower urinary tract symptoms and medication use to rule out other causes of symptoms. Physical examination includes a digital rectal examination and assessment for bladder distention or neurologic impairment. Recommended tests include serum prostate-specific antigen measurement and urinalysis to help identify infection, genitourinary cancer, or calculi as an alternative cause of lower urinary tract symptoms. BPH severity is assessed using validated, self-administered symptom questionnaires such as the American Urological Association Symptom Index or International Prostate Symptom Score. Mild or nonbothersome symptoms do not require treatment. Bothersome symptoms are managed with lifestyle modifications, medications, and surgery. Alpha blockers are first-line medications for BPH. Surgical referral is indicated if BPH-related complications develop, medical therapy fails, or the patient chooses it. Dietary supplements, such as saw palmetto, pygeum, cernilton, and beta sitosterols, and acupuncture are not recommended for the management of BPH.
[Mh] MeSH terms primary: Family Practice/standards
Practice Guidelines as Topic
Practice Patterns, Physicians´
Prostatic Hyperplasia/diagnosis
Prostatic Hyperplasia/therapy
[Mh] MeSH terms secundary: Education, Medical, Continuing
Family Practice/education
Humans
Male
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1601
[Cu] Class update date: 150123
[Lr] Last revision date:150123
[Js] Journal subset:AIM; IM
[Da] Date of entry for processing:150123
[St] Status:MEDLINE

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[PMID]: 25225776
[Au] Autor:Bodeker G; van 't Klooster C; Weisbord E
[Ad] Address:1 Department of Primary Care Health Sciences, Division of Medical Sciences, University of Oxford , Oxford, United Kingdom .
[Ti] Title:Prunus africana (Hook.f.) Kalkman: the overexploitation of a medicinal plant species and its legal context.
[So] Source:J Altern Complement Med;20(11):810-22, 2014 Nov.
[Is] ISSN:1557-7708
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:The linkage between herbal medicines and the sustainability of medical plants from which they are manufactured is increasingly being understood and receiving attention through international accords and trade labeling systems. However, little attention is paid to the fair trade aspects of this sector, including the issue of benefit-sharing agreements with traditional societies whose knowledge and resources are being exploited for commercial herbal medicine development and production. This article examines the case of Prunus africana (Hook.f.) Kalkman, from equatorial Africa. While the conservation and cultivation dimension of the trade in P. africana has been much discussed in literature, no research appears to have focused on the traditional resource rights and related ethical dimensions of this trade in traditional medicine of Africa. Serving as a cautionary tale for the unbridled exploitation of medicinal plants, the history of P. africana extraction is considered here in the context of relevant treaties and agreements existing today. These include the Nagoya Protocol, a supplementary agreement to the Convention on Biological Diversity, the Trade-Related Aspects of Intellectual Property Rights agreement from the World Trade Organization, and two African regional frameworks: the Swakopmund Protocol and the Organisation Africaine de la Propriété Intellectuelle Initiative. In the context of strengthening medicinal plant research in Africa, a novel international capacity-building project on traditional medicines for better public health in Africa will be discussed, illustrating how access and benefit sharing principles might be incorporated in future projects on traditional medicines.
[Mh] MeSH terms primary: Agriculture/legislation & jurisprudence
Conservation of Natural Resources/legislation & jurisprudence
Plants, Medicinal/growth & development
Prunus africana/growth & development
[Mh] MeSH terms secundary: Africa South of the Sahara
Agriculture/economics
Commerce
Conservation of Natural Resources/economics
Ecosystem
Humans
Medicine, Traditional/economics
Medicine, Traditional/methods
Medicine, Traditional/standards
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE; RESEARCH SUPPORT, NON-U.S. GOV'T; REVIEW
[Em] Entry month:1505
[Cu] Class update date: 151119
[Lr] Last revision date:151119
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[Da] Date of entry for processing:141121
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.1089/acm.2013.0459

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[PMID]: 25194085
[Au] Autor:Stamatiou KN; Moschouris H
[Ad] Address:Department of Urology, Tzaneio Hospital, Pireas, Greece. stamatiouk@gmail.com.
[Ti] Title:A prospective interventional study in chronic prostatitis with emphasis to clinical features.
[So] Source:Urol J;11(4):1829-33, 2014 Sep 06.
[Is] ISSN:1735-546X
[Cp] Country of publication:Iran
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:PURPOSE: Chronic bacterial prostatitis displays a variety of symptoms (mainly local pain exhibiting vari­ability in origin and intensity). These symptoms often persist despite bacterial eradication. The purpose of this article is to exam the role of phytotherapeutic agents as complementary treatment in patients with bacterial prostatitis. MATERIALS AND METHODS: The material consisted of individuals with reported pelvic discomfort and genital pain with or without lower urinary tract symptoms (LUTS) and sexual dysfunction visiting our department from March 2009 to March 2011. Patients underwent Stamey-Meares test (several cases underwent the two glass test). Depending on history and specific symptoms urethral smear and semen cultures were additionally obtained from several patients. All patients were randomized into two groups. Subjects in the first group (72 patients) received appropriate antibiotic (according to the sensitivity test) for 15 days, while subjects in the second group (72 patients) received phytotherapeutic agents for 30 days, additionally the conventional 15 days antibiotic treatment. The response was tested using laboratory and clinical criteria. RESULTS: We found no statistically significant differences between the two groups regarding bacterial and symptom persistence rate, however, symptoms burden was lower in patients receiving combinational treatment. CONCLUSION: Phytotherapeutic agents may improve pain and prostatitis related difficulty in urination. Further randomized, placebo-controlled studies are needed to substantiate safer conclusions.
[Mh] MeSH terms primary: Anti-Bacterial Agents/therapeutic use
Phytotherapy
Plant Extracts/therapeutic use
Plant Preparations/therapeutic use
Prostatitis/drug therapy
Prunus africana
[Mh] MeSH terms secundary: Adult
Aged
Chronic Disease
Drug Therapy, Combination
Enterococcus faecalis
Escherichia coli Infections/complications
Escherichia coli Infections/drug therapy
Gram-Positive Bacterial Infections/complications
Gram-Positive Bacterial Infections/drug therapy
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Pelvic Pain/etiology
Prospective Studies
Prostatism/etiology
Prostatitis/microbiology
Severity of Illness Index
Sexual Dysfunction, Physiological/etiology
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE; RANDOMIZED CONTROLLED TRIAL
[Nm] Name of substance:0 (Anti-Bacterial Agents); 0 (Plant Extracts); 0 (Plant Preparations); J7WWH9M8QS (saw palmetto extract)
[Em] Entry month:1505
[Cu] Class update date: 161125
[Lr] Last revision date:161125
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[Da] Date of entry for processing:140907
[St] Status:MEDLINE


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