Database : MEDLINE
Search on : Pyomyositis [Words]
References found : 1045 [refine]
Displaying: 1 .. 10   in format [Detailed]

page 1 of 105 go to page                         

  1 / 1045 MEDLINE  
              next record last record
select
to print
Photocopy
Full text

[PMID]: 29338140
[Au] Autor:Kumar S; Bhalla A; Singh R; Sharma N; Sharma A; Gautam V; Singh S; Varma S
[Ad] Address:Department of Internal Medicine, Postgraduate Institute of Medical Education and Research, Chandigarh, India.
[Ti] Title:Primary pyomyositis in North India: a clinical, microbiological, and outcome study.
[So] Source:Korean J Intern Med;33(2):417-431, 2018 Mar.
[Is] ISSN:2005-6648
[Cp] Country of publication:Korea (South)
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:BACKGROUND/AIMS: Pyomyositis is an infective condition with primary involvement of the skeletal muscles. There is sparse recent literature on patients with pyomyositis. METHODS: This study was carried out at emergency services of a tertiary care center located in subtropical area of Indian subcontinent. RESULTS: Sixty-two patients of primary pyomyositis formed the study cohort. Mean age of occurrence was 29.9 ± 14.8 years. There were 54 men. Twelve patients had underlying medical diseases. Muscle pain was seen in all 62 patients. Forty-eight patients (77.4%) had the fever. Most common site of involvement was thigh muscles (n = 29, 46.8%). Forty-nine patients (79%) presented in the suppurative stage of illness. Patients with comorbidities were older (age: median 36 years [interquartile range (IQR), 25 to 47] vs. 24 years [IQR, 16 to 35], = 0.024), had higher culture positivity with gram-negative organisms (8/9 [88.89%] vs. 6/29 [20.69%], = 0.001). Importantly, higher number of these patients received inappropriate antibiotics initially. Patients with positive pus culture result had higher complication rate (32/38 [84.21%] vs. 10/18 [55.56%], = 0.044). Six patients (9.7%) had in-hospital mortality. Lower first-day serum albumin, initial inappropriate antibiotic therapy, and advanced form of the disease at presentation were associated with increased in-hospital mortality. CONCLUSIONS: Primary pyomyositis is not an uncommon disease entity. Patients with comorbidities were more likely to receive initial inappropriate antibiotic therapy. Patients with positive pus culture report had the higher rate of complications. Lower first-day serum albumin, initial inappropriate antibiotic therapy and advanced form of the disease at presentation were associated with increased in-hospital mortality.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1801
[Cu] Class update date: 180309
[Lr] Last revision date:180309
[St] Status:In-Data-Review
[do] DOI:10.3904/kjim.2016.011

  2 / 1045 MEDLINE  
              first record previous record next record last record
select
to print
Photocopy
Full text

[PMID]: 29486726
[Au] Autor:Ehelepola NDB; Rajapaksha RKGM; Dhanapala DMUB; Thennekoon TDK; Ponnamperuma S
[Ad] Address:The Teaching (General) Hospital - Kandy, Kandy, Sri Lanka. drehelepola@gmail.com.
[Ti] Title:Concurrent methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus septicemia and pyomyositis in a patient with dengue hemorrhagic fever: a case report.
[So] Source:BMC Infect Dis;18(1):99, 2018 Feb 27.
[Is] ISSN:1471-2334
[Cp] Country of publication:England
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:BACKGROUND: Concurrent presence of dengue hemorrhagic fever (DHF), tropical pyomyositis and septicemia due to methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) in a previously healthy person has never been reported. These three conditions even individually are potentially fatal. "Here we describe a case of a patient contracting dengue and developing DHF along with concurrent pyomyositis likely to be due to MRSA, leading to MRSA septicemia with abscesses formed by MRSA". CASE PRESENTATION: A 44-year old previously healthy Sinhalese man presented on day 3 of the illness with fever, headache, arthralgia and myalgia and watery loose stools. His pulse rate was 76/min, blood pressure was 110/80 mmHg, while cardiovascular, respiratory and abdomen examination findings were unremarkable. The test for the dengue NS1 antigen was positive on the same day. We have diagnosed dengue and started managing him symptomatically as per the current national guidelines. The patient developed DHF with bilateral pleural effusion and ascitis. On the day 5 he developed severe myalgia, tenderness and non pitting edema of lower limbs especially in the thighs. His creatine kinase levels were high and an ultrasound scan confirmed myositis of both thighs. We suspected myositis due to dengue but investigated for possible simultaneous sepsis as well. On day 9 his blood culture became positive for MRSA. Considering the sensitivity of the bacteria intravenous vancomycin and ciprofloxacin was administered for 21 days. He developed a small abscess at the site of the first intravenous access and a large one above the ankle on the left. On day 12 the latter was drained and the pus culture yielded MRSA sensitive to the same antibiotics. The rapid test for dengue IgM was negative initially but later a positive MAC-ELISA test entrenched dengue infection. After improvement he was sent home on day 33 of the illness. He has developed two other abscesses in the proximity of the drained one and they were drained on day 57. The patient recovered. CONCLUSIONS: When dengue patients develop symptoms and signs of myositis, prompt investigations for pyomyositis and the treatment can save lives.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1803
[Cu] Class update date: 180307
[Lr] Last revision date:180307
[St] Status:In-Data-Review
[do] DOI:10.1186/s12879-018-3012-1

  3 / 1045 MEDLINE  
              first record previous record next record last record
select
to print
Photocopy
Full text

[PMID]: 29507017
[Au] Autor:Katsuura Y; Cincere B; Cason G; Osborn J
[Ad] Address:Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, University of Tennessee College of Medicine Chattanooga, Chattanooga, Tennessee, USA.
[Ti] Title:Metastatic MSSA infection of the spine and extremities.
[So] Source:BMJ Case Rep;2018, 2018 Mar 05.
[Is] ISSN:1757-790X
[Cp] Country of publication:England
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Here, we present a rare case of metastatic methicillin sensitive infection arising from an unknown focus and spreading throughout the lumbar spine with associated pyomyositis of the paraspinal musculature, and septic arthritis of the knee, ankle and sternoclavicular joint. This case highlights the potential for missed aspects and delay in diagnosis in the care of metastatic and the need for multispecialty intervention. Treatment of infections requires a high index of suspicion and careful examination of multiple organ systems to identify the full extent of the disease. A discussion on metastatic infection follows the report.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1803
[Cu] Class update date: 180306
[Lr] Last revision date:180306
[St] Status:In-Process

  4 / 1045 MEDLINE  
              first record previous record next record last record
select
to print
Photocopy
Full text

[PMID]: 29501822
[Au] Autor:Saeed K; Esposito S; Gould I; Ascione T; Bassetti M; Bonnet E; Bouza E; Chan M; Davis JS; De Simone G; Dryden M; Gottlieb T; Hijazi K; Lye DC; Pagliano P; Petridou C; Righi E; Segreti J; Unal S; Yalcin AN
[Ad] Address:Department of Microbiology, Hampshire Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust, Basingstoke and Winchereter, UK; University of Southampton, School of medicine, Southampton, UK.
[Ti] Title:Hot topics in necrotising skin and soft tissue infections.
[So] Source:Int J Antimicrob Agents;, 2018 Feb 28.
[Is] ISSN:1872-7913
[Cp] Country of publication:Netherlands
[La] Language:eng
[Pt] Publication type:EDITORIAL
[Em] Entry month:1803
[Cu] Class update date: 180304
[Lr] Last revision date:180304
[St] Status:Publisher

  5 / 1045 MEDLINE  
              first record previous record next record last record
select
to print
Photocopy
Full text

[PMID]: 29274860
[Au] Autor:Elzohairy MM
[Ad] Address:Orthopaedic department, faculty of medicine, Zagazig university, university Villas, 4, Zeid Ben Sabet Street, 44511 Zagazig, Egypt. Electronic address: elzohairy.me@gmail.com.
[Ti] Title:Primary pyomyositis in children.
[So] Source:Orthop Traumatol Surg Res;, 2017 Dec 22.
[Is] ISSN:1877-0568
[Cp] Country of publication:France
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:BACKGROUND: Pyomyositis (PM) is defined as a primary pyogenic infection of the striated skeletal muscle; although it has many dystrophic musculoskeletal complications, it is always misdiagnosed by many orthopedic surgeons. HYPOTHESIS: PM is rare in temperate climates and usually considered to be a tropical disease, until recent times, after globalization, it is possible to occur in the subtropical climate as in our country. MATERIAL AND METHODS: In the present series, the results of 15 children patients with primary pyomyositis have been reviewed. In five out of them, conservative treatment protocol alone which has been by intravenous and oral antibiotics therapy was effective. The remaining ten patients with confirmed abscess formation needed invasive procedures which have been percutaneous US-guided drainage in two patients and an open surgical drainage in the remaining 8 patients. RESULTS: Conservative treatment was successful in five cases with marked improvement within 3 days, but in the other ten patients who needed surgical treatment, all were effectively treated except three out of them who were complicated as follows; elbow stiffness in one case, hip joint septic arthritis with epiphysitis in the second case and osteomyelitis of the lower femoral end with knee joint septic arthritis in last one. DISCUSSION: Both clinical picture and laboratory investigation of PM are not specific and resembled many other differential diagnoses so the proper imaging study is of valuable importance needs to be accurately identified and treated to avoid its delayed complications. CONCLUSION: In children complaining of joint pain or muscle aches and septic-appearing, pyomyositis should be considered in the differential diagnosis. MRI is the most valuable tool for diagnosis of PM. Early diagnosis, the use of appropriate antibiotic therapy and complete drainage of the purulent material are important factors for successful treatment that leads to complete resolution of PM. LEVEL OF EVIDENCE: IV.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1712
[Cu] Class update date: 180220
[Lr] Last revision date:180220
[St] Status:Publisher

  6 / 1045 MEDLINE  
              first record previous record next record last record
select
to print
Photocopy
Full text

[PMID]: 29419450
[Au] Autor:Chen YH; Lu CC; Chen HC
[Ad] Address:Division of Rheumatology/Immunology/Allergy, Department of Internal Medicine, Tri-Service General Hospital, National Defense Medical Center, Taipei, Taiwan, R.O.C.
[Ti] Title: Pyomyositis in a Patient with Systemic Lupus Erythematosus.
[So] Source:J Rheumatol;45(2):286-287, 2018 Feb.
[Is] ISSN:0315-162X
[Cp] Country of publication:Canada
[La] Language:eng
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1802
[Cu] Class update date: 180208
[Lr] Last revision date:180208
[St] Status:In-Data-Review
[do] DOI:10.3899/jrheum.170122

  7 / 1045 MEDLINE  
              first record previous record next record last record
select
to print
Photocopy
Full text

[PMID]: 29295786
[Au] Autor:Fernández Hernández L; Campoamor Serrano MT; de la Fuente Cid B
[Ad] Address:Servicio de Medicina Interna, Hospital de Cabueñes, Gijón, Asturias, España. Electronic address: loremed21@hotmail.com.
[Ti] Title:Celulitis y piomiositis cervical posterior por Staphylococcus aureus resistente a meticilina en un paciente diabético. Cellulitis and posterior cervical pyomyositis by Staphylococcus aureus methicillin resistant in diabetic patient.
[So] Source:Med Clin (Barc);, 2017 Dec 30.
[Is] ISSN:1578-8989
[Cp] Country of publication:Spain
[La] Language:eng; spa
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1801
[Cu] Class update date: 180103
[Lr] Last revision date:180103
[St] Status:Publisher

  8 / 1045 MEDLINE  
              first record previous record next record last record
select
to print
Photocopy
Full text

[PMID]: 29293205
[Au] Autor:Bline K; Denny SA
[Ti] Title:Septic Arthritis, Osteomyelitis, and Pyomyositis in a Previously Healthy Infant.
[So] Source:Pediatr Emerg Care;34(1):e18-e20, 2018 Jan.
[Is] ISSN:1535-1815
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Septic arthritis of the shoulder is rare in the pediatric population. In younger children and infants, it can be very difficult to diagnose. Septic arthritis of the shoulder is more commonly associated with concurrent osteomyelitis when compared to septic arthritis of the lower extremity. We describe a case of a 9-month-old patient with septic arthritis, osteomyelitis, and pyomyositis of the shoulder, and a discussion of diagnosis and management of pediatric bone and joint infection in the emergency department setting.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1801
[Cu] Class update date: 180102
[Lr] Last revision date:180102
[St] Status:In-Process
[do] DOI:10.1097/PEC.0000000000001370

  9 / 1045 MEDLINE  
              first record previous record next record last record
select
to print
Photocopy
Full text

[PMID]: 29289987
[Au] Autor:Kiran M; Mohamed S; Newton A; George H; Garg N; Bruce C
[Ad] Address:Department of Trauma and Orthopaedic Surgery, Alder Hey Children's Hospital, Liverpool, L12 2AP, UK. drmanishkiran@gmail.com.
[Ti] Title:Pelvic pyomyositis in children: changing trends in occurrence and management.
[So] Source:Int Orthop;, 2017 Dec 30.
[Is] ISSN:1432-5195
[Cp] Country of publication:Germany
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:AIMS: We present the largest series of paediatric pelvic pyomyositis from a temperate country, analyse the factors influencing long term prognosis and suggest a diagnostic protocol. MATERIALS AND METHOD: We included 41 patients diagnosed with primary paediatric pelvic pyomyositis between 1998 and 2016, in this study with a mean age of 7.5 years. Demographic, clinical, radiological and follow-up data were reviewed. Statistical analysis was performed to analyse the influence of early diagnosis and treatment on the final outcome. RESULTS: There was an increased occurrence of primary pelvic pyomyositis in the last two years. Of cases identified, 85% fulfilled Kocher's criteria for hip septic arthritis. The mean time to diagnosis was 2.8 ± 0.8 days. The most common muscle affected was obturator internus (65.85%) and multifocal involvement was common (46.34%). Early diagnosis and antibiotic treatment within seven days from the time of onset of symptoms was the only factor that influenced final outcome (p < 0.001). DISCUSSION AND CONCLUSION: Pyomyositis is no longer restricted to tropical countries. The time from onset of symptoms to start of antibiotic treatment influences the final outcome. Clinical examination and inflammatory markers have low specificity in distinguishing between pyomyositis, septic arthritis, osteomyelitis or other infections. MRI is more sensitive and can diagnose pyomyositis in its early stages. Every suspected case of septic arthritis of the hip should undergo an ultrasound. MRI scan may be performed if the ultrasound shows inconclusive evidence of an effusion. Early identification will facilitate early antibiotic treatment which will improve the final outcome. CLINICAL RELEVANCE: There is an increasing occurrence of this tropical disease in temperate countries. Early diagnosis with an MRI scan and early antibiotic use results in good outcomes.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1801
[Cu] Class update date: 171231
[Lr] Last revision date:171231
[St] Status:Publisher
[do] DOI:10.1007/s00264-017-3746-1

  10 / 1045 MEDLINE  
              first record previous record
select
to print
Photocopy
Full text

[PMID]: 29179775
[Au] Autor:Smith-Singares E; Boachie JA; Iglesias IM; Jaffe L; Goldkind A; Jeng EI
[Ad] Address:Department of Surgery, Division of Surgical Critical Care, University of Illinois at Chicago, Chicago, 60612, IL, USA. singares@uic.edu.
[Ti] Title:Fusobacterium emphysematous pyomyositis with necrotizing fasciitis of the leg presenting as compartment syndrome: a case report.
[So] Source:J Med Case Rep;11(1):332, 2017 Nov 28.
[Is] ISSN:1752-1947
[Cp] Country of publication:England
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:BACKGROUND: Fusobacterium necrophorum is a common agent of disease in humans, but the occurrence of primary infections outside the head and neck area is extremely rare. While infection with Fusobacterium necrophorum has a rather benign course above the thorax, the organism is capable of producing very severe disease when located in unusual sites, including various forms of septic thrombophlebitis. No infections of the leg have been documented before; thus, antibiotic coverage for Fusobacterium is currently not recommended in this area. CASE PRESENTATION: A 50-year-old homeless African-American man presented complaining of severe pain in his right lower extremity. A clinical workup was consistent with emphysematous pyomyositis and compartment syndrome; he received limb-saving surgical intervention. The offending organism was identified as Fusobacterium necrophorum, and the antibiotic coverage was adjusted accordingly. CONCLUSIONS: Bacteria typically involved in necrotizing infections of the lower extremity include Group A ß-hemolytic Streptococcus, Clostridium perfringens, and common anaerobic bacteria (Bacteroides, Peptococcus, and Peptostreptococcus). This case report presents a case of gas gangrene of the leg caused by Fusobacterium necrophorum, the first such case reported. Fusobacterium should now be included in the differential diagnosis of necrotizing fasciitis of the extremities.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1711
[Cu] Class update date: 171219
[Lr] Last revision date:171219
[St] Status:In-Process
[do] DOI:10.1186/s13256-017-1493-y


page 1 of 105 go to page                         
   


Refine the search
  Database : MEDLINE Advanced form   

    Search in field  
1  
2
3
 
           



Search engine: iAH v2.6 powered by WWWISIS

BIREME/PAHO/WHO - Latin American and Caribbean Center on Health Sciences Information