Database : MEDLINE
Search on : Reactive and Attachment and Disorder [Words]
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[PMID]: 29242179
[Au] Autor:Arpaci I; Baloglu M; Özteke Kozan HI; Kesici S
[Ad] Address:Department of Computers and Instructional Technologies, Faculty of Education, Gaziosmanpasa University, Tokat, Turkey.
[Ti] Title:Individual Differences in the Relationship Between Attachment and Nomophobia Among College Students: The Mediating Role of Mindfulness.
[So] Source:J Med Internet Res;19(12):e404, 2017 Dec 14.
[Is] ISSN:1438-8871
[Cp] Country of publication:Canada
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:BACKGROUND: There is a growing interest in nomophobia, which is defined as the fear of being out of cellular phone contact, or "feelings of discomfort or anxiety experienced by individuals when they are unable to use their mobile phones or utilize the affordances these devices provide". However, only limited research can be found in terms of its determinants at present. Contemporary literature suggests that the relationships among attachment styles, mindfulness, and nomophobia have not been investigated. OBJECTIVE: This study aims to investigate the mediating effect of mindfulness on the relationship between attachment and nomophobia. In addition, the study also focuses on gender differences in attachment, mindfulness, and nomophobia. A theory-based structural model was tested to understand the essentials of the associations between the constructs. METHODS: The Experiences in Close Relationships Scale, Nomophobia Questionnaire, and Mindful Attention Awareness Scale were used to collect data from undergraduate students (N=450; 70.9% women [319/450]; mean age=21.94 years [SD 3.61]). Two measurement models (ie, attachment and mindfulness) and a structural model were specified, estimated, and evaluated. RESULTS: The structural equation model shows that the positive direct effects of avoidant (.13, P=.03) and anxious attachment (.48, P<.001) on nomophobia were significant. The negative direct effects of avoidant (-.18, P=.01) and anxious attachment (-.33, P<.001) on mindfulness were also significant. Moreover, mindfulness has a significant negative effect on nomophobia for women only (-.13, P=.03). Finally, the Sobel test showed that the indirect effects of avoidant and anxious attachment on nomophobia via mindfulness were significant (P<.001). The direct and indirect effects of anxious attachment, avoidant attachment, and mindfulness altogether accounted for 33% of the total variance in nomophobia. Gender comparison results show that there is a significant difference in attachment based on gender (F =6.97, P=.01, Wilk λ=.97, partial η =.03). Women (mean 68.46 [SD 16.96]) scored significantly higher than men (mean 63.59 [SD 15.97]) in anxious attachment (F =7.93, P=.01, partial η =.02). Gender differences in mindfulness were not significant (F =3.45, P=.69). On the other hand, results do show significant gender differences in nomophobia (F =2.71, P=.03, Wilk λ=.98, partial η =.02) where women scored significantly higher than men. CONCLUSIONS: In general, individuals who are emotionally more dependent and crave more closeness and attention in the relationship tend to display higher levels of fear or discomfort when they have no access to their mobile phones. However, gender has a differential impact on the relationship between avoidant attachment and nomophobia. This study establishes the impact of mindfulness on nomophobia for women; therefore, future studies should test the effectiveness of mindfulness-based therapy approaches and confirm whether they are effective and efficient. On the basis of significant gender difference in nomophobia and attachment, we conclude that gender should be taken into account in mindfulness-based treatments dealing with nomophobia.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1712
[Cu] Class update date: 180308
[Lr] Last revision date:180308
[St] Status:In-Process
[do] DOI:10.2196/jmir.8847

  2 / 933 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29251895
[Au] Autor:Shannon J; Blythe S; Peters K
[Ti] Title:NEONATAL ABSTINENCE SYNDROME AND THE ATTACHMENT RELATIONSHIP.
[So] Source:Aust Nurs Midwifery J;24(6):42, 2016 12.
[Is] ISSN:2202-7114
[Cp] Country of publication:Australia
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Approximately 4.2% of pregnant women consume illicit drugs during pregnancy (AIHW, 2011). Drug exposed infants are more likely to be born small for gestational age, be pre-term, and be admitted to special care or intensive care nurseries (AIHW, 2007).
[Mh] MeSH terms primary: Neonatal Abstinence Syndrome/complications
Neonatal Abstinence Syndrome/nursing
Reactive Attachment Disorder/etiology
Reactive Attachment Disorder/nursing
[Mh] MeSH terms secundary: Adult
Female
Humans
Infant
Infant, Newborn
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1801
[Cu] Class update date: 180118
[Lr] Last revision date:180118
[Js] Journal subset:N
[Da] Date of entry for processing:171219
[St] Status:MEDLINE

  3 / 933 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29067549
[Au] Autor:Sharma V
[Ad] Address:Department of Psychiatry, University of Western Ontario, London, ON, Canada. vsharma@uwo.ca.
[Ti] Title:Relationship of bipolar disorder with psychiatric comorbidity in the postpartum period-a scoping review.
[So] Source:Arch Womens Ment Health;, 2017 Oct 24.
[Is] ISSN:1435-1102
[Cp] Country of publication:Austria
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Childbirth can trigger a variety of psychiatric disorders; however, no disorder is as profoundly affected by childbirth as bipolar disorder. Rates of psychiatric comorbidity especially anxiety disorders, obsessive compulsive disorder, and substance use disorders are quite high in individuals with bipolar disorder. The purpose of this scoping review is to ascertain the effect of childbirth on the relationship between the onset of bipolar disorder and comorbid psychiatric disorders. On June 27, 2017, a search of the Medline, PsycINFO, CINHAL, EMBASE, SCOPUS, COCHRANE, and ISI-Web of Science (WOS) databases was performed using the terms mental disorders, mental disease, major depressive disorder, major depression, depression, panic disorder, bipolar disorder, comorbidity, anxiety disorders, obsessive compulsive disorder, post-traumatic stress disorder, schizophrenia, eating disorders, reactive attachment disorder, childbirth, parturition, puerperium, postpartum, postpartum period and postnatal period. Reference lists of identified papers were manually searched, and all relevant papers published in English were included. A total of eight relevant articles were identified and included in the review. There is some evidence to suggest that occurrence of certain psychiatric disorders in the postpartum period may predict later onset of bipolar disorder. It is unknown whether childbirth raises the risk of postpartum recurrence of comorbid disorders. Whether patients who have past histories of psychiatric disorders are at increased risk for onset of bipolar disorder in the postpartum period also remains unclear. Additional research is needed to increase our understanding of the impact of childbirth on bipolar disorder and comorbid psychiatric disorders. A better understanding of this issue could lead to more accurate and timely detection, improved treatment planning, and optimal delivery of care for these disorders.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE; REVIEW
[Em] Entry month:1710
[Cu] Class update date: 171025
[Lr] Last revision date:171025
[St] Status:Publisher
[do] DOI:10.1007/s00737-017-0782-1

  4 / 933 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 28791819
[Au] Autor:Kosacka M; Porebska I; Jankowska R
[Ad] Address:Department of Pulmonology and Lung Cancer, Wroclaw Medical University, Poland.
[Ti] Title:Decreased sL-selectin serum levels in sleep apnea syndrome patients with cardiovascular diseases.
[So] Source:Adv Clin Exp Med;26(3):449-453, 2017 May-Jun.
[Is] ISSN:1899-5276
[Cp] Country of publication:Poland
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:BACKGROUND: Obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSA) is a common disorder associated with an increased risk of cardiovascular diseases. OBJECTIVES: sL-selectin is an adhesion molecule released from the surface of leukocytes as they are activated and may inhibit leukocyte attachment to the endothelium. The aim of this study was to evaluate sL-selectin serum levels in OSA patients with cardiovascular diseases. MATERIAL AND METHODS: A total of 163 OSA patients were enrolled in the study. The mean age was 55.41 ± 8.63 years and the mean AHI (apnea hypopnea index) was 35.02 ± 22.28/h. A control group was composed of 59 healthy subjects. All subjects underwent a nocturnal respiratory polygraphy. sL-selectin serum levels were measured using the enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) method. RESULTS: sL-selectin serum levels were significantly lower in OSA patients than in the control group (1080.02 ± 175.29 vs 1350.73 ± 569.75 ng/mL, p < 0.05). In addition, there was a negative correlation between sL-selectin levels and AHI and DI and a positive correlation between sL-selectin levels and mean and minimum saturation. sL-selectin levels were lower in OSA patients with cardiovascular diseases than in those without co-morbidities. We also found that sL-selectin correlated positively with HDL-cholesterol (high density lipoprotein) and negatively with uric acid and CRP (C-reactive protein). CONCLUSIONS: Our work, together with observations relating to other diseases and experimental studies, suggests that lower sL-selectin levels could play a role in an increased risk of cardiovascular complications in sleep apnea syndrome. However future studies are needed to understand the role of sL-selectin in sleep apnea syndrome.
[Mh] MeSH terms primary: Selectins/blood
Sleep Apnea Syndromes/blood
Sleep Apnea, Obstructive/blood
[Mh] MeSH terms secundary: Biomarkers/blood
C-Reactive Protein/metabolism
Cardiovascular Diseases/blood
Cardiovascular Diseases/metabolism
Cholesterol, HDL/blood
Enzyme-Linked Immunosorbent Assay/methods
Female
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Polysomnography/methods
Risk Factors
Sleep Apnea Syndromes/metabolism
Sleep Apnea, Obstructive/metabolism
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Nm] Name of substance:0 (Biomarkers); 0 (Cholesterol, HDL); 0 (Selectins); 9007-41-4 (C-Reactive Protein)
[Em] Entry month:1710
[Cu] Class update date: 171004
[Lr] Last revision date:171004
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[Da] Date of entry for processing:170810
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.17219/acem/62215

  5 / 933 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 28752493
[Au] Autor:Adler-Neal AL; Zeidan F
[Ad] Address:Department of Neurobiology and Anatomy, Wake Forest School of Medicine, 1 Medical Center Boulevard, Winston-Salem, NC, 27157, USA.
[Ti] Title:Mindfulness Meditation for Fibromyalgia: Mechanistic and Clinical Considerations.
[So] Source:Curr Rheumatol Rep;19(9):59, 2017 Sep.
[Is] ISSN:1534-6307
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:PURPOSE OF REVIEW: Fibromyalgia is a disorder characterized by widespread pain and a spectrum of psychological comorbidities, rendering treatment difficult and often a financial burden. Fibromyalgia is a complicated chronic pain condition that requires a multimodal therapeutic approach to optimize treatment efficacy. Thus, it has been postulated that mind-body techniques may prove fruitful in treating fibromyalgia. Mindfulness meditation, a behavioral technique premised on non-reactive sensory awareness, attenuates pain and improves mental health outcomes. However, the impact of mindfulness meditation on fibromyalgia-related outcomes has not been comprehensively characterized. The present review delineates the existing evidence supporting the effectiveness and hypothesized mechanisms of mindfulness meditation in treating fibromyalgia-related outcomes. RECENT FINDINGS: Mindfulness-based interventions premised on cultivating acceptance, non-attachment, and social engagement may be most effective in decreasing fibromyalgia-related pain and psychological symptoms. Mindfulness-based therapies may alleviate fibromyalgia-related outcomes through multiple neural, psychological, and physiological processes. Mindfulness meditation may provide an effective complementary treatment approach for fibromyalgia patients, especially when combined with other reliable techniques (exercise; cognitive behavioral therapy). However, characterizing the specific analgesic mechanisms supporting mindfulness meditation is a critical step to fostering the clinical validity of this technique. Identification of the specific analgesic mechanisms supporting mindfulness-based pain relief could be utilized to better design behavioral interventions to specifically target fibromyalgia-related outcomes.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE; REVIEW
[Em] Entry month:1707
[Cu] Class update date: 171118
[Lr] Last revision date:171118
[St] Status:In-Process
[do] DOI:10.1007/s11926-017-0686-0

  6 / 933 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 28708838
[Au] Autor:Wright B; Hackney L; Hughes E; Barry M; Glaser D; Prior V; Allgar V; Marshall D; Barrow J; Kirby N; Garside M; Kaushal P; Perry A; McMillan D
[Ad] Address:Hull York Medical School, University of York, York, United Kingdom.
[Ti] Title:Decreasing rates of disorganised attachment in infants and young children, who are at risk of developing, or who already have disorganised attachment. A systematic review and meta-analysis of early parenting interventions.
[So] Source:PLoS One;12(7):e0180858, 2017.
[Is] ISSN:1932-6203
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:BACKGROUND: Disorganised attachment patterns in infants have been linked to later psychopathology. Services have variable practices for identifying and providing interventions for families of children with disorganised attachment patterns, which is the attachment pattern leading to most future psychopathology. Several recent government reports have highlighted the need for better parenting interventions in at risk groups. OBJECTIVES: The objective of this review and meta-analysis was to evaluate the clinical effectiveness of available parenting interventions for families of children at high risk of developing, or already showing, a disorganised pattern of attachment. METHODS: Population: Studies were included if they involved parents or caregivers of young children with a mean age under 13 years who had a disorganised classification of attachment or were identified as at high risk of developing such problems. Included interventions were aimed at parents or caregivers (e.g. foster carers) seeking to improve attachment. Comparators included an alternative intervention, an attention control, treatment as usual or no intervention. The primary outcome was a disorganised pattern in childhood measured using a validated attachment instrument. Studies that did not use a true Randomised Controlled Trial (RCT) design were excluded from the review. Both published and unpublished papers were included, there were no restrictions on years since publication and foreign language papers were included where translation services could be accessed within necessary timescales. RESULTS: A comprehensive search of relevant databases yielded 15,298 papers. This paper reports a systematic review as part of an NIHR HTA study identifying studies pre-2012, updated to include all papers to October 2016. Two independent reviewers undertook two stage screening and data extraction of the included studies at all stages. A Cochrane quality assessment was carried out to assess the risk of bias. In total, fourteen studies were included in the review. In a meta-analysis of these fourteen studies the interventions saw less disorganised attachment at outcome compared to the control (OR = 0.50, (0.32, 0.77), p = 0.008). The majority of the interventions targeted maternal sensitivity. We carried out exploratory analyses to examine factors that may influence treatment outcome but these should be treated with caution given that we were limited by small numbers of studies. CONCLUSIONS: Parenting interventions that target parental sensitivity show promise in reducing disorganised attachment. This is limited by few high quality studies and the fact that most studies are with mothers. More high quality randomised controlled trials are required to elucidate this further.
[Mh] MeSH terms primary: Parenting
Reactive Attachment Disorder/diagnosis
[Mh] MeSH terms secundary: Caregivers/psychology
Child, Preschool
Databases, Factual
Humans
Infant
Odds Ratio
Parents/psychology
Reactive Attachment Disorder/etiology
Risk
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE; META-ANALYSIS; REVIEW
[Em] Entry month:1709
[Cu] Class update date: 170927
[Lr] Last revision date:170927
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[Da] Date of entry for processing:170715
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.1371/journal.pone.0180858

  7 / 933 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 28701098
[Au] Autor:Schlüter-Müller S
[Ad] Address:Universität Basel Schanzenstr. 13 CH-4056 Basel Schweiz UPK Basel.
[Ti] Title:AIT (Adolescent Identity Treatment) ­ ein integratives Therapiekonzept zur Behandlung von Persönlichkeitsstörungen. [AIT (Adolescent Identity Treatment) - an Integrative Treatment Model for the Treatment of Personality Disorders].
[So] Source:Prax Kinderpsychol Kinderpsychiatr;66(6):392-403, 2017 Jul.
[Is] ISSN:0032-7034
[Cp] Country of publication:Germany
[La] Language:ger
[Ab] Abstract:AIT (Adolescent Identity Treatment) - an Integrative Treatment Model for the Treatment of Personality Disorders Personality disorders are patterns of maladaptive personality traits that have an impact on the individual throughout the life span. Borderline Personality Disorder (BPD) is a very severe, but treatable mental disorder. Identity disturbance is seen as the central construct for detecting severe personality pathology - and, most notably, borderline personality disorder - in adults and adolescents. Crises in the development of identity usually resolve into a normal and consolidated identity with flexible and adaptive functioning whereas identity diffusion is viewed as a lack of integration of the concept of the self and significant others. It is seen as the basis for subsequent personality pathology, including that of borderline personality disorder. Although BPD has its onset in adolescence and emerging adulthood the diagnosis is often delayed. In most cases, specific treatment is only offered late in the course of the disorder and to relatively few individuals. Adolescent Identity Treatment (AIT) is a treatment model that focuses on identity pathology as the core characteristic of personality disorders. This model integrates specific techniques for the treatment of adolescent personality pathology on the background of object-relation theories and modified elements of Transference-Focused Psychotherapy. Moreover, psychoeducation, a behavior-oriented homeplan and intensive family work is part of AIT.
[Mh] MeSH terms primary: Borderline Personality Disorder/therapy
Delivery of Health Care, Integrated
Personality Disorders/therapy
[Mh] MeSH terms secundary: Adolescent
Adult
Borderline Personality Disorder/diagnosis
Borderline Personality Disorder/psychology
Child
Combined Modality Therapy
Delayed Diagnosis
Family Therapy
Humans
Identity Crisis
Personality Disorders/diagnosis
Personality Disorders/psychology
Psychotherapy
Reactive Attachment Disorder/diagnosis
Reactive Attachment Disorder/psychology
Reactive Attachment Disorder/therapy
Transference (Psychology)
Young Adult
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1709
[Cu] Class update date: 170914
[Lr] Last revision date:170914
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[Da] Date of entry for processing:170714
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.13109/prkk.2017.66.6.392

  8 / 933 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 28577603
[Au] Autor:Boris NW; Renk K
[Ad] Address:Center for Prevention and Early Intervention Policy, Florida State University, 1339 East Lafayette Street, Tallahassee, FL 32301, USA. Electronic address: nboris212@gmail.com.
[Ti] Title:Beyond Reactive Attachment Disorder: How Might Attachment Research Inform Child Psychiatry Practice?
[So] Source:Child Adolesc Psychiatr Clin N Am;26(3):455-476, 2017 Jul.
[Is] ISSN:1558-0490
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:This article provides an updated review of attachment research with a focus on how comprehensive clinical assessment and intervention informs the care of young children. Child psychiatrists can serve as an important part of care coordination teams working with young children who have histories of early maltreatment and/or disruption in caregiving whether or not the children they are seeing meet criteria for an attachment disorder. Child psychiatrists should be familiar with both comprehensive assessment and the recent attachment-based interventions and appreciate how pharmacotherapy can be a useful adjunctive intervention when intensive therapy alone is ineffective.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE; REVIEW
[Em] Entry month:1706
[Cu] Class update date: 170604
[Lr] Last revision date:170604
[St] Status:In-Process

  9 / 933 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 28537091
[Au] Autor:Giltaij HP; Sterkenburg PS; Schuengel C
[Ad] Address:1 Department of Clinical Child and Family Studies, Faculty of Behavioural and Movement Sciences, Vrije Universiteit Amsterdam, The Netherlands.
[Ti] Title:Convergence between observations and interviews in clinical diagnosis of reactive attachment disorder and disinhibited social engagement disorder.
[So] Source:Clin Child Psychol Psychiatry;22(4):603-619, 2017 Oct.
[Is] ISSN:1461-7021
[Cp] Country of publication:England
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:OBJECTIVE: A comprehensive approach is needed for diagnosing disordered attachment behavior due to the multifaceted nature of attachment. Differences between various indicators can pose a challenge for deciding on the proper diagnosis. This study assessed the convergence between clinical interview assessment and observation-based clinical diagnosis, and their linkages with inadequate care. METHOD: Participating children ( N = 55) had intelligence quotients (IQs) between 50 and 85 and were referred for psychiatric consultation. Data were obtained by structured review of medical records, the Disturbances of Attachment Interview (DAI), and the Clinical Observation of Attachment (COA) procedure. RESULTS: Of the 18 children identified using the DAI with Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders-Fifth Edition (DSM-5) diagnosis of reactive attachment disorder (RAD) and/or disinhibited social engagement disorder (DSED), only 7 received a clinical DSM-5 diagnosis of RAD and/or DSED. Observed maladaptive attachment behavior in the COA was strongly associated with DAI scores and with clinical diagnosis of DSM-5 RAD and/or DSED. There was a significantly higher prevalence of extremes of insufficient care in children who were classified with RAD by DAI or DSM-5 and/or with DSED by DSM-5 compared to those with no attachment disorder. CONCLUSIONS: Using structured observation and record assessment leads to more conservative identification of RAD or DSED than using the DAI.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1705
[Cu] Class update date: 171027
[Lr] Last revision date:171027
[St] Status:In-Process
[do] DOI:10.1177/1359104517709049

  10 / 933 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 28401844
[Au] Autor:Humphreys KL; Nelson CA; Fox NA; Zeanah CH
[Ad] Address:Tulane University.
[Ti] Title:Signs of reactive attachment disorder and disinhibited social engagement disorder at age 12 years: Effects of institutional care history and high-quality foster care.
[So] Source:Dev Psychopathol;29(2):675-684, 2017 May.
[Is] ISSN:1469-2198
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Two disorders of attachment have been consistently identified in some young children following severe deprivation in early life: reactive attachment disorder and disinhibited social engagement disorder. However, less is known about whether signs of these disorders persist into adolescence. We examined signs of reactive attachment disorder and disinhibited social engagement disorder at age 12 years in 111 children who were abandoned at or shortly after birth and subsequently randomized to care as usual or to high-quality foster care, as well as in 50 comparison children who were never institutionalized. Consistent with expectations, those who experienced institutional care in early life had more signs of reactive attachment disorder and disinhibited social engagement disorder at age 12 years than children never institutionalized. In addition, using a conservative intent-to-treat approach, those children randomized to foster care had significantly fewer signs of reactive attachment disorder and disinhibited social engagement disorder than those randomized to care as usual. Analyses within the ever institutionalized group revealed no effects of the age of placement into foster care, but number of caregiving disruptions experienced and the percentage of the child's life spent in institutional care were significant predictors of signs of attachment disorders assessed in early adolescence. These findings indicate that adverse caregiving environments in early life have enduring effects on signs of attachment disorders, and provide further evidence that high-quality caregiving interventions are associated with reductions in both reactive attachment disorder and disinhibited social engagement disorder.
[Mh] MeSH terms primary: Child Care/psychology
Child, Institutionalized/psychology
Foster Home Care/psychology
Reactive Attachment Disorder/etiology
Reactive Attachment Disorder/physiopathology
[Mh] MeSH terms secundary: Child
Female
Humans
Male
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE; RANDOMIZED CONTROLLED TRIAL
[Em] Entry month:1707
[Cu] Class update date: 170724
[Lr] Last revision date:170724
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[Da] Date of entry for processing:170413
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.1017/S0954579417000256


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