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[PMID]: 29447172
[Au] Autor:Alemayehu AM; Belete GT; Adimassu NF
[Ad] Address:Department of Optometry, College of Medicine and Health Sciences, University of Gondar, Gondar, Ethiopia.
[Ti] Title:Knowledge, attitude and associated factors among primary school teachers regarding refractive error in school children in Gondar city, Northwest Ethiopia.
[So] Source:PLoS One;13(2):e0191199, 2018.
[Is] ISSN:1932-6203
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:INTRODUCTION: Refractive error is an important cause of correctable visual impairment in the worldwide with a global distribution of 1.75% to 20.7% among schoolchildren. Teacher's knowledge about refractive error play an important role in encouraging students to seek treatment that helps in reducing the burden of visual impairment. OBJECTIVE: To determine knowledge, attitude and associated factors among primary school teachers regarding refractive error in school children in Gondar city. METHODS: Institution based cross-sectional study was conducted on 565 primary school teachers in Gondar city using pretested and structured self-administered questionnaire. For processing and analysis, SPSS version 20 was used and variables which had a P value of <0.05 in the multivariable analysis were considered as statistically significant. RESULT: A total of 565 study subjects were participated in this study with a mean age of 42.05 ± 12.01 years. Of these study participants 55.9% (95% CI: 51.9, 59.8) had good knowledge and 57.2% (95% CI: 52.9, 61.4) had favorable attitude towards refractive error. History of spectacle use [AOR = 2.13 (95% CI: 1.32, 3.43)], history of eye examination [AOR = 1.67 (95% CI: 1.19, 2.34)], training on eye health [AOR = 1.94 (95% CI; 1.09, 3.43)] and 11-20 years of experience [AOR = 2.53 (95% CI: 1.18, 5.43)] were positively associated with knowledge. Whereas being male [AOR = 2.03 (95% CI: 1.37, 3.01)], older age [AOR = 3.05 (95% CI: 1.07, 8.72)], 31-40 years of experience [AOR = 0.23 (95% CI: 0.07, 0.72)], private school type [AOR = 1.76 (95% CI: 1.06, 2.93)] and 5th -8th teaching category [AOR = 1.54 (95% CI: 1.05, 2.24)] were associated with attitude. CONCLUSION: Knowledge and attitude of study subjects were low which needs training of teachers about the refractive error.
[Mh] MeSH terms primary: Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice
Teacher Training/methods
[Mh] MeSH terms secundary: Adult
Cross-Sectional Studies
Ethiopia
Eyeglasses
Female
Humans
Knowledge
Male
Middle Aged
Refractive Errors/diagnosis
Refractive Errors/etiology
Refractive Errors/prevention & control
Risk Factors
School Teachers
Schools
Students
Surveys and Questionnaires
Teacher Training/classification
Vision, Low
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE; RESEARCH SUPPORT, NON-U.S. GOV'T
[Em] Entry month:1803
[Cu] Class update date: 180309
[Lr] Last revision date:180309
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[Da] Date of entry for processing:180216
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.1371/journal.pone.0191199

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[PMID]: 29522223
[Au] Autor:Pallas A; Yeo TK; Trevenen M; Barrett G
[Ti] Title:Evaluation of the Accuracy of Two Marking Methods and the Novel toriCAM Application for Toric Intraocular Lens Alignment.
[So] Source:J Refract Surg;34(3):150-155, 2018 Mar 01.
[Is] ISSN:1081-597X
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:PURPOSE: To compare the accuracy of two common reference marking methods for toric intraocular lens alignment before and after using the novel toriCAM application. METHODS: In this prospective, randomized study, 22 participants were randomly allocated to two groups, either freehand or slit-lamp-assisted marking. Corneal markings at 0° and 180° were made using either method. The toriCAM application on a smartphone was then used to assess the rotational alignment of these markings and compared to the actual alignment as measured by the Zaldivar calipers on the iTrace Topographer (Tracey Technologies, Houston, TX) as a reference. The errors in marking with and without using the application were analyzed for all patients in each cohort and determined for each marking method. RESULTS: Twenty eyes of 11 patients were marked using the freehand method and 20 eyes of the other 11 patients were marked using the slit-lamp method. The mean absolute error of all markings before toriCAM adjustment was 3.18° ± 2.22°. This was significantly reduced to 1.28° ± 1.34° after using the application (P < .001). This improvement was also noted separately in the freehand and slit-lamp groups. Comparison of the freehand and slit-lamp methods did not show any statistically significant difference in accuracy at both time points. CONCLUSIONS: The novel toriCAM application is able to significantly improve the accuracy of reference marking for both freehand and slit-lamp methods. [J Refract Surg. 2018;34(3):150-155.].
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1803
[Cu] Class update date: 180309
[Lr] Last revision date:180309
[St] Status:In-Process
[do] DOI:10.3928/1081597X-20180115-03

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[PMID]: 29436656
[Au] Autor:Wu Y; Lam CS; Tse DY; To CH; Liu Q; McFadden SA; Chun RK; Li KK; Bian J; Lam C
[Ad] Address:State Key Laboratory of Ophthalmology, Zhongshan Ophthalmic Center, Sun Yat­Sen University, Guangzhou, Guangdong 510060, P.R. China.
[Ti] Title:Early quantitative profiling of differential retinal protein expression in lens-induced myopia in guinea pig using fluorescence difference two-dimensional gel electrophoresis.
[So] Source:Mol Med Rep;17(4):5571-5580, 2018 Apr.
[Is] ISSN:1791-3004
[Cp] Country of publication:Greece
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:The current study aimed to investigate the differential protein expression in guinea pig retinas in response to lens-induced myopia (LIM) before fully compensated eye growth. Four days old guinea pigs (n=5) were subjected to ­4D LIM for 8 days. Refractive errors were measured before and at the end of the lens wear period. Ocular dimensions were also recorded using high­frequency A­scan ultrasonography. After the LIM treatment, retinas of both eyes were harvested and soluble proteins were extracted. Paired retinal protein expressions in each animal were profiled and compared using a sensitive fluorescence difference two­dimensional gel electrophoresis. The quantitative retinal proteomes of myopic and control eye were analysed using computerised DeCyder software. Those proteins that were consistently changed with at least 1.2­fold difference (P<0.05) in the same direction in all five animals were extracted, trypsin digested and identified by tandem mass spectrometry. Significant myopia was induced in guinea pigs after 8 days of lens wear. The vitreous chamber depth in lens­treated eyes was found to be significantly elongated. Typically, more than 1,000 protein spots could be detected from each retina. Thirty­two of them showed differential expression between myopic and untreated retina. Among these proteins, 21 spots were upregulated and 11 were downregulated. Eight protein spots could be successfully identified which included ß­actin, enolase 1, cytosolic malate dehydrogenase, Ras­related protein Rab­11B, protein­L­isoaspartate (D­aspartate) O­methyltransferase, PKM2 protein, X­linked eukaryotic translation initiation factor 1A and ACP1 protein. The present study serves as the first report to uncover the retinal 2D proteome expressions in mammalian guinea pig myopia model using a top­down fluorescent dyes labelling gel approach. The results showed a downregulation in glycolytic enzymes that may suggest a significant alteration of glycolysis during myopia development. Other protein candidates also suggested multiple pathways which could provide new insights for further study of the myopic eye growth.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1802
[Cu] Class update date: 180309
[Lr] Last revision date:180309
[St] Status:In-Process
[do] DOI:10.3892/mmr.2018.8584

  4 / 9336 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29383537
[Au] Autor:Horio J; Kaneko H; Takayama K; Tuzuki K; Kakihara H; Iwami M; Kawase Y; Tsunekawa T; Yamaguchi N; Nonobe N; Terasaki H
[Ad] Address:Department of Ophthalmology, Aichi Children's Health and Medical Center, Obu, Japan.
[Ti] Title:Changes in refractive characteristics in Japanese children with Down syndrome.
[So] Source:Jpn J Ophthalmol;62(2):231-236, 2018 Mar.
[Is] ISSN:1613-2246
[Cp] Country of publication:Japan
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:PURPOSE: To investigate the refractive characteristics of Japanese children with Down syndrome. STUDY DESIGN: Retrospective study. METHODS: The clinical records of refractive errors and ocular manifestations in children with Down syndrome who visited the Aichi Children's Health and Medical Center between November 2001 and January 2016 were retrospectively reviewed. The children were divided into the 3 following groups depending on their age: group 1 (≤ 6 years), group 2 (7-12 years), and group 3 (13-19 years). The collection of refractive error data was performed only for the right eyes and only once for each child, when the children were last examined with their pupils dilated. RESULTS: The study included 416 children (224 boys, 192 girls; average age, 6.1 ± 4.1 years). Group 3 had significantly stronger myopia than did groups 1 and 2. The mean cylindrical power in all the children was - 2.1 ± 1.2 diopters (D), and cylindrical power ≤ - 1.0 D (stronger than - 1.0 D) was seen in 366 eyes (88%). No significant difference in cylindrical power was found among the 3 groups. CONCLUSIONS: The spherical equivalent refraction showed an age-dependent myopic shift. Given that the amount of astigmatism did not show age-dependent differences, the age-dependent myopic shift could be due mainly to the change in spherical power.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1802
[Cu] Class update date: 180308
[Lr] Last revision date:180308
[St] Status:In-Process
[do] DOI:10.1007/s10384-018-0565-x

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[PMID]: 29376228
[Au] Autor:Hwang S; Lim DH; Hyun J; Kim MJ; Chung TY
[Ad] Address:Department of Ophthalmology, Samsung Medical Center, Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, Seoul, Korea.
[Ti] Title:Myopic Shift after Implantation of a Novel Diffractive Trifocal Intraocular Lens in Korean Eyes.
[So] Source:Korean J Ophthalmol;32(1):16-22, 2018 Feb.
[Is] ISSN:2092-9382
[Cp] Country of publication:Korea (South)
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:PURPOSE: To evaluate the clinical outcomes of cataract surgery using novel diffractive trifocal intraocular lenses (IOLs) in Koreans. METHODS: This was a retrospective, consecutive, interventional study of cataract surgery using POD FineVision IOL implantation. Complete ophthalmologic examinations were performed preoperatively and postoperatively. Defocus curves were assessed over a range of +1.5 to -4.0 diopters in 0.5-diopter steps at one month postoperatively. Uncorrected distant visual acuity, uncorrected intermediate visual acuity, uncorrected near visual acuity, corrected distant visual acuity, distant-corrected intermediate visual acuity, and distant-corrected near visual acuity were assessed one month postoperatively, and manifest refraction was performed during every visit. RESULTS: The study analyzed 31 eyes in 20 patients. There were statistically significant improvements in uncorrected distance visual acuity, uncorrected intermediate visual acuity, uncorrected near visual acuity, corrected distance visual acuity, distance-corrected intermediate visual acuity, and distance-corrected near visual acuity (p < 0.001). The final postoperative refractive outcomes showed statistically significant myopic shifts compared to the target refraction based on SRK/T, SRK-II, Haigis, and Hoffer Q formulas (p < 0.001). CONCLUSIONS: POD FineVision IOLs provide stable visual restoration with improvements of near and intermediate vision in presbyopic eyes. POD FineVision IOLs show myopic shift in a Korean population; therefore, surgeons should be cautious when selecting IOL power in such patients.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1801
[Cu] Class update date: 180308
[Lr] Last revision date:180308
[St] Status:In-Data-Review
[do] DOI:10.3341/kjo.2017.0060

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[PMID]: 28471101
[Au] Autor:Kim BH; Yu YS; Kim SJ
[Ad] Address:Department of Ophthalmology, Seoul National University Hospital, Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul, Korea.
[Ti] Title:Ophthalmologic Features of Lennox-Gastaut Syndrome.
[So] Source:Korean J Ophthalmol;31(3):263-267, 2017 Jun.
[Is] ISSN:2092-9382
[Cp] Country of publication:Korea (South)
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:PURPOSE: To describe the characteristics and frequency of ophthalmologic findings in patients with Lennox-Gastaut syndrome (LGS). METHODS: The medical records of patients diagnosed with LGS at Seoul National University Children's Hospital from January 2004 to August 2014 were retrospectively reviewed. The records of 34 patients (mean age ± standard deviation, 2.66 ± 3.51 years; male, 58.8%) were reviewed. The primary measure was the incidence of ophthalmologic manifestations. RESULTS: Of the 34 patients, 88.2% had at least one ocular abnormality. Refractive error (52.9%) was the most frequently observed ophthalmologic manifestation in patients with LGS, followed by strabismus (32.4%), cortical visual impairment (23.5%), and retinopathy of prematurity (8.8%). Among these cases, seven patients had exotropia and three had esotropia. CONCLUSIONS: LGS is a childhood-onset epileptic encephalopathy with variable ophthalmologic manifestations, the most frequent being refractive errors. Patients with suspected LGS should be examined regularly because ophthalmological features can change during their disease course.
[Mh] MeSH terms primary: Eye Movements/physiology
Lennox Gastaut Syndrome/complications
Refraction, Ocular/physiology
Refractive Errors/etiology
Strabismus/etiology
[Mh] MeSH terms secundary: Adolescent
Brain/pathology
Child
Child, Preschool
Female
Humans
Infant
Infant, Newborn
Lennox Gastaut Syndrome/diagnosis
Magnetic Resonance Imaging
Male
Refractive Errors/diagnosis
Refractive Errors/physiopathology
Strabismus/diagnosis
Strabismus/physiopathology
Vision Tests
Visual Acuity
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1710
[Cu] Class update date: 180308
[Lr] Last revision date:180308
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[Da] Date of entry for processing:170505
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.3341/kjo.2015.0161

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[PMID]: 29502613
[Au] Autor:Popovic M; Schlenker MB; Campos-Möller X; Pereira A; Ahmed IIK
[Ad] Address:From the Faculty of Medicine (Popovic, Pereira) and the Department of Ophthalmology and Vision Sciences (Schlenker, Campos-Möller, Ahmed), University of Toronto, Toronto, and Prism Eye Institute (Campos-Möller, Ahmed) and the Department of Ophthalmology (Ahmed), Trillium Health Partners, Mississauga
[Ti] Title:Wang-Koch formula for optimization of intraocular lens power calculation: Evaluation at a Canadian center.
[So] Source:J Cataract Refract Surg;44(1):17-22, 2018 Jan.
[Is] ISSN:1873-4502
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:PURPOSE: To externally validate the Wang-Koch method for optimization of intraocular lens (IOL) formulas. SETTING: TLC Laser Eye Centre, Mississauga, Ontario, Canada. DESIGN: Retrospective case series. METHODS: Consecutive cataract patients with an axial length (AL) of 25.0 mm or longer were recruited. The predicted postoperative spherical equivalents (SEs) calculated from the Holladay 1 formula were compared with the 3-week postoperative SEs to yield prediction errors for Wang-Koch adjusted and unadjusted ALs. A mixed linear model was used to compare the proportion of eyes with a prediction error of ±0.25 diopter (D) or worse, ±0.50 D or worse, and ±1.00 D or worse between groups. The secondary outcomes of mean absolute error and median absolute error were also analyzed. A subgroup analysis was performed based on AL subgroups. RESULTS: Two hundred sixty-two eyes were selected for inclusion with a balanced sex distribution, a mean age of 62.49 years ± 9.13 (SD), and a preoperative AL of 26.49 ± 1.10 mm. Subgroup prediction error comparisons of ±0.50 D or worse favored unadjusted eyes with ALs between 25.0 mm and 26.0 mm (n = 105; P < .001), no difference in eyes with ALs between 26.0 mm and 27.0 mm (n = 91; P = .43), adjusted eyes with ALs between 27.0 mm and 28.0 mm (n = 36; P = .003), and adjusted eyes with ALs of 28.00 mm or longer (n = 30; P < .001). CONCLUSION: The Wang-Koch adjustment should only be applied in eyes with ALs longer than 27.0 mm that have IOL power calculation with the Holladay 1 formula.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1803
[Cu] Class update date: 180305
[Lr] Last revision date:180305
[St] Status:In-Data-Review

  8 / 9336 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29500699
[Au] Autor:Satou T; Kato S; Igarashi A; Ito M; Tsunehiro S; Koshimizu M; Niida T; Shimizu K
[Ad] Address:Department of Orthoptics and Visual Sciences, School of Health Sciences, International University of Health and Welfare, 2600-1, Kitakanemaru, Ohtawara, Tochigi, 324-8501, Japan. tsukasa@iuhw.ac.jp.
[Ti] Title:Prediction of pupil size under binocular open-view settings using the new CASIA2 device.
[So] Source:Int Ophthalmol;, 2018 Mar 02.
[Is] ISSN:1573-2630
[Cp] Country of publication:Netherlands
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:PURPOSE: Pupillometry should be performed under conditions as close to natural viewing as possible. The present study aimed to determine whether pupil size in binocular open-view settings can be predicted based on pupil size measured using the CASIA2 device. METHODS: The present study included 61 participants (25 men and 36 women; mean age, 49 ± 15 years; age range, 22-69 years) with no history of ophthalmic disease other than refractive errors and cataract. We measured pupil size using the new CASIA2 device and a binocular open-view digital pupillometer (FP-10000II, TMI Co., Ltd., Saitama). Intra-class and inter-class reliabilities were evaluated by measuring pupil times three times with each device (two independent examiners) in 21 of the 61 participants. Reproducibility was analyzed using intra-class and inter-class correlation coefficients (ICCs). Regression formulae for calculating FP10000II pupil size based on CASIA2 pupil size were developed via simple linear regression analyses. RESULTS: Both devices exhibited high ICC values (> 0.80). The regression formulae for calculating the FP10000II pupil size for the distant and near views based on CASIA2 pupil size were y = 0.5702x + 0.4611 (determination coefficient, 0.67) and y = 0.502x + 0.445 (determination coefficient, 0.64), respectively. CONCLUSIONS: Pupil size under binocular open-view settings can be predicted based on simultaneous measurement of pupil size during evaluation of the anterior segment using the CASIA2 device. The calculated pupil size may represent a useful index for determining the most appropriate treatment strategy in candidates for cataract and refractive surgery.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1803
[Cu] Class update date: 180303
[Lr] Last revision date:180303
[St] Status:Publisher
[do] DOI:10.1007/s10792-018-0879-1

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[PMID]: 29308602
[Au] Autor:Sankar MJ; Sankar J; Chandra P
[Ad] Address:Newborn Health Knowledge Centre, WHO Collaborating Centre for Training and Research in Newborn Care, Department of Pediatrics, All India Institute of Medical Sciences, Delhi, India.
[Ti] Title:Anti-vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) drugs for treatment of retinopathy of prematurity.
[So] Source:Cochrane Database Syst Rev;1:CD009734, 2018 01 08.
[Is] ISSN:1469-493X
[Cp] Country of publication:England
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:BACKGROUND: Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) plays a key role in angiogenesis in foetal life. Researchers have recently attempted to use anti-VEGF agents for the treatment of retinopathy of prematurity (ROP), a vasoproliferative disorder. The safety and efficacy of these agents in preterm infants with ROP is currently uncertain. OBJECTIVES: To evaluate the efficacy and safety of anti-VEGF drugs when used either as monotherapy, that is without concomitant cryotherapy or laser therapy, or in combination with planned cryo/laser therapy in preterm infants with type 1 ROP (defined as zone I any stage with plus disease, zone I stage 3 with or without plus disease, or zone II stage 2 or 3 with plus disease). SEARCH METHODS: We searched the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL 2016, Issue 11), MEDLINE (1966 to 11 December 2016), Embase (1980 to 11 December 2016), CINAHL (1982 to 11 December 2016), and conference proceedings. SELECTION CRITERIA: Randomised or quasi-randomised controlled trials that evaluated the efficacy or safety of administration, or both, of anti-VEGF agents compared with conventional therapy in preterm infants with ROP. DATA COLLECTION AND ANALYSIS: We used standard Cochrane and Cochrane Neonatal methods for data collection and analysis. We used the GRADE approach to assess the quality of the evidence. MAIN RESULTS: Six trials involving a total of 383 infants fulfilled the inclusion criteria. Five trials compared intravitreal bevacizumab (n = 4) or ranibizumab (n = 1) with conventional laser therapy (monotherapy), while the sixth study compared intravitreal pegaptanib plus conventional laser therapy with laser/cryotherapy (combination therapy).When used as monotherapy, bevacizumab/ranibizumab did not reduce the risk of complete or partial retinal detachment (3 studies; 272 infants; risk ratio (RR) 1.04, 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.21 to 5.13; risk difference (RD) 0.00, 95% CI -0.04 to 0.04; very low-quality evidence), mortality before discharge (2 studies; 229 infants; RR 1.50, 95% CI 0.26 to 8.75), corneal opacity requiring corneal transplant (1 study; 286 eyes; RR 0.34, 95% CI 0.01 to 8.26), or lens opacity requiring cataract removal (3 studies; 544 eyes; RR 0.15, 95% CI 0.01 to 2.79). The risk of recurrence of ROP requiring retreatment also did not differ between groups (2 studies; 193 infants; RR 0.88, 95% CI 0.47 to 1.63; RD -0.02, 95% CI -0.12 to 0.07; very low-quality evidence). Subgroup analysis showed a significant reduction in the risk of recurrence in infants with zone I ROP (RR 0.15, 95% CI 0.04 to 0.62), but an increased risk of recurrence in infants with zone II ROP (RR 2.53, 95% CI 1.01 to 6.32). Pooled analysis of studies that reported eye-level outcomes also revealed significant increase in the risk of recurrence of ROP in the eyes that received bevacizumab (RR 5.36, 95% CI 1.22 to 23.50; RD 0.10, 95% CI 0.03 to 0.17). Infants who received intravitreal bevacizumab had a significantly lower risk of refractive errors (very high myopia) at 30 months of age (1 study; 211 eyes; RR 0.06, 95% CI 0.02 to 0.20; RD -0.40, 95% CI -0.50 to -0.30; low-quality evidence).When used in combination with laser therapy, intravitreal pegaptanib was found to reduce the risk of retinal detachment when compared to laser/cryotherapy alone (152 eyes; RR 0.26, 95% CI 0.12 to 0.55; RD -0.29, 95% CI -0.42 to -0.16; low-quality evidence). The incidence of recurrence of ROP by 55 weeks' postmenstrual age was also lower in the pegaptanib + laser therapy group (76 infants; RR 0.29, 95% CI 0.12 to 0.7; RD -0.35, 95% CI -0.55 to -0.16; low-quality evidence). There was no difference in the risk of perioperative retinal haemorrhages between the two groups (152 eyes; RR 0.62, 95% CI 0.24 to 1.56; RD -0.05, 95% CI -0.16 to 0.05; very low-quality evidence). However, the risk of delayed systemic adverse effects with any of the three anti-VEGF drugs is not known. AUTHORS' CONCLUSIONS: Implications for practice: Intravitreal bevacizumab/ranibizumab, when used as monotherapy, reduces the risk of refractive errors during childhood but does not reduce the risk of retinal detachment or recurrence of ROP in infants with type 1 ROP. While the intervention might reduce the risk of recurrence of ROP in infants with zone I ROP, it can potentially result in higher risk of recurrence requiring retreatment in those with zone II ROP. Intravitreal pegaptanib, when used in conjunction with laser therapy, reduces the risk of retinal detachment as well as the recurrence of ROP in infants with type 1 ROP. However, the quality of the evidence was very low to low for most outcomes due to risk of detection bias and other biases. The effects on other critical outcomes and, more importantly, the long-term systemic adverse effects of the drugs are not known. Insufficient data precludes strong conclusions favouring routine use of intravitreal anti-VEGF agents - either as monotherapy or in conjunction with laser therapy - in preterm infants with type 1 ROP. IMPLICATIONS FOR RESEARCH: Further studies are needed to evaluate the effect of anti-VEGF agents on structural and functional outcomes in childhood and delayed systemic effects including adverse neurodevelopmental outcomes.
[Mh] MeSH terms primary: Angiogenesis Inhibitors/administration & dosage
Aptamers, Nucleotide/administration & dosage
Bevacizumab/administration & dosage
Ranibizumab/administration & dosage
Retinopathy of Prematurity/drug therapy
Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor A/antagonists & inhibitors
[Mh] MeSH terms secundary: Angiogenesis Inhibitors/adverse effects
Aptamers, Nucleotide/adverse effects
Bevacizumab/adverse effects
Combined Modality Therapy
Cryotherapy/methods
Humans
Infant, Newborn
Intravitreal Injections
Laser Therapy/methods
Randomized Controlled Trials as Topic
Ranibizumab/adverse effects
Retinal Detachment/prevention & control
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE; META-ANALYSIS; REVIEW
[Nm] Name of substance:0 (Angiogenesis Inhibitors); 0 (Aptamers, Nucleotide); 0 (Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor A); 2H1PA8H1EN (pegaptanib); 2S9ZZM9Q9V (Bevacizumab); ZL1R02VT79 (Ranibizumab)
[Em] Entry month:1803
[Cu] Class update date: 180301
[Lr] Last revision date:180301
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[Da] Date of entry for processing:180109
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.1002/14651858.CD009734.pub3

  10 / 9336 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29268725
[Au] Autor:Dhungel D; Shrestha GS
[Ad] Address:Private Practice Optometrist, Kathmandu, Nepal.
[Ti] Title:Visual symptoms associated with refractive errors among Thangka artists of Kathmandu valley.
[So] Source:BMC Ophthalmol;17(1):258, 2017 Dec 21.
[Is] ISSN:1471-2415
[Cp] Country of publication:England
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:BACKGROUND: Prolong near work, especially among people with uncorrected refractive error is considered a potential source of visual symptoms. The present study aims to determine the visual symptoms and the association of those with refractive errors among Thangka artists. METHODS: In a descriptive cross-sectional study, 242 (46.1%) participants of 525 thangka artists examined, with age ranged between 16 years to 39 years which comprised of 112 participants with significant refractive errors and 130 absolutely emmetropic participants, were enrolled from six Thangka painting schools. The visual symptoms were assessed using a structured questionnaire consisting of nine items and scoring from 0 to 6 consecutive scales. The eye examination included detailed anterior and posterior segment examination, objective and subjective refraction, and assessment of heterophoria, vergence and accommodation. Symptoms were presented in percentage and median. Variation in distribution of participants and symptoms was analysed using the Kruskal Wallis test for mean, and the correlation with the Pearson correlation coefficient. A significance level of 0.05 was applied for 95% confidence interval. The majority of participants (65.1%) among refractive error group (REG) were above the age of 30 years, with a male predominance (61.6%), compared to the participants in the normal cohort group (NCG), where majority of them (72.3%) were below 30 years of age (72.3%) and female (51.5%). RESULT: Overall, the visual symptoms are high among Thangka artists. However, blurred vision (p = 0.003) and dry eye (p = 0.004) are higher among the REG than the NCG. Females have slightly higher symptoms than males. Most of the symptoms, such as sore/aching eye (p = 0.003), feeling dry (p = 0.005) and blurred vision (p = 0.02) are significantly associated with astigmatism. CONCLUSION: Thangka artists present with significant proportion of refractive error and visual symptoms, especially among females. The most commonly reported symptoms are blurred vision, dry eye and watering of the eye. The visual symptoms are more correlated with astigmatism.
[Mh] MeSH terms primary: Art
Refraction, Ocular/physiology
Refractive Errors/epidemiology
Visual Acuity
[Mh] MeSH terms secundary: Adolescent
Adult
Cross-Sectional Studies
Female
Humans
Male
Nepal/epidemiology
Prevalence
Refractive Errors/diagnosis
Refractive Errors/physiopathology
Surveys and Questionnaires
Vision Tests
Young Adult
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1802
[Cu] Class update date: 180228
[Lr] Last revision date:180228
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[Da] Date of entry for processing:171223
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.1186/s12886-017-0659-0


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