Database : MEDLINE
Search on : Restless and Legs and Syndrome [Words]
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[PMID]: 29517509
[Au] Autor:Sinclair PM
[Ad] Address:Faculty of Health & Medicine, School of Nursing & Midwifery, The University of Newcastle, Callaghan, New South Wales, Australia.
[Ti] Title:Interventions for chronic kidney disease-associated restless legs syndrome.
[So] Source:Int J Evid Based Healthc;, 2018 Mar 06.
[Is] ISSN:1744-1609
[Cp] Country of publication:Australia
[La] Language:eng
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1803
[Cu] Class update date: 180309
[Lr] Last revision date:180309
[St] Status:Publisher
[do] DOI:10.1097/XEB.0000000000000137

  2 / 4252 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29522121
[Au] Autor:Levesque A; Riant T; Ploteau S; Rigaud J; Labat JJ; for Convergences PP Netwok
[Ad] Address:Federative Pelvic Pain Center, Department of Urology.
[Ti] Title:Clinical Criteria of Central Sensitization in Chronic Pelvic and Perineal Pain (Convergences PP Criteria): Elaboration of a Clinical Evaluation Tool Based on Formal Expert Consensus.
[So] Source:Pain Med;, 2018 Mar 07.
[Is] ISSN:1526-4637
[Cp] Country of publication:England
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Background: The evaluation of chronic pelvic and perineal pain (CPP) is often complex. The patient's description of the pain often appears to be disproportionate to the limited findings on physical examination and/or complementary investigations. The concept of central sensitization may allow better understanding and management of patients with CPP. Objective: The aim of this study was to elaborate a clinical evaluation tool designed to simply identify sensitization in pelvic pain. Methods: A list of 63 items was submitted to 22 international CPP experts according to the Delphi method. Results: Ten clinical criteria were adopted for the creation of a clinical evaluation tool: 1) pain influenced by bladder filling and/or urination, 2) pain influenced by rectal distension and/or defecation, 3) pain during sexual activity, 4) perineal and/or vulvar pain in response to normally nonpainful stimulation, 5) pelvic trigger points (e.g., in the piriformis, obturator internus, and/or levator ani muscles), 6) pain after urination, 7) pain after defecation, 8) pain after sexual activity, 9) variable (fluctuating) pain intensity and/or variable pain distribution, 10) migraine or tension headaches and/or fibromyalgia and/or chronic fatigue syndrome and/or post-traumatic stress disorder and/or restless legs syndrome and/or temporomandibular joint dysfunction and/or multiple chemical sensitivity. Conclusions: This process resulted in the elaboration of a clinical evaluation tool designed to identify and appropriately manage patients with CPP comprising a sensitization component.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1803
[Cu] Class update date: 180309
[Lr] Last revision date:180309
[St] Status:Publisher
[do] DOI:10.1093/pm/pny030

  3 / 4252 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29408974
[Au] Autor:Liu SY; Perez MA; Lau N
[Ad] Address:The Grado Department of Industrial & Systems Engineering, Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University, Blacksburg, Virginia, U.S.A.
[Ti] Title:The Impact of Sleep Disorders on Driving Safety - Findings from the SHRP 2 Naturalistic Driving Study.
[So] Source:Sleep;, 2018 Feb 02.
[Is] ISSN:1550-9109
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Study Objectives: This study investigated the association between driving safety and seven sleep disorders amongst 3,541 participants of the Second Strategic Highway Research Program (SHRP 2) naturalistic driving study. Methods: SHRP 2 collected naturalistic driving data from participants between 16 to 98 years old by instrumenting participants' vehicles. The analyses used logistic regression to determine the likelihood of crash/near-crash involvement, Poisson log-linear regression to assess crash/near-crash rate, and ordinal logistic regression to assess driver maneuver appropriateness and crash/near-crash severity. These analyses did not account for any medical treatments for the sleep disorders. Results: Females with restless legs syndrome/Willis-Ekbom disease (RLS/WED), drivers with insomnia or nacrolepsy are associated with significantly higher risk of crash/near-crash. Drivers with shift work sleep disorder (SWSD) are assoicated with significantly increased crash/near-crash rate. Females with RLS/WED or sleep apnea and drivers with SWSD are associated with less safe driver maneuver and drivers with periodic limb movement disorder are assoicated with more severe events. The four analyses provide no evidence of safety decrements associated with migraine. Conclusions: This study is the first examination on the association between seven sleep disorders and different measures of driving risk using large-scale naturalistic driving study data. The results corroborate much of the existing simulator and epidemiological research related to sleep disorder patients and their driving safety, but add ecological validity to those findings. These results contribute to the empirical basis for medical professionals, policy makers and employers in making decisions to aid individuals with sleep disorders in balancing safety and personal mobility.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1802
[Cu] Class update date: 180308
[Lr] Last revision date:180308
[St] Status:Publisher
[do] DOI:10.1093/sleep/zsy023

  4 / 4252 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29365206
[Au] Autor:Ferri R; DelRosso LM; Aricò D; Zucconi M; Ferini-Strambi L; Picchietti DL; Pizza F; Plazzi G; Manconi M; Bruni O
[Ad] Address:Sleep Research Centre; Department of Neurology I.C., Oasi Institute for Research on Mental Retardation and Brain Aging (IRCCS), Troina, Italy.
[Ti] Title:Leg Movement Activity during Sleep in School-Age Children and Adolescents: A Detailed Study in Normal Controls and Subjects with Restless Legs Syndrome and Narcolepsy Type 1.
[So] Source:Sleep;, 2018 Jan 22.
[Is] ISSN:1550-9109
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Study Objectives: To evaluate leg movement activity during sleep (LMS) in normal school-age children and adolescents, to eventually establish age-specific periodic LMS (PLMS) index thresholds that support the diagnosis of restless legs syndrome (RLS) and to evaluate the utility of other LMS indices. Methods: Polysomnographic recordings from 61 controls, 46 children with RLS, and 44 children with narcolepsy type 1 (NT1) were analyzed for total leg movements (LMS), PLMS, and isolated leg movements (ISOLMS) duration and indices, separately for school-age children and adolescents. Moreover, intermovement interval (IMI) graphs and time-of-night distribution of LMS were analyzed and cut-off thresholds for PLMS index and total LMS index were assessed for the separation of RLS from controls. Results: All indices tended to decrease from school-age children to adolescents in normal controls and in NT1, while in RLS, only PLMS index increased. All school-age children had a similar IMI distribution with a single peak at IMI 2-4s followed by gradual decline. In adolescents with RLS a second peak at IMI 10-50s, was seen. Time-of-night distribution of most indices decreased in RLS while most tended to increase in NT1. A PLMS index cutoff of 2/h best differentiated RLS from controls in school-age children (accuracy 70.0%) and in adolescents (accuracy 70.8%); however, most NT1 subjects also showed PLMS indices higher than this threshold. Conclusions: PLMS index alone does not reliably predict the diagnosis of RLS in children and adolescents. However, analyses of IMI distribution and time-of-night distribution provide additional elements to support a diagnosis of RLS.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1801
[Cu] Class update date: 180308
[Lr] Last revision date:180308
[St] Status:Publisher
[do] DOI:10.1093/sleep/zsy010

  5 / 4252 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29351820
[Au] Autor:Modarresnia L; Golgiri F; Madani NH; Emami Z; Tanha K
[Ad] Address:Endocrine Research Center, Institute of Endocrinology and Metabolism, Iran University of Medical Sciences (IUMS), Tehran, Iran.
[Ti] Title:Restless Legs Syndrome in Iranian People With Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus: The Role in Quality of Life and Quality of Sleep.
[So] Source:J Clin Sleep Med;14(2):223-228, 2018 Feb 15.
[Is] ISSN:1550-9397
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:STUDY OBJECTIVES: To investigate the prevalence of restless legs syndrome (RLS) in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) and explore its role in quality of life (QoL) and quality of sleep of these patients. METHODS: This is a cross-sectional study performed on 210 Iranian people with T2DM. The diagnosis of RLS was established based on the essential diagnostic criteria for RLS recommended by the National Institutes of Health. Sleep quality and QoL were assessed in all participants using Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index and EuroQol five-dimension questionnaire, respectively. Regression models were used for final analysis of data. RESULTS: The prevalence of RLS was 19.5%; of whom 38.1% had poor quality of sleep. Male sex, being single, body mass index (BMI), and RLS were associated with poor quality of sleep. Patients with RLS were almost three times as likely as the patients without RLS to have poor sleep quality. Moreover, being female, BMI value, level of glycosylated hemoglobine (HbA1C), and RLS were associated with lower QoL. RLS lowers the score of QoL even more than BMI and HbA1C. In addition, the QoL and sleep quality of this population of patients with diabetes have not been affected by the severity of RLS as well as presence or absence of neuropathy. CONCLUSIONS: RLS has an independent and significant role in sleep quality and QoL in the patients with diabetes. Neuropathy with RLS does not confer any additive burden on QoL and sleep quality of this population of patients with diabetes.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1801
[Cu] Class update date: 180308
[Lr] Last revision date:180308
[St] Status:In-Data-Review
[do] DOI:10.5664/jcsm.6938

  6 / 4252 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29346624
[Au] Autor:Ferri R; Silvani A; Rundo F; Zucconi M; Aricò D; Bruni O; Ferini-Strambi L; Manconi M
[Ad] Address:Sleep Research Centre; Department of Neurology I.C., Oasi Institute for Research on Mental Retardation and Brain Aging (IRCCS), Troina, Italy.
[Ti] Title:Data-driven Approaches to Define the Upper Limit of the Inter-movement Interval of Periodic Leg Movements during Sleep.
[So] Source:Sleep;, 2018 Jan 13.
[Is] ISSN:1550-9109
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Objective: to define statistically the upper limit of the inter-movement interval (IMI, the time interval between the onset of consecutive movements) of periodic leg movements during sleep (PLMS). Subjects and Methods: we computed the IMI distribution of a large sample (n = 141) of patients with restless legs syndrome (RLS) and analyzed it with two independent approaches, based on fitting either empirical functions or normal and exponential functions to the data. Results: the two fitting approaches consistently pointed to an upper limit of the PLMS IMI in the range between 50 s and 60 s. Decreasing the upper limit of PLMS IMI from 90 s to 60 s evidently decreased the PLMS index in RLS patients and control subjects; nevertheless, the PLMS index remained significantly higher in RLS vs. control subjects. Shifting the upper limit of PLMS IMI to 60 s did not significantly modify the effectiveness of discrimination of PLMS between controls and RLS patients. Conclusion: these results seem to indicate that a conservative, yet data-driven upper limit for IMI contributing to the PLMS in patients with RLS might be 60 s instead of 90 s, as recommended by the present guidelines.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1801
[Cu] Class update date: 180308
[Lr] Last revision date:180308
[St] Status:Publisher
[do] DOI:10.1093/sleep/zsy008

  7 / 4252 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29325239
[Au] Autor:Liu X; Chen H; Liu ZZ; Jia CX
[Ad] Address:Shandong University School of Public Health, No. 44, Wenhuaxi Rd, Lixia Dist. Jinan 250012, China. xclpsymd@gmail.com.
[Ti] Title:Insomnia and Psychopathological Features Associated With Restless Legs Syndrome in Chinese Adolescents.
[So] Source:J Clin Psychiatry;79(1), 2018 Jan/Feb.
[Is] ISSN:1555-2101
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:OBJECTIVE: Little is known about psychopathological features associated with restless legs syndrome (RLS) in pediatric populations. This study examined sleep duration, insomnia, and psychopathological profile associated with RLS in a large community sample of adolescents. Methods: Participants included 11,831 adolescents from 3 counties of Shandong, China. Mean age of the participants was 15.0 (SD = 1.5) years, and 51% were boys. In November and December 2015, participants completed a structured questionnaire to assess sleep duration, sleep problems, behavioral/emotional problems, and hopelessness. RLS was assessed by the 2003 National Institutes of Health (NIH) Restless Legs Syndrome Diagnosis and Epidemiology Workshop criteria. RESULTS: Of the sample, 9.5% met the 2003 NIH workshop criteria for RLS, and 2.2% had RLS at least 3 times per week. Compared with adolescents without RLS, adolescents with RLS < 3 times per week and those with RLS ≥ 3 times per week demonstrated significantly higher rates of insomnia symptoms (13.8%, 20.0%, and 36.4%, respectively; χ² = 117.84, P < .0001), internalizing (9.1%, 18.5%, and 34.1%; χ² = 238.84, P < .001) and externalizing (9.8%, 17.4%, and 34.1%; χ² = 193.87, P < .001) problems, and hopelessness (13.0%, 16.9%, and 27.8%; χ² = 54.10, P < .001). After adjusting for demographics and internalizing and externalizing problems, RLS ≥ 3 times per week was associated with a doubled risk of insomnia (OR = 2.05; 95% CI, 1.53-2.75). After adjusting for demographics, sleep duration, and insomnia, RLS ≥ 3 times per week was associated with a more than doubled risk of internalizing (OR = 2.65; 95% CI, 1.94-3.62) and externalizing problems (OR = 2.75; 95% CI, 2.02-3.74). CONCLUSIONS: RLS is associated with increased risk of insomnia, hopelessness, and both internalizing and externalizing problems. Our findings suggest that clinicians need to assess RLS in adolescents with sleep and mental health problems.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1801
[Cu] Class update date: 180308
[Lr] Last revision date:180308
[St] Status:In-Data-Review

  8 / 4252 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29325115
[Au] Autor:Schilling C; Gappa L; Schredl M; Streit F; Treutlein J; Frank J; Deuschle M; Meyer-Lindenberg A; Rietschel M; Witt SH
[Ad] Address:Central Institute of Mental Health, Sleep laboratory, Medical Faculty Mannheim / Heidelberg University, Mannheim, Germany.
[Ti] Title:Fast sleep spindle density is associated with rs4680 (Val108/158Met) genotype of Catechol-O-Methyltransferase (COMT).
[So] Source:Sleep;, 2018 Jan 06.
[Is] ISSN:1550-9109
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Study Objectives: Sleep spindles are a hallmark of NREM stage 2 sleep. Fast sleep spindles correlate with cognitive functioning, and are reduced in schizophrenia. Although spindles are highly genetically determined, distinct genetic mechanisms influencing sleep spindle activity have not been identified so far. Spindles are generated within a thalamo-cortical network. Dopaminergic neurotransmission modulates activity within this network and importantly depends on activity of catechol-O-methyltransferase (COMT). We aimed at testing whether the common functional rs4680 (Val108/158Met) polymorphism of COMT modulates fast spindle activity in healthy subjects. Methods: In 150 healthy subjects (93 women, 57 men; mean age 30.9 ± 11.6 years) sleep spindle density was analyzed during the second of two nights of polysomnography. We investigated the effect of the COMT Val108/158Met genotype on fast spindle density in whole night NREM sleep stages N2 and N3. Results: As predicted, higher Val allele dose correlates with reduced fast spindle density. Additional exploratory analysis of the effect of COMT genotype revealed that slow spindle density in heterozygote subjects was lower than that of both homozygote groups. Morphological characteristics of fast and slow spindles did not show significant differences between genotypes. COMT genotype had also no significant effect on measures of general sleep quality. Conclusions: This is the first report of a distinct gene effect on sleep spindle density in humans. As variation in the COMT Val108/158Met polymorphism is associated with differential expression of fast spindles in healthy subjects, genetically determined dopaminergic neurotransmission may modulate spindle oscillations during NREM sleep. Clinical Trial name, URL, and registration: Registered at German Clinical Trials Register Clinical Trail name: Activity of stress-related systems, metabolic consequences and genetics of restless legs syndrome, periodic limb movements, parasomnias, narcolepsy and healthy controls (DRKS00008902) URL: https://www.drks.de/drks_web/navigate.do?navigationId=trial.HTML&TRIAL_ID=DRKS00008902.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1801
[Cu] Class update date: 180308
[Lr] Last revision date:180308
[St] Status:Publisher
[do] DOI:10.1093/sleep/zsy007

  9 / 4252 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29253240
[Au] Autor:Fulda S; Heinzer R; Haba-Rubio J
[Ad] Address:Sleep & Epilepsy Center, Neurocenter of Southern Switzerland, Lugano, Switzerland.
[Ti] Title:Characteristics and determinants of respiratory event associated leg movements.
[So] Source:Sleep;, 2017 Dec 15.
[Is] ISSN:1550-9109
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Study Objectives: To (i) replicate the recently described distribution of respiratory event associated leg movements (rLM) in subjects with mild to moderate obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSAS), (ii) explore global and local factors associated with the presence of rLM, and (iii) investigate differences related to OSAS severity and periodic leg movements during sleep (PLMS) status. Methods: We randomly selected six groups of subjects without restless legs syndrome (12-15 subjects in each group), stratified by AHI severity (AHI 10-20, 20-30, and 30-40) and PLMS status (PLMS index < 15/h and > 15/h) from the population based HypnoLaus study that assessed full polysomnography at home in subjects aged 40 to 80 years, randomly selected from the population register of the city of Lausanne, Switzerland. Results: Our results confirmed the distribution of leg movement activity at the end of respiratory events (-2.0 s to +10.25 s). Mixed effects logistic regression modeling rLM-probability showed that rLM were more frequent in high-PLMS subjects, at the end of obstructive apneas (vs. hypopneas) and in the presence of arousals at the end of the events. In high-PLMS subjects rLM-probability decreased with time of night and was more reduced during REM sleep (vs. NREM sleep) while the duration of the respiratory event had a significant effect only in low-PLMS subjects. Conclusions: We confirm the previously reported distribution of rLM in subjects with mild to moderate OSAS and our results suggest that rLM are sensitive to both sleep-related and respiratory-related factors in a complex interaction with the PLMS status.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1712
[Cu] Class update date: 180308
[Lr] Last revision date:180308
[St] Status:Publisher
[do] DOI:10.1093/sleep/zsx206

  10 / 4252 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29198293
[Au] Autor:Gupta R; Ulfberg J; Allen RP; Goel D
[Ad] Address:Department of Psychiatry, Himalayan Institute of Medical Sciences, Swami Ram Nagar, Jolly Grant, Dehradun, India.
[Ti] Title:Comparison of Subjective Sleep Quality of Long-Term Residents at Low and High Altitudes: SARAHA Study.
[So] Source:J Clin Sleep Med;14(1):15-21, 2018 Jan 15.
[Is] ISSN:1550-9397
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:STUDY OBJECTIVES: To study the effect of altitude on subjective sleep quality in populations living at high and low altitudes after excluding cases of restless legs syndrome (RLS). METHODS: This population-based study was conducted at three different altitudes (400 m, 1,900-2,000 m, and 3,200 m above sea level). All consenting subjects available from random stratified sampling in the Himalayan and sub-Himalayan regions of India were included in the study (ages 18 to 84 years). Sleep quality and RLS status were assessed using validated translations of Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index (PSQI) and Cambridge Hopkins RLS diagnostic questionnaire. Recent medical records were screened to gather data for medical morbidities. RESULTS: In the total sample of 1,689 participants included, 55.2% were women and average age of included subjects was 35.2 (± 10.9) years. In this sample, overall 18.4% reported poor quality of sleep (PSQI ≥ 5). Poor quality of sleep was reported more commonly at high altitude compared to low altitude (odds ratio [OR] = 2.65; 95% CI = 1.9-3.7; < .001). It was more frequently reported among patients with RLS (29.7% versus 17.1% without RLS; < .001). Other factors that were associated with poor quality of sleep were male sex, smoking, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), and varicose veins. Binary logistic regression indicated that COPD (OR = 1.97; 95% CI = 1.36-2.86; < .001), high altitude (OR = 2.22; 95% CI = 1.55-3.18; < .001), and RLS (OR = 1.66; 95% CI = 1.12-2.46; = .01) increased the odds for poor quality of sleep. CONCLUSIONS: This study showed that poor quality of sleep was approximately twice as prevalent at high altitudes compared to low altitudes even after removing the potential confounders such as RLS and COPD.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1712
[Cu] Class update date: 180308
[Lr] Last revision date:180308
[St] Status:In-Data-Review
[do] DOI:10.5664/jcsm.6870


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