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[PMID]: 29473197
[Au] Autor:Kang JH; Sung J; Song YM; Kim YH
[Ad] Address:Clinic of Oral Medicine and Orofacial Pain, Institute of Oral Health Science, Ajou University School of Medicine, Suwon, Korea.
[Ti] Title:Heritability of the airway structure and head posture using twin study.
[So] Source:J Oral Rehabil;, 2018 Feb 23.
[Is] ISSN:1365-2842
[Cp] Country of publication:England
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Inherited traits of obstructive sleep apnoea (OSA) may have link to the heritability of the airway anatomy. The aim of this study was to investigate heritability of the airway anatomy by comparing skeletal and soft tissue features of Korean monozygotic twins (MZ) and dizygotic twins (DZ). In total, 72 participants (mean age, 41.5 ± 5.9 years; 40 males, 32 females) including 48 MZ (24 pairs) and 24 DZ (12 pairs) with same sex were participated. The craniofacial, craniovertebral, hyoideal and pharyngeal parameters were measured using lateral cephalograms. The genetic analysis was performed using Falconer's method. High heritability was detected in the hyoid position and inclination of the cervical column. The velopharyngeal and hypopharyngeal dimensions showed higher heritability compared to those of the nasopharynx and oropharynx. The body mass index (BMI) had interactions with the nasopharyngeal and hypopharyngeal dimensions and length of the tongue and soft palate. The mandibular growth had correlations with the nasopharyngeal and hypopharyngeal dimensions. The vertical skeletal relationships appeared to have interaction with the nasopharyngeal, velopharyngeal and hypopharyngeal dimensions, as well as length of the tongue and soft palate. A forwarded inclination of the cervical columns was seen in connections with BMI and the nasopharyngeal and hypopharyngeal dimensions. The airway structures and head postures seemed to be under strong genetic controls. The airway dimensions had associations with BMI, head postures and skeletal structures which showed high heritability. Forwarded head postures would be physiological adaptations of compromised airway adequacy by increased BMI and retrognathia.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1802
[Cu] Class update date: 180310
[Lr] Last revision date:180310
[St] Status:Publisher
[do] DOI:10.1111/joor.12620

  2 / 2136 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29521769
[Au] Autor:Sensoy AT; Kaymaz I; Ertas Ü; Kiki A
[Ad] Address:Department of Mechanical Engineering, Engineering Faculty, Bayburt University, Bayburt.
[Ti] Title:Determining the Patient-Specific Optimum Osteotomy Line for Severe Mandibular Retrognathia Patients.
[So] Source:J Craniofac Surg;, 2018 Mar 08.
[Is] ISSN:1536-3732
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:PURPOSE: The purpose of this study is to suggest a patient-specific osteotomy line to optimize the distractor position and thus to minimize the disadvantages of conventional mandibular distraction osteogenesis (MDO) protocols. In addition, this study also aims to compare the conventional MDO protocols with the new MDO protocol proposed in this study in terms of both orthodontic outcomes and mechanical effects of osteotomy level on callus stabilization by means of the finite element method. METHODS: A preoperative patient-specific 3-dimensional bone model was created and segmented by using computed tomography images of an individual patient. Virtual orthodontic set-up was applied to the segmented model prior to the virtual surgery. In order to compare the proposed osteotomy line with the conventional lines used in clinical applications, virtual surgery simulations were performed and callus tissues were modelled for each scenario. The comparison of the success of each osteotomy line was carried out based on the occlusion of the teeth. RESULTS: The osteotomy line determined using the method proposed in this study has resulted in far less malocclusion than the conventional method. Namely, any angular deviation from the optimum osteotomy line determined in this study might result in deep-bite or open-bite. On the other hand, the finite element analysis results have indicated that this deviation also negatively affects the callus stability. CONCLUSION: In order to achieve a better MDO treatment in terms of occlusion of the teeth and the callus stability, the location of the osteotomy line and the distractor position can be computationally determined. The results suggest that MDO protocol developed in this study might be used in clinic to achieve a better outcome from the MDO treatment.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1803
[Cu] Class update date: 180309
[Lr] Last revision date:180309
[St] Status:Publisher
[do] DOI:10.1097/SCS.0000000000004470

  3 / 2136 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29364827
[Au] Autor:Verma R; Jena AK; Singh SP; Utreja AK; Rattan V
[Ad] Address:Department of Orthodontics and Dentofacial Orthopedics, Gian Sagar Dental College and Hospital, Ramnagar, Banur, Punjab, India. rashmiverma.in@gmail.com.
[Ti] Title:Multidisciplinary management of post-ankylosis malocclusion and mandibular deformity.
[So] Source:J Clin Orthod;51(12):809-819, 2017 Dec.
[Is] ISSN:0022-3875
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Mh] MeSH terms primary: Ankylosis/therapy
Temporomandibular Joint Disorders
[Mh] MeSH terms secundary: Adult
Humans
Male
Malocclusion/etiology
Malocclusion/therapy
Patient Care Team
Retrognathia/etiology
Retrognathia/therapy
[Pt] Publication type:CASE REPORTS; JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1803
[Cu] Class update date: 180308
[Lr] Last revision date:180308
[Js] Journal subset:D
[Da] Date of entry for processing:180125
[St] Status:MEDLINE

  4 / 2136 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29373821
[Au] Autor:Yuen H; Rossouw PE; Wolford LM; Wang H
[Ad] Address:Orthodontic Resident, Eastman Institute for Oral Health, University of Rochester, Rochester, NY.
[Ti] Title:Pharyngeal Airway Space Changes After Condylar Replacement and Mandibular Advancement Surgery.
[So] Source:J Oral Maxillofac Surg;, 2018 Jan 03.
[Is] ISSN:1531-5053
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:PURPOSE: The aim of this study was to examine the total volume and cross-sectional areas of the pharyngeal airway after bilateral condylar replacement and mandibular advancement surgery. MATERIALS AND METHODS: A total of 137 patients (126 women and 11 men) underwent bilateral temporomandibular joint total joint replacement performed by 1 surgeon. A subsample of 30 patients who underwent condylar replacement and only mandibular advancement were evaluated for impact on the airway. Measurements were taken preoperatively, postoperatively, and at a follow-up 1 year after surgery on cone beam computed tomography scans. InVivoDental 3-dimensional imaging (Anatomage, San Jose, CA) was used to measure airway space regarding total volume (in cubic centimeters); minimum cross-sectional area (in square millimeters); minimum cross sections of the first, second, and third cervical vertebrae; and whether the patient had mandibular retrognathia before surgery. A second operator was used to test for interoperator error. Descriptive and bivariate statistics were computed, and the P value was set at .05. RESULTS: There was a significant increase in all measurements at the follow-up visit compared with the preoperative visit. There were no significant differences between groups based on simultaneous Le Fort I surgery, mandibular retrognathia, and gender. However, there were statistically significant differences in cross sections 1 and 2, as well as minimum cross-sectional area, regarding age. Condylar replacement and mandibular advancement have a significant association with an increase in airway space. The intraclass correlation coefficient showed excellent agreement between interoperator measurements. CONCLUSIONS: Patients undergoing bilateral temporomandibular joint replacement and mandibular advancement surgery showed an increase in pharyngeal airway space at a 1-year follow-up. In this study, age was significantly associated with the cross-sectional areas of the airway, with older patients having smaller values.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1801
[Cu] Class update date: 180225
[Lr] Last revision date:180225
[St] Status:Publisher

  5 / 2136 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29235540
[Au] Autor:Kim YM; Seo GH; Jung E; Jang JH; Kim SZ; Lee BH
[Ad] Address:Department of Pediatrics, Asan Medical Center Children's Hospital, University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Seoul, Korea.
[Ti] Title:Characteristic dysmorphic features in congenital disorders of glycosylation type IIb.
[So] Source:J Hum Genet;63(3):383-386, 2018 Mar.
[Is] ISSN:1435-232X
[Cp] Country of publication:England
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Over 100 types of congenital disorders of glycosylation (CDG) have been reported and the number is rapidly increasing. However, each type is very rare and is problematic to diagnose. Mannosyl-oligosaccharide glucosidase (MOGS)-CDG (CDG type IIb) is an extremely rare CDG that has only been reported in three patients from two unrelated families. Using targeted exome sequencing, we identified another patient affected by this condition. This patient had increased serum trisialotransferrin levels. Importantly, a review of the features of all four patients revealed the recognizable clinical hallmarks of MOGS-CDG. The distinct dysmorphic features of this condition include long eyelashes, retrognathia, hirsutism, clenched overlapped fingers, hypoventilation, hepatomegaly, generalized edema, and immunodeficiency.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1712
[Cu] Class update date: 180226
[Lr] Last revision date:180226
[St] Status:In-Process
[do] DOI:10.1038/s10038-017-0386-7

  6 / 2136 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29317143
[Au] Autor:Morice A; Renault F; Soupre V; Chapuis C; Trichet Zbinden C; Kadlub N; Giudice A; Vazquez MP; Picard A
[Ad] Address:Department of Maxillo-facial and Plastic Surgery, Necker-Enfants Malades Hospital, Assistance Publique-Hôpitaux de Paris, Université Paris-Descartes, Paris, France; Centre de Références des Malformations de la Face et de la Cavité Buccale, Paris, France. Electronic address: annemoriceaertgeerts@gmai
[Ti] Title:Predictors of speech outcomes in children with Pierre Robin sequence.
[So] Source:J Craniomaxillofac Surg;46(3):479-484, 2018 Mar.
[Is] ISSN:1878-4119
[Cp] Country of publication:Scotland
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:BACKGOUND: Pierre Robin sequence (PRS) has worse speech outcomes than isolated cleft palate. We aimed to search for possible associations of phonological outcomes with PRS status (isolated vs syndromic), clinical severity, soft palate muscles deficiency, or surgical procedure. METHODS: We designed a retrospective study of 130 children (male/female ratio: 0.4) with isolated (96) or syndromic (34) PRS with cleft palate. Grading systems were used to classify retrognathia, glossoptosis, and respiratory and feeding disorders. Electromyography was used to investigate levator veli palatini muscles. Hard cleft palate was measured using maxillary casts. Intravelar veloplasty was performed using the Sommerlad's technique. Phonological outcomes were assessed using the Borel-Maisonny classification. RESULTS: Cleft palate was repaired in one stage (65.5%) or hard palate closure was postponed (34.5%). Velopharyngeal insufficiency was more frequent in syndromic PRS (53%) vs. isolated PRS (30.5%) (p = 0.01), but was not statistically associated with clinical grade, hard cleft palate width, soft palate electromyography, and surgical procedure. CONCLUSIONS: In children with PRS, anatomic variables, initial clinical severity, and soft palate muscle deficiency are not predictors of speech prognosis.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1801
[Cu] Class update date: 180223
[Lr] Last revision date:180223
[St] Status:In-Process

  7 / 2136 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29447809
[Au] Autor:Dharmarajan H; Liu YC; Hippard HK; Chandy B
[Ad] Address:Baylor College of Medicine, Department of Otolaryngology - Head and Neck Surgery, One Baylor Plaza Suite NA-102, Houston, TX 77030, USA. Electronic address: hdharmar@bcm.edu.
[Ti] Title:Difficult airway intubation simulation using Bonfils fiberscope and rigid fiberscope for surgical training.
[So] Source:Int J Pediatr Otorhinolaryngol;105:171-175, 2018 Feb.
[Is] ISSN:1872-8464
[Cp] Country of publication:Ireland
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:INTRODUCTION: Pediatric otolaryngologists are frequently called to assist in difficult airway management in newborns with Pierre Robin Sequence (PRS) who have microretrognathia, glossoptosis, and an anterior larynx. The Bonfils fiberscope (BF) is a curved rigid scope designed to provide superior visualization in the anterior larynx. OBJECTIVE: (1) to assess whether BF provides an improvement in intubation success rate, time to intubation, or airway visualization as compared to rigid fiberscope (RF) in a difficult airway simulation setting and (2) to determine whether a training program for BF can improve time to intubation through practice trials. METHODS: Six right-handed trainees completed five trials on each of the three following airway models using the BF and RF: normal anatomy, anterior larynx and PRS. The normal larynx model was intubated only with RF. Main outcome measures were the time needed for tracheal intubation and Cormack-Lehane classification (1-4). RESULTS: The majority of the intubation trials showed a statistically significant difference between first and last completion times (p < .05) suggesting construct validity. Only the anterior larynx trials with BF did not demonstrate an improvement in time to intubation between first and last attempts (p < .3125). For the PRS retrognathia model, there was no statistically significant difference in time to intubation between using the BF and the RF (p < .44); in the anterior larynx model, the RF yielded a faster time to intubation than the BF on the final trial attempts (p < .0313). By Cormack-Lehane classification measures, laryngeal visualization by the BF was better than RF in the PRS manikin (p < .0022) while there was no significant difference in grade scores for the anterior larynx manikin (p < .45). All six trainees reported an improved visualization of the larynx with the BF compared to the RF for both the anterior larynx and PRS manikins; at the end of the trial runs, all participants noted an improvement in comfort level using the BF. CONCLUSION: The difficult airway simulation model is feasible for surgical training. BF adds superior visualization of the anterior larynx in PRS. Otolaryngology training programs may include BF as a supplemental tool in addition to RF as a part of the airway equipment training since there is significant improvement in time to intubation with consecutive practice trials and superior laryngeal visualization.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1802
[Cu] Class update date: 180215
[Lr] Last revision date:180215
[St] Status:In-Process

  8 / 2136 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29350460
[Au] Autor:Quiñones-Pérez B; VanNoy GE; Towne MC; Shen Y; Singh MN; Agrawal PB; Smith SE
[Ad] Address:Division of Genetics and Genomics, Boston Children's Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts.
[Ti] Title:Three-generation family with novel contiguous gene deletion on chromosome 2p22 associated with thoracic aortic aneurysm syndrome.
[So] Source:Am J Med Genet A;176(3):560-569, 2018 Mar.
[Is] ISSN:1552-4833
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Latent transforming growth factor binding proteins (LTBP) are a family of extracellular matrix glycoproteins that play an important role in the regulation of transforming growth factor beta (TGF-ß) activation. Dysregulation of the TGF-ß pathway has been implicated in the pathogenesis of inherited disorders predisposing to thoracic aortic aneurysms syndromes (TAAS) including Marfan syndrome (MFS; FBN1) and Loeys-Dietz syndrome (LDS; TGFBR1, TGFBR2, TGFB2, TGFB3, SMAD2, SMAD3). While these syndromes have distinct clinical criteria, they share clinical features including aortic root dilation and musculoskeletal findings. LTBP1 is a component of the TGF-ß pathway that binds to fibrillin-1 in the extracellular matrix rendering TGF-ß inactive. We describe a three-generation family case series with a heterozygous ∼5.1 Mb novel contiguous gene deletion of chromosome 2p22.3-p22.2 involving 11 genes, including LTBP1. The deletion has been identified in the proband, father and grandfather, who all have a phenotype consistent with a TAAS. Findings include thoracic aortic dilation, ptosis, malar hypoplasia, high arched palate, retrognathia, pes planus, hindfoot deformity, obstructive sleep apnea, and low truncal tone during childhood with joint laxity that progressed to reduced joint mobility over time. While the three affected individuals did not meet criteria for either MFS or LDS, they shared features of both. Although the deletion includes 11 genes, given the relationship between LTBP1, TGF-ß, and fibrillin-1, LTBP1 stands out as one of the possible candidate genes for the clinical syndrome observed in this family. More studies are necessary to evaluate the potential role of LTBP1 in the pathophysiology of TAAS.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1801
[Cu] Class update date: 180215
[Lr] Last revision date:180215
[St] Status:In-Data-Review
[do] DOI:10.1002/ajmg.a.38590

  9 / 2136 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29407503
[Au] Autor:Balkhande PB; Lakkakula BVKS; Chitharanjan AB
[Ad] Address:Department of Orthodontics and Dentofacial Orthopaedics, Sri Ramachandra University, Porur, Chennai, India.
[Ti] Title:Relationship between matrilin-1 gene polymorphisms and mandibular retrognathism.
[So] Source:Am J Orthod Dentofacial Orthop;153(2):255-261.e1, 2018 Feb.
[Is] ISSN:1097-6752
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:INTRODUCTION: Mandibular retrognathism is a type of malocclusion that refers to an abnormal posterior position of the mandible as a result of a developmental abnormality. From the literature, it is evident that the mandibular growth pattern is determined by the intramembranous ossification of the mandibular body and endochondral ossification of the condyle. Matrilin-1 is a cartilage extracellular matrix protein, and matrilin-1 gene (MATN1) polymorphisms have been found to be involved in dental malocclusions of humans. In this study, we aimed to examine the association between MATN1 polymorphisms and the risk of mandibular retrognathism, in a case-control study with a South Indian population. METHODS: Eighty-one patients with mandibular retrognathism (SNB, <78°) and 71 controls having an orthognathic mandible (SNB, 80° ± 2°) were recruited. In both the patient and control groups, subjects with an orthognathic maxilla (SNA, 82° ± 2°) were included. Three single nucleotide polymorphisms of the MATN1 gene (rs1149048, rs1149042, and rs1065755) were genotyped using polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism. The statistical association analysis was performed using the chi-square test. Pair-wise linkage disequilibrium was computed, and haplotypes were compared between subjects and controls. Nonparametric tests were used to compare cephalometric measurements between groups. RESULTS: No polymorphic site deviated from Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium in the controls. The rs1149042 genotypes and alleles were found to be associated with reduced risk of mandibular retrognathism. Furthermore, rs1149042 genotypes were associated with mandibular measurements (SNB and ANB). There was no strong and consistent linkage disequilibrium linkage disequilibrium across two different single nucleotide polymorphisms and haplotypes were not associated with mandibular retrognathism. CONCLUSIONS: The results of our study suggest an association between the MATN1 gene polymorphisms and mandibular retrognathism.
[Mh] MeSH terms primary: Matrilin Proteins/genetics
Polymorphism, Single Nucleotide/genetics
Retrognathia/genetics
[Mh] MeSH terms secundary: Adolescent
Adult
Case-Control Studies
Child
Genetic Association Studies
Humans
Male
Mandible/pathology
Matrilin Proteins/physiology
Retrognathia/pathology
Young Adult
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Nm] Name of substance:0 (Matrilin Proteins)
[Em] Entry month:1802
[Cu] Class update date: 180213
[Lr] Last revision date:180213
[Js] Journal subset:D; IM
[Da] Date of entry for processing:180207
[St] Status:MEDLINE

  10 / 2136 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29425754
[Au] Autor:Ngo R; Pullano E; Peacock ZS; Lahey ET; August M
[Ad] Address:Resident, Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, MA.
[Ti] Title:Does the Medical Comorbidity Profile of Obstructive Sleep Apnea Patients Treated With Maxillomandibular Advancement Differ From That of Obstructive Sleep Apnea Patients Managed Nonsurgically?
[So] Source:J Oral Maxillofac Surg;, 2018 Jan 31.
[Is] ISSN:1531-5053
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:PURPOSE: Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) patients with retrognathia and measurable anatomic airway determinants may represent a subset of OSA patients and have distinct comorbidity profiles. Our aim was to compare the medical comorbidities of OSA patients managed surgically with maxillomandibular advancement with those of nonsurgical patients. PATIENTS AND METHODS: In this cross-sectional retrospective study, patients for both cohorts were identified through the Massachusetts General Hospital oral and maxillofacial surgery data registry and the Massachusetts General Hospital Research Patient Data Registry. The inclusion criteria consisted of clinical records documenting body mass index (BMI), apnea-hypopnea index, respiratory disturbance index, and/or oxygen nadir. The primary predictor variable was the treatment modality chosen: surgical (maxillomandibular advancement) or nonsurgical. Demographic information and OSA parameters were evaluated. The primary outcome variable was the number of documented comorbidities in each group. Two-sample t tests were used for continuous variables, whereas χ or Fisher exact tests were used for categorical variables. RESULTS: The nonsurgical cohort consisted of 71 patients (67.6% men), and the surgical cohort consisted of 51 patients (84.3% men). Comparison of descriptive characteristics showed that the nonsurgical cohort had a higher average age (49 ± 9.4 years) than the surgical cohort (41 ± 10.7 years, P < .001). In addition, a higher average BMI was present in the nonsurgical group (42.3 ± 11.9 in nonsurgical group vs 29.7 ± 5.5 in surgical group, P < .001). Polysomnogram parameters were comparable with the exception of a higher Epworth Sleepiness Scale score in the surgical cohort (15.5 ± 5.30 in surgical group vs 9.90 ± 6.80 in nonsurgical group, P = .005). The nonsurgical cohort had a higher total number of comorbidities (7 ± 4 in nonsurgical group vs 4 ± 3 in surgical group, P < .001). Hypertension, cardiovascular disease, hyperlipidemia, pulmonary hypertension, obstructive pulmonary disease, and type 2 diabetes mellitus had higher prevalences within the nonsurgical group. CONCLUSIONS: The results of this study suggest that nonsurgically managed OSA patients tend to have more complex medical comorbidity profiles than those managed surgically. Obesity (BMI >30) was more prevalent in the nonsurgical cohort, which may be contributory. The additive contribution of OSA needs to be further elucidated.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1802
[Cu] Class update date: 180209
[Lr] Last revision date:180209
[St] Status:Publisher


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