Database : MEDLINE
Search on : Rigor and Mortis [Words]
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[PMID]: 29514100
[Au] Autor:Galimov ER; Pryor RE; Poole SE; Benedetto A; Pincus Z; Gems D
[Ad] Address:Institute of Healthy Ageing and Department of Genetics, Evolution and Environment, University College London, London, UK.
[Ti] Title:Coupling of Rigor Mortis and Intestinal Necrosis during C. elegans Organismal Death.
[So] Source:Cell Rep;22(10):2730-2741, 2018 Mar 06.
[Is] ISSN:2211-1247
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Organismal death is a process of systemic collapse whose mechanisms are less well understood than those of cell death. We previously reported that death in C. elegans is accompanied by a calcium-propagated wave of intestinal necrosis, marked by a wave of blue autofluorescence (death fluorescence). Here, we describe another feature of organismal death, a wave of body wall muscle contraction, or death contraction (DC). This phenomenon is accompanied by a wave of intramuscular Ca release and, subsequently, of intestinal necrosis. Correlation of directions of the DC and intestinal necrosis waves implies coupling of these death processes. Long-lived insulin/IGF-1-signaling mutants show reduced DC and delayed intestinal necrosis, suggesting possible resistance to organismal death. DC resembles mammalian rigor mortis, a postmortem necrosis-related process in which Ca influx promotes muscle hyper-contraction. In contrast to mammals, DC is an early rather than a late event in C. elegans organismal death. VIDEO ABSTRACT.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1803
[Cu] Class update date: 180307
[Lr] Last revision date:180307
[St] Status:In-Data-Review

  2 / 468 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 28466553
[Au] Autor:Morgan LO; Johnson M; Cornelison JB; Isaac CV; deJong JL; Prahlow JA
[Ad] Address:Office of the Medical Examiner & the Department of Pathology, Western Michigan University Homer Stryker M.D. School of Medicine, Kalamazoo, MI.
[Ti] Title:Autopsy Fingerprint Technique Using Fingerprint Powder.
[So] Source:J Forensic Sci;63(1):262-265, 2018 Jan.
[Is] ISSN:1556-4029
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:The collection of high-quality fingerprints is an important component of routine forensic autopsies and represents one of the several potential methods for identifying a decedent. Fingerprint collection at autopsy frequently employs a manual method using fingerprint ink and cards, although some offices use digital-scanning equipment. While these methodologies are adequate in most circumstances, this study introduces an alternative method using fingerprint powder and adhesive labels. The method is quick, easy to perform, and cost-effective and provides the additional advantage of an adhesive label that easily conforms to the finger, palm, or foot which reduces smudging of prints in individuals with rigor mortis, skin slippage, or decomposition compared to more traditional autopsy fingerprint collection techniques. The prints can then be easily stored, either in hard-copy form or scanned to make a digital record.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1705
[Cu] Class update date: 180109
[Lr] Last revision date:180109
[St] Status:In-Process
[do] DOI:10.1111/1556-4029.13532

  3 / 468 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29137521
[Au] Autor:Hlávka JP
[Ad] Address:Jakub P. Hlávka ( jhlavka@rand.org ) is an assistant policy researcher in health economics and technology policy at the RAND Corporation and a doctoral fellow at the Pardee RAND Graduate School, both in Santa Monica, California.
[Ti] Title:Cleaning Up Medical Research Rigor Mortis: How Sloppy Science Creates Worthless Cures, Crushes Hope, And Wastes Billions By Richard Harris New York (NY) : Basic Books , 2017 288 pp., $28.00.
[So] Source:Health Aff (Millwood);36(11):2028-2029, 2017 Nov.
[Is] ISSN:1544-5208
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1711
[Cu] Class update date: 171115
[Lr] Last revision date:171115
[St] Status:In-Data-Review
[do] DOI:10.1377/hlthaff.2017.1040

  4 / 468 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 28974784
[Au] Autor:Mir NA; Rafiq A; Kumar F; Singh V; Shukla V
[Ad] Address:Division of AN&FT, Central Avian Research Institute, Izatnagar, Bareilly, India.
[Ti] Title:Determinants of broiler chicken meat quality and factors affecting them: a review.
[So] Source:J Food Sci Technol;54(10):2997-3009, 2017 Sep.
[Is] ISSN:0022-1155
[Cp] Country of publication:India
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Broiler production at mass level has already been achieved and now emphasis is being laid on increasing meat quality by altering various characteristics of broiler meat. Appearance, texture, juiciness, wateriness, firmness, tenderness, odor and flavor are the most important and perceptible meat features that influence the initial and final quality judgment by consumers before and after purchasing a meat product. The quantifiable properties of meat such as water holding capacity, shear force, drip loss, cook loss, pH, shelf life, collagen content, protein solubility, cohesiveness, and fat binding capacity are indispensable for processors involved in the manufacture of value added meat products. Nutrition of birds has a significant impact on poultry meat quality and safety. It is well known that dietary fatty acid profiles are reflected in tissue fatty acid. Management of poultry meat production is reflected mostly on consumption features (juiciness, tenderness, flavour) of meat. After slaughter, biochemical changes, causing the conversion of muscle to meat, determine final meat quality. Postmortem carcass temperature has profound effect on rigor mortis and the physicochemical changes observed in PSE muscles are attributed to postmortem glycolysis, temperature, and pH. Primary processing and further processing have become a matter of concern with respect to nutritional quality of broiler meat. Genetic variation among birds could contribute to large differences in the rate of rigor mortis completion and meat quality. Heritability estimates for meat quality traits in broilers are amazingly high (0.35-0.81), making genetic selection a best tool for improvement of broiler meat quality.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE; REVIEW
[Em] Entry month:1710
[Cu] Class update date: 171008
[Lr] Last revision date:171008
[St] Status:PubMed-not-MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.1007/s13197-017-2789-z

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[PMID]: 28720937
[Au] Autor:da Silva DCF; de Arruda AMV; Gonçalves AA
[Ad] Address:Agricultural Sciences Center (CCA), Federal Rural University of Semi-Arid (UFERSA), Av. Francisco Mota, 572, Presidente Costa e Silva, Mossoró, RN 59625-900 Brazil.
[Ti] Title:Quality characteristics of broiler chicken meat from free-range and industrial poultry system for the consumers.
[So] Source:J Food Sci Technol;54(7):1818-1826, 2017 Jun.
[Is] ISSN:0022-1155
[Cp] Country of publication:India
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:ABSTRACT: The aim of this study was to determine and compare the quality parameters of broiler chicken meat from free-range and industrial poultry system. Proximate composition, color, pH, shear force, microbial quality and sensory characteristics were evaluated. Both free-range and industrial chicken meat presented PSE (pale, soft and exudative) anomaly ( * > 53). An inverse correlation between lightness, pH and shear force was observed. The free range broiler meat had higher yellow color ( * 11.56) and shear force (2.75 kgf) and lower red color ( * 1.65) and pH (5.75) in comparison to the industrial broiler meat, due intensive physical activity on growing phase and influence of the pre-slaughter stress on the rigor mortis. The thigh cut from free range broiler meat showed higher protein levels (18.00%), while to the thigh and drumstick cuts of industrial broiler meat showed higher total fat levels (3.4 and 5.0%, respectively). In general, each strain and chickens producing methods gave the peculiar characteristics to meat (chemical, physical, microbiological and sensorial).
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1707
[Cu] Class update date: 170723
[Lr] Last revision date:170723
[St] Status:PubMed-not-MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.1007/s13197-017-2612-x

  6 / 468 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 28630697
[Au] Autor:Bjørnvad CR; Nielsen ME; Hansen SEM; Nielsen DH
[Ad] Address:Department of Veterinary Clinical and Animal Sciences, Faculty of Health and Medical Sciences, University of Copenhagen, Dyrlaegevej 16, 1870 Frederiksberg C, Denmark.
[Ti] Title:The effect of position on the precision of dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry and correlation with body condition score in dogs and cats.
[So] Source:J Nutr Sci;6:e20, 2017.
[Is] ISSN:2048-6790
[Cp] Country of publication:England
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry (DEXA) has been used to assess body composition in dogs and cats in several studies, but studies are difficult to compare for several reasons. The aim of the present study was to evaluate whether positioning of dogs or cats in either dorsal or ventral recumbency during DEXA scanning influences results. Dogs and cats that were brought to the University Hospital for Companion Animals for euthanasia during the period 15 September-6 November 2015 were consecutively recruited if owners signed a written consent. Following euthanasia and before rigor mortis, the animals were body condition scored (BCS, nine-point scale) and DEXA scanned. DEXA measurements of total body mass (TBM), bone mineral content (BMC), bone mineral density (BMD), lean soft tissue mass (LSTM) and body fat (BF) were performed five times in ventral and two times in dorsal recumbency on each animal. Differences between positioning were analysed using Student's test or Wilcoxon's test depending on normality of the data. A total of thirteen dogs and seven cats of different breeds, size, sexes and age were included. The CV for DEXA parameters in ventral or dorsal recumbency were, for dogs, TBM ≤ 0·1 %, BMC ≤ 1·63 %, BMD ≤ 1·29 %, LSTM ≤ 0·89 % and BF ≤ 1·52 %; and, for cats, TBM ≤ 0·08 %, BMC ≤ 0·61 %, BMD ≤ 0·49 %, LSTM ≤ 0·45 % and BF ≤ 0·88 %. In both positions, a good correlation was found for dogs ( 0·84-0·85; < 0·0003) and cats ( 0·89-0·90; < 0·0081) between the nine-point BCS system and BF percentage measured by DEXA. Ventral and dorsal recumbency provides comparable results, except that BMD measures were higher in dorsal recumbency ( < 0·0004).
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1706
[Cu] Class update date: 170816
[Lr] Last revision date:170816
[St] Status:PubMed-not-MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.1017/jns.2017.16

  7 / 468 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 28596166
[Au] Autor:Jones SP
[Ad] Address:From the Department of Medicine-Cardiovascular, University of Louisville, KY. Steven.P.Jones@Louisville.edu.
[Ti] Title:I'll Have the Rigor, but Hold the Mortis.
[So] Source:Circ Res;120(12):1852-1854, 2017 Jun 09.
[Is] ISSN:1524-4571
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Pt] Publication type:EDITORIAL
[Em] Entry month:1706
[Cu] Class update date: 170714
[Lr] Last revision date:170714
[St] Status:In-Data-Review
[do] DOI:10.1161/CIRCRESAHA.117.311114

  8 / 468 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 28213867
[Au] Autor:Crostack C; Sehner S; Raupach T; Anders S
[Ad] Address:Department of Legal Medicine, University Medical Center Hamburg Eppendorf, Butenfeld 34, 22529, Hamburg, Germany.
[Ti] Title:Re-establishment of rigor mortis: evidence for a considerably longer post-mortem time span.
[So] Source:Int J Legal Med;131(4):1039-1042, 2017 Jul.
[Is] ISSN:1437-1596
[Cp] Country of publication:Germany
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Re-establishment of rigor mortis following mechanical loosening is used as part of the complex method for the forensic estimation of the time since death in human bodies and has formerly been reported to occur up to 8-12 h post-mortem (hpm). We recently described our observation of the phenomenon in up to 19 hpm in cases with in-hospital death. Due to the case selection (preceding illness, immobilisation), transfer of these results to forensic cases might be limited. We therefore examined 67 out-of-hospital cases of sudden death with known time points of death. Re-establishment of rigor mortis was positive in 52.2% of cases and was observed up to 20 hpm. In contrast to the current doctrine that a recurrence of rigor mortis is always of a lesser degree than its first manifestation in a given patient, muscular rigidity at re-establishment equalled or even exceeded the degree observed before dissolving in 21 joints. Furthermore, this is the first study to describe that the phenomenon appears to be independent of body or ambient temperature.
[Mh] MeSH terms primary: Joints/pathology
Rigor Mortis
[Mh] MeSH terms secundary: Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Female
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Postmortem Changes
Recurrence
Time Factors
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1710
[Cu] Class update date: 171031
[Lr] Last revision date:171031
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[Da] Date of entry for processing:170219
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.1007/s00414-017-1558-x

  9 / 468 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 28193431
[Au] Autor:Lerfall J; Hasli PR; Skare EF; Olsen RE; Rotabakk BT; Roth B; Slinde E; Egelandsdal B
[Ad] Address:Norwegian University of Science and Technology, Department of Biotechnology and Food Science, NO-7491 Trondheim, Norway. Electronic address: Jorgen.lerfall@ntnu.no.
[Ti] Title:A comparative study of diploid versus triploid Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar L.). The effects of rearing temperatures (5, 10 and 15°C) on raw material characteristics and storage quality.
[So] Source:Food Chem;225:37-44, 2017 Jun 15.
[Is] ISSN:0308-8146
[Cp] Country of publication:England
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Several major market operators argue that the current level of knowledge about quality is too scant to justify a switch to a large-scale production of triploid salmon. The aim of the present study was, therefore, to elucidate how rearing conditions (5, 10 and 15°C) affect the flesh quality of triploid Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar L., 1.6±0.3kg). As a reference, diploid salmon kept under equal conditions and with equal genetics were used. The main design discriminant was the holding temperature; increased temperature gave increased blood lactate, rigor index (I ), drip loss (DL), content of astaxanthin and intensity of redness, but reduced muscle pH, cathepsin activity and fillet lightness. Salmon kept at 10°C grew the fastest. It is concluded that ploidy gave less variation than temperature. Triploids were characterized by lower blood haematocrit (Hct) and I , higher DL and collagenase activity, and on average, paler and less yellowish fillets.
[Mh] MeSH terms primary: Diploidy
Fish Products
Food Storage
Salmo salar/genetics
Triploidy
[Mh] MeSH terms secundary: Animals
Temperature
[Pt] Publication type:COMPARATIVE STUDY; JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1705
[Cu] Class update date: 170504
[Lr] Last revision date:170504
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[Da] Date of entry for processing:170215
[St] Status:MEDLINE

  10 / 468 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 28040666
[Au] Autor:Madadin M; Samaranayake RP; O'Donnell C; Cordner S
[Ad] Address:University of Dammam, Saudi Arabia; Victorian Institute of Forensic Medicine, Australia. Electronic address: mmadadin@uod.edu.sa.
[Ti] Title:Post-mortem CT evaluation of atlanto-occipital dissociation.
[So] Source:J Forensic Leg Med;46:16-19, 2017 Feb.
[Is] ISSN:1878-7487
[Cp] Country of publication:England
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Atlanto-occipital dissociation injury is an important injury in forensic pathology practice. Radiological diagnosis of atlanto-occipital dissociation clinically is assessed by direct measurement of occipito-vertebral skeletal relationships. Different measurements may be used to diagnose atlanto-occipital dissociation, including the basion-dens interval (BDI) and basion-axial interval (BAI). It is not known whether the normal ante-mortem measurements of BDI and BAI described in the literature are applicable to post-mortem CT images of the occipito-cervical junction (OCJ) or whether these measurements could be affected by early post-mortem changes. This study aims to compare post-mortem BDI and BAI measurements with ante-mortem values. Post-mortem CT scans of the cervical spines of 100 deceased adults were reviewed, and the BDI and BAI were measured. Different parameters were recorded in each case. The results from this study suggest that there are no effects of post-mortem changes on the measurement of BAI as relied upon clinically. There appear to be some effects of fully established rigor mortis on BDI measurement, shortening it. This may have consequences for the post mortem diagnosis of atlanto-occipital dissociation.
[Mh] MeSH terms primary: Atlanto-Occipital Joint/diagnostic imaging
Atlanto-Occipital Joint/injuries
Joint Dislocations/diagnostic imaging
Tomography, X-Ray Computed
[Mh] MeSH terms secundary: Adult
Female
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Postmortem Changes
Young Adult
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1703
[Cu] Class update date: 170314
[Lr] Last revision date:170314
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[Da] Date of entry for processing:170102
[St] Status:MEDLINE


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