Database : MEDLINE
Search on : Root and Caries [Words]
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[PMID]: 29510618
[Au] Autor:Ratanaporncharoen C; Tabata M; Kitasako Y; Ikeda M; Goda T; Matsumoto A; Tagami J; Miyahara Y
[Ti] Title:pH mapping on tooth surfaces for quantitative caries diagnosis using micro Ir/IrOx pH sensor.
[So] Source:Anal Chem;, 2018 Mar 07.
[Is] ISSN:1520-6882
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:A quantitative diagnostic method for dental caries would improve oral health, which directly affects the quality of life. Here we describe the preparation and application of Ir/IrOx pH sensors, which are used to measure the surface pH of dental caries. The pH level is used as an indicator to distinguish between active and arrested caries. After a dentist visually inspected and defined 18 extracted dentinal caries at various positions as active or arrested caries, the surface pH values of sound and caries areas were directly measured with an Ir/IrOx pH sensor with a diameter of 300 µm as a dental explorer. The average pH values of the sound root, the arrested caries, and active caries were 6.85, 6.07, and 5.30 respectively. The pH obtained with an Ir/IrOx sensor was highly correlated with the inspection results by the dentist, indicating that the types of caries were successfully categorized. This caries testing technique using a micro Ir/IrOx pH sensor provides an accurate quantitative caries evaluation and has potential in clinical diagnosis.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1803
[Cu] Class update date: 180307
[Lr] Last revision date:180307
[St] Status:Publisher
[do] DOI:10.1021/acs.analchem.8b00867

  2 / 3269 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29504166
[Au] Autor:Mounssif I; Stefanini M; Mazzotti C; Marzadori M; Sangiorgi M; Zucchelli G
[Ti] Title:Esthetic evaluation and patient-centered outcomes in root-coverage procedures.
[So] Source:Periodontol 2000;, 2018 Mar 04.
[Is] ISSN:1600-0757
[Cp] Country of publication:Denmark
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Treatment of buccal gingival recession is performed for esthetic concerns, root sensitivity, root caries and cervical abrasion resulting from incorrect toothbrushing. Over the years, clinicians and researchers have improved surgical techniques to achieve surrogate end points, such as complete root coverage, gingival recession reduction or keratinized tissue increase, ignoring the input from the patient regarding the true indications for treatment. In the past few years there has been an emphasis to include patient-centered outcomes in the evaluation of root-coverage procedures. The aim of this narrative review is to describe the professional objective assessment of the esthetic results after root-coverage procedures and the patient perception of outcome in terms of esthetics, postoperative morbidity and dentinal hypersensitivity resolution after the treatment of gingival recessions. The need to align professional (surrogate) end points with patient-centered outcomes (true end points) in the future is emphasized.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE; REVIEW
[Em] Entry month:1803
[Cu] Class update date: 180305
[Lr] Last revision date:180305
[St] Status:Publisher
[do] DOI:10.1111/prd.12216

  3 / 3269 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29501118
[Au] Autor:Chiu G; Chang C; Roberts WE
[Ad] Address:Newton Implant Center, HsinChu City, Taiwan.
[Ti] Title:Interdisciplinary treatment for a compensated Class II partially edentulous malocclusion: Orthodontic creation of a posterior implant site.
[So] Source:Am J Orthod Dentofacial Orthop;153(3):422-435, 2018 Mar.
[Is] ISSN:1097-6752
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:A 36-year-old woman with good periodontal health sought treatment for a compensated Class II partially edentulous malocclusion associated with a steep mandibular plane (SN-MP, 45°), 9 missing teeth, a 3-mm midline discrepancy, and compromised posterior occlusal function. She had multiple carious lesions, a failing fixed prostheses in the mandibular right quadrant replacing the right first molar, and a severely atrophic edentulous ridge in the area around the mandibular left first and second molars. After restoration of the caries, the mandibular left third molar served as anchorage to correct the mandibular arch crowding. The mandibular left second premolar was retracted with a light force of 2 oz (about 28.3 cN) on the buccal and lingual surfaces to create an implant site between the premolars. Modest lateral root resorption was noted on the distal surface of the mandibular left second premolar after about 7 mm of distal translation in 7 months. Six months later, implants were placed in the mandibular left and right quadrants; the spaces were retained with the fixed appliance for 5 months and a removable retainer for 1 month. Poor cooperation resulted in relapse of the mandibular left second premolar back into the implant site, and it was necessary to reopen the space. When the mandibular left fixture was uncovered, a 3-mm deep osseous defect on the distobuccal surface was found; it was an area of relatively immature bundle bone, because the distal aspect of the space was reopened after the relapse. Subsequent bone grafting resulted in good osseous support of the implant-supported prosthesis. The relatively thin band of attached gingiva on the implant at the mandibular right first molar healed with a recessed contour that was susceptible to food impaction. A free gingival graft restored soft tissue form and function. This severe malocclusion with a discrepancy index value of 28 was treated to an excellent outcome in 38 months of interdisciplinary treatment. The Cast-Radiograph Evaluation score was 13. However, the treatment was complicated by routine relapse and implant osseous support problems. Retreatment of space opening and 2 additional surgeries were required to correct an osseous defect and an inadequate soft tissue contour. Orthodontic treatment is a viable option for creating implant sites, but fixed retention is required until the prosthesis is delivered. Bone augmentation is indicated at the time of implant placement to offset expected bone loss. Complex restorative treatment may result in routine complications that are effectively managed with interdisciplinary care.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1803
[Cu] Class update date: 180304
[Lr] Last revision date:180304
[St] Status:In-Process

  4 / 3269 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29493814
[Au] Autor:Marzadori M; Stefanini M; Sangiorgi M; Mounssif I; Monaco C; Zucchelli G
[Ti] Title:Crown lengthening and restorative procedures in the esthetic zone.
[So] Source:Periodontol 2000;, 2018 Mar 01.
[Is] ISSN:1600-0757
[Cp] Country of publication:Denmark
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Crown lengthening is one of the most common surgical procedures in periodontal practice. Its indications include subgingival caries, crown or root fractures, altered passive eruption, cervical root resorption and short clinical abutment, and its aim is to re-establish the biologic width in a more apical position. While the procedure in posterior areas of the dentition has been thoroughly investigated, crown lengthening performed for esthetic reasons in the anterior areas is still a matter of debate and an evidence-based technique is not available. This paper provides accurate descriptions of the surgical and restorative phases of the esthetic crown-lengthening procedure by answering the following questions: what is the ideal surgical flap design? how much supporting bone should be removed? how should the position of the flap margin relate to the alveolar bone at surgical closure? and how should the healing phase be managed in relation to the timing and the position of the provisional restoration with respect to the gingival margin?
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE; REVIEW
[Em] Entry month:1803
[Cu] Class update date: 180301
[Lr] Last revision date:180301
[St] Status:Publisher
[do] DOI:10.1111/prd.12208

  5 / 3269 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29480759
[Au] Autor:Öter B; Topçuog Lu N; Tank MK; Çehreli SB
[Ad] Address:1 Department of Pedodontics, Istanbul Research and Training Hospital, Baskent University , Istanbul, Turkey .
[Ti] Title:Evaluation of Antibacterial Efficiency of Different Root Canal Disinfection Techniques in Primary Teeth.
[So] Source:Photomed Laser Surg;, 2018 Feb 26.
[Is] ISSN:1557-8550
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:BACKGROUND: A successful primary root canal treatment depends on effective shaping and cleaning the root canal system and finally filling it with a hermetic sealer. Clinically, roots of primary teeth are difficult to shape and the irrigation/disinfection protocol has great importance on prognosis. OBJECTIVE: The present study evaluated the antibacterial efficiency of Endosafe (Orangedental GmbH & Co. KG), photo-activated disinfection (PAD; Orangedental GmbH & Co. KG), diode laser (Epic 10; Biolase, Inc.), ozone (O , Ozonytron; Biozonix, München, Germany), and sodium hypochloride applications in primary root canals that were infected with Enterococcus faecalis after standard mechanical instrumentation. METHODS: The study was conducted on roots of 100 human primary molar teeth, which were extracted due to excessive caries. The roots were divided in 5 groups with 15 roots in each root disinfection protocol. In addition, 15 samples and 10 samples served as positive and negative controls, respectively. The Shapiro-Wilk test, the Kruskal-Wallis test and then by post hoc group comparisons with the Bonferroni-adjusted Mann-Whitney U test (unpaired observations) was used. RESULTS: Sodium hypochlorite (NaOCl) exhibited the highest antibacterial effect (0 colony-forming units per mL). Diode laser irradiation was statistically more effective than the ozone, PAD, and Endosafe groups (p < 0.001). Endosafe, PAD, and ozone groups showed similar antibacterial effect (p > 0.05). Although not statistically significant, the Endosafe was more effective in reducing the bacterial count when compared with ozone and PAD. CONCLUSIONS: The five tested irrigation systems were shown to be effective in disinfection of the E. faecalis-contaminated primary root canals and best results were obtained with 2.5% NaOCl and diode laser.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1802
[Cu] Class update date: 180226
[Lr] Last revision date:180226
[St] Status:Publisher
[do] DOI:10.1089/pho.2017.4324

  6 / 3269 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29289728
[Au] Autor:Hilton TJ; Funkhouser E; Ferracane JL; Gordan VV; Huff KD; Barna J; Mungia R; Marker T; Gilbert GH; National Dental PBRN Collaborative Group
[Ad] Address:Department of Restorative Dentistry, School of Dentistry, Oregon Health & Science University, 2730 S.W. Moody Ave., Portland, OR 97201-5042, United States. Electronic address: hiltont@ohsu.edu.
[Ti] Title:Associations of types of pain with crack-level, tooth-level and patient-level characteristics in posterior teeth with visible cracks: Findings from the National Dental Practice-Based Research Network.
[So] Source:J Dent;70:67-73, 2018 Mar.
[Is] ISSN:1879-176X
[Cp] Country of publication:England
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:OBJECTIVES: The objective of this study was to determine which patient traits, behaviors, external tooth and/or crack characteristics correlate with the types of symptoms that teeth with visible cracks exhibit, namely pain on biting, pain due to cold stimuli, or spontaneous pain. METHODS: Dentists in the National Dental Practice-Based Research Network enrolled a convenience sample of subjects each of whom had a single, vital posterior tooth with at least one observable external crack (cracked teeth); 2858 cracked teeth from 209 practitioners were enrolled. Data were collected at the patient-, tooth-, and crack-level. Generalized estimating equations were used to obtain significant (p < .05) independent odds ratios (OR) associated with teeth that were painful for 10 outcomes based on types of pain and combinations thereof. RESULTS: Overall, 45% of cracked teeth had one or more symptoms. Pain to cold was the most common symptom, which occurred in 37% of cracked teeth. Pain on biting (16%) and spontaneous pain (11%) were less common. Sixty-five percent of symptomatic cracked teeth had only one type of symptom, of these 78% were painful only to cold. No patient-, tooth- or crack-level characteristic was significantly associated with pain to cold alone. Positive associations for various combinations of pain symptoms were present with cracks that: (1) were on molars; (2) were in occlusion; (3) had a wear facet through enamel; (4) had caries; (5) were evident on a radiograph; (6) ran in more than one direction; (7) blocked transilluminated light; (8) connected with another crack; (9) extended onto the root; (10) extended in more than one direction; or (11) were on the distal surface. Persons who were <65 yo or who clench, grind, or press their teeth together also were more likely to have pain symptoms. Pain was less likely in teeth with stained cracks or exposed roots, or in non-Hispanic whites. CONCLUSIONS: Although pain to cold was the most commonly noted pain associated with symptomatic cracked teeth, no patient-, tooth- or crack-level characteristic was significantly associated with pain to cold alone. Characteristics were only associated with pain on biting and/or spontaneous pain with or without pain to cold. CLINICAL SIGNIFICANCE: Although often considered the most reliable diagnosis for a cracked tooth, pain on biting is not the most common symptom of a tooth with a visible crack, but rather pain to cold.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1801
[Cu] Class update date: 180225
[Lr] Last revision date:180225
[St] Status:In-Data-Review

  7 / 3269 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29459906
[Au] Autor:Rekhi A; Marya CM; Nagpal R; Oberoi SS
[Ti] Title:Assessment of Oral Health Related Quality of Life Among the Institutionalised Elderly in Delhi, India.
[So] Source:Oral Health Prev Dent;16(1):59-66, 2018.
[Is] ISSN:1602-1622
[Cp] Country of publication:England
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:PURPOSE: To assess the oral health related quality of life (OHRQoL) among older people residing in old-age homes in Delhi, India. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Oral health related quality of life was measured by using the Hindi version of Geriatric Oral Health Assessment Index (GOHAI) which was tested for its reliability and validity. Sociodemographic data were collected and questions regarding the self-perception of general health, oral health and perceived need for dental treatment were put forward. Clinical assessment was also performed. RESULTS: The mean additive-GOHAI score of the study population was found to be 41.57 ± 6.07. Statistically significant associations were found between GOHAI and perceived measures. GOHAI scores decreased with a decrease in the number of teeth present and a decrease in the number of teeth having coronal and root caries. Those subjects who were in need of multi-unit prostheses or full prostheses had significantly poorer OHRQoL compared to those without any prosthetic need or need of single-unit prostheses. CONCLUSION: This study revealed the extent of dental problems in old-age home residents and may help to plan appropriate preventive measures.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1802
[Cu] Class update date: 180220
[Lr] Last revision date:180220
[St] Status:In-Data-Review
[do] DOI:10.3290/j.ohpd.a39818

  8 / 3269 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29449065
[Au] Autor:Wang YL; Chang HH; Chiang YC; Lu YC; Lin CP
[Ad] Address:School of Dentistry, National Taiwan University, Department of Dentistry, National Taiwan University Hospital, Taipei, Taiwan; Graduate Institute of Clinical Dentistry, School of Dentistry, National Taiwan University, Taipei, Taiwan.
[Ti] Title:Effects of fluoride and epigallocatechin gallate on soft-drink-induced dental erosion of enamel and root dentin.
[So] Source:J Formos Med Assoc;, 2018 Feb 12.
[Is] ISSN:0929-6646
[Cp] Country of publication:Singapore
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:BACKGROUND/PURPOSE: Fluoride and epigallocatechin gallate (EGCG) have been proven to prevent dental caries. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effects of fluoride and EGCG on soft-drink-induced dental erosion in vitro. METHODS: Forty enamel and dentin specimens were prepared from extracted human teeth. The specimens were divided into 4 groups and treated separately with distilled water (as control), 0.5 M sodium fluoride (NF), 400 µM EGCG (EG), and a solution containing 0.5 M NaF and 400 µM EGCG (FG). Cyclic erosive treatment was performed according to the experimental procedures. The specimens were analyzed using laser scanning confocal microscopy, scanning electron microscopy, and a microhardness tester. The data were analyzed using ANOVA and Bonferroni's post hoc test. The significance level was set at 5%. RESULTS: The amount of substance loss was lower in the NF and EG groups than in the control group (p < 0.05). The erosion-caused substance loss was more pronounced in the dentin than in the enamel specimens. Surface microhardness loss was lower in the NF and EG groups than in the control group (p < 0.05). The diameter of the dentinal tubule was wider in the control group than in the NF and EG groups (p < 0.05). No combined effects were observed in the FG group. CONCLUSION: Both fluoride and EGCG are effective in preventing soft-drink-induced erosion compared with the control group. Fluoride and EGCG may interfere with each other. The mechanisms of the anti-erosive effect need to be explored in the future.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1802
[Cu] Class update date: 180216
[Lr] Last revision date:180216
[St] Status:Publisher

  9 / 3269 MEDLINE  
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Cury, Jaime Aparecido
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[PMID]: 29444502
[Au] Autor:Souza SE; Sampaio AA; Del Bel Cury AA; Cavalcanti YW; Ricomini Filho AP; Cury JA
[Ad] Address:Piracicaba Dental School, UNICAMP, Piracicaba, Brazil.
[Ti] Title:Starch Combined with Sucrose Provokes Greater Root Dentine Demineralization than Sucrose Alone.
[So] Source:Caries Res;52(4):323-330, 2018 Feb 14.
[Is] ISSN:1421-976X
[Cp] Country of publication:Switzerland
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Since there is no consensus about whether starch increases the cariogenic potential of sucrose, we used a validated 3-species biofilm model to evaluate if starch combined with sucrose provokes higher root dentine demineralization than sucrose alone. Biofilms (n = 18) composed by Streptococcus mutans (the most cariogenic bacteria), Actinomces naeslundii (which has amylolytic activity), and Streptococcus gordonii (which binds salivary amylase) were formed on root dentine slabs under exposure 8 ×/day to one of the following treatments: 0.9% NaCl, 1% starch, 10% sucrose, or a combination of 1% starch and 10% sucrose. Before each treatment, biofilms were pretreated with human whole saliva for 1 min. The pH of the culture medium was measured daily as an indicator of biofilm acidogenicity. After 96 h of growth, the biofilms were collected, and the biomass, bacteria viability, and polysaccharides were analyzed. Dentine demineralization was assessed by surface hardness loss (% SHL). Biofilm bioarchitecture was analyzed using confocal laser scanning microscopy. Treatment with a starch and sucrose combination provoked higher (p = 0.01) dentine demineralization than sucrose alone (% SHL = 53.2 ± 7.0 vs. 43.2 ± 8.7). This was supported by lower pH values (p = 0.007) of the culture medium after daily exposure to the starch and sucrose combination compared with sucrose (4.89 ± 0.29 vs. 5.19 ± 0.32). Microbiological and biochemical findings did not differ between biofilms treated with the combination of starch and sucrose and sucrose alone (p > 0.05). Our findings give support to the hypothesis that a starch and sucrose combination is more cariogenic for root dentine than sucrose alone.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1802
[Cu] Class update date: 180214
[Lr] Last revision date:180214
[St] Status:Publisher
[do] DOI:10.1159/000486427

  10 / 3269 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29430787
[Au] Autor:Chhabra A; Chhabra N; Jain A; Kabi D
[Ad] Address:Department of Prosthodontics and Dental Surgery, Vardhman Mahavir Medical College & Safdarjung Hospital, New Delhi, India.
[Ti] Title:Overdenture Prostheses with Metal Copings: A Retrospective Analysis of Survival and Prosthodontic Complications.
[So] Source:J Prosthodont;, 2018 Feb 11.
[Is] ISSN:1532-849X
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:PURPOSE: To retrospectively evaluate complications associated with overdentures and abutment teeth restored with metal copings, including post-procedural and prosthetic problems; also to analyze the frequency and influencing factors associated with these problems. MATERIALS AND METHODS: A total of 80 subjects (48 females, 32 males, mean age 62 years) wearing root-supported overdentures were enrolled in the study. All participants were thoroughly examined by a single examiner, and appropriate maintenance care was performed. The 80 subjects had 270 abutments, which were endodontically treated teeth. All 80 subjects were carefully interviewed, inspected, and evaluated for post-procedural and clinical problems with their overdentures for an observation period of up to 5 years. RESULTS: Of the post-procedural problems evaluated, the most common problems were gingival inflammation (69%) and root caries (36%) because of poor oral hygiene (41%) and loss of metal copings (34%), followed by overdenture base fracture over abutment teeth (34%). Other post-procedural problems reported were loss of overdenture stability (23%), incidence of overdenture repair (20%), poor retention (18%), incidental finding of root fragments (unplanned) in the jaws (15%), and up to two grade net change in the mobility of overdenture abutments (8%). All prostheses were in use at the time of data collection and observation up to 5 years. CONCLUSIONS: Overdenture therapy was satisfactory; however, post-procedural and prosthetic complications and aftercare maintenance must not be underestimated.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1802
[Cu] Class update date: 180212
[Lr] Last revision date:180212
[St] Status:Publisher
[do] DOI:10.1111/jopr.12756


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