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[PMID]: 29374598
[Au] Autor:Gao M; Zhang S; Luo C; He X; Wei S; Jiang W; He F; Lin Z; Yan M; Dong W
[Ad] Address:Biotechnology Research Institute, Guangxi Academy of Agricultural Sciences, No. 174, Daxue Road, Nanning, Guangxi 530007, PR China. Electronic address: gmp2009@163.com.
[Ti] Title:Transcriptome analysis of starch and sucrose metabolism across bulb development in Sagittaria sagittifolia.
[So] Source:Gene;649:99-112, 2018 Apr 05.
[Is] ISSN:1879-0038
[Cp] Country of publication:Netherlands
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Sagittaria sagittifolia L is an important bulb vegetable that has high nutritional and medical value. Bulb formation and development are crucial to Sagittaria sagittifolia; however, its sucrose metabolism is poorly understood and there are a lack of sufficient transcriptomic and genomic data available to fully understand the molecular mechanisms underlying bulb formation and development as well as the bulb transcriptome. Five cDNA libraries were constructed at different developmental stages and sequenced using high-throughput Illumina RNA sequencing. From approximately 63.53 Gb clean reads, a total of 60,884 unigenes, with an average length of 897.34 bp and N50 of 1.368 kb, were obtained. A total of 36,590 unigenes were successfully annotated using five public databases. Across different developmental stages, 4195, 827, 832, 851, and 1494 were differentially expressed in T02, T03, T04, T05, and T06 libraries, respectively. Gene ontology (GO) analysis revealed several differentially-expressed genes (DEGs) associated with catalytic activity, binding, and transporter activity. The Kyoto encyclopedia of genes and genomes (KEGG) revealed that these DEGs are involved in physiological and biochemical processes. RT-qPCR was used to profile the expression of these unigenes and revealed that the expression patterns of the DEGs were consistent with the transcriptome data. In this study, we conducted a comparative gene expression analysis at the transcriptional level using RNA-seq across the different developmental stages of Sagittaria sagittifolia. We identified a set of genes that might contribute to starch and sucrose metabolism, and the genetic mechanisms related to bulblet development were also explored. This study provides important data for future studies of the genetic and molecular mechanisms underlying bulb formation and development in Sagittaria sagittifolia.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE; REVIEW
[Em] Entry month:1801
[Cu] Class update date: 180220
[Lr] Last revision date:180220
[St] Status:In-Process

  2 / 105 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 28850842
[Au] Autor:Zengel S; Weaver J; Wilder SL; Dauzat J; Sanfilippo C; Miles MS; Jellison K; Doelling P; Davis A; Fortier BK; Harris J; Panaccione J; Wall S; Nixon Z
[Ad] Address:Research Planning, Inc. (RPI), 247 E. 7th Avenue, Suite 200, Tallahassee, FL 32303, USA. Electronic address: szengel@researchplanning.com.
[Ti] Title:Vegetation recovery in an oil-impacted and burned Phragmites australis tidal freshwater marsh.
[So] Source:Sci Total Environ;612:231-237, 2018 Jan 15.
[Is] ISSN:1879-1026
[Cp] Country of publication:Netherlands
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:In-situ burning of oiled marshes is a cleanup method that can be more effective and less damaging than intrusive manual and mechanical methods. In-situ burning of oil spills has been examined for several coastal marsh types; however, few published data are available for Phragmites australis marshes. Following an estimated 4200gallon crude oil spill and in-situ burn in a Phragmites tidal freshwater marsh at Delta National Wildlife Refuge (Mississippi River Delta, Louisiana), we examined vegetation impacts and recovery across 3years. Oil concentrations in marsh soils were initially elevated in the oiled-and-burned sites, but were below background levels within three months. Oiling and burning drastically affected the marsh vegetation; the formerly dominant Phragmites, a non-native variety in our study sites, had not fully recovered by the end of our study. However, overall vegetation recovery was rapid and local habitat quality in terms of native plants, particularly Sagittaria species, and wildlife value was enhanced by burning. In-situ burning appears to be a viable response option to consider for future spills in marshes with similar plant species composition, hydrogeomorphic settings, and oiling conditions. In addition, likely Phragmites stress from high water levels and/or non-native scale insect damage was also observed during our study and has recently been reported as causing widespread declines or loss of Phragmites stands in the Delta region. It remains an open question if these stressors could lead to a shift to more native vegetation, similar to what we observed following the oil spill and burn. Increased dominance by native plants may be desirable as local patches, but widespread loss of Phragmites, even if replaced by native species, could further acerbate coastal erosion and wetland loss, a major concern in the region.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1708
[Cu] Class update date: 180103
[Lr] Last revision date:180103
[St] Status:In-Process

  3 / 105 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 28755698
[Au] Autor:Zhao B; Fu D; Yu Y; Huang C; Yan K; Li P; Shafi J; Zhu H; Wei S; Ji M
[Ad] Address:College of Plant Protection, Shenyang Agricultural University, Shenyang, Liaoning 110866, China.
[Ti] Title:Non-target-site resistance to ALS-inhibiting herbicides in a Sagittaria trifolia L. population.
[So] Source:Pestic Biochem Physiol;140:79-84, 2017 Aug.
[Is] ISSN:1095-9939
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Sagittaria trifolia L. is one of the most competitive weeds in rice fields in northeastern China. The continuous use of acetolactate synthase (ALS)-inhibitors has led to the evolution of herbicide resistant S. trifolia. A subpopulation BC1, which was derived from the L1 population, was analyzed using DNA sequencing and ALS enzyme activity assays and levels of resistance to five ALS-inhibiting herbicides was determined. DNA sequencing and ALS enzyme assays revealed no amino acid substitutions and no significant differences in enzyme sensitivity between susceptible and resistant populations. Whole-plant dose-response experiments showed that the BC1 population exhibited different levels of resistance (resistance ratios ranging from 2.14 to 51.53) to five ALS herbicides, and the addition of malathion (P450 inhibitor) to bensulfuron-methyl, penoxsulam and bispyribac-sodium strongly reduced the dry weight accumulation of the BC1 population compared with the effects of the three herbicides alone. The results of the present study demonstrated that the BC1 population has evolved non-target-site resistance to ALS-inhibiting herbicides.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1707
[Cu] Class update date: 170730
[Lr] Last revision date:170730
[St] Status:In-Process

  4 / 105 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 27862580
[Au] Autor:Dorken ME; Perry LE
[Ad] Address:Department of Biology, Trent University, Peterborough, ON, Canada.
[Ti] Title:Correlated paternity measures mate monopolization and scales with the magnitude of sexual selection.
[So] Source:J Evol Biol;30(2):377-387, 2017 Feb.
[Is] ISSN:1420-9101
[Cp] Country of publication:Switzerland
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Indirect measures of sexual selection have been criticized because they can overestimate the magnitude of selection. In particular, they do not account for the degree to which mating opportunities can be monopolized by individuals of the sex that compete for mates. We introduce a measure of mate monopolization (m) based on the magnitude of correlated paternity and evaluate its ability to track changes in the magnitude of sexual selection. Simulation models were used to compare how well m tracked changes in the selection differential (s) for a trait regulating mating success. We further evaluated the association between m and s using ten replicate mating arrays of Sagittaria latifolia in which plants with contrasting alleles at microsatellite loci competed for siring opportunities. The computer models and mating arrays both demonstrated a positive linear association between m and s, supporting the utility of m as an index of sexual selection. Commonly used measures of sexual selection are not easily applied to organisms, such as the flowering plants, for which mating events are difficult to observe. The measure of mate monopolization introduced here could prove to be a useful addition to studies of sexual selection in these organisms.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1611
[Cu] Class update date: 170204
[Lr] Last revision date:170204
[St] Status:In-Process
[do] DOI:10.1111/jeb.13013

  5 / 105 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 27704241
[Au] Autor:Pollux BJ
[Ad] Address:Experimental Zoology Group, Department of Animal Sciences, Wageningen University, De Elst 1, 6708 WD, Wageningen, The Netherlands. bart.pollux@wur.nl.
[Ti] Title:Consistent individual differences in seed disperser quality in a seed-eating fish.
[So] Source:Oecologia;183(1):81-91, 2017 Jan.
[Is] ISSN:1432-1939
[Cp] Country of publication:Germany
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Animal-mediated seed dispersal (zoochory) is considered to be an important mechanism regulating biological processes at larger spatial scales. To date, intra-specific variation in seed disperser quality within seed-dispersing animals has not been studied. Here, I employed seed feeding trials to quantify individual differences in disperser quality within the common carp (Cyprinus carpio) using seeds of two aquatic plants: unbranched bur-reed (Sparganium emersum, Sparganiaceae) and arrowhead (Sagittaria sagittifolia, Alismataceae). I found substantial variation among carp individuals in their propensity to ingest seeds and their ability to digest them, resulting in up to 31-fold differences in the probability of seed dispersal. In addition, there were significant differences in the time that seeds are retained in their digestive systems, generating a twofold difference in the maximum distance over which they can potentially disperse seeds. I propose that seed-eating animal species consist of individuals that display continuous variation in disperser quality, with at one end of the continuum individuals that are likely to eat seeds, pass them unharmed through their digestive tract and transport them over large distances to new locations (i.e. high-quality seed dispersers) and at the other end individuals that rarely eat seeds, destroy most of the ones they ingest and transport the few surviving seeds over relatively short distances (low-quality seed dispersers). Although individual differences in seed dispersal quality could be the result of a variety of factors, these results underline the ecological and evolutionary potential of such variation for both plants and animals.
[Mh] MeSH terms primary: Carps
Individuality
[Mh] MeSH terms secundary: Animals
Eating
Seed Dispersal
Seeds
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1705
[Cu] Class update date: 170515
[Lr] Last revision date:170515
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[Da] Date of entry for processing:161006
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.1007/s00442-016-3749-4

  6 / 105 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 27687794
[Au] Autor:Lyu N; Du W; Wang XF
[Ad] Address:College of Life Sciences, Wuhan University, Wuhan, China.
[Ti] Title:Unique growth paths of heterospecific pollen tubes result in late entry into ovules in the gynoecium of Sagittaria (Alismataceae).
[So] Source:Plant Biol (Stuttg);19(2):108-114, 2017 Mar.
[Is] ISSN:1438-8677
[Cp] Country of publication:England
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Pollen-pistil interactions are a fundamental process in the reproductive biology of angiosperms and play a particularly important role in maintaining incipient species that exist in sympatry. However, the majority of previous studies have focused on species with syncarpous gynoecia (fused carpels) and not those with apocarpous gynoecia (unfused carpels). In the present study, we investigated the growth of conspecific pollen tubes compared to heterospecific pollen tubes in Sagittaria species, which have apocarpous gynoecia. We conducted controlled pollinations between S.pygmaea and S.trifolia and observed the growth of conspecific and heterospecific pollen tubes under a fluorescence microscope. Heterospecific and conspecific pollen tubes arrived at locules within the ovaries near simultaneously. However, conspecific pollen tubes entered into the ovules directly, whereas heterospecific tubes passed through the carpel base and adjacent receptacle tissue, to ultimately fertilize other unfertilized ovules. This longer route taken by heterospecific pollen tubes therefore caused a delay in the time required to enter into the ovules. Furthermore, heterospecific pollen tubes displayed similar growth patterns at early and peak pollination. The growth pattern of heterospecific pollen tubes at late pollination was similar to that of conspecific pollen tubes at peak pollination. Heterospecific and conspecific pollen tubes took different routes to fertilize ovules. A delayed entry of heterospecific pollen into ovules may be a novel mechanism of conspecific pollen advantage (CPA) for apocarpous species.
[Mh] MeSH terms primary: Pollen Tube/growth & development
Pollination
Sagittaria/growth & development
[Mh] MeSH terms secundary: China
Crosses, Genetic
Flowers/cytology
Flowers/growth & development
Flowers/physiology
Ovule/cytology
Ovule/growth & development
Ovule/physiology
Pollen/cytology
Pollen/growth & development
Pollen/physiology
Pollen Tube/cytology
Pollen Tube/physiology
Reproduction
Sagittaria/cytology
Sagittaria/physiology
Sympatry
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1703
[Cu] Class update date: 170306
[Lr] Last revision date:170306
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[Da] Date of entry for processing:161001
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.1111/plb.12508

  7 / 105 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 27738710
[Au] Autor:Zhang SH; Xu PY; Chang JJ
[Ad] Address:College of Resources and Environmental Science, South-Central University for Nationalities, Wuhan, 430074, China.
[Ti] Title:Physiological Responses of Aphanizomenon flos-aquae Under the Stress of Sagittaria sagittifolia Extract.
[So] Source:Bull Environ Contam Toxicol;97(6):870-875, 2016 Dec.
[Is] ISSN:1432-0800
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:The algal growth and physiological characters of Aphanizomenon flos-aquae were studied under the stress of Sagittaria sagittifolia extract. The results showed that the growth of A. flos-aquae was significantly inhibited by S. sagittifolia extract. The exopolysaccharide (EPS), total soluble protein, intracellular phosphorus (o-PO -P) contents and malondialdehyde (MDA) contents in A. flos-aquae cells increased significantly. These results suggested that A. flos-aquae can adapt to stress by increasing its normal metabolic activity. The algal cellular antioxidant enzymes, superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase (CAT) and peroxidase (POD), were triggered to different degrees when exposed to S. sagittifolia extract. The MDA contents and activities of SOD, CAT and POD in algal cells suggested that oxidative damage induced by S. sagittifolia extract via the oxidation of ROS (O ) might be an important factor responsible for the inhibition of the growth of A. flos-aquae. In addition, SOD may be an important site for the inhibition of S. sagittifolia extract on A. flos-aquae cells. These results indicate that S. sagittifolia may be a good candidate for controlling A. flos-aquae blooms.
[Mh] MeSH terms primary: Aphanizomenon/drug effects
Aphanizomenon/growth & development
Oxidative Stress/drug effects
Plant Extracts/toxicity
Sagittaria/toxicity
[Mh] MeSH terms secundary: Antioxidants/metabolism
Aphanizomenon/metabolism
Catalase/metabolism
Malondialdehyde/metabolism
Peroxidase/metabolism
Phosphorus/metabolism
Plant Extracts/chemistry
Polysaccharides/metabolism
Proteins/metabolism
Sagittaria/chemistry
Superoxide Dismutase/metabolism
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Nm] Name of substance:0 (Antioxidants); 0 (Plant Extracts); 0 (Polysaccharides); 0 (Proteins); 27YLU75U4W (Phosphorus); 4Y8F71G49Q (Malondialdehyde); EC 1.11.1.6 (Catalase); EC 1.11.1.7 (Peroxidase); EC 1.15.1.1 (Superoxide Dismutase)
[Em] Entry month:1701
[Cu] Class update date: 170127
[Lr] Last revision date:170127
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[Da] Date of entry for processing:161015
[St] Status:MEDLINE

  8 / 105 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 27167595
[Au] Autor:Borisova G; Chukina N; Maleva M; Kumar A; Prasad MN
[Ad] Address:a Department of Plant Physiology and Biochemistry , Faculty of Biology, Institute of Natural Sciences, Ural Federal University , Ekaterinburg , Russia.
[Ti] Title:Thiols as biomarkers of heavy metal tolerance in the aquatic macrophytes of Middle Urals, Russia.
[So] Source:Int J Phytoremediation;18(10):1037-45, 2016 Oct 02.
[Is] ISSN:1549-7879
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Aquatic macrophytes, viz. Sagittaria sagittifolia L., Lemna gibba L., Elodea canadensis Michx., Batrachium trichophyllum (Chaix.) Bosch., Ceratophyllum demersum L. and Potamogeton sp. (P. perfoliatus L., P. alpinus Balb., P. crispus L., P. berchtoldii Fieber, P. friesii Rupr., P. pectinatus L.) were collected from 11 sites for determining their metal accumulation and thiols content. Cu(2+), Ni(2+), Mn(2+), Zn(2+), and Fe(3+) exceeded maximum permissible concentrations in chosen sites. Significant transfer of metals from water to leaves is observed in the order of Ni(2+) < Cu(2+) < Zn(2+) < Fe(3+) < Mn(2+). The maximum variation of bioconcentration factor was noticed for manganese. The accumulation of heavy metals in leaves was correlated with non-protein and protein thiols, confirming their important role in metal tolerance. The largest contribution was provided by Cu(2+) (on the average r = 0.88, p < 0.05), which obviously can be explained as an important role of these ions in thiols synthesis. Increased synthesis of thiols in the leaves allows the usage of SH-containing compounds as biomarkers of metal tolerance. Considering accumulation of metals and tolerance, B. trichophyllum, C. demersum and L. gibba are the most suitable species for phytoremediation of highly multimetal contamination, while E. canadensis and some species of Potamageton are suitable for moderately metal-polluted sites.
[Mh] MeSH terms primary: Magnoliopsida/metabolism
Metals, Heavy/metabolism
Sulfhydryl Compounds/metabolism
Water Pollutants, Chemical/metabolism
[Mh] MeSH terms secundary: Biodegradation, Environmental
Biomarkers/metabolism
Magnoliopsida/chemistry
Plant Leaves/metabolism
Russia
Sulfhydryl Compounds/analysis
Water Pollutants, Chemical/analysis
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Nm] Name of substance:0 (Biomarkers); 0 (Metals, Heavy); 0 (Sulfhydryl Compounds); 0 (Water Pollutants, Chemical)
[Em] Entry month:1704
[Cu] Class update date: 171116
[Lr] Last revision date:171116
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[Da] Date of entry for processing:160512
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.1080/15226514.2016.1183572

  9 / 105 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 27155407
[Au] Autor:Li J; Liu Y; Zhang P; Zeng G; Cai X; Liu S; Yin Y; Hu X; Hu X; Tan X
[Ad] Address:College of Environmental Science and Engineering, Hunan University, Changsha 410082, China; Key Laboratory of Environmental Biology and Pollution Control (Hunan University), Ministry of Education, Changsha 410082, China. Electronic address: lijiang1304@163.com.
[Ti] Title:Growth inhibition and oxidative damage of Microcystis aeruginosa induced by crude extract of Sagittaria trifolia tubers.
[So] Source:J Environ Sci (China);43:40-47, 2016 May.
[Is] ISSN:1001-0742
[Cp] Country of publication:Netherlands
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Aquatic macrophytes are considered to be promising in controlling harmful cyanobacterial blooms. In this research, an aqueous extract of Sagittaria trifolia tubers was prepared to study its inhibitory effect on Microcystis aeruginosa in the laboratory. Several physiological indices of M. aeruginosa, in response to the environmental stress, were analyzed. Results showed that S. trifolia tuber aqueous extract significantly inhibited the growth of M. aeruginosa in a concentration-dependent way. The highest inhibition rate reached 90% after 6 day treatment. The Chlorophyll-a concentration of M. aeruginosa cells decreased from 343.1 to 314.2g/L in the treatment group. The activities of superoxide dismutase and peroxidase and the content of reduced glutathione in M. aeruginosa cells initially increased as a response to the oxidative stress posed by S. trifolia tuber aqueous extract, but then decreased as time prolonged. The lipid peroxidation damage of the cyanobacterial cell membranes was reflected by the malondialdehyde level, which was notably higher in the treatment group compared with the controls. It was concluded that the oxidative damage of M. aeruginosa induced by S. trifolia tuber aqueous extract might be one of the mechanisms for the inhibitory effects.
[Mh] MeSH terms primary: Harmful Algal Bloom/drug effects
Microcystis/drug effects
Plant Extracts/toxicity
Sagittaria
[Mh] MeSH terms secundary: Chlorophyll
Cyanobacteria
Glutathione/metabolism
Lipid Peroxidation
Malondialdehyde/metabolism
Oxidative Stress
Oxidoreductases/metabolism
Reactive Oxygen Species/metabolism
Superoxide Dismutase/metabolism
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Nm] Name of substance:0 (Plant Extracts); 0 (Reactive Oxygen Species); 1406-65-1 (Chlorophyll); 4Y8F71G49Q (Malondialdehyde); EC 1.- (Oxidoreductases); EC 1.15.1.1 (Superoxide Dismutase); GAN16C9B8O (Glutathione); YF5Q9EJC8Y (chlorophyll a)
[Em] Entry month:1701
[Cu] Class update date: 170805
[Lr] Last revision date:170805
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[Da] Date of entry for processing:160508
[St] Status:MEDLINE

  10 / 105 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 27150128
[Au] Autor:Yakimowski SB; Barrett SC
[Ad] Address:Department of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology, University of Toronto, 25 Willcocks Street, Toronto, Ontario, M5S 3B2, Canada. sarah.yakimowski@queensu.ca.
[Ti] Title:The role of hybridization in the evolution of sexual system diversity in a clonal, aquatic plant.
[So] Source:Evolution;70(6):1200-11, 2016 Jun.
[Is] ISSN:1558-5646
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:The stable coexistence within populations of females, males, and hermaphrodites (subdioecy) is enigmatic because theoretical models indicate that maintenance of this sexual system involves highly restricted conditions. Subdioecy is more commonly interpreted as a transitory stage along the gynodioecious pathway from hermaphroditism to dioecy. The widespread, North American, aquatic plant Sagittaria latifolia is largely composed of monoecious or dioecious populations; however, subdioecious populations with high frequencies of hermaphrodites (mean frequency = 0.50) characterize the northern range boundary of dioecy in eastern North America. We investigated two hypotheses for the origin of subdioecy in this region. Using polymorphic microsatellite loci, we evaluated whether subdioecy arises through selection on standing genetic variation for male sex inconstancy in dioecious populations, or results from hybridization between monoecious and dioecious populations. We found evidence for both pathways to subdioecy, although hybridization was the more common mechanism, with genetic evidence of admixture in nine of 14 subdioecious populations examined. Hybridization has also played a role in the origin of androdioecious populations in S. latifolia, a mechanism not often considered in the evolution of this rare sexual system. Our study demonstrates how hybridization has the potential to play a role in the diversification of plant sexual systems.
[Mh] MeSH terms primary: Biological Evolution
Hybridization, Genetic
Polymorphism, Genetic
Sagittaria/physiology
[Mh] MeSH terms secundary: Canada
Microsatellite Repeats
Reproduction
Sagittaria/genetics
United States
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1709
[Cu] Class update date: 170920
[Lr] Last revision date:170920
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[Da] Date of entry for processing:160507
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.1111/evo.12941


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