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[PMID]: 29440596
[Au] Autor:Mahesh HB; Subba P; Advani J; Shirke MD; Loganathan RM; Chandana S; Shilpa S; Chatterjee O; Pinto SM; Prasad K; Gowda M
[Ad] Address:Center for Functional Genomics and Bioinformatics, TransDisciplinary University, Institute of Trans-Disciplinary Health Sciences and Technology CITY: Bengaluru STATE: Karnataka India [IN].
[Ti] Title:Multi-omics driven assembly and annotation of the sandalwood (Santalum album) genome.
[So] Source:Plant Physiol;, 2018 Feb 12.
[Is] ISSN:1532-2548
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Santalum album (Indian sandalwood) is an important tropical evergreen tree, known for its fragrant heartwood-derived essential oil and its valuable carving wood. Here, we applied an integrated genomic, transcriptomic, and proteomic approach to assemble and annotate the Indian sandalwood genome. Our genome sequencing resulted in the establishment of a draft map of the smallest genome for any woody tree species to date (221 Mb). The genome annotation predicted 38,119 protein-coding genes and 27.42% repetitive DNA elements. In-depth proteome analysis revealed the identities of 72,325 unique peptides, which confirmed 10,076 of the predicted genes. Addition of transcriptomic and proteogenomic approaches resulted in the identification of 53 novel proteins and 34 gene-correction events that were missed by genomic approaches. Proteogenomic analysis also helped in reassigning 1,348 potential non-coding RNAs as bona fide protein-coding mRNAs. Gene expression patterns at RNA and protein levels indicated that peptide sequencing was useful in capturing proteins encoded by nuclear and organellar genomes alike. Mass spectrometry-based proteomic evidence provided an unbiased approach towards identification of proteins encoded by organellar genomes. Such proteins are often missed in the transcriptome dataset due to enrichment of only mRNAs that contain poly-A tails. Overall, use of integrated -omic approaches enhanced the quality of assembly and annotation of this non-model plant genome. Availability of genomic, transcriptomic, and proteomic data will enhance genomics-assisted breeding, germplasm characterization, and conservation of sandalwood trees.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1802
[Cu] Class update date: 180214
[Lr] Last revision date:180214
[St] Status:Publisher

  2 / 169 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29289243
[Au] Autor:Birkbeck AA
[Ad] Address:Firmenich SA, Corporate R&D Division, P.O. Box 239, CH-1211 Geneva 8;, Email: alec.birkbeck@firmenich.com.
[Ti] Title:The Synthesis of Fragrant Natural Products from .: (+)-( )-α-Santalol and (-)-( )-ß-Santalol.
[So] Source:Chimia (Aarau);71(12):823-835, 2017 Dec 01.
[Is] ISSN:0009-4293
[Cp] Country of publication:Switzerland
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:The synthetic challenges associated with the selective synthesis of α-Santalene (1), (Z)-α-Santalol (2), ß-Santalene (3), and most importantly (Z)-ß-Santalol (4) have interested the world's synthetic chemists for decades. These molecules, lovely examples of nature's exquisite creations, have been isolated from East Indian Sandalwood Oil (Santalum album L.) and have stimulated chemists to develop new and efficient methodologies to synthesize them. The synthesis and evolution of various approaches to the [2.2.1]bicycloheptane ring system present in ß-Santalene (3) and the even more challenging selective synthesis of the (Z)-allylic alcohol sidechain present in both (Z)-α-Santalol (2) and ((Z)-ß-Santalol (4) will be covered in this review.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1801
[Cu] Class update date: 180123
[Lr] Last revision date:180123
[St] Status:In-Process
[do] DOI:10.2533/chimia.2017.823

  3 / 169 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29257757
[Au] Autor:Bhat TA; Begum W
[Ad] Address:Department of Obstetrics and Gyneacology, National Institute of Unani Medicine, Bangalore, India.
[Ti] Title:Efficacy of Tamarindus indicus, Melia azadirach and Santalum album in syndromic management of abnormal vaginal discharge: A single-blind randomised controlled trial.
[So] Source:J Complement Integr Med;, 2017 Dec 19.
[Is] ISSN:1553-3840
[Cp] Country of publication:Germany
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Background At least 25 % of women attending genitourinary medicine (GUM) clinics receive treatment for one of the three common causes of abnormal vaginal discharge: bacterial vaginosis, candidiasis and trichomoniasis. Syndromic diagnostic approach was adopted by National AIDS Control Organisation (NACO) India, at the primary health centre level. Syndromic management implies the simultaneous treatment of two or more infections. The aim of this study was to assess efficacy of sandal sufaid, maghze tukhme bakayin and khaste tamar hindi in syndromic management of Sailanur rehm. Methods This study was a randomized, single blind, standard controlled trial. It was conducted to compare efficacy of formulation which contains buradae sandal safaid, safoofe maghze tukhme bakayin, safoofe khaste tamar hindi and safoofe shakkar safaid against combination of azithromycin, fluconazole and secnidazole on diagnosed subjects of Sailanur rehm. Test group received 10 g of test drug B.D for 21 days while control group received single dose of standard drug to both the partners. Vaginal symptom score (VSS) was used for assessing discharge and associated complaints. Visual analogous scale (VAS) was used for assessing low backache and lower abdominal pain. Results There were no significant differences between the two groups concerning baseline characteristics (p>0.05). VSS was significantly decreased with p<0.001 for both control and test group. VAS was significantly decreased with p<0.001 and p=0.07 in test and control group respectively for low backache. For lower abdominal pain p=0.006 for both groups after the completion of treatment. Conclusions The formulation can effectively alleviate the disease with associated symptoms without any side effects. It can be used in syndromic management of vaginal discharge. Future research is on large sample size.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1712
[Cu] Class update date: 171219
[Lr] Last revision date:171219
[St] Status:Publisher

  4 / 169 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 28749977
[Au] Autor:Wu C; Wang X
[Ad] Address:Research Institute of Forest Resource Information Techniques, Chinese Academy of Forestry, Beijing, China.
[Ti] Title:Preliminary research on the identification system for anthracnose and powdery mildew of sandalwood leaf based on image processing.
[So] Source:PLoS One;12(7):e0181537, 2017.
[Is] ISSN:1932-6203
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:This paper presents a survey on a system that uses digital image processing techniques to identify anthracnose and powdery mildew diseases of sandalwood from digital images. Our main objective is researching the most suitable identification technology for the anthracnose and powdery mildew diseases of the sandalwood leaf, which provides algorithmic support for the real-time machine judgment of the health status and disease level of sandalwood. We conducted real-time monitoring of Hainan sandalwood leaves with varying severity levels of anthracnose and powdery mildew beginning in March 2014. We used image segmentation, feature extraction and digital image classification and recognition technology to carry out a comparative experimental study for the image analysis of powdery mildew, anthracnose disease and healthy leaves in the field. Performing the actual test for a large number of diseased leaves pointed to three conclusions: (1) Distinguishing effects of BP (Back Propagation) neural network method, in all kinds of classical methods, for sandalwood leaf anthracnose and powdery mildew disease are relatively good; the size of the lesion areas were closest to the actual. (2) The differences between two diseases can be shown well by the shape feature, color feature and texture feature of the disease image. (3) Identifying and diagnosing the diseased leaves have ideal results by SVM, which is based on radial basis kernel function. The identification rate of the anthracnose and healthy leaves was 92% respectively, and that of powdery mildew was 84%. Disease identification technology lays the foundation for remote monitoring disease diagnosis, preparing for remote transmission of the disease images, which is a very good guide and reference for further research of the disease identification and diagnosis system in sandalwood and other species of trees.
[Mh] MeSH terms primary: Image Processing, Computer-Assisted
Plant Diseases/microbiology
Plant Leaves/microbiology
Santalum/microbiology
[Mh] MeSH terms secundary: Support Vector Machine
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1709
[Cu] Class update date: 170929
[Lr] Last revision date:170929
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[Da] Date of entry for processing:170728
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.1371/journal.pone.0181537

  5 / 169 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 28698478
[Au] Autor:Kim TH; Hatano T; Okamoto K; Yoshida T; Kanzaki H; Arita M; Ito H
[Ad] Address:Department of Food Science and Biotechnology, Daegu University, Gyeongsan 38453, Korea. skyey7@daegu.ac.kr.
[Ti] Title:Antifungal and Ichthyotoxic Sesquiterpenoids from Santalum album Heartwood.
[So] Source:Molecules;22(7), 2017 Jul 08.
[Is] ISSN:1420-3049
[Cp] Country of publication:Switzerland
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:In our continuing study on a survey of biologically active natural products from heartwood of (Southwest Indian origin), we newly found potent fish toxic activity of an -hexane soluble extract upon primary screening using killifish (medaka) and characterized α-santalol and ß-santalol as the active components. The toxicity (median tolerance limit (TLm) after 24 h at 1.9 ppm) of α-santalol was comparable with that of a positive control, inulavosin (TLm after 24 h at 1.3 ppm). These fish toxic compounds including inulavosin were also found to show a significant antifungal effect against a dermatophytic fungus, . Based on a similarity of the morphological change of the immobilized hyphae in scanning electron micrographs between treatments with α-santalol and griseofulvin (used as the positive control), inhibitory effect of α-santalol on mitosis (the antifungal mechanism proposed for griseofulvin) was assessed using sea urchin embryos. As a result, α-santalol was revealed to be a potent antimitotic agent induced by interference with microtubule assembly. These data suggested that α-santalol or sandalwood oil would be promising to further practically investigate as therapeutic agent for cancers as well as fungal skin infections.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1707
[Cu] Class update date: 170712
[Lr] Last revision date:170712
[St] Status:In-Process

  6 / 169 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 28633414
[Au] Autor:Celedon JM; Bohlmann J
[Ad] Address:Michael Smith Laboratories, University of British Columbia, 301-2185 East Mall, Vancouver, CanadaBC V6T 1Z4.
[Ti] Title:An extended model of heartwood secondary metabolism informed by functional genomics.
[So] Source:Tree Physiol;:1-9, 2017 Jun 14.
[Is] ISSN:1758-4469
[Cp] Country of publication:Canada
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:The development of heartwood (HW) and the associated accumulation of secondary metabolites, which are also known as 'specialized metabolites' or 'extractives', is an important feature of tree biology. Heartwood development can affect tree health with broader implications for forest health. Heartwood development also defines a variety of wood quality traits that are important in the forest industry such as durability and colour of wood products. In the bioproducts industry, HW provides a source of high-value small molecules such as fragrances and antimicrobials. The HW properties of decay resistance in living trees, durability and colour of wood products, and small molecule bioproducts are largely defined by secondary metabolites, the biosynthesis of which appears to be activated during the onset of HW formation. Traditionally, it is thought that HW formation involves a spike in the activity of secondary metabolism in parenchyma cells in a transition zone between sapwood and HW, followed by programmed cell-death. The resulting HW tissue is thought to consist entirely of dead cells. Here, we discuss a variation of existing models of HW formation, based on the recent discovery of HW-specific transcriptome signatures of terpenoid biosynthesis in sandalwood (Santalum album L.) that invokes the activity of living cells in HW.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1706
[Cu] Class update date: 170621
[Lr] Last revision date:170621
[St] Status:Publisher
[do] DOI:10.1093/treephys/tpx070

  7 / 169 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 28614106
[Au] Autor:Warshaw EM; Zug KA; Belsito DV; Fowler JF; DeKoven JG; Sasseville D; Maibach HI; Mathias CGT; DeLeo VA; Taylor JS; Fransway AF; Marks JG; Pratt MD; Zirwas MJ; Geier J; Uter W
[Ad] Address:From the *Department of Dermatology, Minneapolis Veterans Affairs Medical Center; †HCMC Parkside Occupational and Contact Dermatitis Clinic; and ‡Department of Dermatology, University of Minnesota Medical School, Minneapolis; §Dartmouth-Hitchcock Medical Center, Lebanon, NH; ∥Department of Dermatology, Columbia University Medical Center, New York, NY; ¶University of Louisville, KY; #Division of Dermatology, Sunnybrook Health Sciences Centre, University of Toronto, Ontario; and **Division of Dermatology, Montreal General Hospital, McGill University, Quebec, Canada; ††Department of Dermatology, University of California, San Francisco; ‡‡Department of Dermatology, University of Cincinnati, OH; §§Department of Dermatology, Keck School of Medicine, Los Angeles, CA; ∥∥Department of Dermatology, Cleveland Clinic, OH; ¶¶Associates in Dermatology, Fort Myers, FL; ##Department of Dermatology, Pennsylvania State University, State College; ***Division of Dermatology, University of Ottawa, Ontario, Canada; †††Ohio State University, Columbus; and ‡‡‡Information Network of Departments of Dermatology at the University of Gottingen; and §§§Department of Medical Informatics, Biometry and Epidemiology, University of Erlangen-Nuremberg, Germany.
[Ti] Title:Positive Patch-Test Reactions to Essential Oils in Consecutive Patients From North America and Central Europe.
[So] Source:Dermatitis;28(4):246-252, 2017 Jul/Aug.
[Is] ISSN:2162-5220
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:BACKGROUND: Synthetic fragrances and natural essential oils (EOs) are used in perfumery and found in various cosmetics. Essential oils are also increasingly used to promote wellness. In previous studies, the sensitization potential of some EOs has been identified; however, the current prevalence of sensitivity is largely unknown. OBJECTIVES: The aim of this study was to determine frequency of positive patch-test reactions to EOs tested in the baseline series, along with 3 fragrance markers (FMs) (fragrance mix I, fragrance mix II, and Myroxylon pereirae), in consecutive patients in the US/Canadian North American Contact Dermatitis Group (NACDG) (2009-2014) and the central European, trinational Information Network of Departments of Dermatology (IVDK) (2010-2014). METHODS: This study used a retrospective analysis of patch-test results and relevant demographic/clinical data collected electronically by the networks, obtained with Santalum album 10% petrolatum (pet) (IVDK only); Cananga odorata 2% (NACDG) and 10% (IVDK) pet; Jasminum species 2% (NACDG) and 5% (IVDK) pet; Mentha piperita 2% pet; Melaleuca alternifolia, oxidized (tea tree oil), 5% pet; and Lavandula angustifolia 2% pet (latter 3 NACDG only). RESULTS: Overall, 62,354 patients were tested to 3 FMs and EOs (NACDG, 13,398; IVDK, 48,956); 11,568 (18.6%) reacted to at least 1 FM or EO, whereas 857 (1.4%) reacted to 1 or more EOs but none of the 3 FMs. For both the NACDG and IVDK populations, individuals who were positive to 1 or more of the 9 study allergens were significantly less likely to be male, have occupational skin disease, or have hand involvement and significantly more likely to have leg dermatitis and be 40 years and older (P's ≤ 0.005). Prevalence rates for EOs were as follows: S. album, 1.4% IVDK; C. odorata, 1.1% NACDG and 2.4% IVDK; Jasminum species, 0.7% NACDG and 1.4% IVDK; M. piperita, 0.9% NACDG; L. angustifolia, 0.3% NACDG; and M. alternifolia, 0.3% NACDG. Of the 140 NACDG patients who reacted to 1 or more of the 5 NACDG EOs but none of the FMs, M. alternifolia yielded most positive reactions (45%); half of these reactions were strong (++ or +++, 50.8%) and of definite/probable clinical relevance (52.4%). Of the 717 IVDK patients who reacted to 1 or more of the 3 IVDK EOs but none of the 3 FMs, 38% were positive to C. odorata, 38% to S. album and 36% to Jasminum species.' CONCLUSIONS: Testing to EOs may be important for detecting sensitivity not detected by FMs alone. In North America, M. alternifolia is an important and clinically relevant sensitizer often not detected by FM. In Europe, as well as in North America, clinical relevance is often difficult to evaluate because (1) labeling of EOs when used as fragrance is not mandatory, and (2) these mixtures may indicate sensitization to 1 or more of their individual constituents from other sources, including synthetic fragrances.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1706
[Cu] Class update date: 170718
[Lr] Last revision date:170718
[St] Status:In-Process
[do] DOI:10.1097/DER.0000000000000293

  8 / 169 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 28587294
[Au] Autor:Moniodis J; Jones CG; Renton M; Plummer JA; Barbour EL; Ghisalberti EL; Bohlmann J
[Ad] Address:School of Biological Sciences (M084), University of Western Australia, 35 Stirling Hwy, Crawley, WA 6009, Australia. jess.moniodis@uwa.edu.au.
[Ti] Title:Sesquiterpene Variation in West Australian Sandalwood (Santalum spicatum).
[So] Source:Molecules;22(6), 2017 Jun 06.
[Is] ISSN:1420-3049
[Cp] Country of publication:Switzerland
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:West Australian sandalwood ( ) has long been exploited for its fragrant, sesquiterpene-rich heartwood; however sandalwood fragrance qualities vary substantially, which is of interest to the sandalwood industry. We investigated metabolite profiles of trees from the arid northern and southeastern and semi-arid southwestern regions of West Australia for patterns in composition and co-occurrence of sesquiterpenes. Total sesquiterpene content was similar across the entire sample collection; however sesquiterpene composition was highly variable. Northern populations contained the highest levels of desirable fragrance compounds, α- and ß-santalol, as did individuals from the southwest. Southeastern populations were higher in , -farnesol, an undesired allergenic constituent, and low in santalols. These trees generally also contained higher levels of α-bisabolol. , -farnesol co-occurred with dendrolasin. Contrasting α-santalol and , farnesol chemotypes revealed potential for future genetic tree improvement. Although chemical variation was evident both within and among regions, variation was generally lower within regions. Our results showed distinct patterns in chemical diversity of across its natural distribution, consistent with earlier investigations into sandalwood population genetics. These results are relevant for plantation tree improvement and conservation efforts.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1706
[Cu] Class update date: 170607
[Lr] Last revision date:170607
[St] Status:In-Process

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[PMID]: 28343686
[Au] Autor:Cagliero C; Bicchi C; Cordero C; Liberto E; Rubiolo P; Sgorbini B
[Ad] Address:Dipartimento di Scienza e Tecnologia del Farmaco, Università degli Studi di Torino, Via P. Giuria 9, I-10125, Torino, Italy.
[Ti] Title:Analysis of essential oils and fragrances with a new generation of highly inert gas chromatographic columns coated with ionic liquids.
[So] Source:J Chromatogr A;1495:64-75, 2017 Apr 28.
[Is] ISSN:1873-3778
[Cp] Country of publication:Netherlands
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:In the fields of essential oils and fragrances, samples often consist of mixtures of compounds with similar structural and physical characteristics (e.g. mono- and sesquiterpenoids), whose correct identification closely depends on the synergic combination of chromatographic and mass spectral data. This sample complexity means that new GC stationary phases with different selectivities are continually being investigated. Ionic liquids (ILs) are of great interest as GC stationary phases in this field because of their selectivity (significantly different than that of currently phases) and their high temperature stability. A first generation of IL GC columns was found to be competitive when applied to these field, in terms of selectivity and efficiency, compared to conventional columns (polydimethylsiloxane, (e.g. OV-1), methyl-polysiloxane 5%-phenyl (e.g. SE-52), 7%-cyanopropyl, 7%-phenyl polysiloxane (e.g. OV-1701), and polyethylen glycol (e.g. PEG-20M). However, these columns showed significant activity towards polar or active analytes, which primarily affected their quantitative performance. A new generation of highly-inactive columns coated with three of the most widely-used ionic liquid GC stationary phases has recently been introduced; these phases are SLB-IL60i (1,12-di(tripropylphosphonium) dodecane bis(trifluoromethylsulfonyl) imide [NTf ], SLB-IL76i (tri-(tripropylphosphonium-hexanamido)-triethylamine [NTf ]), and SLB-IL111i (1,5-di (2,3-dimethyllimidazolium) pentane [NTf ]). This study carefully tested the new inert IL columns, in view of their routine application in the fragrance and essential oil fields. They were found to have unusually high selectivity, comparable to that of first-generation IL columns, while their inertness and efficiency were competitive with those of currently-used conventional columns. The IL column performance of first and second generations was compared, through the quali-quantitative analysis of components in a group of different complexity samples; these included the Grob test, a standard mixture of "suspected" skin allergens, and the essential oils of chamomile and sandalwood.
[Mh] MeSH terms primary: Gas Chromatography-Mass Spectrometry
Ionic Liquids/chemistry
Oils, Volatile/analysis
[Mh] MeSH terms secundary: Allergens/analysis
Farnesol/analysis
Oils, Volatile/chemistry
Plant Extracts/chemistry
Santalum/chemistry
Santalum/metabolism
Sesquiterpenes/analysis
Stereoisomerism
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Nm] Name of substance:0 (Allergens); 0 (Ionic Liquids); 0 (Oils, Volatile); 0 (Plant Extracts); 0 (Sesquiterpenes); 1DGG9VW8SA (santalol); 4602-84-0 (Farnesol)
[Em] Entry month:1705
[Cu] Class update date: 170502
[Lr] Last revision date:170502
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[Da] Date of entry for processing:170328
[St] Status:MEDLINE

  10 / 169 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 28169358
[Au] Autor:Zhang X; Teixeira da Silva JA; Niu M; Li M; He C; Zhao J; Zeng S; Duan J; Ma G
[Ad] Address:Key Laboratory of Plant Resources Conservation and Sustainable Utilization, South China Botanical Garden, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Guangzhou, China.
[Ti] Title:Physiological and transcriptomic analyses reveal a response mechanism to cold stress in Santalum album L. leaves.
[So] Source:Sci Rep;7:42165, 2017 Feb 07.
[Is] ISSN:2045-2322
[Cp] Country of publication:England
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Santalum album L. (Indian sandalwood) is an economically important plant species because of its ability to produce highly valued perfume oils. Little is known about the mechanisms by which S. album adapts to low temperatures. In this study, we obtained 100,445,724 raw reads by paired-end sequencing from S. album leaves. Physiological and transcriptomic changes in sandalwood seedlings exposed to 4 °C for 0-48 h were characterized. Cold stress induced the accumulation of malondialdehyde, proline and soluble carbohydrates, and increased the levels of antioxidants. A total of 4,424 differentially expressed genes were responsive to cold, including 3,075 cold-induced and 1,349 cold-repressed genes. When cold stress was prolonged, there was an increase in the expression of cold-responsive genes coding for transporters, responses to stimuli and stress, regulation of defense response, as well as genes related to signal transduction of all phytohormones. Candidate genes in the terpenoid biosynthetic pathway were identified, eight of which were significantly involved in the cold stress response. Gene expression analyses using qRT-PCR showed a peak in the accumulation of SaCBF2 to 4, 50-fold more than control leaves and roots following 12 h and 24 h of cold stress, respectively. The CBF-dependent pathway may play a crucial role in increasing cold tolerance.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1702
[Cu] Class update date: 170224
[Lr] Last revision date:170224
[St] Status:In-Data-Review
[do] DOI:10.1038/srep42165


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