Database : MEDLINE
Search on : Sarcocystosis [Words]
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[PMID]: 29510746
[Au] Autor:Saeed MA; Rashid MH; Vaughan J; Jabbar A
[Ad] Address:Department of Veterinary Biosciences, Faculty of Veterinary and Agricultural Sciences, The University of Melbourne, Werribee, Victoria, 3030, Australia.
[Ti] Title:Sarcocystosis in South American camelids: The state of play revisited.
[So] Source:Parasit Vectors;11(1):146, 2018 Mar 06.
[Is] ISSN:1756-3305
[Cp] Country of publication:England
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Members of the genus Sarcocystis (Apicomplexa: Sarcocystidae) are intracellular protozoan parasites that infect a wide range of domestic and wild animals, resulting in economic losses in production animals worldwide. Sarcocystis spp. have indirect life-cycles where canids and felids serve as main definitive hosts while a range of domestic and wild animals serve as intermediate hosts, including South American camelids (SACs) such as alpacas, llamas and guanacos. These animals primarily occur in South American countries on Andean, elevated plains but in recent years, alpacas and llamas have become emerging animal industries in other parts of the world such as Australia, Europe and the USA due to their high-quality fiber, meat and hides. For instance, alpaca meat is becoming popular in many parts of the world due to its lower cholesterol content than other red meat, thereby it has the potential of a valuable product for both local and international markets. However, SAC meat can be degraded and/or even condemned due to the presence of macroscopic sarcocysts in skeletal muscles, leading to significant economic losses to farmers. The infection is generally asymptomatic, though highly pathogenic or even fatal Sarcocystis infections have also been reported in alpacas and llamas. Despite the economic importance of sarcocystosis in SACs, little is known about the life-cycle of parasites involved, disease transmission, epidemiology, pathogenesis, diagnosis, control and public health significance. This review article provides an in-depth analysis of the existing knowledge on the taxonomy, epidemiology, clinicopathology and diagnosis of Sarcocystis in SACs, highlights knowledge gaps and proposes future areas of research that could contribute to our better understanding of sarcocystosis in these animals.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE; REVIEW
[Em] Entry month:1803
[Cu] Class update date: 180311
[Lr] Last revision date:180311
[St] Status:In-Data-Review
[do] DOI:10.1186/s13071-018-2748-1

  2 / 1420 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29508303
[Au] Autor:Anderson D; Nathoo N; Lu JQ; Kowalewska-Grochowska KT; Power C
[Ad] Address:Department of Medicine (Neurology), HMRC 611, University of Alberta, Edmonton, AB, T6G 2G3, Canada.
[Ti] Title:Sarcocystis myopathy in a patient with HIV-AIDS.
[So] Source:J Neurovirol;, 2018 Mar 05.
[Is] ISSN:1538-2443
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Sarcocystosis is a zoonotic infection that causes intestinal and muscular illnesses in humans. Sarcocystosis was until recently considered rare in humans. To complete their life cycle, Sarcocystis species require both a definitive and an intermediate host. Humans are the definitive host when infected by one of two species: Sarcocystis hominis (from eating undercooked beef) or Sarcocystis suihominis (from eating uncooked pork). Infection with either of these species results in intestinal sarcocystosis, causing a self-limited disease characterized by nausea, abdominal pain, and diarrhea. Humans act as the intermediate host when infected by Sarcocystis nesbitti, resulting in the markedly different clinical picture of muscular sarcocystosis. Most documented cases of muscular sarcocystosis were assumed to be acquired in Malaysia, in addition to other regions of Southeast Asia and India. Published cases of muscular sarcocystosis from the Middle East, Central and South America, and Africa are all rare. Although the clinical presentation of muscular sarcocystosis remains to be fully characterized, fever, myalgia, and headache are among the most common symptoms. Here, we report a patient from sub-Saharan Africa with chronic Sarcocystis myopathy and well-controlled HIV-AIDS.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1803
[Cu] Class update date: 180306
[Lr] Last revision date:180306
[St] Status:Publisher
[do] DOI:10.1007/s13365-018-0620-x

  3 / 1420 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29411109
[Au] Autor:Máca O
[Ad] Address:Department of Pathology and Parasitology, State Veterinary Institute Prague, Sídlistní 136/24, 165 00, Prague 6 - Lysolaje, Czech Republic. biola.biola@seznam.cz.
[Ti] Title:Molecular identification of Sarcocystis lutrae in the European otter (Lutra lutra) and the European badger (Meles meles) from the Czech Republic.
[So] Source:Parasitol Res;117(3):943-945, 2018 Mar.
[Is] ISSN:1432-1955
[Cp] Country of publication:Germany
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Muscular sarcosporidial infections by Sarcocystis lutrae (Apicomplexa: Sarcocystidae) from the otter (Lutra lutra) and badger (Meles meles) (Carnivora: Mustelidae) were found in the Czech Republic. As part of a diversity evaluation of Sarcocystis in wild carnivores during 2016-2017, samples of diaphragm, tongue and hind-limb muscles were collected from nine districts, examined by compression and characterized molecularly. Cyst walls were thin, with no visible protrusions, and histological sections of infected muscle tissue showed no host responses. Fourteen of 17 badgers (82% prevalence) and one otter (100% prevalence) were positive for sarcocysts. Sequence analyses at four loci (18S rRNA, 28S rRNA, ITS1 and cox1) confirmed the identity as S. lutrae. This is also the first report of a co-infection with muscular sarcocystosis and Trichinella in badger. The finding of Trichinella is important from the zoonotic point of view, since badgers are used for meat consumption. Similar and future monitoring of both parasitic taxa are needed.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1802
[Cu] Class update date: 180302
[Lr] Last revision date:180302
[St] Status:In-Process
[do] DOI:10.1007/s00436-018-5793-y

  4 / 1420 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29479682
[Au] Autor:Phythian CJ; Jackson B; Bell R; Citer L; Barwell R; Windsor PA
[Ad] Address:Norwegian University of Life Sciences, Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, Institute for Production Animal Clinical Medicine, Section for Small Ruminants, 4325 Sandnes, Norway.
[Ti] Title:Abattoir surveillance of Sarcocystis spp., Cysticercosis ovis and Echinococcus granulosus in Tasmanian slaughter sheep, 2007-2013.
[So] Source:Aust Vet J;96(3):62-68, 2018 Mar.
[Is] ISSN:1751-0813
[Cp] Country of publication:England
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:OBJECTIVE: To estimate the prevalence of macroscopic Sarcocystis spp., Cysticercus ovis and Echinococcus granulosus recorded at routine postmortem inspection of Tasmanian slaughter sheep during 2007 to 2013. METHODS: A retrospective analysis of routine postmortem meat inspection data maintained on 352,325 Tasmanian adult slaughter sheep inspected across nine abattoirs in Tasmania, Victoria and South Australia as part of the National Sheep Health Monitoring Project (NSHMP). RESULTS: During the period 1 September 2007 to 30 June 2013, the estimated prevalence of macroscopic Sarcocystis spp. was 14.3%, C. ovis was 3.2% and E. granulosus was 0.01%. Mean Sarcocystis spp. line prevalence ranged from 0% to 33.5%. Significant between-abattoir differences in the level of sarcosporidiosis (P < 0.001) and C. ovis were found (P < 0.001). Overall, very low levels of hydatidosis were recorded throughout the surveillance period. Predicted within-line prevalence of macroscopic sarcocysts in animals coming from a known/recorded local government area (LGA) (P < 0.001) was lower than that of lines where the LGA was unknown or not recorded. A higher prevalence of sarcocystosis was recorded in lines of sheep aged ≥ 2 years compared with those < 2 years (P < 0.001). CONCLUSION: Reasons for the significant between-abattoir differences in recorded levels of ovine sarcosporidiosis and cysticercosis remain unknown, but may represent sampling bias, with subsets of slaughter sheep going to abattoirs with different tiers or access to markets. Further investigation into apparent differences, including epidemiological studies of properties with high lesion prevalence, comparing meat inspector diagnostic sensitivity, assessing the effect of line speed and tiers and market access in different abattoirs, may be useful.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1802
[Cu] Class update date: 180226
[Lr] Last revision date:180226
[St] Status:In-Process
[do] DOI:10.1111/avj.12670

  5 / 1420 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29261446
[Au] Autor:White CL; Lankau EW; Lynch D; Knowles S; Schuler KL; Dubey JP; Shearn-Bochsler VI; Isidoro-Ayza M; Thomas NJ
[Ad] Address:1 US Geological Survey, National Wildlife Health Center, 6006 Schroeder Road, Madison, Wisconsin 53711, USA.
[Ti] Title:MORTALITY TRENDS IN NORTHERN SEA OTTERS ( ENHYDRA LUTRIS KENYONI) COLLECTED FROM THE COASTS OF WASHINGTON AND OREGON (2002-15).
[So] Source:J Wildl Dis;, 2017 Dec 20.
[Is] ISSN:1943-3700
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:During 2002-15 we examined the causes of mortality in a population of northern sea otters ( Enhydra lutris kenyoni). Beachcast sea otters were collected primarily from the coast of Washington. Although there are no permanent sea otter residents in Oregon, several beachcast otters were collected from the Oregon coast. Infectious diseases were the primary cause of death (56%) for otters we examined. Sarcocystosis was the leading infectious cause of death (54%) and was observed throughout the study period. Some infectious diseases, such as morbilliviral encephalitis and leptospirosis, were documented for a limited number of years and then not detected again despite continued testing for these pathogens in necropsied animals. Trauma was the second most common cause of death (14%) during the study period. The continued stable growth of the Washington population of otters suggests they are able to tolerate current mortality rates.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1712
[Cu] Class update date: 171220
[Lr] Last revision date:171220
[St] Status:Publisher
[do] DOI:10.7589/2017-05-122

  6 / 1420 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29080770
[Au] Autor:Dubey JP; Trupkiewicz JG; Verma SK; Mowery JD; Adedoyin G; Georoff T; Grigg ME
[Ad] Address:United States Department of Agriculture, Agricultural Research Service, Animal Parasitic Diseases Laboratory, Beltsville Agricultural Research Center,Building 1001, Beltsville, MD, 20705, USA. Electronic address: jitender.dubey@ars.usda.gov.
[Ti] Title:Atypical fatal sarcocystosis associated with Sarcocystis neurona in a White-nosed coati (Nasua narica molaris).
[So] Source:Vet Parasitol;247:80-84, 2017 Nov 30.
[Is] ISSN:1873-2550
[Cp] Country of publication:Netherlands
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:The protozoan parasite Sarcocystis neurona is an important cause of disease in horses (equine protozoal myeloencephalitis, EPM) and marine mammals. Isolated reports of clinical EPM-like disease have been documented in a zebra, raccoon, domestic cat, domestic dog, ferret, skunk, mink, lynx, red panda and fisher. The predominant disease is encephalomyelitis associated with schizonts in neural tissues. Here, we report highly disseminated sarcocystosis, in many tissues of a captive White-nosed coati (Nasua narica molaris). The 14year old, neutered male coati was euthanized due to progressive weakness, lethargy, and inappetence. Schizonts, including free and intracellular merozoites were detected in many cell types, and differed morphologically from S. neurona schizonts in horses. Only a few sarcocysts were seen in skeletal muscle and the myocardium. Immunohistochemically, the protozoa reacted positively to S. neurona but not to Toxoplasma gondii antibodies. Severe inflammtory disease detected in the stomach, intestine, adrenal and thyroid glands, ciliary body of eye, and urinary bladder associated with schizonts in the coati has not been reported earlier in any host with EPM. Although, a few schizonts were found in the brain, encephalitis was minimal and not the cause of clinical signs. Multilocus PCR-DNA sequencing using DNA derived from the coati lung tissue identified an S. neurona infection using the 18S, 28S and ITS-1 markers, and a novel genotype using primer pairs against antigenic surface proteins (SnSAG3, SnSAG4, SnSAG1-5-6) and microsatellite markers (MS, SN7, SN9). Although the genotype was similar to the widely distributed Type VI strain, it possessed a novel allele at SnSAG5, and a different MS combination of repeats at SN7 and SN9. Whether this severe parasitism was related to the host or the parasite needs further investigation.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1710
[Cu] Class update date: 171029
[Lr] Last revision date:171029
[St] Status:In-Process

  7 / 1420 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 28985163
[Au] Autor:Yabsley MJ
[Ad] Address:Southeastern Cooperative Wildlife Disease Study, 589 D. W. Brooks Drive, Wildlife Health Building, College of Veterinary Medicine and the Warnell School of Forestry and Natural Resources, The University of Georgia, Athens, Georgia 30602, USA ( myabsley@uga.edu ).
[Ti] Title:Sarcocystosis of Animals and HumansSarcocystosis of Animals and Humans. Second Edition. By J. P. Dubey, R. Calero-Bernal, B. M. Rosenthal, C. A. Speer, and R. Fayer. CRC Press, Boca Raton, Florida. 2016. 481 pp. ISBN-10: 1498710123, ISBN-13: 978-1498710121. US $140 hardback; $98 eBook.
[So] Source:J Wildl Dis;53(4):948-949, 2017 Oct.
[Is] ISSN:1943-3700
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1710
[Cu] Class update date: 171006
[Lr] Last revision date:171006
[St] Status:In-Data-Review
[do] DOI:10.7589/0090-3558-53.4.948

  8 / 1420 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 28982020
[Au] Autor:Taurisano ND; Butler BP; Stone D; Hariharan H; Fields PJ; Ferguson HW; Haulena M; Cotrell P; Nielsen O; Raverty S
[Ad] Address:1 Department of Pathobiology, St. George's University, School of Veterinary Medicine, True Blue, St. George, Grenada, West Indies.
[Ti] Title:Streptococcus phocae in Marine Mammals of Northeastern Pacific and Arctic Canada: A Retrospective Analysis of 85 Postmortem Investigations.
[So] Source:J Wildl Dis;, 2017 Oct 05.
[Is] ISSN:1943-3700
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Streptococcus phocae is a pathogen of marine mammals, although its pathogenicity remains poorly understood. Recovery of this bacterium from asymptomatic carriers suggests that it is an opportunistic pathogen. We investigated the role of S. phocae in naturally occurring disease and its significance as a pathogen based on postmortem investigations. Between 2007 and 2012, 1,696 whole carcasses, tissue samples, or both were submitted from the northeastern Pacific and Arctic Canada for diagnostic testing. Streptococcus phocae was cultured from phocids (n=66), otariids (n=12), harbor porpoises (Phocoena phocoena; n=5), and sea otters (Enhydra lutris; n=2). Pathologic manifestations of S. phocae-associated disease included localized, as well as systemic, inflammatory lesions with common findings of suppurative bronchopneumonia (n=17) and bacteremia (n=27). Lung lesions were frequently culture-positive for S. phocae, suggesting commensal colonization of the oropharynx with subsequent opportunistic infection of the respiratory tract during tissue injury, coinfection, immunosuppression, or other debilitating conditions. The presence of a positive spleen culture, and interpretations at necropsy and histopathology, were used to determine the presence of S. phocae bacteremia. Less frequent lesions that were culture positive for S. phocae included abscesses (n=9), meningitis (n=7), and cellulitis (n=1). The majority of cases with S. phocae lesions featured pre-existing conditions that presumably contributed to some degree of debilitation or immunosuppression, including emaciation (n=29), liver mercury accumulation (n=29), trauma (n=22), severe pulmonary or cardiovascular nematodiasis (n=9), concurrent bacterial or viral infections (n=8), or sarcocystosis (n=6). These findings suggest that S. phocae could be characterized as an opportunistic pathogen, associated with debilitating conditions in stranded and rehabilitating marine mammals. Wildlife investigators can use these results to draw more definitive conclusions regarding positive S. phocae cultures during postmortem studies in marine mammals.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1710
[Cu] Class update date: 171005
[Lr] Last revision date:171005
[St] Status:Publisher
[do] DOI:10.7589/2016-09-208

  9 / 1420 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 28963770
[Au] Autor:Amairia S; Amdouni Y; Rouatbi M; Rjeibi MR; Awadi S; Gharbi M
[Ad] Address:Laboratoire de Parasitologie, Institution de la Recherche et de l'Enseignement Supérieur Agricoles, École Nationale de Médecine Vétérinaire de Sidi Thabet, Univ. Manouba, Sidi Thabet, Tunisia.
[Ti] Title:First detection and molecular identification of Sarcocystis spp. in small ruminants in North-West Tunisia.
[So] Source:Transbound Emerg Dis;, 2017 Sep 30.
[Is] ISSN:1865-1682
[Cp] Country of publication:Germany
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Sarcocystosis is a parasitic disease caused by varying Sarcocystis species infecting humans and animals. It is commonly found in small ruminants causing pathogenic effects. This contributes to detrimental economic loss for local farmers and the local economy due this disease. Although the distribution of Sarcocystis can be found all over the world, the species infecting small ruminants in Tunisia is still unknown. Through this study, we aim to estimate the molecular prevalence of natural infection with Sarcocystis spp. in sheep and goats using molecular identification. Also, phylogenetic analyses were used to identify the different species of this parasite infecting small ruminants in northern Tunisia for the first time. DNA was extracted from 198 and 121, sheep and goats meat samples, respectively. The molecular prevalence of Sarcocystis spp. in sheep and goats was 58.6% (116/198) and 50.4% (61/121), respectively. Compared to the Noire de Thibar and cross-breeds, the Barbarine sheep had the highest infection prevalence (63.4%) (p = .004). Five of the 116 positive samples were sequenced identifying Sarcocystis tenella from sheep. For goats, the sequencing results showed that five positive PCR products belonged to Sarcocystis capracanis species.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1710
[Cu] Class update date: 170930
[Lr] Last revision date:170930
[St] Status:Publisher
[do] DOI:10.1111/tbed.12722

  10 / 1420 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 28848280
[Au] Autor:Banothu D; Manchukonda U; Rayulu VC
[Ad] Address:Department of Veterinary Parasitology, College of Veterinary Science, Hyderabad, Sri Venkateswara Veterinary University, Rajendranagar, Hyderabad, 500030 India.
[Ti] Title:Diagnosis of bovine sarcocystosis by immunoflourescent antibody technique.
[So] Source:J Parasit Dis;41(3):795-798, 2017 Sep.
[Is] ISSN:0971-7196
[Cp] Country of publication:India
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Studies on sarcocystosis showed an overall sero-prevalence of 79.46% by IFAT which included 80.14% in cattle and 78.59% in buffaloes out of 716 animals screened. The antibody titers of six randomly selected positive samples from different age groups of <2, 2-5, 5-10 and >10 years old bovines ranged from 16 to 64, 32 to 256, 32 to 128 and 16 to 64 with an average titer of 32 ± 2.92, 106.6 ± 34, 74.6 ± 17 and 34.6 ± 9, respectively. Significantly, lower rates of infection were observed in the cattle of below 2 years (60%) age and an ascending rate of infection in the age groups of 2-5 years (81.33%), 5-10 years (80.52%) and above 10 years (90.9%).
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1708
[Cu] Class update date: 170902
[Lr] Last revision date:170902
[St] Status:PubMed-not-MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.1007/s12639-017-0890-x


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