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[PMID]: 29524469
[Au] Autor:Hendrickse P; Galinska M; Hodson-Tole E; Degens H
[Ad] Address:School of Healthcare Science, Manchester Metropolitan University, UK; Institute of Sport Science and Innovation, Lithuanian Sports University, Kaunas, Lithuania. Electronic address: paul.w.hendrickse@stu.mmu.ac.uk.
[Ti] Title:An evaluation of common markers of muscle denervation in denervated young-adult and old rat gastrocnemius muscle.
[So] Source:Exp Gerontol;, 2018 Mar 07.
[Is] ISSN:1873-6815
[Cp] Country of publication:England
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:A large part of age-related muscle wasting is due to incomplete reinnervation of fibres that have become denervated following motoneuron loss. Neural cell adhesion molecule (NCAM) and sodium channel NaV1.5 are considered markers for denervation, but the time course of changes in their expression following denervation has never been systematically evaluated in young-adult and old muscle. To assess the time course of denervation-induced changes in their expression, the left gastrocnemius muscle in 15 young-adult (5-month) and 10 old (25-month) male Wistar rats was denervated for 1, 2 or 4 weeks, while the right muscle served as an internal control. Sections were stained for α-bungarotoxin, to visualise the neuromuscular junctions, combined with NCAM, polysialylated NCAM (PSA-NCAM) or NaV1.5. In young-adult animals, denervation induced a transient decrease in junctional and cytoplasmic NCAM expression, while in the old NCAM expression was increased after 2 weeks. Cytoplasmic PSA-NCAM was increased in both young-adult and old fibres after 2 weeks denervation with a further increase after 4 weeks in the young only. The junctional PSA-NCAM was transiently increased or decreased in the young and old muscles, respectively. NaV1.5 expression decreased after 1 and 2 weeks of denervation in NaV1.5 in young muscle fibres before returning to control levels, whereas old muscle fibres displayed a transient increase after 1 week followed by a decrease and a return to control levels after 2 and 4 weeks respectively. In conclusion, NCAM and NaV1.5 are not unequivocally elevated with denervation and consequently are not adequate markers of fibre denervation.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1803
[Cu] Class update date: 180310
[Lr] Last revision date:180310
[St] Status:Publisher

  2 / 5584 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29475111
[Au] Autor:Brent MB; Brel A; Thomsen JS
[Ad] Address:Department of Biomedicine, Aarhus University, Denmark. Electronic address: mbb@biomed.au.dk.
[Ti] Title:PTH (1-34) and growth hormone in prevention of disuse osteopenia and sarcopenia in rats.
[So] Source:Bone;110:244-253, 2018 Feb 20.
[Is] ISSN:1873-2763
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Osteopenia and sarcopenia develops rapidly during disuse. The study investigated whether intermittent parathyroid hormone (1-34) (PTH) and growth hormone (GH) administered alone or in combination could prevent or mitigate disuse osteopenia and sarcopenia in rats. Disuse was achieved by injecting 4IU botulinum toxin A (BTX) into the right hindlimb musculature of 12-14-week-old female Wistar rats. Seventy-two rats were divided into six groups: 1. Baseline; 2. Ctrl; 3. BTX; 4. BTX+GH; 5. BTX+PTH; 6. BTX+PTH+GH. PTH (1-34) (60g/kg/day) and GH (5mg/kg/day). The animals were sacrificed after 6weeks of treatment. Sarcopenia was established by histomorphometry, while the skeletal properties were determined using DXA, CT, mechanical testing, and dynamic bone histomorphometry. Disuse resulted in lower muscle mass (-63%, p<0.05), trabecular BV/TV (-28%, p<0.05), Tb.Th (-11%, p<0.05), lower diaphyseal cortical thickness (-10%, p<0.001), and lower bone strength at the distal femoral metaphysis (-27%, p<0.001) compared to Ctrl animals. PTH fully counteracted the immobilization-induced lower BV/TV, Tb.Th, and distal femoral metaphyseal strength. GH increased muscle mass (+17%, p<0.05) compared to BTX, but did not prevent the immobilization-induced loss of bone strength, BV/TV, and cortical trabecular thickness. Combination of PTH and GH increased distal femoral metaphyseal bone strength (+45%, p<0.001), BV/TV (+50%, p<0.05), Tb.Th (+40%, p<0.05), and whole femoral aBMD (+15%, p<0.001) compared to BTX and muscle mass (+21%, p<0.05) compared to BTX+PTH. In conclusion, PTH and GH in combination is more efficient at preventing the disuse-related deterioration of bone strength, density, and micro-architecture than either PTH or GH given as monotherapy. Furthermore, GH, either alone or in combination with PTH, attenuated disuse-induced loss of muscle mass. The combination of PTH and GH resulted in a more effective treatment than PTH and GH as monotherapy.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1802
[Cu] Class update date: 180310
[Lr] Last revision date:180310
[St] Status:Publisher

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[PMID]: 29438735
[Au] Autor:Rader EP; Naimo MA; Ensey J; Baker BA
[Ad] Address:Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health, Morgantown, WV 26505, United States. Electronic address: Wlz4@cdc.gov.
[Ti] Title:High-intensity stretch-shortening contraction training modifies responsivity of skeletal muscle in old male rats.
[So] Source:Exp Gerontol;104:118-126, 2018 Feb 10.
[Is] ISSN:1873-6815
[Cp] Country of publication:England
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Utilization of high-intensity resistance training to counter age-related sarcopenia is currently debated because of the potential for maladaptation when training design is inappropriate. Training design is problematic because the influence of various loading variables (e.g. contraction mode, repetition number, and training frequency) is still not well characterized at old age. To address this in a precisely controlled manner, we developed a rodent model of high-intensity training consisting of maximally-activated stretch-shortening contractions (SSCs), contractions typical during resistance training. With this model, we determined that at old age, high-repetition SSC training (80 SSCs: 8 sets of 10 repetitions) performed frequently (i.e. 3 days per week) for 4.5 weeks induced strength deficits with no muscle mass gain while decreasing frequency to 2 days per week promoted increases in muscle mass and muscle quality (i.e. performance normalized to muscle mass). This finding confirmed the popular notion that decreasing training frequency has a robust effect with age. Meanwhile, the influence of other loading variables remains contentious. The aim of the present study was to assess muscle adaptation following modulation of contraction mode and repetition number during high-intensity SSC training. Muscles of young (3 month old) and old (30 month old) male rats were exposed to 4.5 weeks of low-repetition static training of 4 (i.e. 4 sets of one repetition) isometric (ISO) contractions 3 days per week or a more moderate-repetition dynamic training of 40 SSCs (i.e. 4 sets of 10 repetitions) 3 days per week. For young rats, performance and muscle mass increased regardless of training protocol. For old rats, no muscle mass adaptation was observed for 4 ISO training while 40 SSC training induced muscle mass gain without improvement in muscle quality, an outcome distinct from modulating training frequency. Muscle mass gain for old rats was accompanied by decreased protein levels of tumor necrosis factor alpha, a mediator of age-related chronic inflammatory signaling, to young levels. These findings suggest that while dynamic high-intensity training with a moderate number of repetitions has a limited capacity for altering muscle quality, such training is a viable strategy for countering age-related inflammatory signaling and modifying muscle mass.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1802
[Cu] Class update date: 180310
[Lr] Last revision date:180310
[St] Status:Publisher

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[PMID]: 29421607
[Au] Autor:Dulac MC; Pion CH; Lemieux F; Boutros El Hajj G; Belanger M; Gaudreau P; Chevalier S; Morais JA; Gouspillou G; Aubertin-Leheudre M
[Ad] Address:Dpartement de Biologie, Facult des Sciences, Universit du Qubec Montral, Montral, QC, Canada; Centre de recherche de l'Institut universitaire de griatrie de Montral, Universit de Montral, Montral, QC, Canada.
[Ti] Title:Differences in muscle adaptation to a 12-week mixed power training in elderly men, depending on usual protein intake.
[So] Source:Exp Gerontol;104:78-85, 2018 Feb 05.
[Is] ISSN:1873-6815
[Cp] Country of publication:England
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:INTRODUCTION: Normal aging is often associated with a decline of muscle mass (MM), strength (MS) and quality (MQ: MS/MM), leading to functional incapacities. This aging-related deterioration of muscles may involve a decreased protein intake. Mixed power training has been recently shown to induce positive effects on MM, MS and MQ. However, to our knowledge, no study has examined if muscle adaptations following mixed power training could be influenced by the daily amount of protein ingested in elderly men. METHODS: Twenty-one men completed the intervention and were divided into 2 groups based on their usual protein intake: PROT 1.1- (<1.1 gkg d [n = 10; 73  3 years]) and PROT 1.2+ (>1.2 gkg d [n = 11; 73  3 years]). Body composition (DXA: lean and fat masses), MS (1-maximal repetition on leg-press and handgrip strength), MQ (MS/body mass and MS/lower limb lean mass), functional capacities (Short Physical Performance Battery/Senior Fitness Test), dietary intake (3-day food record) and energy expenditure (accelerometer; 7 days) were measured. Mixed power training intervention consisted in power and functional exercises (12 weeks; 3 times/week; 1 h/session). RESULTS: Lower limb MS increase in the PROT 1.2+ group was greater from that of the PROT 1.1- group when normalized to lower limbs lean mass (p = 0.036). In addition, a trend for greater gain in lower limb MS normalized to body mass (p = 0.053) was observed in the PROT 1.2+. CONCLUSION: To optimize mixed power training effects on muscle function, healthy older men should ingest daily at least 1.2 gkg d of protein. These beneficial effects of a higher usual protein intake were observed especially for MQ, which is one of the best predictors of functional capacities in older adults.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1802
[Cu] Class update date: 180310
[Lr] Last revision date:180310
[St] Status:Publisher

  5 / 5584 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29523869
[Au] Autor:Mogi M; Kohara K; Tabara Y; Tsukuda K; Igase M; Horiuchi M
[Ad] Address:Department of Molecular Cardiovascular Biology and Pharmacology, Ehime University, Graduate School of Medicine, Tohon, Japan. mmogi@m.ehime-u.ac.jp.
[Ti] Title:Correlation between the 24-h urinary angiotensinogen or aldosterone level and muscle mass: Japan shimanami health promoting program study.
[So] Source:Hypertens Res;, 2018 Mar 09.
[Is] ISSN:1348-4214
[Cp] Country of publication:England
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Our previous report indicated that sarcopenia is associated with arterial stiffness and cardiovascular death. The renin-angiotensin system (RAS) plays an important role in cardiovascular disease and its activation may be correlated with sarcopenia according to basic research. However, few clinical studies have assessed the correlation between skeletal muscle loss and RAS component concentrations in healthy subjects. The purpose of this study was to investigate the relationships between the excretion of angiotensinogen (AGT) and aldosterone (Ald) in 24-h urine samples and clinical and sarcopenic indices. A total of 344 people participated in a voluntary medical check-up program, "Anti-Aging Doc", and underwent measurement of their sarcopenia-related indices. Urine samples were collected for 24-h within 8 weeks after a medical check-up using a partition cup and a proportional sampling method. Urine AGT and Ald levels were evaluated by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). After compensating for possible confounding parameters, including baPWV, the 24-h urinary excretion of AGT was independently and negatively associated with the thigh muscle cross-sectional area. On the other hand, urinary Ald excretion was not associated with sarcopenia-related indices after compensation, even though it showed a modest but significantly positive association with sarcopenic indices in single regression analysis. Urinary AGT was related to sarcopenic indices and may be involved in the pathogenesis of sarcopenia. On the other hand, urinary Ald was not related to sarcopenic indices when considering other risk factors.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1803
[Cu] Class update date: 180310
[Lr] Last revision date:180310
[St] Status:Publisher
[do] DOI:10.1038/s41440-018-0021-9

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[PMID]: 29520606
[Au] Autor:Hong N; Kim CO; Youm Y; Kim HC; Rhee Y
[Ad] Address:Department of Internal Medicine, Severance Hospital, Endocrine Research Institute, Yonsei University College of Medicine, Seoul, 120-752, Korea.
[Ti] Title:Low peak jump power is associated with elevated odds of dysmobility syndrome in community-dwelling elderly individuals: the Korean Urban Rural Elderly (KURE) study.
[So] Source:Osteoporos Int;, 2018 Mar 08.
[Is] ISSN:1433-2965
[Cp] Country of publication:England
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:In a community-dwelling elderly cohort (Korean Urban Rural Elderly), low peak jump power was associated with elevated odds of dysmobility syndrome and its components, independent of age and comorbidities. Jump power measurement improved discrimination of individuals with dysmobility syndrome when added to conventional risk factors. INTRODUCTION: Dysmobility syndrome was proposed to encompass the risks affecting musculoskeletal outcomes. Jump power measurement is a safe, reproducible high-intensity test for physical function in elderly. However, the relationship between jump power and dysmobility syndrome remains unknown. METHODS: A total of 1369 subjects (mean 71.6years; women, 66%) were analyzed from a community-based cohort. Dysmobility syndrome was defined as the presence of ≥ 3 factors among falls in the preceding year, low lean mass, high fat mass, osteoporosis, low grip strength, and low timed get-up-and-go (TUG) performance. Subjects were grouped into tertiles of jump power relative to weight based on sex-stratified cutoffs (32.4 and 27.6W/kg in men; 23.9 and 19.9W/kg in women) or into the failed-to-jump group. RESULTS: The prevalence of dysmobility syndrome was 20% overall, increasing from the highest (T1) to lowest (T3) jump power tertile (1, 11, 15% in men; 11, 16, 39% in women) and the failed-to-jump group (39% in men; 48% in women). Low jump power or failed-to-jump was associated with elevated odds of dysmobility syndrome (T3 vs. T1, adjusted odds ratio [aOR] 4.35, p < 0.001; failed-to-jump vs. T1, aOR 7.60, p < 0.001) and its components including falls, low lean mass, high fat mass, and poor TUG performance but not osteoporosis after adjustment for covariates. Jump power modestly discriminated dysmobility syndrome (area under the curve [AUC], 0.71, p < 0.001), which improved discriminatory performance when added to conventional risk factors (AUC, from 0.75 to 0.79, p < 0.001). CONCLUSIONS: Low peak jump power was associated with elevated odds of dysmobility syndrome and its components, independent of age and comorbidities.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1803
[Cu] Class update date: 180309
[Lr] Last revision date:180309
[St] Status:Publisher
[do] DOI:10.1007/s00198-018-4466-0

  7 / 5584 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29520591
[Au] Autor:Mayr R; Fritsche HM; Zeman F; Reiffen M; Siebertz L; Niessen C; Pycha A; van Rhijn BWG; Burger M; Gierth M
[Ad] Address:Department of Urology, St. Josef Medical Centre, University of Regensburg, Landshuterstr. 65, 93053, Regensburg, Germany. roman.mayr@ukr.de.
[Ti] Title:Sarcopenia predicts 90-day mortality and postoperative complications after radical cystectomy for bladder cancer.
[So] Source:World J Urol;, 2018 Mar 08.
[Is] ISSN:1433-8726
[Cp] Country of publication:Germany
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:PURPOSE: A single-center study was conducted to investigate the impact of sarcopenia as a predictor for 90-day mortality (90dM) and complications within 90days after radical cystectomy for bladder cancer. METHODS: In total, 327 patients with preoperative available digital computed tomography (CT) scans of the abdomen and pelvis were identified. The lumbar skeletal muscle index was measured using preoperative abdominal CT to assess sarcopenia. Complications were recorded and graded according to Clavien-Dindo (CD). Predictors of 90dM and complications within 90days were analyzed by uni- and multivariable logistic regression. RESULTS: Of the 327 patients, 262 (80%) were male and 108 (33%) patients were classified as sarcopenic. Within 90days, 28 (7.8%) patients died, of whom 15 patients were sarcopenic and 13 were not. In multivariable logistic regression analysis, sarcopenia (OR 2.59; 95% CI 1.13-5.95; p = 0.025), ASA 3-4 (OR 2.53; 95% CI 1.10-5.82; p = 0.029) and cM + (OR 7.43; 95% CI 2.34-23.64; p = 0.001) were independent predictors of 90-day mortality. Sarcopenic patients experienced significantly more complications, i.e., CD 4a-5 (p = 0.003), compared to non-sarcopenic patients. In multivariable logistic regression analysis, sarcopenia was independently associated with CD ≥ 3b complications corrected for age, BMI, ASA-Score and type of urinary diversion. CONCLUSIONS: We reported that sarcopenia proved an independent predictor for 90 dM and complications in patients undergoing RC for bladder cancer.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1803
[Cu] Class update date: 180309
[Lr] Last revision date:180309
[St] Status:Publisher
[do] DOI:10.1007/s00345-018-2259-x

  8 / 5584 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29519962
[Au] Autor:Hanyu H
[Ad] Address:Department of Geriatric Medicine, Tokyo Medical University.
[Ti] Title:[Prevention of Dementia-with Special Reference to Lifestyle and Vascular Risk Factors].
[So] Source:Brain Nerve;70(3):191-198, 2018 Mar.
[Is] ISSN:1881-6096
[Cp] Country of publication:Japan
[La] Language:jpn
[Ab] Abstract:There is a wide range of potentially modifiable risk factors for Alzheimer's disease and dementia, including cardiovascular risk factors (e.g. hypertension, diabetes, dyslipidemia, obesity, sleep-apnea syndrome), psychosocial factors (e.g., depression), health behaviors (e.g., low level of physical or mental activity, smoking status), and head trauma. In the elderly, weight loss associated with frailty and sarcopenia is another risk factor for dementia. Recent epidemiological studies have shown that the prevalence of dementia has declined in the US and European countries during the last 20 years. In addition to an increase in educational attainment, treatment and prevention of vascular risk factors may contribute to some extent of the decline in dementia prevalence.
[Pt] Publication type:ENGLISH ABSTRACT; JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1803
[Cu] Class update date: 180309
[Lr] Last revision date:180309
[St] Status:In-Data-Review
[do] DOI:10.11477/mf.1416200981

  9 / 5584 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29518867
[Au] Autor:Hu GF; Tian JH; Yang J; Fu HX; Liu J
[Ti] Title:[Sarcopenia and long-term prognosis of patients with chronic heart failure in patients aged 70 years and over].
[So] Source:Zhonghua Nei Ke Za Zhi;57(3):212-215, 2018 Mar 01.
[Is] ISSN:0578-1426
[Cp] Country of publication:China
[La] Language:chi
[Ab] Abstract:To explore the association between sarcopenia (SAR) and long-term prognosis of patients with chronic heart failure (CHF) aged 70 years and over, 182 CHF patients from January 1, 2012 to December 31, 2014 were included in the present study. The patients were divided into the SAR group and the non-SAR group. The median follow-up period was 36 (3, 57) months. The endpoint was any heart failure-related event (HFRE). There were significant differences in age, body mass index, hemoglobin, B-type natriuretic peptide, hypersensitive troponin T (hs-TnT), left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF) and cardiac function class between the two groups (all 0.05). The Kaplan-Meier analysis showed that the survival time of the non-SAR patients was much longer than that of the SAR patients ( 0.05). The multivariate Cox regression analysis indicated that SAR was an independent risk factor for HFRE, suggesting a role of sarcopenia on long-term prognosis of patients with chronic heart failure.
[Pt] Publication type:ENGLISH ABSTRACT; JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1803
[Cu] Class update date: 180309
[Lr] Last revision date:180309
[St] Status:In-Process
[do] DOI:10.3760/cma.j.issn.0578-1426.2018.03.012

  10 / 5584 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29518764
[Au] Autor:Dionyssiotis Y; Kapsokoulou A; Samlidi E; Angoules AG; Papathanasiou J; Chronopoulos E; Kostoglou-Athanassiou I; Trovas G
[Ad] Address:Physical Medicine & Rehabilitation Department, European Interbalkan Medical Center, Thessaloniki, Greece.
[Ti] Title:Sarcopenia: From definition to treatment.
[So] Source:Hormones (Athens);16(4):429-439, 2017 Oct.
[Is] ISSN:1109-3099
[Cp] Country of publication:Greece
[La] Language:eng
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1803
[Cu] Class update date: 180308
[Lr] Last revision date:180308
[St] Status:In-Data-Review
[do] DOI:10.14310/horm.2002.1764


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