Database : MEDLINE
Search on : Sepsis [Words]
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[PMID]: 25834342
[Au] Autor:Ahmed Z; Bansal SK; Dhillon S
[Ad] Address:Zohair Ahmed, Saurabh Bansal, Department of Internal Medicine, University of Illinois Peoria Campus, OSF Saint Francis Medical Center, Peoria, IL 61637, United States.
[Ti] Title:Pyogenic liver abscess caused by Fusobacterium in a 21-year-old immunocompetent male.
[So] Source:World J Gastroenterol;21(12):3731-5, 2015 Mar 28.
[Is] ISSN:2219-2840
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:A 21-year-old male with no significant past medical history, presented with right upper quadrant (RUQ) abdominal pain along with fevers and chills. Lab work revealed leukocytosis, anemia, and slightly elevated alkaline phosphatase. Viral serology for hepatitis B virus, hepatitis C virus, and human immunodeficiency virus were negative and he was immunocompetent. Computed tomography imaging revealed hepatic abscesses, the largest measuring 9.5 cm. Empiric antibiotics were started and percutaneous drains were placed in the abscesses. Anaerobic cultures from the abscesses grew Fusobacterium nucleatum. This is a gram negative anaerobic bacteria; a normal flora of the oral cavity. Fusobacterium is most commonly seen in Lemiere's disease, which is translocation of oral bacteria to the internal jugular vein causing a thrombophlebitis and subsequent spread of abscesses. Our patient did not have Lemiere's, and is the first case described of fusobacterium pyogenic liver abscess in a young immunocompetent male with good oral hygiene. This case was complicated by sepsis, empyema, and subsequent abscesses located outside the liver. These abscesses' have the propensity to flare abruptly and can be fatal. This case not only illustrates fusobacterium as a rare entity for pyogenic liver abscess, but also the need for urgent diagnosis and treatment. It is incumbent on physicians to diagnose and drain any suspicious hepatic lesions. While uncommon, such infections may develop without any overt source and can progress rapidly. Prompt drainage with antibiotic therapy remains the cornerstone of therapy.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1504
[Cu] Class update date: 150404
[Lr] Last revision date:150404
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[St] Status:In-Data-Review
[do] DOI:10.3748/wjg.v21.i12.3731

  2 / 90564 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 25834341
[Au] Autor:Wang ZQ; Chen LQ; Yuan Y; Wang WP; Niu ZX; Yang YS; Cai J
[Ad] Address:Zhi-Qiang Wang, Long-Qi Chen, Yong Yuan, Wen-Ping Wang, Zhong-Xi Niu, Yu-Shang Yang, Jie Cai, Department of Thoracic Surgery, West China Hospital, Sichuan University, Chengdu 610041, Sichuan Province, China....
[Ti] Title:Effects of neutrophil elastase inhibitor in patients undergoing esophagectomy: A systematic review and meta-analysis.
[So] Source:World J Gastroenterol;21(12):3720-30, 2015 Mar 28.
[Is] ISSN:2219-2840
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:AIM: To evaluate the benefit and safety of sivelestat (a neutrophil elastase inhibitor) administration in patients undergoing esophagectomy. METHODS: Online databases including PubMed, EMBASE, the Cochrane Library, Web of Knowledge, and Chinese databases (Wanfang database, VIP and CNKI) were searched systematically up to November 2013. Randomized controlled trials and high-quality comparative studies were considered eligible for inclusion. Three reviewers evaluated the methodological quality of the included studies, and Stata 12.0 software was used to analyze the extracted data. The risk ratio (RR) was used to express the effect size of dichotomous outcomes, and mean difference (MD) or standardized mean difference was used to express the effect size of continuous outcomes. RESULTS: Thirteen studies were included in this systematic review and nine studies were included in the meta-analysis. The duration of mechanical ventilation was significantly decreased in the sivelestat group on postoperative day 5 [I (2) = 76.3%, SMD = -1.41, 95%CI: -2.63-(-0.19)]. Sivelestat greatly lowered the incidence of acute lung injury in patients after surgery (I (2) = 0%, RR = 0.27, 95%CI: 0.08-0.93). However, it did not decrease the incidence of pneumonia, intensive care unit stay or postoperative hospital stay, and did not increase the incidence of complications such as anastomotic leakage, recurrent nerve palsy, wound infection, sepsis and catheter-related fever. CONCLUSION: A neutrophil elastase inhibitor is beneficial in patients undergoing esophagectomy. More high quality, large sample, multi-center and randomized controlled trials are needed to validate this effect.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1504
[Cu] Class update date: 150404
[Lr] Last revision date:150404
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[St] Status:In-Data-Review
[do] DOI:10.3748/wjg.v21.i12.3720

  3 / 90564 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 25834403
[Au] Autor:Zhao C; Zhang Y; Zou P; Wang J; He W; Shi D; Li H; Liang G; Yang S
[Ad] Address:School of Environmental and Biological Engineering, Nanjing University of Science and Technology, Nanjing, People's Republic of China ; Chemical Biology Research Center, School of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Wenzhou Medical University, Wenzhou, People's Republic of China....
[Ti] Title:Synthesis and biological evaluation of a novel class of curcumin analogs as anti-inflammatory agents for prevention and treatment of sepsis in mouse model.
[So] Source:Drug Des Devel Ther;9:1663-78, 2015.
[Is] ISSN:1177-8881
[Cp] Country of publication:New Zealand
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:A novel class of asymmetric mono-carbonyl analogs of curcumin (AMACs) were synthesized and screened for anti-inflammatory activity. These analogs are chemically stable as characterized by UV absorption spectra. In vitro, compounds 3f, 3m, 4b, and 4d markedly inhibited lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced expression of pro-inflammatory cytokines tumor necrosis factor-α and interleukin-6 in a dose-dependent manner, with IC50 values in low micromolar range. In vivo, compound 3f demonstrated potent preventive and therapeutic effects on LPS-induced sepsis in mouse model. Compound 3f downregulated the phosphorylation of extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK)1/2 MAPK and suppressed IκBα degradation, which suggests that the possible anti-inflammatory mechanism of compound 3f may be through downregulating nuclear factor kappa binding (NF-κB) and ERK pathways. Also, we solved the crystal structure of compound 3e to confirm the asymmetrical structure. The quantitative structure-activity relationship analysis reveals that the electron-withdrawing substituents on aromatic ring of lead structures could improve activity. These active AMACs represent a new class of anti-inflammatory agents with improved stability, bioavailability, and potency compared to curcumin. Our results suggest that 3f may be further developed as a potential agent for prevention and treatment of sepsis or other inflammation-related diseases.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1504
[Cu] Class update date: 150404
[Lr] Last revision date:150404
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[St] Status:In-Data-Review
[do] DOI:10.2147/DDDT.S75862

  4 / 90564 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 25834828
[Au] Autor:Cheng B; Hoeft AH; Book M; Shu Q; Pastores SM
[Ad] Address:Department of Anesthesiology, The First Affiliated Hospital, School of Medicine, Zhejiang University, Qingchun Road 79, Hangzhou 310003, China....
[Ti] Title:Sepsis: pathogenesis, biomarkers, and treatment.
[So] Source:Biomed Res Int;2015:846935, 2015.
[Is] ISSN:2314-6141
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1504
[Cu] Class update date: 150404
[Lr] Last revision date:150404
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[St] Status:In-Data-Review
[do] DOI:10.1155/2015/846935

  5 / 90564 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 25834731
[Au] Autor:McGarry JG; McEvoy SH; Brophy DP
[Ad] Address:Department of Surgery, St. Vincent's University Hospital, Elm Park, Dublin 4, Ireland.
[Ti] Title:Endovascular recanalisation of an acute superior mesenteric artery occlusion. A case report and review of the literature.
[So] Source:Ann Med Surg (Lond);4(1):76-9, 2015 Mar.
[Is] ISSN:2049-0801
[Cp] Country of publication:England
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:INTRODUCTION: Acute mesenteric ischaemia (AMI) continues to have a high mortality, ranging from 60 to 80%. PRESENTATION OF CASE: A 78-year-old male presented with a 20-hour history of abdominal pain, secondary to a superior mesenteric artery (SMA) thromboembolic occlusion diagnosed on computed tomography (CT) angiography. Following confirmation of bowel viability at laparotomy, endovascular intervention using combined thrombolysis, angioplasty and thromboaspiration was performed. Despite successful recanalisation of the occlusion, his condition continued to deteriorate fatally due to progressive sepsis. DISCUSSION: We discuss the role of biphasic CT in diagnosis of AMI, and review the evidence for endovascular interventions now increasingly used in the emergent management of thromboembolic AMI. CONCLUSION: Early diagnosis using CT angiography is essential, as it is highly sensitive in detecting a visceral arterial occlusion. However, laparotomy is often required to accurately determine bowel viability and the need for resection. Endovascular interventions appear to be effective alternatives to open surgery with appropriate patient selection.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1504
[Cu] Class update date: 150404
[Lr] Last revision date:150404
[Da] Date of entry for processing:150402
[St] Status:PubMed-not-MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.1016/j.amsu.2014.07.005

  6 / 90564 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 25834549
[Au] Autor:Abdallah Y; Kaddu-Mulindwa D; Nankunda J; Musoke PM
[Ad] Address:Department of Paediatrics and Child Health, Makerere University College of Health Sciences....
[Ti] Title:Prevalence and immediate outcome of candida colonized preterm neonates admitted to Special Care Unit of Mulago Hospital, Kampala Uganda.
[So] Source:Afr Health Sci;15(1):197-205, 2015 Mar.
[Is] ISSN:1729-0503
[Cp] Country of publication:Uganda
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:BACKGROUND: Candida species is the third commonest cause of sepsis among neonates. Colonization by Candida is a predictor for candidemia among preterm neonates. OBJECTIVES: To determine prevalence of early Candida colonization and early outcome among colonized preterm neonates admitted to Mulago hospital Special Care Unit. METHODS: A prospective observational cohort was conducted between December 2008 and April 2009. Preterm neonates aged >72 hours and less than one week were screened for Candida colonization of the groin, oral pharynx and rectum using CHROMagar. Colonized neonates were followed up for 14 days. Blood cultures were done for those with signs of septicaemia. The Fisher's exact tests and logistic regression were conducted for factors associated with colonization and mortality among colonized neonates. P values of < 0.05 were considered significant and confidence interval of 95% was used. RESULTS: Candida colonization occurred in 50/213 (23.5%) neonates. Gestational age ≤ 30 weeks was the only factor independently associated with colonization (p = 0.005). Of the colonized 14/46 (30.4%) died and 13/46 (28.3%) developed mucocutaneous candidiasis. No candidemia was identified. Multiple site colonization was independently associated with mortality (p=0.035). CONCLUSION: The consequence of high colonization observed in this study needs to be further elucidated in Uganda.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1504
[Cu] Class update date: 150404
[Lr] Last revision date:150404
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[St] Status:In-Data-Review
[do] DOI:10.4314/ahs.v15i1.26

  7 / 90564 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 25834520
[Au] Autor:Ajayi NA; Ukwaja KN; Ifebunandu NA; Nnabu R; Onwe FI; Asogun DA
[Ad] Address:Department of Internal Medicine, Federal Teaching Hospital Abakaliki, Ebonyi State, Nigeria....
[Ti] Title:Lassa fever - full recovery without ribavarin treatment: a case report.
[So] Source:Afr Health Sci;14(4):1074-7, 2014 Dec.
[Is] ISSN:1729-0503
[Cp] Country of publication:Uganda
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:BACKGROUND: Lassa fever is a rodent-borne zoonosis that clinically manifests as an acute hemorrhagic fever. It is treated using ribavarin. Surviving Lassa fever without receiving the antiviral drug ribavarin is rare. Only few cases have been documented to date. CASE PRESENTATION: We report a case of a 59-year old female with fever who was initially thought to have acute pyelonephritis and sepsis syndrome with background malaria. Further changes in her clinical state and laboratory tests led to a suspicion of Lassa fever. However at the time her laboratory confirmatory test for Lassa fever returned, her clinical state had improved and she made full recovery without receiving ribavarin. Her close contacts showed no evidence of Lassa virus infection. CONCLUSION: This report adds to the literature on the natural history of Lassa fever; and that individuals may survive Lassa fever with conservative management of symptoms of the disease and its complications.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1504
[Cu] Class update date: 150404
[Lr] Last revision date:150404
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[St] Status:In-Data-Review
[do] DOI:10.4314/ahs.v14i4.40

  8 / 90564 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 25834511
[Au] Autor:Mah-Mungyeh E; Chiabi A; Tchokoteu FL; Nguefack S; Bogne JB; Siyou H H; Fru FS; Enoh J; Mbonda E; Tchokoteu PF
[Ad] Address:Faculty of Medicine and Biomedical Sciences, University of Yaounde I/Yaounde Gynaeco-Obstetric and Pediatric Hospital, Cameroon....
[Ti] Title:Neonatal mortality in a referral hospital in Cameroon over a seven year period: trends, associated factors and causes.
[So] Source:Afr Health Sci;14(4):985-92, 2014 Dec.
[Is] ISSN:1729-0503
[Cp] Country of publication:Uganda
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:BACKGROUND: The fourth Millennium Development Goals targets reduction by 2/3 the mortality rate of under-fives by 2015. This reduction starts with that of neonatal mortality representing 40% of childhood mortality. In Cameroon neonatal mortality was 31 in 2011. OBJECTIVES: We assessed the trends, associated factors and causes of neonatal deaths at the Yaounde Gynaeco-Obstetric and Pediatric Hospital. METHODS: The study was a retrospective chart review. Data was collected from the hospital records, and included both maternal and neonatal variables from 1st January 2004 to 31st December 2010. RESULTS: The neonatal mortality was 10%. Out-borns represented 49.3% of the deceased neonates with 11.3% born at home. The neonatal mortality rate followed a downward trend dropping from 12.4% in 2004 to 7.2% in 2010. The major causes of deaths were: neonatal sepsis (37.85%), prematurity (31.26%), birth asphyxia (16%), and congenital malformations (10.54%). Most (74.2%) of the deaths occurred within the first week with 35% occurring within 24hours of life. Mortality was higher in neonates with birth weight less than 2500g and a gestational age of less than 37 weeks. In the mothers, it was high in single parenthood , primiparous and in housewives and students. CONCLUSION: There has been a steady decline of neonatal mortality since 2004. Neonatal sepsis, prematurity, birth asphyxia and congenital malformations were the major causes of neonatal deaths. Neonatal sepsis remained constant although at lower rates over the study period.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1504
[Cu] Class update date: 150404
[Lr] Last revision date:150404
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[St] Status:In-Data-Review
[do] DOI:10.4314/ahs.v14i4.30

  9 / 90564 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 25834506
[Au] Autor:Aliku TO; Lubega S; Lwabi P; Oketcho M; Omagino JO; Mwambu T
[Ad] Address:Department of Paediatrics, Gulu University ; Uganda Heart Institute, Mulago Hospital Complex....
[Ti] Title:Outcome of patients undergoing open heart surgery at the Uganda heart institute, Mulago hospital complex.
[So] Source:Afr Health Sci;14(4):946-52, 2014 Dec.
[Is] ISSN:1729-0503
[Cp] Country of publication:Uganda
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:BACKGROUND: Heart disease is a disabling condition and necessary surgical intervention is often lacking in many developing countries. Training of the superspecialties abroad is largely limited to observation with little or no opportunity for hands on experience. An approach in which open heart surgeries are conducted locally by visiting teams enabling skills transfer to the local team and helps build to build capacity has been adopted at the Uganda Heart Institute (UHI). OBJECTIVES: We reviewed the progress of open heart surgery at the UHI and evaluated the postoperative outcomes and challenges faced in conducting open heart surgery in a developing country. METHODS: Medical records of patients undergoing open heart surgery at the UHI from October 2007 to June 2012 were reviewed. RESULTS: A total of 124 patients underwent open heart surgery during the study period. The commonest conditions were: venticular septal defects (VSDs) 34.7% (43/124), Atrial septal defects (ASDs) 34.7% (43/124) and tetralogy of fallot (TOF) in 10.5% (13/124). Non governmental organizations (NGOs) funded 96.8% (120/124) of the operations, and in only 4 patients (3.2%) families paid for the surgeries. There was increasing complexity in cases operated upon from predominantly ASDs and VSDs at the beginning to more complex cases like TOFs and TAPVR. The local team independently operated 19 patients (15.3%). Postoperative morbidity was low with arrhythmias, left ventricular dysfunction and re-operations being the commonest seen. Post operative sepsis occurred in only 2 cases (1.6%). The overall mortality rate was 3.2. CONCLUSION: Open heart surgery though expensive is feasible in a developing country. With increased direct funding from governments and local charities to support open heart surgeries, more cardiac patients access surgical treatment locally.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1504
[Cu] Class update date: 150404
[Lr] Last revision date:150404
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[St] Status:In-Data-Review
[do] DOI:10.4314/ahs.v14i4.25

  10 / 90564 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 25829640
[Au] Autor:Dekmezian M; Beal SG; Damashek MJ; Benavides R; Dhiman N
[Ad] Address:med fusion Laboratory, Lewisville, TX (Dekmezian, Beal, Damashek, Benavides, Dhiman), and the Department of Pathology and Laboratory Medicine, Baylor University Medical Center at Dallas, Dallas, Texas (Dekmezian, Beal, Benavides)....
[Ti] Title:The SUCCESS model for laboratory performance and execution of rapid molecular diagnostics in patients with sepsis.
[So] Source:Proc (Bayl Univ Med Cent);28(2):144-50, 2015 Apr.
[Is] ISSN:0899-8280
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Successful performance and execution of rapid diagnostics in a clinical laboratory hinges heavily on careful validation, accurate and timely communication of results, and real-time quality monitoring. Laboratories must develop strategies to integrate diagnostics with stewardship and evidence-based clinical practice guidelines. We present a collaborative SUCCESS model for execution and monitoring of rapid sepsis diagnostics to facilitate timely treatment. Six months after execution of the Verigene Gram-Positive Blood Culture (BC-GP) and the AdvanDx PNA-FISH assays, data were collected on 579 and 28 episodes of bacteremia and fungemia, respectively. Clinical testing was executed using a SUCCESS model comprising the following components: stewardship, utilization of resources, core strategies, concierge services, education, support, and surveillance. Stewardship needs were identified by evaluating the specialty services benefiting from new testing. Utilization of resources was optimized by reviewing current treatment strategies and antibiogram and formulary options. Core strategies consisted of input from infectious disease leadership, pharmacy, and laboratory staff. Concierge services included automated Micro-eUpdate and physician-friendly actionable reports. Education modules were user-specific, and support was provided through a dedicated 24/7 microbiology hotline. Surveillance was performed by daily audit by the director. Using the SUCCESS model, the turnaround time for the detailed report with actionable guidelines to the physician was ∼3 hours from the time of culture positivity. The overall correlation between rapid methods and culture was 94% (546/579). Discrepant results were predominantly contaminants such as a coagulase-negative staphylococci or viridans streptococci in mixed cultures. SUCCESS is a cost-effective and easily adaptable model for clinical laboratories with limited stewardship resources.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1504
[Cu] Class update date: 150404
[Lr] Last revision date:150404
[Da] Date of entry for processing:150401
[St] Status:PubMed-not-MEDLINE


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