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[PMID]: 27153324
[Au] Autor:Zotova NV; Chereshnev VA; Gusev EY
[Ad] Address:Laboratory of immunology of inflammation, Institute of immunology and physiology of UB RAS, Yekaterinburg, Russian Federation....
[Ti] Title:Systemic Inflammation: Methodological Approaches to Identification of the Common Pathological Process.
[So] Source:PLoS One;11(5):e0155138, 2016.
[Is] ISSN:1932-6203
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:We defined Systemic inflammation (SI) as a "typical, multi-syndrome, phase-specific pathological process, developing from systemic damage and characterized by the total inflammatory reactivity of endotheliocytes, plasma and blood cell factors, connective tissue and, at the final stage, by microcirculatory disorders in vital organs and tissues." The goal of the work: to determine methodological approaches and particular methodical solutions for the problem of identification of SI as a common pathological process. SI can be defined by the presence in plasma of systemic proinflammatory cell stress products-cytokines and other inflammatory mediators, and also by the complexity of other processes signs. We have developed 2 scales: 1) The Reactivity Level scale (RL)-from 0 to 5 points: 0-normal level; RL-5 confirms systemic nature of inflammatory mediator release, and RL- 2-4 defines different degrees of event probability. 2) The SI scale, considering additional criteria along with RL, addresses more integral criteria of SI: the presence of ≥ 5 points according to the SI scale proves the high probability of SI developing. To calculate the RL scale, concentrations of 4 cytokines (IL-6, IL-8, IL-10, TNF-α) and C-reactive protein in plasma were examined. Additional criteria of the SI scale were the following: D-dimers>500ng/ml, cortisol>1380 or <100nmol/l, troponin I≥0.2ng/ml and/or myoglobin≥800ng/ml. 422 patients were included in the study with different septic (n-207) and aseptic (n-215) pathologies. In 190 cases (of 422) there were signs of SI (lethality 38.4%, n-73). In only 5 of 78 cases, lethality was not confirmed by the presence of SI. SI was registered in 100% of cases with septic shock (n-31). There were not significant differences between AU-ROC of CR, SI scale and SOFA to predict death in patients with sepsis and trauma.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1605
[Cu] Class update date: 160514
[Lr] Last revision date:160514
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[St] Status:In-Data-Review
[do] DOI:10.1371/journal.pone.0155138

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[PMID]: 27135829
[Au] Autor:Shahid AS; Ahmed T; Shahunja KM; Kabir S; Chowdhury F; Faruque AS; Das SK; Sarker MH; Bardhan PK; Chisti MJ
[Ad] Address:Infectious Diseases Division, International Centre for Diarrhoeal Disease Research, Bangladesh (icddr,b), Dhaka, Bangladesh....
[Ti] Title:Factors Associated with Streptococcal Bacteremia in Diarrheal Children under Five Years of Age and Their Outcome in an Urban Hospital in Bangladesh.
[So] Source:PLoS One;11(5):e0154777, 2016.
[Is] ISSN:1932-6203
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:BACKGROUND: Although Streptococcal bacteremia is common in diarrheal children with high morbidity and mortality, no systematic data are available on Streptococcal bacteremia in diarrheal children. We sought to evaluate the factors associated with Streptococcal bacteremia in diarrheal children under five years of age and their outcome. METHODS: We used an unmatched case-control design to investigate the associated factors with Streptococcal bacteremia in all the diarrheal children under five years of age through electronic medical record system of Dhaka hospital of International Centre for Diarrhoeal Disease Research, Bangladesh. We had simultaneously used a retrospective cohort design to further evaluate the outcome of our study children. All the enrolled children had their blood culture done between January 2010 and December 2012. Comparison was made among the children with (cases = 26) and without Streptococcal bacteremia (controls = 78). Controls were selected randomly from hospitalized diarrheal children under five years of age. RESULTS: Cases had proportionately higher deaths compared to controls, but it was statistically insignificant (15% vs. 10%, p = 0.49). The cases more often presented with severe dehydration, fever, respiratory distress, severe sepsis, and abnormal mental status compared to the controls (for all p<0.05). In the logistic regression analysis, after adjusting for potential confounders, it has been found that Streptococcal bacteremia in diarrheal children under five years of age was independently associated with nutritional edema (OR: 5.86, 95% CI = 1.28-26.80), hypoxemia (OR: 19.39, 95% CI = 2.14-175.91), fever (OR: 4.44, 95% CI = 1.13-17.42), delayed capillary refill time (OR: 7.00, 95% CI = 1.36-35.93), and respiratory distress (OR: 2.69, 95% CI = 1.02-7.12). CONCLUSIONS AND SIGNIFICANCE: The results of our analyses suggest that diarrheal children under five years of age presenting with nutritional edema, hypoxemia, fever, delayed capillary refill time, and respiratory distress may be at risk of Streptococcal bacteremia. It underscores the importance of identification of these simple clinical parameters for the prompt recognition and management in order to reduce the morbidity and death of such children especially in resource limited settings.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1605
[Cu] Class update date: 160514
[Lr] Last revision date:160514
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[St] Status:In-Data-Review
[do] DOI:10.1371/journal.pone.0154777

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[PMID]: 25257390
[Au] Autor:Guo Z; Zhao C; Wang Z
[Ad] Address:Department of Thoracic surgery, Putuo Hospital,Shanghai University of Traditional Chinese Medicine, No. 164 Lan Xi Road, Shanghai, 200062, China. 13321990498@189.cn.
[Ti] Title:Gene expression profiles analysis identifies key genes for acute lung injury in patients with sepsis.
[So] Source:Diagn Pathol;9:176, 2014.
[Is] ISSN:1746-1596
[Cp] Country of publication:England
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:BACKGROUND: To identify critical genes and biological pathways in acute lung injury (ALI), a comparative analysis of gene expression profiles of patients with ALI + sepsis compared with patients with sepsis alone were performed with bioinformatic tools. METHODS: GSE10474 was downloaded from Gene Expression Omnibus, including a collective of 13 whole blood samples with ALI + sepsis and 21 whole blood samples with sepsis alone. After pre-treatment with robust multichip averaging (RMA) method, differential analysis was conducted using simpleaffy package based upon t-test and fold change. Hierarchical clustering was also performed using function hclust from package stats. Beisides, functional enrichment analysis was conducted using iGepros. Moreover, the gene regulatory network was constructed with information from Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes (KEGG) and then visualized by Cytoscape. RESULTS: A total of 128 differentially expressed genes (DEGs) were identified, including 47 up- and 81 down-regulated genes. The significantly enriched functions included negative regulation of cell proliferation, regulation of response to stimulus and cellular component morphogenesis. A total of 27 DEGs were significantly enriched in 16 KEGG pathways, such as protein digestion and absorption, fatty acid metabolism, amoebiasis, etc. Furthermore, the regulatory network of these 27 DEGs was constructed, which involved several key genes, including protein tyrosine kinase 2 (PTK2), v-src avian sarcoma (SRC) and Caveolin 2 (CAV2). CONCLUSION: PTK2, SRC and CAV2 may be potential markers for diagnosis and treatment of ALI. VIRTUAL SLIDES: The virtual slide(s) for this article can be found here: http://www.diagnosticpathology.diagnomx.eu/vs/5865162912987143.
[Pt] Publication type:RETRACTED PUBLICATION; RETRACTION OF PUBLICATION
[Em] Entry month:1605
[Cu] Class update date: 150427
[Lr] Last revision date:150427
[Da] Date of entry for processing:150427
[St] Status:PubMed-not-MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.1186/s13000-014-0176-x

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[PMID]: 23969534
[Au] Autor:Jimbo K; Arai K; Kobayashi I; Matsuoka K; Shimizu H; Yanagi T; Kubota M; Ohtsuka Y; Shimizu T; Nakazawa A
[Ad] Address:*Department of Pediatrics and Adolescent Medicine, Juntendo University Graduate School of Medicine †Division of Gastroenterology, National Center for Child Health and Development, Tokyo ‡Department of Pediatrics, Hokkaido University Graduate School of Medicine, Sapporo §Department of Pathology, National Center for Child Health and Development, Tokyo ||Division of General Pediatrics, Saitama Children's Medical Center, Saitama, Japan.
[Ti] Title:Isolated autoimmune enteropathy associated with autoantibodies to a novel 28-kDa duodenal antigen.
[So] Source:J Pediatr Gastroenterol Nutr;60(3):e17-9, 2015 Mar.
[Is] ISSN:1536-4801
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Mh] MeSH terms primary: Autoantibodies/analysis
Duodenitis/etiology
Duodenum/immunology
Intestinal Mucosa/immunology
Polyendocrinopathies, Autoimmune/diagnosis
[Mh] MeSH terms secundary: Anti-Inflammatory Agents/therapeutic use
Antigens/chemistry
Antigens/metabolism
Colitis/etiology
Colon/immunology
Colon/metabolism
Colon/pathology
Diagnosis, Differential
Diarrhea, Infantile/etiology
Drug Therapy, Combination
Duodenum/metabolism
Duodenum/pathology
Humans
Immunosuppressive Agents/therapeutic use
Infant
Intestinal Mucosa/metabolism
Intestinal Mucosa/pathology
Male
Polyendocrinopathies, Autoimmune/drug therapy
Polyendocrinopathies, Autoimmune/immunology
Polyendocrinopathies, Autoimmune/physiopathology
Sepsis/etiology
Treatment Outcome
[Pt] Publication type:CASE REPORTS; JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Nm] Name of substance:0 (Anti-Inflammatory Agents); 0 (Antigens); 0 (Autoantibodies); 0 (Immunosuppressive Agents)
[Em] Entry month:1605
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[Da] Date of entry for processing:150225
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.1097/MPG.0b013e3182a936dc

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[PMID]: 25588650
[Au] Autor:Jorakate P; Higdon M; Kaewpan A; Makprasert S; Yuenprakhon S; Tawisaid K; Dejsirilert S; Whistler T; Baggett HC
[Ad] Address:Global Disease Detection, Thailand Ministry of Public Health-U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) Collaboration, Nonthaburi, Thailand hqg0@cdc.gov....
[Ti] Title:Contribution of the BacT/Alert MB Mycobacterium bottle to bloodstream infection surveillance in Thailand: added yield for Burkholderia pseudomallei.
[So] Source:J Clin Microbiol;53(3):910-4, 2015 Mar.
[Is] ISSN:1098-660X
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Community-acquired bloodstream infections cause substantial morbidity and mortality worldwide, but microbiology capacity and surveillance limitations have challenged good descriptions of pathogen distribution in many regions, including Southeast Asia. Active surveillance for bloodstream infections has been conducted in two rural Thailand provinces for >7 years. Blood specimens were divided into two culture bottles, one optimized for aerobic growth (F bottle) and a second for enhanced growth of mycobacteria (MB bottle), and processed with the BactT/Alert 3D system. Because the routine use of MB culture bottles is resource intensive (expensive and requires prolonged incubation), we assessed the added yield of MB bottles by comparing the proportion of pathogens detected by MB versus that by F bottles from 2005 to 2012. Of 63,066 blood cultures, 7,296 (12%) were positive for at least one pathogen; the most common pathogens were Escherichia coli (28%), Burkholderia pseudomallei (11%), Klebsiella pneumoniae (9%), and Staphylococcus aureus (6%). Two bottles improved the yield overall, but the added yield attributable to the MB bottles was limited to a few pathogens. In addition to the detection of mycobacteria and some fungi, MB bottles improved the detection of B. pseudomallei (27% [MB] versus 8% [F]; P < 0.0001), with added benefit if therapy was initiated prior to the blood culture. The targeted use of MB bottles is warranted for patients at risk for mycobacterial and fungal infections and for infection with B. pseudomallei, a common cause of septicemia in Thailand.
[Mh] MeSH terms primary: Bacteria/isolation & purification
Bacteriological Techniques/methods
Fungi/isolation & purification
Sepsis/diagnosis
[Mh] MeSH terms secundary: Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Child
Child, Preschool
Community-Acquired Infections/diagnosis
Epidemiological Monitoring
Female
Humans
Infant
Infant, Newborn
Male
Middle Aged
Rural Population
Sensitivity and Specificity
Thailand
Young Adult
[Pt] Publication type:EVALUATION STUDIES; JOURNAL ARTICLE; RESEARCH SUPPORT, NON-U.S. GOV'T; RESEARCH SUPPORT, U.S. GOV'T, P.H.S.
[Em] Entry month:1605
[Cu] Class update date: 150902
[Lr] Last revision date:150902
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[Da] Date of entry for processing:150221
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.1128/JCM.02008-14

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[PMID]: 25568436
[Au] Autor:Piau C; Kerjouan M; Le Mouel M; Patrat-Delon S; Henaux PL; Brun V; Morin MP; Gautier P; Rodriguez-Nava V; Kayal S
[Ad] Address:Medical School, University Rennes 1, Rennes, France IGDR-UMR 6290-CNRS, University Rennes 1, Rennes, France Department of Microbiology, CHU Rennes-Hôpital Pontchaillou, Rennes, France samer.kayal@chu-rennes.fr caroline.piau@chu-rennes.fr....
[Ti] Title:First case of disseminated infection with Nocardia cerradoensis in a human.
[So] Source:J Clin Microbiol;53(3):1034-7, 2015 Mar.
[Is] ISSN:1098-660X
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Here we report in a human, a renal transplant patient, the first disseminated infection with Nocardia cerradoensis, isolated after a brain biopsy. Species identification was based on 16S rRNA, gyrB, and hsp65 gene analyses. Antibiotic treatment was successful by combining carbapenems and aminoglycosides and then switching to oral trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole.
[Mh] MeSH terms primary: Nocardia Infections/diagnosis
Nocardia/classification
Nocardia/isolation & purification
Sepsis/diagnosis
[Mh] MeSH terms secundary: Aminoglycosides/therapeutic use
Anti-Bacterial Agents/therapeutic use
Brain/microbiology
Brain/pathology
Carbapenems/therapeutic use
Cluster Analysis
DNA Gyrase
DNA, Bacterial/chemistry
DNA, Bacterial/genetics
DNA, Ribosomal/chemistry
DNA, Ribosomal/genetics
Female
Heat-Shock Proteins
Humans
Kidney Transplantation
Microbial Sensitivity Tests
Microscopy
Middle Aged
Molecular Sequence Data
Nocardia/chemistry
Nocardia/genetics
Nocardia Infections/microbiology
Phylogeny
RNA, Ribosomal, 16S/genetics
Radiography, Abdominal
Radiography, Thoracic
Sepsis/microbiology
Sequence Analysis, DNA
Spectrometry, Mass, Matrix-Assisted Laser Desorption-Ionization
Transplant Recipients
Treatment Outcome
Trimethoprim, Sulfamethoxazole Drug Combination/therapeutic use
[Pt] Publication type:CASE REPORTS; JOURNAL ARTICLE; RESEARCH SUPPORT, NON-U.S. GOV'T
[Nm] Name of substance:0 (Aminoglycosides); 0 (Anti-Bacterial Agents); 0 (Carbapenems); 0 (DNA, Bacterial); 0 (DNA, Ribosomal); 0 (Heat-Shock Proteins); 0 (RNA, Ribosomal, 16S); 8064-90-2 (Trimethoprim, Sulfamethoxazole Drug Combination); EC 5.99.1.3 (DNA Gyrase)
[Em] Entry month:1605
[Cu] Class update date: 150902
[Lr] Last revision date:150902
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[Da] Date of entry for processing:150221
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.1128/JCM.02979-14

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[PMID]: 25673909
[Au] Autor:Yu D; Noh D; Park J
[Ad] Address:College of Veterinary Medicine, Chonnam National University, Gwangju, 500-757 (Yu), and Chonbuk National University, Jeonju, 561-756 (Noh, Park), Korea.
[Ti] Title:Flow cytometric evaluation of disseminated intravascular coagulation in a canine endotoxemia model.
[So] Source:Can J Vet Res;79(1):52-7, 2015 Jan.
[Is] ISSN:1928-9022
[Cp] Country of publication:Canada
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Sepsis is associated with substantial morbidity and mortality in dogs. Alterations in hemostasis by systemic inflammation play an important role in the pathophysiology of sepsis. To evaluate the functional hemostatic changes in sepsis, we evaluated coagulation profiles and flow cytometric measurement of P-selectin (CD62P) expression on platelets, as well as platelet-leukocyte aggregation from a lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced endotoxemia model in dogs (n = 7). A sublethal dose of LPS [1 mg/kg body weight (BW)] induced thrombocytopenia and increased activated partial thromboplastin time (aPTT), prothrombin time (PT), and D-dimer concentrations. Flow cytometry analysis showed a significant increase in P-selectin expression on platelets between 1 and 24 h of a total 48 h of the experiment. In addition, platelet-leukocyte aggregation was significantly increased in the early stage of endotoxemia (at 1 and < 6 h for platelet-monocyte aggregation and at 3 h for platelet-neutrophil aggregation). Our results suggest that CD62P expression on platelets and platelet-leukocyte aggregation, as measured by flow cytometry, can be useful biomarkers of disseminated intravascular coagulation (DIC) in canine sepsis. These functional changes contribute to our understanding of the pathophysiology of hemostasis in endotoxemia.
[Mh] MeSH terms primary: Blood Platelets/metabolism
Disseminated Intravascular Coagulation/veterinary
Dog Diseases/diagnosis
Endotoxemia/veterinary
P-Selectin/blood
Platelet Aggregation
[Mh] MeSH terms secundary: Animals
Biomarkers/blood
Disseminated Intravascular Coagulation/blood
Disseminated Intravascular Coagulation/diagnosis
Disseminated Intravascular Coagulation/etiology
Dog Diseases/blood
Dog Diseases/etiology
Dogs
Endotoxemia/complications
Female
Fibrin Fibrinogen Degradation Products/metabolism
Flow Cytometry
Lipopolysaccharides
Male
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE; RESEARCH SUPPORT, NON-U.S. GOV'T
[Nm] Name of substance:0 (Biomarkers); 0 (Fibrin Fibrinogen Degradation Products); 0 (Lipopolysaccharides); 0 (P-Selectin); 0 (fibrin fragment D); 0 (lipopolysaccharide, Escherichia coli 0111 B4)
[Em] Entry month:1605
[Cu] Class update date: 150701
[Lr] Last revision date:150701
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[Da] Date of entry for processing:150212
[St] Status:MEDLINE

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[PMID]: 25510385
[Au] Autor:Vazquez FJ; Posadas-Martínez ML; de Quirós FG; Giunta DH
[Ad] Address:Department of Internal Medicine, Hospital Italiano de Buenos Aires, Buenos Aires, Argentina. fernando.vazquez@hospitalitaliano.org.ar.
[Ti] Title:Prognosis of patients with suspected pulmonary embolism in Buenos Aires: a prospective cohort study.
[So] Source:BMC Pulm Med;14:200, 2014.
[Is] ISSN:1471-2466
[Cp] Country of publication:England
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:BACKGROUND: The prognosis of patients with suspected pulmonary embolism (PE) in whom PE has been ruled out (RPE) is unclear. We aimed to evaluate survival and diagnosis of new cancer in suspected PE patients at follow up. METHODS: A prospective cohort study nested in a prospective Institutional Registry of Venous Thromboembolic Disease was performed between 2006 and 2011. This study was designed to evaluate all consecutive, incident cases of suspected PE in adults. The study was performed at the Hospital Italiano de Buenos Aires, a tertiary level hospital, in hospitalized patients and outpatients. Suspected PE cases were collected using a computerized system that alerts whenever a physician requests pulmonary angiography, angiotomography, or ventilation-perfusion scintigraphy. PE was defined by pre-specified criteria and RPE was defined when diagnostic tests were negative for PE. RESULTS: We included 1736 cases of suspected PE. The prevalence of PE was 29% (n = 504). There was no difference in the overall survival at 30 days and follow-up between PE and RPE patients. The presence of provoked or unprovoked venous thromboembolic disease in these patients did not affect survival. The main causes of death were PE in the confirmed PE group (60%), and neoplasm (42%) and sepsis (37%) in the RPE group. Survival at 90 days was 63% for PE (95% CI 58-67%) and 67% for RPE patients (95% CT 64-69%). At follow-up, there was no difference in diagnosis of new cancer between PE and RPE patients (2% vs 2%, p = 0.82), even when taking into account the unprovoked group. CONCLUSIONS: Even when the main cause of death in PE patients is PE itself, the overall mortality is similar between PE and RPE patients. The reason for this finding could be because of the more frequent and severe comorbidities in RPE than in PE patients. TRIAL REGISTRATION: HomeClinicalTrial.gov: NCT01372514.
[Mh] MeSH terms primary: Neoplasms/mortality
Pulmonary Embolism/epidemiology
Sepsis/mortality
Venous Thromboembolism/epidemiology
[Mh] MeSH terms secundary: Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Argentina/epidemiology
Cause of Death
Comorbidity
Female
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Neoplasms/epidemiology
Prevalence
Prognosis
Prospective Studies
Pulmonary Embolism/diagnosis
Pulmonary Embolism/mortality
Survival Rate
[Pt] Publication type:CLINICAL TRIAL; JOURNAL ARTICLE; RESEARCH SUPPORT, NON-U.S. GOV'T
[Em] Entry month:1605
[Cu] Class update date: 141224
[Lr] Last revision date:141224
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[Da] Date of entry for processing:141222
[Cl] Clinical Trial:ClinicalTrial
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.1186/1471-2466-14-200

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[PMID]: 25398720
[Au] Autor:Filgueiras LR; Capelozzi VL; Martins JO; Jancar S
[Ti] Title:Sepsis-induced lung inflammation is modulated by insulin.
[So] Source:BMC Pulm Med;14:177, 2014.
[Is] ISSN:1471-2466
[Cp] Country of publication:England
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:BACKGROUND: We have previously shown that diabetic rats are more susceptible to sepsis, but that the Acute lung injury (ALI) secondary to sepsis is less intense than in non-diabetics. In the present study, we further investigated the ALI-secondary to sepsis in diabetic rats and the effect of insulin treatment. METHODS: Diabetes was induced in male Wistar rats by alloxan and sepsis by cecal ligation and puncture surgery (CLP). Some diabetic rats were given neutral protamine Hagedorn (NPH) insulin (4 IU, s.c.) 2 h before CLP. Six h later, the lungs were examined for edema, cell infiltration and prostaglandin-E2 (PGE2) levels in the bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL). RESULTS: The results confirmed that leukocyte infiltration and edema were milder in diabetic rats with sepsis. After insulin treatment, the lung inflammation in diabetics increased to levels comparable to the non-diabetics. The BAL concentration of PGE2 was also lower in diabetics with sepsis, and increased after insulin treatment. Sepsis was followed by early fibroblast activation in the lung parenchyma, evaluated by increased transforming growth factor (TGF)-ß and smooth muscle actin (α-SMA) expression, as well as an elevated number of cells with myofibroblasts morphology. These events were significantly lower in diabetic rats and increased after insulin treatment. CONCLUSION: The results show that insulin modulates the early phase of inflammation and myofibroblast differentiation in diabetic rats.
[Mh] MeSH terms primary: Acute Lung Injury/pathology
Diabetes Mellitus, Experimental/drug therapy
Edema/microbiology
Insulin/therapeutic use
Pneumonia/pathology
Sepsis/complications
[Mh] MeSH terms secundary: Actins/metabolism
Acute Lung Injury/microbiology
Alloxan
Animals
Bronchoalveolar Lavage Fluid/chemistry
Bronchoalveolar Lavage Fluid/cytology
Cell Count
Diabetes Mellitus, Experimental/chemically induced
Diabetes Mellitus, Experimental/complications
Dinoprostone/analysis
Leukocytes/drug effects
Male
Myofibroblasts/drug effects
Pneumonia/microbiology
Rats
Rats, Wistar
Specific Pathogen-Free Organisms
Transforming Growth Factor beta/metabolism
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE; RESEARCH SUPPORT, NON-U.S. GOV'T
[Nm] Name of substance:0 (Actins); 0 (Insulin); 0 (Transforming Growth Factor beta); 0 (smooth muscle actin, rat); 6SW5YHA5NG (Alloxan); K7Q1JQR04M (Dinoprostone)
[Em] Entry month:1605
[Cu] Class update date: 141203
[Lr] Last revision date:141203
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[Da] Date of entry for processing:141129
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.1186/1471-2466-14-177

  10 / 97109 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 27175654
[Au] Autor:Audemard-Verger A; Descloux E; Ponard D; Deroux A; Fantin B; Fieschi C; John M; Bouldouyre A; Karkowsi L; Moulis G; Auvinet H; Valla F; Lechiche C; Davido B; Martinot M; Biron C; Lucht F; Asseray N; Froissart A; Buzelé R; Perlat A; Boutboul D; Fremeaux-Bacchi V; Isnard S; Bienvenu B
[Ad] Address:From the CHU de Caen, Department of Internal Medicine, Caen (AA-V, BB), Department of Infectious Diseases, Nouvelle Calédonie University Hospital, Nouvelle Calédonie (ED, MJ), Laboratory of Immunology, Grenoble University Hospital, Grenoble (DP, AD), Department of Internal Medicine, Grenoble University Hospital, Grenoble, Department of Internal Medicine, Beaujon Hospital, Assistance Publique-Hôpitaux de Paris (AP-HP), Paris (BF), Department of Clinical Immunology, Saint-Louis University Hospital, Assistance Publique-Hôpitaux de Paris (AP-HP), Paris (CF, DB), Department of Internal Medicine, Robert Ballanger General Hospital, Aulnay sous Bois (MAB), Department of Internal Medicine, Hôpital d'Instruction des Armées, Metz (LK), Department of Internal Medicine, Toulouse University Hospital, UMR 1027 INSERM University of Toulouse; CIC 1436, Toulouse (GM), Department of Internal Medicine, Brest University Hospital, Brest (HA), Department of Paediatric Intensive Care Unit, Lyon University Hospital, Lyon (FV), Department of Infectious Diseases, Nîmes University Hospital, Nîmes (CL), Department of Infectious Diseases, Raymond Poincaré University Hospital, Garches (BD), Department of Medicine, Colmar General Hospital, Colmar (MM), Department of Infectious Diseases, Nantes University Hospital, Nantes (CB, NA), Department of Infectious Diseases, Saint Etienne University Hospital, Saint Etienne (FL), Department of Internal Medicine, Créteil Hospital, Créteil (AF), Department of Infectious Diseases, Tours University Hospital, Tour (RB), Department of Internal Medicine, Rennes University Hospital, Rennes (AP), Laboratory of Immunology, Team Dentritic Cells Physiology, Cochin Institute (SI); and Laboratory of Immunology, Européen Georges Pompidou University Hospital, Assistance Publique-Hôpitaux de Paris (AP-HP), Paris (VF-B), France.
[Ti] Title:Infections Revealing Complement Deficiency in Adults: A French Nationwide Study Enrolling 41 Patients.
[So] Source:Medicine (Baltimore);95(19):e3548, 2016 May.
[Is] ISSN:1536-5964
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Complement system is a part of innate immunity, its main function is to protect human from bacterial infection. As genetic disorders, complement deficiencies are often diagnosed in pediatric population. However, complement deficiencies can also be revealed in adults but have been poorly investigated. Herein, we describe a case series of infections revealing complement deficiency in adults to study clinical spectrum and management of complement deficiencies.A nationwide retrospective study was conducted in French university and general hospitals in departments of internal medicine, infectious diseases enrolling patients older than 15 years old who had presented at least one infection leading to a complement deficiency diagnosis.Forty-one patients included between 2002 and 2015 in 19 different departments were enrolled in this study. The male-to-female ratio was 1.3 and the mean age at diagnosis was 28 ±â€Š14 (15-67) years. The main clinical feature was Neisseria meningitidis meningitis 75% (n = 31/41) often involving rare serotype: Y (n = 9) and W 135 (n = 7). The main complement deficiency observed was the common final pathway deficiency 83% (n = 34/41). Half of the cohort displayed severe sepsis or septic shock at diagnosis (n = 22/41) but no patient died. No patient had family history of complement deficiency. The mean follow-up was 1.15 ±â€Š1.95 (0.1-10) years. Half of the patients had already suffered from at least one infection before diagnosis of complement deficiency: meningitis (n = 13), pneumonia (n = 4), fulminans purpura (n = 1), or recurrent otitis (n = 1). Near one-third (n = 10/39) had received prophylactic antibiotics (cotrimoxazole or penicillin) after diagnosis of complement deficiency. The vaccination coverage rate, at the end of the follow-up, for N meningitidis, Streptococcus pneumonia, and Haemophilius influenzae were, respectively, 90% (n = 33/37), 47% (n = 17/36), and 35% (n = 14/34).This large study emphasizes that complement deficiencies can be revealed in adults by infectious episodes. Most of them were meningococcal infections revealing common final pathway deficiency. To avoid undiagnosis or late diagnosis, adult displaying first episode of N meningitidis infection should be tested for complement deficiency.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1605
[Js] Journal subset:AIM; IM
[St] Status:In-Data-Review
[do] DOI:10.1097/MD.0000000000003548


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