Database : MEDLINE
Search on : Sepsis [Words]
References found : 87542 [refine]
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[PMID]: 25043691
[Au] Autor:Matson BC; Corty RW; Karpinich NO; Murtha AP; Valdar W; Grotegut CA; Caron KM
[Ad] Address:Departments of Cell Biology & Physiology, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, NC 27599, USA. Electronic address: brooke_matson@med.unc.edu....
[Ti] Title:Midregional pro-adrenomedullin plasma concentrations are blunted in severe preeclampsia.
[So] Source:Placenta;35(9):780-3, 2014 Sep.
[Is] ISSN:1532-3102
[Cp] Country of publication:England
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Levels of the peptide hormone adrenomedullin (AM) are elevated during normal pregnancy, but whether this differs during complications of pregnancy remains unresolved. AM can be quantified by measuring its pre-prohormone byproduct, midregional pro-adrenomedullin (MR-proADM). MR-proADM has shown prognostic value as a biomarker of heart failure, sepsis, and community-acquired pneumonia. Given the relevance of AM to pregnancy, we tested the hypothesis that MR-proADM provides a biomarker for preeclampsia. We find that MR-proADM plasma concentrations are blunted in severe preeclampsia and that MR-proADM is similarly effective as established biomarkers endoglin and placental growth factor at discriminating patients with severe preeclampsia from controls.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1408
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[St] Status:In-Data-Review

  2 / 87542 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 25152754
[Au] Autor:Ma G; Wang H; Mo G; Cui L; Li Y; Shao Y; Liu X; Xie Y; Li J; Fu J; Tao H; Zhao B; Zhang L; Li K
[Ad] Address:Guangdong Key Laboratory of Age-Related Cardiac and Cerebral Diseases, Affiliated Hospital of Guangdong Medical College, Zhanjiang 524001, China....
[Ti] Title:The Pro12Ala Polymorphism of PPAR-γ Gene Is Associated with Sepsis Disease Severity and Outcome in Chinese Han Population.
[So] Source:PPAR Res;2014:701971, 2014.
[Is] ISSN:1687-4757
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-γ (PPAR-γ) is a ligand-binding nuclear receptor, and its activation plays a prominent role in regulating the inflammatory response. Therefore, PPAR-γ has been suggested as a candidate gene for sepsis. In the present study, we investigated the association between the Pro12Ala polymorphism of PPAR-γ and sepsis in a Han Chinese population. A total of 308 patients with sepsis and 345 healthy controls were enrolled in this study. Genotyping was performed using the polymerase chain reaction-ligation detection reaction (PCR-LDR) method. No significant differences were detected in the allele and genotype distributions of the PPAR-γ Pro12Ala SNP between septic patients and controls (P = 0.622 for genotype; P = 0.629 for allele). However, stratification by subtypes (sepsis, septic shock, and severe sepsis) revealed a statistically significant difference in the frequency of the Ala allele and Ala-carrier genotype between the patients with the sepsis subtype and the healthy controls (P = 0.014 for allele and P = 0.012, for genotype). Moreover, significant differences were found in the frequency of the Ala allele and genotype between the sepsis survivors and nonsurvivors (all P = 0.002). In the survivors, the PPAR-γ Pro12Ala genotype was significantly associated with decreased disease severity and recovery time (all P < 0.001). Thus, genetic polymorphism is thought to play a role in the development and outcome of sepsis.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1408
[Da] Date of entry for processing:140825
[St] Status:PubMed-not-MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.1155/2014/701971

  3 / 87542 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 24986645
[Au] Autor:Mlynarczyk GS; Berg CA; Withrock IC; Fick ME; Anderson SJ; Laboissonniere LA; Jefferson MA; Brewer MT; Stock ML; Lange JK; Luna KC; Acharya S; Kanuri S; Sharma S; Kondru NC; McCormack GR; Carlson SA
[Ad] Address:Department of Biomedical Sciences, Iowa State University College of Veterinary Medicine, Ames, IA 50011, United States....
[Ti] Title:Salmonella as a biological "Trojan horse" for neoplasia: Future possibilities including brain cancer.
[So] Source:Med Hypotheses;83(3):343-5, 2014 Sep.
[Is] ISSN:1532-2777
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:This manuscript considers available evidence that a specific Salmonella strain could be used as an effective orally-administered option for cancer therapy involving the brain. It has been established that Salmonella preferentially colonizes neoplastic tissue and thrives as a facultative anaerobe in the intra-tumor environment. Although Salmonella accumulates in tumors by passive processes, it is still possible for lipopolysaccharide to cause sepsis and endotoxic shock during the migration of bacteria to the tumor site. An LPS-free version of a recently identified Salmonella isolate may have the capability to circumvent the blood brain barrier and provide a safer method of reaching brain tumors. This isolate merits further research as a "Trojan horse" for future oral biotherapy of brain cancer.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1408
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[St] Status:In-Data-Review

  4 / 87542 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 24957506
[Au] Autor:Tauil KM; Gaio E; Melo-Silva CA; Carvalho RS; Amado VM
[Ad] Address:Laboratory of Respiratory Physiology, Universidade de Braslia, Braslia - DF, Brazil. Electronic address: ktauil@gmail.com....
[Ti] Title:Pulmonary arterial hypertension and sepsis: Prothrombotic profile and inflammation can changes pulmonary mechanics?
[So] Source:Med Hypotheses;83(3):290-1, 2014 Sep.
[Is] ISSN:1532-2777
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) is associated to cellular and structural alterations of lung vasculature. Endothelial dysfunction promotes vasoconstriction, smooth muscle hypertrophy, intimal proliferation, angioproliferative plexiform lesions, and in situ thrombosis increasing pulmonary vascular resistance and arterial stiffness. Indeed, an inflammatory component has been defined in PAH on the last years. Sepsis is a systemic complex syndrome, of infectious origin. The presence of inflammation is well established in this condition and it is also considered a risk factor for acute lung injury. Thrombotic events play important role in sepsis pathophysiology. The association between PAH and sepsis potentiate the metabolic oxygen consumption/offer imbalance, with very high mortality risk. Furthermore, it is possible that the association of these two conditions should intensify thrombotic events on pulmonary microcirculation, reducing area of pulmonary vascular bed available for blood flow. For the other side, an inflammation synergism observed on these two conditions should increase the respiratory system impedance.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1408
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[St] Status:In-Data-Review

  5 / 87542 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 25152158
[Au] Autor:Young PC
[Ad] Address:University of Utah, Salt Lake City, Utah.
[Ti] Title:A data-based approach to evaluation and empiric treatment of newborn sepsis.
[So] Source:J Pediatr;165(3):640-3, 2014 Sep.
[Is] ISSN:1097-6833
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1408
[Js] Journal subset:AIM; IM
[St] Status:In-Data-Review

  6 / 87542 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 24948344
[Au] Autor:Lhost JJ; Goetz EM; Belling JD; van Roojen WM; Spicer G; Hokanson JS
[Ad] Address:School of Medicine and Public Health, University of Wisconsin, Madison, WI....
[Ti] Title:Pulse Oximetry Screening for Critical Congenital Heart Disease in Planned Out-of-Hospital Births.
[So] Source:J Pediatr;165(3):485-9, 2014 Sep.
[Is] ISSN:1097-6833
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:OBJECTIVES: To describe the use of pulse oximetry screening (POS) for critical congenital heart disease (CCHD). STUDY DESIGN: This observational study of Wisconsin out-of-hospital births was performed from January to November, 2013. Licensed midwives, Amish birth attendants, and public health nurses were trained in the use of pulse oximetry to detect CCHD, supplied with pulse oximeters, and reported screening results and clinical outcomes. RESULTS: Results of POS in 440 newborns were reviewed; 173/440 births were from Amish or Mennonite communities. Prenatal ultrasonography was performed in less than one-half of the pregnancies and in only 13% of Amish and Mennonite women. A total of 432 babies passed the screening, 5 babies were incorrectly assigned to have passed or failed, and 3 babies failed the screening. Two of the babies who failed the screening were treated for sepsis and the third had congenital heart disease. There was 1 false negative result (coarctation of the aorta and ventricular septal defect). CONCLUSIONS: This study provides information on the use of POS for CCHD in out-of-hospital births and shows that POS can be successfully implemented outside the hospital setting. Although the failure rate in this small sample was higher than reported in studies of hospital births, those babies failing the screening had significant disease processes that were identified more rapidly because of the screening.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1408
[Js] Journal subset:AIM; IM
[St] Status:In-Data-Review

  7 / 87542 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 25152627
[Au] Autor:Chittawatanarat K; Jaipakdee W; Chotirosniramit N; Chandacham K; Jirapongcharoenlap T
[Ad] Address:Division of Surgical Critical Care and Trauma, Department of Surgery, Faculty of Medicine, Chiang Mai University, Chiang Mai, Thailand....
[Ti] Title:Microbiology, resistance patterns, and risk factors of mortality in ventilator-associated bacterial pneumonia in a Northern Thai tertiary-care university based general surgical intensive care unit.
[So] Source:Infect Drug Resist;7:203-10, 2014.
[Is] ISSN:1178-6973
[Cp] Country of publication:New Zealand
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:BACKGROUND: Ventilator-associated pneumonia (VAP) occurrence, causative pathogens, and resistance patterns in surgical intensive care units (SICU) are different between Western and developing Asian countries. In Thailand, resistant organisms have progressively increased in the last decade. However, the evidence describing causes of VAP and its outcomes, especially secondary to resistant pathogens, in Asian developing countries' SICUs is very limited. Therefore, the objective of this study was to describe the incidence, pathogen characteristics, and risk factors that impact mortality and patient survival following VAP in a tertiary Northern Thai SICU. METHODS: Between 2008 and 2012, VAP occurred in a total of 150 patients in Chiang Mai University's general SICUs (6.32.8 cases per 1,000 mechanical ventilator days). The following clinical data were collected from 46 patients who died and 104 patients who survived: microbiologic results, susceptible patterns, and survival status at hospital discharge. Antimicrobial susceptibility patterns were classified as susceptible, multidrug resistant (MDR), extensively drug resistant (XDR), and pan-drug resistant (PDR). The hazard ratio (HR) was calculated for risk factor analysis. RESULTS: Regarding the microbiology, gram negative organisms were the major pathogens (n=142, 94.7%). The first three most common organisms were Acinetobacter baumannii (38.7% of all organisms, mortality 41.4%), Klebsiella pneumoniae (17.3%, mortality 30.8%), and Pseudomonas aeruginosa (16.7%, mortality 16%) respectively. The most common gram positive organism was Staphylococcus aureus (4.0%, mortality 50%). The median day of VAP occurrence were significantly different between the three groups (P<0.01): susceptible (day 4), MDR (day 5), and XDR (day 6.5). Only half of all VAP cases were caused by susceptible organisms. Antibiotic resistance was demonstrated by 49.3% of the gram negative organisms and 62.5% of the gram positive organisms. Extensive drug resistance was evident only in Acinetobacter baumannii (30.6%) and Pseudomonas aeruginosa (1.3%). No pan-drug resistance was found during surveillance. The significant HR risk factors were age (P=0.03), resistant organisms (P=0.04), XDR (P=0.02), and acute physiology and chronic health evaluation II score (<0.01). Acinetobacter baumannii (P=0.06) and intubation due to severe sepsis (P=0.08) demonstrated a trend toward a significant increase in the HR. On the other hand, there were significantly decreased HRs in trauma patients (P=0.01). Initial administration of appropriate antibiotic therapy had a tendency toward a significant decrease in the HR (P=0.08). CONCLUSION: Gram negative organisms were the primary cause of bacterial VAP in Chiang Mai University's general SICU. Resistant strains were present in half of all VAP cases and were associated with the day of VAP onset. Regarding risk factors, age, acute physiology, chronic health evaluation II score, resistant organisms (especially XDR), and being a non-trauma patient increased the risk of mortality.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1408
[Da] Date of entry for processing:140825
[St] Status:PubMed-not-MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.2147/IDR.S67267

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[PMID]: 24970052
[Au] Autor:Lahiff C; Cournane S; Creagh D; Fitzgerald B; Conway R; Byrne D; Silke B
[Ad] Address:Division of Internal Medicine, St. James's Hospital, Dublin 8, Ireland....
[Ti] Title:Factors predicting the hospital episode costs of emergency medical admissions.
[So] Source:Eur J Intern Med;25(7):633-8, 2014 Sep.
[Is] ISSN:1879-0828
[Cp] Country of publication:Netherlands
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:BACKGROUND: Important outcome predictor variables for emergency medical admissions are the Manchester Triage Category, Acute Illness Severity, Chronic Disabling Disease and Sepsis Status. We have examined whether these are also predictors of hospital episode costs. METHODS: All patients admitted as medical emergencies between January 2008 and December 2012 were studied. Costs per case were adjusted by reference to the relative cost weight of each diagnosis related group (DRG) but included all pay costs, non-pay costs and infra-structural costs. We used a multi-variate logistic regression with generalized estimating equations (GEE), adjusted for correlated observations, to model the prediction of outcome (30-day in-hospital mortality) and hospital costs above or below the median. We used quantile regression to model total episode cost prediction over the predictor distribution (quantiles 0.25, 0.5 and 0.75). RESULTS: The multivariate model, using the above predictor variables, was highly predictive of an in-hospital death-AUROC of 0.91 (95% CI: 0.90, 0.92). Variables predicting outcome similarly predicted hospital episode cost; however predicting costs above or below the median yielded a lower AUROC of 0.73 (95% CI: 0.73, 0.74). Quantile regression analysis showed that hospital episode costs increased disproportionately over the predictor distribution; ordinary regression estimates of hospital episode costs over estimated the costs for low risk and under estimated those for high-risk patients. CONCLUSION: Predictors of outcome also predict costs for emergency medical admissions; however, due to costing data heteroskedasticity and the non-linear relationship between dependant and predictor variables, the hospital episode costs are not as easy to predict based on presentation status.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1408
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[St] Status:In-Data-Review

  9 / 87542 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 24928110
[Au] Autor:Quintero-Villegas MI; Wittke A; Hutkins R
[Ad] Address:University of Nebraska Lincoln, Food Science and Technology, Lincoln, NE, USA.
[Ti] Title:Adherence Inhibition of Cronobacter sakazakii to Intestinal Epithelial Cells by Lactoferrin.
[So] Source:Curr Microbiol;69(4):574-9, 2014 Oct.
[Is] ISSN:1432-0991
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Cronobacter sakazakii is now recognized as an opportunistic pathogen and has been implicated in rare but severe cases of necrotizing enterocolitis, meningitis, and sepsis in neonates. The first step in bacterial pathogenesis requires that the organism adheres to host cells surfaces; therefore, agents that inhibit adherence might be useful for preventing infections. Lactoferrin, an iron binding protein found in milk, has been shown to inhibit bacterial adherence by direct interaction and disruption of bacterial surfaces. Therefore, the goal of this research was to assess the ability of two different types of bovine lactoferrin, alone and in combination with a 1:1 blend of galactooligosaccharides and polydextrose, to inhibit adherence of C. sakazakii to a HEp-2 human cell line. Results showed that the adherence of C. sakazakii was significantly reduced at a minimum lactoferrin concentration of 10mg/ml. However, in combination with the oligosaccharide blend, no synergistic effect was observed in adherence inhibition. These results suggest that lactoferrin might interact with C. sakazakii and directly inhibit adhesion to tissue culture cells.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1408
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[St] Status:In-Data-Review
[do] DOI:10.1007/s00284-014-0623-7

  10 / 87542 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 25149614
[Au] Autor:Tarca E; Aprodu S; -
[Ti] Title:Past and present in omphalocele treatment in romania.
[So] Source:Chirurgia (Bucur);109(4):507-13, 2014 Jul-Aug.
[Is] ISSN:1221-9118
[Cp] Country of publication:Romania
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:BACKGROUND: Omphalocele is a congenital abnormalitywhose prognosis has improved significantly over the last fewdecades, reaching a survival rate of 80-90% in developedcountries. Currently, in Romania no comprehensive studyon the incidence, treatment, and survival of patients withthis defect of the anterior abdominal wall has been carriedout. METHODS: This retrospective analytical study was conductedover a period of 23 years and included 105 children withomphalocele. Prenatal diagnosis, referral to our hospital,children age upon admission, associated diseases, medicaland surgical management, early and late postoperativecomplications, and the length of hospital stay were analysed. RESULTS: The low rate of antenatal diagnosis (13.3%), thehigh frequency of associated congenital malformations (71.4%) and chromosomal abnormalities (27.6%), inadequateand delayed transport to a specialized pediatric surgerycenter together with an increased rate of sepsis (37.1%)resulted in a high mortality rate (54.3%). CONCLUSIONS: The significantly reduced length of hospital stayand higher survival rate despite the apparently morefrequent medical complications plead for the surgical treatment of omphalocele whenever not contraindicated by the presenceof severe pulmonary hypoplasia, cardiac defects, immaturityand other severe congenital anomalies, when conservativetreatment is indicated.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1408
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[St] Status:In-Data-Review


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