Database : MEDLINE
Search on : Sepsis [Words]
References found : 88394 [refine]
Displaying: 1 .. 10   in format [Detailed]

page 1 of 8840 go to page                         

  1 / 88394 MEDLINE  
              next record last record
select
to print
Photocopy
Full text

[PMID]: 25072757
[Au] Autor:Andrews B; Muchemwa L; Kelly P; Lakhi S; Heimburger DC; Bernard GR
[Ad] Address:1Institute for Global Health, Vanderbilt University, Nashville, TN. 2Division of General Internal Medicine and Public Health, Department of Internal Medicine, Vanderbilt University, Nashville, TN. 3Department of Internal Medicine, University of Zambia School of Medicine, Lusaka, Zambia. 4Barts and the London School of Medicine, London, United Kingdom. 5Department of Internal Medicine, University Teaching Hospital, Lusaka, Zambia. 6Division of Allergy, Pulmonary, and Critical Care Medicine, Vanderbilt University, Nashville, TN.
[Ti] Title:Simplified severe sepsis protocol: a randomized controlled trial of modified early goal-directed therapy in zambia*.
[So] Source:Crit Care Med;42(11):2315-24, 2014 Nov.
[Is] ISSN:1530-0293
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:OBJECTIVE: To assess the efficacy of a simple, goal-directed sepsis treatment protocol for reducing mortality in patients with severe sepsis in Zambia. DESIGN: Single-center nonblinded randomized controlled trial. SETTING: Emergency department, ICU, and medical wards of the national referral hospital in Lusaka, Zambia. PATIENTS: One hundred twelve patients enrolled within 24 hours of admission with severe sepsis, defined as systemic inflammatory response syndrome with suspected infection and organ dysfunction INTERVENTIONS: : Simplified Severe Sepsis Protocol consisting of up to 4 L of IV fluids within 6 hours, guided by jugular venous pressure assessment, and dopamine and/or blood transfusion in selected patients. Control group was managed as usual care. Blood cultures were collected and early antibiotics administered for both arms. MEASUREMENTS AND MAIN RESULTS: Primary outcome was in-hospital all-cause mortality. One hundred nine patients were included in the final analysis and 88 patients (80.7%) were HIV positive. Pulmonary infections were the most common source of sepsis. In-hospital mortality rate was 64.2% in the intervention group and 60.7% in the control group (relative risk, 1.05; 95% CI, 0.79-1.41). Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex was isolated from 31 of 82 HIV-positive patients (37.8%) with available mycobacterial blood culture results. Patients in Simplified Severe Sepsis Protocol received significantly more IV fluids in the first 6 hours (2.7 L vs 1.7 L, p = 0.002). The study was stopped early because of high mortality rate among patients with hypoxemic respiratory failure in the intervention arm (8/8, 100%) compared with the control arm (7/10, 70%; relative risk, 1.43; 95% CI, 0.95-2.14). CONCLUSION: Factors other than tissue hypoperfusion probably account for much of the end-organ dysfunction in African patients with severe sepsis. Studies of fluid-based interventions should utilize inclusion criteria to accurately capture patients with hypovolemia and tissue hypoperfusion who are most likely to benefit from fluids. Exclusion of patients with severe respiratory distress should be considered when ventilatory support is not readily available.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1410
[Js] Journal subset:AIM; IM
[St] Status:In-Data-Review
[do] DOI:10.1097/CCM.0000000000000541

  2 / 88394 MEDLINE  
              first record previous record next record last record
select
to print
Photocopy
PubMed Central Full text
Full text

[PMID]: 25320606
[Au] Autor:Varol E
[Ad] Address:Department of Cardiology, Faculty of Medicine, Suleyman Demirel University, Isparta, Turkey.
[Ti] Title:Platelet volume evaluation in patients with sepsis: associated factors should be considered.
[So] Source:Afr Health Sci;14(2):492-3, 2014 Jun.
[Is] ISSN:1729-0503
[Cp] Country of publication:Uganda
[La] Language:eng
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1410
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[St] Status:In-Data-Review
[do] DOI:10.4314/ahs.v14i2.32

  3 / 88394 MEDLINE  
              first record previous record next record last record
select
to print
Photocopy
PubMed Central Full text
Full text

[PMID]: 25316976
[Au] Autor:Singh G; Gladdy G; Chandy TT; Sen N
[Ad] Address:Department of Anaesthesia, Christian Medical College and Hospital, Vellore, Tamil Nadu, India....
[Ti] Title:Incidence and outcome of acute lung injury and acute respiratory distress syndrome in the surgical intensive care unit.
[So] Source:Indian J Crit Care Med;18(10):659-65, 2014 Oct.
[Is] ISSN:0972-5229
[Cp] Country of publication:India
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:INTRODUCTION: To determine the incidence and mortality of acute lung injury (ALI) and acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) in a cohort of patients with risk factors admitted to the Surgical Intensive Care Unit (SICU). MATERIALS AND METHODS: A prospective observational inception cohort study with no intervention was conducted over 12 months. All patients with at least one known risk factor for ALI/ARDS admitted to the SICU were included in the study. The APACHE II severity of disease classification system scoring was performed within 1 h of admission. The ventilatory parameters and chest radiographs were recorded every 24 h. The P/F ratio, PEEP and Lung Injury Score were calculated each day until the day of discharge from the Intensive Care Unit or for the first 7 days of admission, whichever was shorter. RESULTS: The incidence of ARDS among those who were mechanically ventilated was 11.4%. Sepsis was the most common (34.6%) etiology. Among those with risk factors, the incidence of ARDS was 30% and that of ALI was 32.7%. The mortality in those with ARDS was 41.8%. Those who develop ARDS had higher APACHE II scores, lower pH and higher PaCO2 at admission compared with those who developed ALI or no lung injury. CONCLUSION: The incidence and mortality of ARDS was similar to other studies. Identifying those with risk factors for ARDS or mortality will enable appropriate interventional measures.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1410
[Cu] Class update date: 141018
[Lr] Last revision date:141018
[Da] Date of entry for processing:141015
[St] Status:PubMed-not-MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.4103/0972-5229.142175

  4 / 88394 MEDLINE  
              first record previous record next record last record
select
to print
Photocopy
PubMed Central Full text
Full text

[PMID]: 25316975
[Au] Autor:Kumar M; Sharma R; Sethi SK; Bazaz S; Sharma P; Bhan A; Kher V
[Ad] Address:Kidney Institute, Medanta, The Medicity Hospital, Gurgaon, Haryana, India....
[Ti] Title:Vasoactive Inotrope Score as a tool for clinical care in children post cardiac surgery.
[So] Source:Indian J Crit Care Med;18(10):653-8, 2014 Oct.
[Is] ISSN:0972-5229
[Cp] Country of publication:India
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:BACKGROUND: Neonates and infants undergoing heart surgery on cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB) are at high risk for significant post-operative morbidity and mortality. Hence, there is a need to identify and quantify clinical factors during the early post-operative period that are indicative of short-term as well as long-term outcomes. Multiple inotrope scores have been used in practice to quantify the amount of cardiovascular support received by neonates. AIMS: The goal of this study was to determine the association between inotropic/vasoactive support and clinical outcomes in children after open cardiac surgery. MATERIALS AND METHODS: This is a retrospective analysis of the 208 patients who underwent cardiac surgery for congenital heart disease at a tertiary pediatric cardiac surgery Intensive Care Unit (ICU) from January 2012 to March 2013. Multiple demographic, intra-operative and post-operative variables were recorded, including the Vasoactive Inotrope Score (VIS). RESULTS: A total of 208 patients underwent cardiac surgery for congenital heart disease in the study period. The mean age and weight in the study were 66.94 months and 16.31 kg, respectively. Statistically significant associations were found in the various variables and VIS, including infancy, weight < 10 kg, CPB time, pump failure and post-operative variables like sepsis, hematological complications, hepatic dysfunction, acute kidney injury during admission, mortality, prolonged ventilator requirement, CPB time (in min) and hospital stay. CONCLUSIONS: Inotrope score and its adaptations are an excellent tool to measure illness severity, deciding interventions and during parental counseling in the pediatric cardiac surgery ICUs.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1410
[Cu] Class update date: 141018
[Lr] Last revision date:141018
[Da] Date of entry for processing:141015
[St] Status:PubMed-not-MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.4103/0972-5229.142174

  5 / 88394 MEDLINE  
              first record previous record next record last record
select
to print
Photocopy
PubMed Central Full text
Full text

[PMID]: 25317178
[Au] Autor:Bhuyan AK; Sarma D; Kaimal Saikia U; Choudhury BK
[Ad] Address:Gauhati Medical College, Guwahati 781032, India....
[Ti] Title:Grave's Disease with Severe Hepatic Dysfunction: A Diagnostic and Therapeutic Challenge.
[So] Source:Case Rep Med;2014:790458, 2014.
[Is] ISSN:1687-9627
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Hepatic dysfunction in a patient with thyrotoxicosis may result from hyperthyroidism per se, as a side effect of antithyroid drugs, and causes unrelated to hyperthyroidism which sometimes causes diagnostic and therapeutic difficulties. A young female patient was admitted to our hospital with symptoms of thyrotoxicosis, diffuse goiter and ophthalmopathy along with cholestatic pattern of jaundice, and proximal muscle weakness. She was treated with propylthiouracil with gradual recovery. She was continuing her antithyroid medication with regular follow-up. The patient was readmitted a few months later with worsening thyrotoxicosis, proximal muscle weakness, fever, and a hepatocellular pattern of jaundice with sepsis. Propylthiouracil was stopped and lithium along with steroid coverage was given to control her thyrotoxicosis which was later changed to methimazole. Broad spectrum antibiotic therapy was also started but without any response. During her hospital stay, the patient also developed a flaccid paraplegia resembling Guillain-Barre syndrome. IV steroid was started for the neuropathy but meanwhile the patient succumbed to her illness. So in centers where facility for radioiodine therapy is not readily available, some definite well-tested protocols should be formulated to address such common but complicated clinical situations.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1410
[Cu] Class update date: 141018
[Lr] Last revision date:141018
[Da] Date of entry for processing:141015
[St] Status:PubMed-not-MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.1155/2014/790458

  6 / 88394 MEDLINE  
              first record previous record next record last record
select
to print
Photocopy
Full text

[PMID]: 24958171
[Au] Autor:Cuello F; Shankar-Hari M; Mayr U; Yin X; Marshall M; Suna G; Willeit P; Langley SR; Jayawardhana T; Zeller T; Terblanche M; Shah AM; Mayr M
[Ad] Address:From the ‡King's British Heart Foundation Centre, King's College London, SE5 9NU London, UK; §Department of Experimental Pharmacology and Toxicology, Cardiovascular Research Centre, University Medical Center Hamburg-Eppendorf, Hamburg, 20246 Germany; ¶DZHK (German Center for Cardiovascular Research)...
[Ti] Title:Redox state of pentraxin 3 as a novel biomarker for resolution of inflammation and survival in sepsis.
[So] Source:Mol Cell Proteomics;13(10):2545-57, 2014 Oct.
[Is] ISSN:1535-9484
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:In an endotoxaemic mouse model of sepsis, a tissue-based proteomics approach for biomarker discovery identified long pentraxin 3 (PTX3) as the lead candidate for inflamed myocardium. When the redox-sensitive oligomerization state of PTX3 was further investigated, PTX3 accumulated as an octamer as a result of disulfide-bond formation in heart, kidney, and lung-common organ dysfunctions seen in patients with sepsis. Oligomeric moieties of PTX3 were also detectable in circulation. The oligomerization state of PTX3 was quantified over the first 11 days in critically ill adult patients with sepsis. On admission day, there was no difference in the oligomerization state of PTX3 between survivors and non-survivors. From day 2 onward, the conversion of octameric to monomeric PTX3 was consistently associated with a greater survival after 28 days of follow-up. For example, by day 2 post-admission, octameric PTX3 was barely detectable in survivors, but it still constituted more than half of the total PTX3 in non-survivors (p < 0.001). Monomeric PTX3 was inversely associated with cardiac damage markers NT-proBNP and high-sensitivity troponin I and T. Relative to the conventional measurements of total PTX3 or NT-proBNP, the oligomerization of PTX3 was a superior predictor of disease outcome.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1410
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[St] Status:In-Data-Review
[do] DOI:10.1074/mcp.M114.039446

  7 / 88394 MEDLINE  
              first record previous record next record last record
select
to print
Photocopy
PubMed Central Full text
Full text

[PMID]: 25255432
[Au] Autor:Paracha RZ; Ahmad J; Ali A; Hussain R; Niazi U; Tareen SH; Aslam B
[Ad] Address:Atta-Ur-Rahman School of Applied Biosciences (ASAB), National University of Sciences and Technology (NUST), Islamabad, Pakistan....
[Ti] Title:Formal Modelling of Toll like Receptor 4 and JAK/STAT Signalling Pathways: Insight into the Roles of SOCS-1, Interferon-ß and Proinflammatory Cytokines in Sepsis.
[So] Source:PLoS One;9(9):e108466, 2014.
[Is] ISSN:1932-6203
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Sepsis is one of the major causes of human morbidity and results in a considerable number of deaths each year. Lipopolysaccharide-induced sepsis has been associated with TLR4 signalling pathway which in collaboration with the JAK/STAT signalling regulate endotoxemia and inflammation. However, during sepsis our immune system cannot maintain a balance of cytokine levels and results in multiple organ damage and eventual death. Different opinions have been made in previous studies about the expression patterns and the role of proinflammatory cytokines in sepsis that attracted our attention towards qualitative properties of TLR4 and JAK/STAT signalling pathways using computer-aided studies. René Thomas' formalism was used to model septic and non-septic dynamics of TLR4 and JAK/STAT signalling. Comparisons among dynamics were made by intervening or removing the specific interactions among entities. Among our predictions, recurrent induction of proinflammatory cytokines with subsequent downregulation was found as the basic characteristic of septic model. This characteristic was found in agreement with previous experimental studies, which implicate that inflammation is followed by immunomodulation in septic patients. Moreover, intervention in downregulation of proinflammatory cytokines by SOCS-1 was found desirable to boost the immune responses. On the other hand, interventions either in TLR4 or transcriptional elements such as NFκB and STAT were found effective in the downregulation of immune responses. Whereas, IFN-ß and SOCS-1 mediated downregulation at different levels of signalling were found to be associated with variations in the levels of proinflammatory cytokines. However, these predictions need to be further validated using wet laboratory experimental studies to further explore the roles of inhibitors such as SOCS-1 and IFN-ß, which may alter the levels of proinflammatory cytokines at different stages of sepsis.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1409
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[St] Status:In-Data-Review
[do] DOI:10.1371/journal.pone.0108466

  8 / 88394 MEDLINE  
              first record previous record next record last record
select
to print
Photocopy
Full text

[PMID]: 25007234
[Au] Autor:Lee K; Lee JH; Ryu SY; Cho MH; Lee J
[Ad] Address:1 School of Chemical Engineering, Yeungnam University , Gyeongsan, Korea.
[Ti] Title:Stilbenes reduce Staphylococcus aureus hemolysis, biofilm formation, and virulence.
[So] Source:Foodborne Pathog Dis;11(9):710-7, 2014 Sep.
[Is] ISSN:1556-7125
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Stilbenoids have a broad range of beneficial health effects. On the other hand, the emergence of antibiotic-resistant Staphylococcus aureus presents a worldwide problem that requires new antibiotics or nonantibiotic strategies. S. aureus produces α-hemolysin (a pore-forming cytotoxin) that has been implicated in the pathogenesis of sepsis and pneumonia. Furthermore, the biofilms formed by S. aureus constitute a mechanism of antimicrobial resistance. In this study, we investigated the hemolytic and antibiofilm activities of 10 stilbene-related compounds against S. aureus. trans-Stilbene and resveratrol at 10 µg/mL were found to markedly inhibit human blood hemolysis by S. aureus, and trans-stilbene also inhibited S. aureus biofilm formation without affecting its bacterial growth. Furthermore, trans-stilbene and resveratrol attenuated S. aureus virulence in vivo in the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans, which is normally killed by S. aureus. Transcriptional analysis showed that trans-stilbene repressed the α-hemolysin hla gene and the intercellular adhesion locus (icaA and icaD) in S. aureus, and this finding was in line with observed reductions in virulence and biofilm formation. In addition, vitisin B, a stilbenoid tetramer, at 1 µg/mL was observed to significantly inhibit human blood hemolysis by S. aureus.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE; RESEARCH SUPPORT, NON-U.S. GOV'T
[Em] Entry month:1409
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[St] Status:In-Process
[do] DOI:10.1089/fpd.2014.1758

  9 / 88394 MEDLINE  
              first record previous record next record last record
select
to print
Photocopy
Full text

[PMID]: 23581713
[Au] Autor:May JM; Harrison FE
[Ad] Address:Department of Medicine, Vanderbilt University School of Medicine , Nashville, Tennessee.
[Ti] Title:Role of vitamin C in the function of the vascular endothelium.
[So] Source:Antioxid Redox Signal;19(17):2068-83, 2013 Dec 10.
[Is] ISSN:1557-7716
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:SIGNIFICANCE: Vitamin C, or ascorbic acid, has long been known to participate in several important functions in the vascular bed in support of endothelial cells. These functions include increasing the synthesis and deposition of type IV collagen in the basement membrane, stimulating endothelial proliferation, inhibiting apoptosis, scavenging radical species, and sparing endothelial cell-derived nitric oxide to help modulate blood flow. Although ascorbate may not be able to reverse inflammatory vascular diseases such as atherosclerosis, it may well play a role in preventing the endothelial dysfunction that is the earliest sign of many such diseases. RECENT ADVANCES: Beyond simply preventing scurvy, evidence is mounting that ascorbate is required for optimal function of many dioxygenase enzymes in addition to those involved in collagen synthesis. Several of these enzymes regulate the transcription of proteins involved in endothelial function, proliferation, and survival, including hypoxia-inducible factor-1α and histone and DNA demethylases. More recently, ascorbate has been found to acutely tighten the endothelial permeability barrier and, thus, may modulate access of ascorbate and other molecules into tissues and organs. CRITICAL ISSUES: The issue of the optimal cellular content of ascorbate remains unresolved, but it appears that low millimolar ascorbate concentrations are normal in most animal tissues, in human leukocytes, and probably in the endothelium. Although there may be little benefit of increasing near maximal cellular ascorbate concentrations in normal people, many diseases and conditions have either systemic or localized cellular ascorbate deficiency as a cause for endothelial dysfunction, including early atherosclerosis, sepsis, smoking, and diabetes. FUTURE DIRECTIONS: A key focus for future studies of ascorbate and the vascular endothelium will likely be to determine the mechanisms and clinical relevance of ascorbate effects on endothelial function, permeability, and survival in diseases that cause endothelial dysfunction.
[Mh] MeSH terms primary: Antioxidants/physiology
Ascorbic Acid/physiology
Endothelial Cells/physiology
Endothelium, Vascular/metabolism
[Mh] MeSH terms secundary: Animals
Apoptosis
Biological Transport
Capillary Permeability
Cell Proliferation
Humans
Phosphorylation
Protein Processing, Post-Translational
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE; RESEARCH SUPPORT, N.I.H., EXTRAMURAL; REVIEW
[Nm] Name of substance:0 (Antioxidants); PQ6CK8PD0R (Ascorbic Acid)
[Em] Entry month:1407
[Cu] Class update date: 141018
[Lr] Last revision date:141018
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[Da] Date of entry for processing:131216
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.1089/ars.2013.5205

  10 / 88394 MEDLINE  
              first record previous record
select
to print
Photocopy
PubMed Central Full text
Full text

[PMID]: 23002960
[Au] Autor:Martin CR; Bellomy M; Allred EN; Fichorova RN; Leviton A
[Ad] Address:Department of Neonatology, Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, Boston, MA, USA. cmartin1@bidmc.harvard.edu
[Ti] Title:Systemic inflammation associated with severe intestinal injury in extremely low gestational age newborns.
[So] Source:Fetal Pediatr Pathol;32(3):222-34, 2013 Jun.
[Is] ISSN:1551-3823
[Cp] Country of publication:England
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:To define the role of systemic inflammation in infants with intestinal perforation (IP) and necrotizing enterocolitis (NEC), we measured 25 blood protein concentrations on days 1, 7 and 14 in 939 infants born before 28 weeks' gestation. On days 7 and 14, infants with NEC had elevated levels of C-reactive protein (CRP), serum amyloid A (SAA), IL-6 and IL-8. Infants with IP had elevated levels of CRP and insulin growth factor binding protein-1 on day 7 and elevated CRP, SAA, TNF-receptor-2 and matrix metalloproteinase-9 levels on day 14. A better understanding of systemic inflammation might help prevent and treat these disorders.
[Mh] MeSH terms primary: Colitis/pathology
Infant, Premature, Diseases/pathology
Intestinal Perforation/pathology
Sepsis/pathology
[Mh] MeSH terms secundary: Biological Markers/blood
Blood Proteins/metabolism
Colitis/blood
Colitis/complications
Female
Gestational Age
Humans
Infant, Extremely Premature
Infant, Newborn
Infant, Premature, Diseases/blood
Intestinal Perforation/blood
Intestinal Perforation/complications
Necrosis
Placenta/microbiology
Placenta/pathology
Pregnancy
Premature Birth
Sepsis/blood
Sepsis/complications
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE; RESEARCH SUPPORT, N.I.H., EXTRAMURAL
[Nm] Name of substance:0 (Biological Markers); 0 (Blood Proteins)
[Em] Entry month:1312
[Cu] Class update date: 141018
[Lr] Last revision date:141018
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[Da] Date of entry for processing:130506
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.3109/15513815.2012.721477


page 1 of 8840 go to page                         
   


Refine the search
  Database : MEDLINE Advanced form   

    Search in field  
1  
2
3
 
           



Search engine: iAH v2.6 powered by WWWISIS

BIREME/PAHO/WHO - Latin American and Caribbean Center on Health Sciences Information