Database : MEDLINE
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[PMID]: 29410229
[Au] Autor:Polilli E; Sozio F; Di Stefano P; Clerico L; Di Iorio G; Parruti G
[Ad] Address:Clinical Pathology Unit, Pescara General Hospital, Pescara, Italy.
[Ti] Title:Preliminary evaluation of the impact of a Web-based HIV testing programme in Abruzzo Region on the prevention of late HIV presentation and associated mortality.
[So] Source:Int J Infect Dis;69:44-46, 2018 Feb 02.
[Is] ISSN:1878-3511
[Cp] Country of publication:Canada
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:OBJECTIVE: This study aimed to analyze the efficacy of a Web-based testing programme in terms of the prevention of late HIV presentation. The clinical characteristics of patients diagnosed with HIV via the Web-based testing programme were compared to those of patients diagnosed in parallel via standard diagnostic care procedures. METHODS: This study included the clinical and demographic data of newly diagnosed HIV patients enrolled at the study clinic between February 2014 and June 2017. These patients were diagnosed either via standard diagnostic procedures or as a result of the Web-based testing programme. RESULTS: Eighty-eight new cases of HIV were consecutively enrolled; their mean age was 39.1±13.0 years. Fifty-nine patients (67%) were diagnosed through standard diagnostic procedures and 29 (33%) patients came from the Web-based testing programme. Late presentation (62% vs. 34%, p=0.01) and AIDS-defining conditions at presentation (13 vs. 1, p=0.02) were significantly more frequent in the standard care group than in the Web-based group; four of 13 patients with AIDS diagnosed under standard diagnostic procedures died, versus none in the Web-based testing group (p<0.001). CONCLUSIONS: Web-based recruitment for voluntary and free HIV testing helped to diagnose patients with less advanced HIV disease and no risk of death, from all at-risk groups, in comparison with standard care testing.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1802
[Cu] Class update date: 180310
[Lr] Last revision date:180310
[St] Status:Publisher

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[PMID]: 29262776
[Au] Autor:Visser M; van Aar F; Koedijk FDH; Kampman CJG; Heijne JCM
[Ad] Address:National Institute for Public Health and the Environment, P.O. Box 1, 3720, BA, Bilthoven, the Netherlands. maartje.visser@rivm.nl.
[Ti] Title:Repeat Chlamydia trachomatis testing among heterosexual STI outpatient clinic visitors in the Netherlands: a longitudinal study.
[So] Source:BMC Infect Dis;17(1):782, 2017 Dec 20.
[Is] ISSN:1471-2334
[Cp] Country of publication:England
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:BACKGROUND: Chlamydia infections are common in both men and women, are often asymptomatic and can cause serious complications. Repeat testing in high-risk groups is therefore indicated. In the Netherlands, guidelines on repeat chlamydia testing differ between testing facilities, and knowledge on repeat testing behaviour is limited. Here, we analyse the current repeat testing behaviour of heterosexual STI clinic visitors, and aim to identify groups for which repeat testing advice could be advantageous. METHODS: Longitudinal surveillance data from all Dutch STI outpatient clinics were used, which included all STI clinic consultations carried out among heterosexual men and women between June 2014 and December 2015. Repeat testing was defined as returning to the same STI clinic between 35 days and 12 months after initial consultation. We calculated chlamydia positivity at repeat test stratified by initial test result and time between consultations. Logistic regression analyses were used to identify predictors of repeat testing, and predictors of having a chlamydia positive repeat test. RESULTS: In total, 140,486 consultations in 75,487 women and 46,286 men were available for analyses. Overall, 15.4% of women and 11.1% of men returned to the STI clinic within the study period. Highest chlamydia positivity at repeat test was seen 3-5 months after initial positive test. Among both women and men, repeat testing was associated with non-Western ethnicity, having had more than two sex partners in the past 6 months, reporting STI symptoms, having a history of STI, and having a chlamydia positive initial test. Among repeat testers, chlamydia positive repeat test was most strongly associated with younger age, followed by a chlamydia positive initial test. CONCLUSIONS: Repeat testing most often resulted in a positive test result among young heterosexuals (<25) and heterosexuals of any age with a chlamydia infection at the initial consultation. Further efforts are needed to determine optimal repeat testing strategies.
[Mh] MeSH terms primary: Ambulatory Care Facilities/statistics & numerical data
Chlamydia Infections
Chlamydia trachomatis
Heterosexuality/statistics & numerical data
[Mh] MeSH terms secundary: Adolescent
Adult
Chlamydia Infections/diagnosis
Chlamydia Infections/epidemiology
Female
Humans
Longitudinal Studies
Male
Netherlands/epidemiology
Young Adult
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1803
[Cu] Class update date: 180309
[Lr] Last revision date:180309
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[Da] Date of entry for processing:171222
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.1186/s12879-017-2871-1

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[PMID]: 29519911
[Au] Autor:Coyle RM; Miltz AR; Lampe FC; Sewell J; Phillips AN; Speakman A; Dhar J; Sherr L; Sadiq ST; Taylor S; Ivens DR; Collins S; Elford J; Anderson J; Rodger A; AURAH Study Group
[Ad] Address:Research Department of Infection and Population Health, University College London, Royal Free Hospital, London, UK.
[Ti] Title:Ethnicity and sexual risk in heterosexual people attending sexual health clinics in England: a cross-sectional, self-administered questionnaire study.
[So] Source:Sex Transm Infect;, 2018 Mar 08.
[Is] ISSN:1472-3263
[Cp] Country of publication:England
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:OBJECTIVES: In the UK, people of black ethnicity experience a disproportionate burden of HIV and STI. We aimed to assess the association of ethnicity with sexual behaviour and sexual health among women and heterosexual men attending genitourinary medicine (GUM) clinics in England. METHODS: The Attitudes to and Understanding of Risk of Acquisition of HIV is a cross-sectional, self-administered questionnaire study of HIV negative people recruited from 20 GUM clinics in England, 2013-2014. Modified Poisson regression with robust SEs was used to calculate adjusted prevalence ratios (aPR) for the association between ethnicity and various sexual risk behaviours, adjusted for age, study region, education and relationship status. RESULTS: Questionnaires were completed by 1145 men (n=470) and women (n=676). Ethnicity was recorded for 1131 (98.8%) participants: 550 (48.6%) black/mixed African, 168 (14.9%) black/mixed Caribbean, 308 (27.2%) white ethnic groups, 105 (9.3%) other ethnicity. Compared with women from white ethnic groups, black/mixed African women were less likely to report condomless sex with a non-regular partner (aPR (95% CI) 0.67 (0.51 to 0.88)), black/mixed African and black/mixed Caribbean women were less likely to report two or more new partners (0.42 (0.32 to 0.55) and 0.44 (0.29 to 0.65), respectively), and black/mixed Caribbean women were more likely to report an STI diagnosis (1.56 (1.00 to 2.42)). Compared with men from white ethnic groups, black/mixed Caribbean men were more likely to report an STI diagnosis (1.91 (1.20 to 3.04)), but did not report risk behaviours more frequently. Men and women of black/mixed Caribbean ethnicity remained more likely to report STI history after adjustment for sexual risk behaviours. DISCUSSION: Risk behaviours were reported less frequently by women of black ethnicity; however, history of STI was more prevalent among black/mixed Caribbean women. In black/mixed Caribbean men, higher STI history was not explained by ethnic variation in reported risk behaviours. The association between STI and black/mixed Caribbean ethnicity remained after adjustment for risk behaviours.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1803
[Cu] Class update date: 180309
[Lr] Last revision date:180309
[St] Status:Publisher

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[PMID]: 29499752
[Au] Autor:Mao J; Tang W; Liu C; Wong NS; Tang S; Wei C; Tucker JD
[Ad] Address:University of North Carolina Project China, 2 Lujing Road, Floor 11., Guangzhou, Guangdong, 510000, China.
[Ti] Title:Sex tourism among Chinese men who have sex with men: a cross-sectional observational study.
[So] Source:BMC Public Health;18(1):306, 2018 03 02.
[Is] ISSN:1471-2458
[Cp] Country of publication:England
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:BACKGROUND: Sex tourism among men who have sex with men (MSM) may exacerbate transmission of HIV and other sexually transmitted infections (STIs). Sex tourism is defined as purchasing sex with gifts or money outside of one's hometown. Our objective was to characterize the frequency, socio-demographic characteristics, and sexual risk behaviors among Chinese MSM sex tourists. METHODS: An online, cross-sectional survey for high-risk MSM throughout China was conducted in November 2015 covering sociodemographic characteristics, sexual risk behaviors, and sex tourism. Univariate and multivariable logistic regressions were performed to identify correlates of sex tourism. The mean MSM HIV prevalence of sex tourism journey origins and destinations were compared. RESULTS: Of 1189 MSM who completed the survey, 62 (5%) men identified as sex tourists; among these sex tourists, twenty (32%) traveled primarily to purchase sex and the remainder purchased sex while traveling for another purpose. There was minimal socio-demographic and behavioral difference between the two groups. In multivariable analyses, adjusting for age and income, sex tourism was correlated with high-risk sexual behaviors, higher income (aOR 4.44, 95%CI 1.77-11.18) and living with HIV (aOR 2.79, 95%CI 1.03-7.55). Sex tourism was more often from locations with lower to higher MSM HIV prevalence (mean = 4.47, SD = 2.01 versus mean = 6.86, SD = 5.24). CONCLUSION: MSM sex tourists were more likely to have risky sexual behaviors and travel to locations with a higher HIV prevalence. MSM sex tourists may be part of core groups that are disproportionately responsible for MSM HIV transmission. Enhanced surveillance and interventions tailored to MSM sex tourists should be considered.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE; RESEARCH SUPPORT, NON-U.S. GOV'T; RESEARCH SUPPORT, N.I.H., EXTRAMURAL
[Em] Entry month:1803
[Cu] Class update date: 180309
[Lr] Last revision date:180309
[St] Status:In-Process
[do] DOI:10.1186/s12889-018-5214-2

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[PMID]: 29327306
[Au] Autor:Hintze JM; O'Neill JP
[Ad] Address:Royal College of Surgeons in Ireland, 123 St. Stephen's Green, Dublin, Ireland. hintzej@tcd.ie.
[Ti] Title:Strengthening the case for gender-neutral and the nonavalent HPV vaccine.
[So] Source:Eur Arch Otorhinolaryngol;275(4):857-865, 2018 Apr.
[Is] ISSN:1434-4726
[Cp] Country of publication:Germany
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:PURPOSE: The purpose of this review is to highlight the benefits of gender-neutral and the nonavalent human papillomavirus vaccination. Human papillomavirus infection is the most commonly sexually transmitted disease and is known to cause several types of cancers, including cervical, vulvar, vaginal, penile, oropharyngeal, anal, and rectal. 5% of cancers every year are attributable to human papillomavirus infection, with cervical cancer the most common and oropharyngeal cancer estimated to surpass the incidence of cervical cancer by 2020. METHODS: PubMed and MEDLINE were searched using the following search terms: [(human papillomavirus OR HPV) AND (vaccine OR vaccination)] AND [(gardasil OR gardasil9 OR cervarix OR quadrivalent OR nonavalent OR ninevalent) OR (gender neutral OR male)]. RESULTS: There are currently three different types of human papillomavirus vaccinations and range in cover from four to nine different strains known to cause human disease. Most countries currently only supply vaccination to females; however, recent data point towards both a personal benefit as well as a cost-effective population-based benefit with gender-neutral vaccination. Data from female vaccination only have shown the vaccine to be effective in preventing premalignant cervical lesions, and are believed to have the same effect for other human papillomavirus cancers. Male vaccination not only provides personal benefit but also has a "herd effect" for females by preventing the propagation of the virus. CONCLUSION: Gender-neutral vaccination provides significant cost-effective benefits for preventing human papillomavirus-related diseases, and this effect is further enhanced by the use of the nonavalent vaccine.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE; REVIEW
[Em] Entry month:1801
[Cu] Class update date: 180309
[Lr] Last revision date:180309
[St] Status:In-Process
[do] DOI:10.1007/s00405-018-4866-y

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[PMID]: 29304083
[Au] Autor:Adachi K; Xu J; Yeganeh N; Camarca M; Morgado MG; Watts DH; Mofenson LM; Veloso VG; Pilotto JH; Joao E; Gray G; Theron G; Santos B; Fonseca R; Kreitchmann R; Pinto J; Mussi-Pinhata MM; Ceriotto M; Machado DM; Bryson YJ; Grinsztejn B; Moye J; Klausner JD; Bristow CC; Dickover R; Mirochnick M; Nielsen-Saines K; NICHD HPTN 040 Study Team
[Ad] Address:David Geffen UCLA School of Medicine, Los Angeles, CA, United States of America.
[Ti] Title:Combined evaluation of sexually transmitted infections in HIV-infected pregnant women and infant HIV transmission.
[So] Source:PLoS One;13(1):e0189851, 2018.
[Is] ISSN:1932-6203
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:BACKGROUND: Sexually transmitted infections (STIs) including Chlamydia trachomatis (CT), Neisseria gonorrhoeae (NG), Treponema pallidum (TP), and cytomegalovirus (CMV) may lead to adverse pregnancy and infant outcomes. The role of combined maternal STIs in HIV mother-to-child transmission (MTCT) was evaluated in mother-infant pairs from NICHD HPTN 040. METHODOLOGY: Urine samples from HIV-infected pregnant women during labor were tested by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) for CT, NG, and CMV. Infant HIV infection was determined by serial HIV DNA PCR testing. Maternal syphilis was tested by VDRL and confirmatory treponemal antibodies. RESULTS: A total of 899 mother-infant pairs were evaluated. Over 30% had at least one of the following infections (TP, CT, NG, and/or CMV) detected at the time of delivery. High rates of TP (8.7%), CT (17.8%), NG (4%), and CMV (6.3%) were observed. HIV MTCT was 9.1% (n = 82 infants). HIV MTCT was 12.5%, 10.3%, 11.1%, and 26.3% among infants born to women with CT, TP, NG or CMV respectively. Forty-two percent of HIV-infected infants were born to women with at least one of these 4 infections. Women with these infections were nearly twice as likely to have an HIV-infected infant (aOR 1.9, 95% CI 1.1-3.0), particularly those with 2 STIs (aOR 3.4, 95% CI 1.5-7.7). Individually, maternal CMV (aOR 4.4 1.5-13.0) and infant congenital CMV (OR 4.1, 95% CI 2.2-7.8) but not other STIs (TP, CT, or NG) were associated with an increased risk of HIV MTCT. CONCLUSION: HIV-infected pregnant women identified during labor are at high risk for STIs. Co-infection with STIs including CMV nearly doubles HIV MTCT risk. CMV infection appears to confer the largest risk of HIV MTCT. TRIAL REGISTRATION: NCT00099359.
[Mh] MeSH terms primary: HIV Infections/complications
HIV Infections/transmission
Infectious Disease Transmission, Vertical
Pregnancy Complications, Infectious
Sexually Transmitted Diseases/complications
[Mh] MeSH terms secundary: Adolescent
Adult
Chlamydia Infections/complications
Chlamydia trachomatis
Cross-Sectional Studies
Female
Gonorrhea/complications
Humans
Infant
Infant, Newborn
Middle Aged
Pregnancy
Retrospective Studies
Risk Factors
Syphilis/complications
Young Adult
[Pt] Publication type:CLINICAL TRIAL, PHASE III; JOURNAL ARTICLE; MULTICENTER STUDY; RANDOMIZED CONTROLLED TRIAL; RESEARCH SUPPORT, N.I.H., EXTRAMURAL; RESEARCH SUPPORT, NON-U.S. GOV'T
[Em] Entry month:1801
[Cu] Class update date: 180309
[Lr] Last revision date:180309
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[Da] Date of entry for processing:180106
[Cl] Clinical Trial:ClinicalTrial
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.1371/journal.pone.0189851

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[PMID]: 29190210
[Au] Autor:Katz AR
[Ti] Title:Ceftriaxone-Resistant Neisseria gonorrhoeae, Canada, 2017.
[So] Source:Emerg Infect Dis;24(3), 2018 Mar.
[Is] ISSN:1080-6059
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Pt] Publication type:LETTER
[Em] Entry month:1712
[Cu] Class update date: 180309
[Lr] Last revision date:180309
[St] Status:In-Data-Review
[do] DOI:10.3201/eid2403.171892

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[PMID]: 28456528
[Au] Autor:Jiang P; Cai Y; Chen J; Ye X; Mao S; Zhu S; Xue X; Chen S; Zhang L
[Ad] Address:Institute of Molecular Virology and Immunology, Department of Microbiology and Immunology, School of Basic Medical Sciences, Wenzhou Medical University, Wenzhou 325035, Zhejiang, PR China.
[Ti] Title:Evaluation of tandem Chlamydia trachomatis MOMP multi-epitopes vaccine in BALB/c mice model.
[So] Source:Vaccine;35(23):3096-3103, 2017 05 25.
[Is] ISSN:1873-2518
[Cp] Country of publication:Netherlands
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Chlamydia trachomatis (Ct), an obligate intracellular parasite, is the leading cause of bacterial sexually transmitted diseases worldwide. The best solution to control the spread of Ct is to develop safe and effective vaccines. However, an effective vaccine has not been developed due to some challenges such as selection of appropriate candidate antigens and an effective delivery system. In our previous study, we have developed a Ct vaccine that comprises a multi-epitope peptide of Ct major outer membrane protein (MOMP ) and Hepatitis B virus core antigen (HBcAg). The vaccine was evaluated in a murine model with chlamydial genital infection. The results indicated that Ct MOMP multi-epitope delivered by HBcAg could be an effective vaccine for the prevention of Ct. In this study, another two epitopes were selected from the MOMP protein and tandemly linked with MOMP to enhance the immunogenicity and the protective effect of the candidate vaccine. Our results revealed that both the immunogenicity and the protective effect of the tandem Ct MOMP multi-epitopes were much better than that of the single epitope. Therefore, vaccines based on the tandem Ct MOMP multi-epitopes could be more effective immune prophylactics to prevent Ct infection than the single epitope in murine model system.
[Mh] MeSH terms primary: Bacterial Vaccines/immunology
Chlamydia Infections/prevention & control
Chlamydia trachomatis/immunology
Epitopes/immunology
Porins/immunology
[Mh] MeSH terms secundary: Animals
Antibodies, Bacterial/blood
Bacterial Vaccines/administration & dosage
Bacterial Vaccines/chemistry
Chlamydia Infections/microbiology
Chlamydia trachomatis/chemistry
Disease Models, Animal
Epitopes/chemistry
Female
Immunogenicity, Vaccine
Mice
Mice, Inbred BALB C
Porins/chemistry
[Pt] Publication type:EVALUATION STUDIES; JOURNAL ARTICLE; RESEARCH SUPPORT, NON-U.S. GOV'T
[Nm] Name of substance:0 (Antibodies, Bacterial); 0 (Bacterial Vaccines); 0 (Epitopes); 0 (Porins); 146409-23-6 (omp1 protein, Chlamydia trachomatis)
[Em] Entry month:1802
[Cu] Class update date: 180308
[Lr] Last revision date:180308
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[Da] Date of entry for processing:170501
[St] Status:MEDLINE

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[PMID]: 29514776
[Au] Autor:Turner KM; Zienkiewicz AK; Syred J; Looker KJ; de Sa J; Brady M; Free C; Holdsworth G; Baraitser P
[Ad] Address:Bristol Veterinary School, University of Bristol, Bristol, United Kingdom.
[Ti] Title:Web-Based Activity Within a Sexual Health Economy: Observational Study.
[So] Source:J Med Internet Res;20(3):e74, 2018 Mar 07.
[Is] ISSN:1438-8871
[Cp] Country of publication:Canada
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:BACKGROUND: Regular testing for sexually transmitted infections (STIs) is important to maintain sexual health. Self-sampling kits ordered online and delivered in the post may increase access, convenience, and cost-effectiveness. Sexual health economies may target limited resources more effectively by signposting users toward Web-based or face-to-face services according to clinical need. OBJECTIVE: The aim of this paper was to investigate the impact of two interventions on testing activity across a whole sexual health economy: (1) the introduction of open access Web-based STI testing services and (2) a clinic policy of triage and signpost online where users without symptoms who attended clinics for STI testing were supported to access the Web-based service instead. METHODS: Data on attendances at all specialist public sexual health providers in an inner-London area were collated into a single database. Each record included information on user demographics, service type accessed, and clinical activity provided, including test results. Clinical activity was categorized as a simple STI test (could be done in a clinic or online), a complex visit (requiring face-to-face consultation), or other. RESULTS: Introduction of Web-based services increased total testing activity across the whole sexual health economy by 18.47% (from 36,373 to 43,091 in the same 6-month period-2014-2015 and 2015-2016), suggesting unmet need for testing in the area. Triage and signposting shifted activity out of the clinic onto the Web-based service, with simple STI testing in the clinic decreasing from 16.90% (920/5443) to 12.25% (511/4172) of total activity, P<.001, and complex activity in the clinic increasing from 69.15% (3764/5443) to 74.86% (3123/4172) of total activity, P<.001. This intervention created a new population of online users with different demographic and clinical profiles from those who use Web-based services spontaneously. Some triage and signposted users (29.62%, 375/1266) did not complete the Web-based testing process, suggesting the potential for missed diagnoses. CONCLUSIONS: This evaluation shows that users can effectively be transitioned from face-to-face to Web-based services and that this introduces a new population to Web-based service use and changes the focus of clinic-based activity. Further development is underway to optimize the triage and signposting process to support test completion.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1803
[Cu] Class update date: 180308
[Lr] Last revision date:180308
[St] Status:In-Data-Review
[do] DOI:10.2196/jmir.8101

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[PMID]: 29514750
[Au] Autor:Shroff S; Spataro B; Jeong K; Rothenberger S; Rubio D; McNeil M
[Ad] Address:Lenox Hill, Northwell Health, New York, NY, 10128, USA. Electronic address: sshroff@northwell.edu.
[Ti] Title:Let's talk about sex: Development and evaluation of a sexual history and counseling curriculum for internal medicine interns.
[So] Source:Patient Educ Couns;, 2018 Feb 27.
[Is] ISSN:1873-5134
[Cp] Country of publication:Ireland
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:OBJECTIVE: We developed a curriculum to increase internal medicine interns' proficiency in sexual history taking and sexually transmitted illness (STI) counseling. METHODS: The 4-h curriculum included didactics and interactive components, and was evaluated with matched pre- and post-surveys. RESULTS: Twenty-one interns completed the curriculum. Mean knowledge score improved from 59% to 76% from pre- to post-curriculum (P = 0.004). Median comfort score (Likert scale 1-5) with obtaining a sexual history improved from 3.8 [IQR 3.0, 4.0] to 3.8 [IQR 3.6, 4.6] and 3.8 [IQR 3.6, 4.0] to 4.1 [IQR 3.9, 4.8] for male (P = 0.05) and female patients (P = 0.007), respectively. Median frequency score for obtaining a sexual history improved from 2.9 [IQR 2.7, 3.0] to 3.1 [IQR 2.8, 3.4] and 3.2 [IQR 2.8, 3.7] to 3.4 [IQR 3.2, 4.0] for male (P = 0.16) and female patients (P = 0.008), respectively. Pre- and post- curriculum, interns reported significantly higher comfort and frequency in obtaining sexual histories from female vs. male patients. Post- curriculum, interns reported significantly higher comfort with positive STI counseling. PRACTICE IMPLICATIONS: Our curriculum improved interns' knowledge and comfort in sexual history taking and STI counseling. Future interventions should address sex disparities in sexual history taking.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1803
[Cu] Class update date: 180308
[Lr] Last revision date:180308
[St] Status:Publisher


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