Database : MEDLINE
Search on : Siderosis [Words]
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[PMID]: 29335334
[Au] Autor:Greenberg SM; Charidimou A
[Ad] Address:From the Department of Neurology, Massachusetts General Hospital Stroke Research Center, Boston. sgreenberg@partners.org.
[Ti] Title:Diagnosis of Cerebral Amyloid Angiopathy: Evolution of the Boston Criteria.
[So] Source:Stroke;49(2):491-497, 2018 02.
[Is] ISSN:1524-4628
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE; REVIEW; RESEARCH SUPPORT, N.I.H., EXTRAMURAL; RESEARCH SUPPORT, NON-U.S. GOV'T
[Em] Entry month:1801
[Cu] Class update date: 180308
[Lr] Last revision date:180308
[St] Status:In-Process
[do] DOI:10.1161/STROKEAHA.117.016990

  2 / 1827 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29247143
[Au] Autor:Banerjee G; Wilson D; Ambler G; Osei-Bonsu Appiah K; Shakeshaft C; Lunawat S; Cohen H; Yousry T; Lip GYH; Muir KW; Brown MM; Al-Shahi Salman R; Jäger HR; Werring DJ; CROMIS-2 Collaborators
[Ad] Address:From the UCL Stroke Research Centre (G.B., D.W., K.O.-B.A., C.S., S.L., M.M.B., D.J.W.) and Lysholm Department of Neuroradiology and the Neuroradiological Academic Unit (T.Y., H.R.J.), Department of Brain Repair and Rehabilitation, UCL Institute of Neurology, and the National Hospital for Neurology
[Ti] Title:Cognitive Impairment Before Intracerebral Hemorrhage Is Associated With Cerebral Amyloid Angiopathy.
[So] Source:Stroke;49(1):40-45, 2018 01.
[Is] ISSN:1524-4628
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: Although the association between cerebral amyloid angiopathy (CAA) and cognitive impairment is increasingly recognized, it is not clear whether this is because of the impact of recurrent intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH) events, disruptions caused by cerebral small vessel damage, or both. We investigated this by considering whether cognitive impairment before ICH was associated with neuroimaging features of CAA on magnetic resonance imaging. METHODS: We studied 166 patients with neuroimaging-confirmed ICH recruited to a prospective multicentre observational study. Preexisting cognitive impairment was determined using the Informant Questionnaire on Cognitive Decline in the Elderly (IQCODE). Magnetic resonance imaging markers of cerebral small vessel disease, including CAA, were rated by trained observers according to consensus guidelines. RESULTS: The prevalence of cognitive impairment before ICH was 24.7% (n=41) and, in adjusted analyses, was associated with fulfilling the modified Boston criteria for probable CAA at presentation (odds ratio, 4.01; 95% confidence interval, 1.53-10.51; =0.005) and a higher composite CAA score (for each point increase, odds ratio, 1.42; 95% confidence interval, 1.03-1.97; =0.033). We also found independent associations between pre-ICH cognitive decline and the presence of cortical superficial siderosis, strictly lobar microbleeds, and lobar ICH location, but not with other neuroimaging markers, or a composite small vessel disease score. CONCLUSIONS: CAA (defined using magnetic resonance imaging markers) is associated with cognitive decline before symptomatic ICH. This provides evidence that small vessel disruption in CAA makes an independent contribution to cognitive impairment, in addition to effects due to brain injury caused directly by ICH. CLINICAL TRIAL REGISTRATION: URL: https://www.clinicaltrials.gov. Unique identifier: NCT02513316.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE; RESEARCH SUPPORT, NON-U.S. GOV'T
[Em] Entry month:1712
[Cu] Class update date: 180308
[Lr] Last revision date:180308
[Cl] Clinical Trial:ClinicalTrial
[St] Status:In-Process
[do] DOI:10.1161/STROKEAHA.117.019409

  3 / 1827 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29348376
[Au] Autor:Sato K; Ohi T; Shozaki T; Kariya S
[Ad] Address:Department of Neurology, Ajirogikai Uji Hospital.
[Ti] Title:[Benign Outcome of Cochlear Implantation in a Patient with Superficial Siderosis].
[So] Source:Brain Nerve;70(1):73-80, 2018 Jan.
[Is] ISSN:1881-6096
[Cp] Country of publication:Japan
[La] Language:jpn
[Ab] Abstract:We report the case of a 38-year-old man with gait disorder and hearing loss. The patient had developed gait disorder due to a cervical meningioma since 4 year-old disappeared for 15 years after the surgical removal of the meningioma. However, at the age of 21 year-old, the gait disorder reappeared and worsened progressively. Sensorineural hearing loss (SNHL) and epileptic seizures developed during the disease course, and he was diagnosed with superficial siderosis (SS). When he was 37 years old, he experienced sudden-onset of right-side hearing impairment and was considered a candidate for cochlear implantation (CI) at the otorhinolaryngology clinic of the nearby University Hospital. He underwent CI in November 2014. Eight months after the operation, his right side hearing improved although ataxia, hearing loss, and pyramidal sign persisted. At the long term follow-up of 29 months after CI, his hearing remained at the improved level. Thus, CI may be an effective long-term treatment for SNHL in patients with SS and could prevent the progression of his hearing loss. (Received February 1, 2017; Accepted August 23, 2017; Published January 1, 2018).
[Pt] Publication type:ENGLISH ABSTRACT; JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1801
[Cu] Class update date: 180306
[Lr] Last revision date:180306
[St] Status:In-Process
[do] DOI:10.11477/mf.1416200952

  4 / 1827 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29466447
[Au] Autor:Torlasco C; Cassinerio E; Roghi A; Faini A; Capecchi M; Abdel-Gadir A; Giannattasio C; Parati G; Moon JC; Cappellini MD; Pedrotti P
[Ad] Address:Department of Cardiovascular, Neural and Metabolic Sciences, San Luca Hospital, Istituto Auxologico Italiano, Milan, Italy.
[Ti] Title:Role of T1 mapping as a complementary tool to T2* for non-invasive cardiac iron overload assessment.
[So] Source:PLoS One;13(2):e0192890, 2018.
[Is] ISSN:1932-6203
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:BACKGROUND: Iron overload-related heart failure is the principal cause of death in transfusion dependent patients, including those with Thalassemia Major. Linking cardiac siderosis measured by T2* to therapy improves outcomes. T1 mapping can also measure iron; preliminary data suggests it may have higher sensitivity for iron, particularly for early overload (the conventional cut-point for no iron by T2* is 20ms, but this is believed insensitive). We compared T1 mapping to T2* in cardiac iron overload. METHODS: In a prospectively large single centre study of 138 Thalassemia Major patients and 32 healthy controls, we compared T1 mapping to dark blood and bright blood T2* acquired at 1.5T. Linear regression analysis was used to assess the association of T2* and T1. A "moving window" approach was taken to understand the strength of the association at different levels of iron overload. RESULTS: The relationship between T2* (here dark blood) and T1 is described by a log-log linear regression, which can be split in three different slopes: 1) T2* low, <20ms, r2 = 0.92; 2) T2* = 20-30ms, r2 = 0.48; 3) T2*>30ms, weak relationship. All subjects with T2*<20ms had low T1; among those with T2*>20ms, 38% had low T1 with most of the subjects in the T2* range 20-30ms having a low T1. CONCLUSIONS: In established cardiac iron overload, T1 and T2* are concordant. However, in the 20-30ms T2* range, T1 mapping appears to detect iron. These data support previous suggestions that T1 detects missed iron in 1 out of 3 subjects with normal T2*, and that T1 mapping is complementary to T2*. The clinical significance of a low T1 with normal T2* should be further investigated.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1802
[Cu] Class update date: 180304
[Lr] Last revision date:180304
[St] Status:In-Data-Review
[do] DOI:10.1371/journal.pone.0192890

  5 / 1827 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29199057
[Au] Autor:Fraum TJ; Ludwig DR; Kilian S; Curtis WA; Pilgram TK; Sirlin CB; Fowler KJ
[Ad] Address:Mallinckrodt Institute of Radiology, Washington University School of Medicine, 510 S. Kingshighway Blvd, Campus Box 8131, Saint Louis, MO 63110. Electronic address: tylerjfraum@wustl.edu.
[Ti] Title:Epidemiology of Hepatic Steatosis at a Tertiary Care Center: An MRI-based Analysis.
[So] Source:Acad Radiol;25(3):317-327, 2018 Mar.
[Is] ISSN:1878-4046
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:RATIONALE AND OBJECTIVES: Little is known about the frequency and risk factors of hepatic steatosis in the tertiary care setting. Such knowledge is essential to clinicians making decisions about testing for this condition. Thus, our aim was to describe the epidemiology of hepatic steatosis, as captured by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), at a tertiary care center. MATERIALS AND METHODS: A near-consecutive cohort of 1006 adult patients underwent standard-of-care liver MRIs. Images were retrospectively processed to derive proton density fat fraction (PDFF) maps. Data from three spatially distinct regions of interest (ROIs) were aggregated to derive overall hepatic PDFF values. Demographic, anthropometric, clinical, and laboratory variables were included in a multivariate analysis to determine predictors of hepatic steatosis grades (based on established PDFF cutoffs). Hepatic steatosis grades derived from single vs aggregated ROIs were compared. RESULTS: Hepatic steatosis was observed in 25% of patients (19% grade 1; 3% grade 2; 3% grade 3). Controlling for all other variables, the odds of hepatic steatosis increased by 7%-9% (P <.001) for each whole point increase in body mass index (BMI), whereas elevated serum bilirubin was associated with lower odds of hepatic steatosis (P = .002). Race, diabetes mellitus, dyslipidemia, and metabolic syndrome were not independently predictive of hepatic steatosis when controlling for other variables (eg, BMI). Employing single ROIs (rather than three aggregated ROIs) resulted in incorrect steatosis grading in up to 8.0% of patients. CONCLUSION: Many adult patients undergoing liver MRI at a tertiary care center have hepatic steatosis, with larger BMIs as the only independent predictor of higher grades. This information can be used by clinicians at such centers to make evidence-based decisions about when to test for hepatic steatosis in their patients.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1712
[Cu] Class update date: 180302
[Lr] Last revision date:180302
[St] Status:In-Data-Review

  6 / 1827 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29472280
[Au] Autor:Guo R; Li M; Chang T
[Ad] Address:Department of Neurology, Tangdu Hospital, Fourth Military Medical University, Shaanxi Province, China.
[Ti] Title:Letter by Guo et al Regarding Article, "Prevalence and Natural History of Superficial Siderosis: A Population-Based Study".
[So] Source:Stroke;, 2018 Feb 22.
[Is] ISSN:1524-4628
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Pt] Publication type:LETTER
[Em] Entry month:1802
[Cu] Class update date: 180223
[Lr] Last revision date:180223
[St] Status:Publisher

  7 / 1827 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29468260
[Au] Autor:Bower M; Farag M; Phielipp N
[Ad] Address:School of Medicine, University of California Irvine, Irvine Hall, 1001 Health Sciences Road, 92697, Irvine, CA, USA. bowerm1@uci.edu.
[Ti] Title:Superficial Siderosis and Dural Ectasia in a Patient with Marfan Syndrome.
[So] Source:Clin Neuroradiol;, 2018 Feb 21.
[Is] ISSN:1869-1447
[Cp] Country of publication:Germany
[La] Language:eng
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1802
[Cu] Class update date: 180222
[Lr] Last revision date:180222
[St] Status:Publisher
[do] DOI:10.1007/s00062-018-0674-4

  8 / 1827 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29451456
[Au] Autor:Johans SJ; Swong KN; Burkett DJ; Wemhoff MP; Lew SM; Patel CR; Germanwala AV
[Ad] Address:Departments of 1 Neurological Surgery and.
[Ti] Title:Clival meningocele causing bilateral hearing loss in a child due to superficial siderosis of the central nervous system: case report.
[So] Source:J Neurosurg Pediatr;:1-6, 2018 Feb 16.
[Is] ISSN:1933-0715
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Superficial siderosis (SS) of the CNS is a rare and often unrecognized condition. Caused by hemosiderin deposition from chronic, repetitive hemorrhage in the subarachnoid space, it results in parenchymal damage in the subpial layers of the brain and spinal cord. T2-weighted MRI shows the characteristic hypointensity of hemosiderin deposition, classically occurring around the cerebellum, brainstem, and spinal cord. Patients present with progressive gait ataxia and sensorineural hearing impairment. Although there have been several studies, case reports, and review articles over the years, the clear pathophysiology of subarachnoid space hemorrhage remains to be elucidated. The proposed causes include prior intradural surgery, prior trauma, tumors, vascular abnormalities, nerve root avulsion, and dural abnormalities. Surgical repair of a dural defect associated with SS has been shown to be efficacious at preventing symptomatic progression. There have been several reports of dural defects within the spinal canal treated with surgery. Here, the authors present the first known case of a dural defect of the ventral skull base, namely a clival meningocele, presumed to be causing SS. In this case report, a 10-year-old girl with a history of head trauma at the age of 3 years was found to have a clival meningocele 3 years after her original trauma. On follow-up imaging, the patient was found to have radiographic growth of the meningocele along with evidence of SS of the CNS. The patient was treated conservatively until she began to have progressive hearing loss. It was presumed that the growing meningocele was the source of her SS. An endoscopic endonasal transclival approach with a multilayer dural reconstruction was performed to fix the dural defect and repair the meningocele in hopes of mitigating the progression of her symptoms. At her 12-month postoperative follow-up, she was doing well, with audiometry showing a slightly decreased hearing threshold in the left ear but improved speech discrimination bilaterally. Postoperative MRI showed a stable level of hemosiderin deposition and meningocele repair. Long-term follow-up will be necessary to evaluate for continued clinical stabilization or possible improvement.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1802
[Cu] Class update date: 180216
[Lr] Last revision date:180216
[St] Status:Publisher
[do] DOI:10.3171/2017.11.PEDS17302

  9 / 1827 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 28746897
[Au] Autor:Song W; Cressatti M; Zukor H; Liberman A; Galindez C; Schipper HM
[Ad] Address:Bloomfield Centre for Research in Aging, Lady Davis Institute, Jewish General Hospital, Montreal, Quebec, Canada.
[Ti] Title:Parkinsonian features in aging GFAP.HMOX1 transgenic mice overexpressing human HO-1 in the astroglial compartment.
[So] Source:Neurobiol Aging;58:163-179, 2017 Oct.
[Is] ISSN:1558-1497
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Epigenetic influences mediating brain iron deposition, oxidative mitochondrial injury, and macroautophagy in Parkinson disease and related conditions remain enigmatic. Here, we show that selective overexpression of the stress protein, heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) in astrocytes of GFAP.HMOX1 transgenic mice between 8.5 and 19 months of age results in nigrostriatal hypodopaminergia associated with locomotor incoordination and stereotypy; downregulation of tyrosine hydroxylase, DAT, LMX1B, Nurr1, Pitx3 and DJ-1 mRNA and/or protein; overproduction of α-synuclein and ubiquitin; oxidative stress; basal ganglia siderosis; mitochondrial damage/mitophagy; and augmented GABAergic systems (increased GABA, GAD67 and reelin). The neurophenotype of these GFAP.HMOX1 mice is highly consistent with parkinsonism and differs dramatically from the schizophrenia-like features previously documented in younger GFAP.HMOX1 mice. Common stressors may elicit either early-onset developmental (schizophrenia) or later-life degenerative (PD) brain disorders depending on whether the glial HO-1 response is engaged prior to or following the maturation of dopaminergic circuitry. Curtailment of glial HO-1 transduction at strategic points of the life course may confer neuroprotection in human degenerative and developmental central nervous system disorders.
[Mh] MeSH terms primary: Astrocytes/enzymology
Gene Expression/genetics
Glial Fibrillary Acidic Protein/genetics
Heme Oxygenase-1/genetics
Heme Oxygenase-1/metabolism
Membrane Proteins/genetics
Parkinson Disease/genetics
[Mh] MeSH terms secundary: Animals
Autophagy
Cells, Cultured
Dopamine/metabolism
Humans
Mice, Transgenic
Mitochondria/pathology
Oxidative Stress
Parkinson Disease/metabolism
Parkinson Disease/pathology
alpha-Synuclein/metabolism
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Nm] Name of substance:0 (Glial Fibrillary Acidic Protein); 0 (Membrane Proteins); 0 (alpha-Synuclein); EC 1.14.14.18 (HMOX1 protein, human); EC 1.14.14.18 (Heme Oxygenase-1); EC 1.14.14.18 (Hmox1 protein, mouse); VTD58H1Z2X (Dopamine)
[Em] Entry month:1802
[Cu] Class update date: 180214
[Lr] Last revision date:180214
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[Da] Date of entry for processing:170727
[St] Status:MEDLINE

  10 / 1827 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29429117
[Au] Autor:Morelli N; Rota E; Immovilli P; Marchesi G; Michieletti E; Guidetti D
[Ad] Address:Neurology Unit, Guglielmo da Saliceto Hospital, Via Taverna 49, 29121, Piacenza, Italy. nicola.morelli.md@gmail.com.
[Ti] Title:CT and MR myelography in superficial siderosis.
[So] Source:Neurol Sci;, 2018 Feb 10.
[Is] ISSN:1590-3478
[Cp] Country of publication:Italy
[La] Language:eng
[Pt] Publication type:LETTER
[Em] Entry month:1802
[Cu] Class update date: 180211
[Lr] Last revision date:180211
[St] Status:Publisher
[do] DOI:10.1007/s10072-018-3271-z


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