Database : MEDLINE
Search on : Speech and Disorders [Words]
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[PMID]: 29522634
[Au] Autor:De Ciervo F; Willimburgh V; Finvarb G
[Ad] Address:Hospital de Niños "Dr. Ricardo Gutiérrez", Ciudad de Buenos Aires. facundo.dc@hotmail.com.
[Ti] Title:Encefalitis por anticuerpos contra el receptor N-metil-D-aspartato: presentación clínica en un adolescente y revisión de la literatura. ¿Cómo manejar los síntomas neuropsiquiátricos? [N-Methyl-D-Aspartate receptor encephalitis: An adolescent case report and literature review. How to manage neuropsychiatric symptoms].
[So] Source:Vertex;XXVIII(132):128-135, 2017 Mar.
[Is] ISSN:0327-6139
[Cp] Country of publication:Argentina
[La] Language:spa
[Ab] Abstract:Anti-N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor encephalitis was described as a clinical entity in 2007. The present case report aims to describe the signs and symptoms, differential diagnosis, treatment and course of a sixteen-year-old boy with this disorder who was hospitalized for almost two months. In addition, we will expose the therapeutic management and the diffculties presented in the handling of neuropsychiatric symptoms, considering the complex context of heterogeneous clinical manifestations caused by this disorder. The authors conducted a PubMed, LILACS and Cochrane search and added supplementary methods to compile the major quantity of evidence to support the clinical decisions. To date no systematic reviews or clinical guidelines about the management of psychiatric symptoms in adolescents with this condition were found. Only case reports and series of cases are available. The quality of evidence is poor as long as there are not analytic studies available. The adolescent presented to the emergency department with confusion, speech disturbances and right brachio-crural hemiparesis. During the course of hospitalization he developed a catatonic syndrome, several episodes of psychomotor agitation, sleep disorders and psychotic symptoms. He received successive immunomodulatory therapy for autoimmune encephalitis and psychiatric medication. He was discharged with recovery almost ad integrum. In conclusion, the diagnosis of anti-rNMDA encephalitis should be suspected in previously healthy adolescents with no psychopathological antecedents who suddenly present psychiatric and neurological symptoms. The evolution and prognosis depend on the early initiation of immunomodulating therapy. Psychiatrists should be aware and suspect this entity rapidly and play an important role as consultants for the management of psychiatric and behavioral disturbances.
[Pt] Publication type:ENGLISH ABSTRACT; JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1803
[Cu] Class update date: 180309
[Lr] Last revision date:180309
[St] Status:In-Data-Review

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Clinical Trials Registry
Full text

[PMID]: 29394251
[Au] Autor:Feinstein JS; Khalsa SS; Yeh HW; Wohlrab C; Simmons WK; Stein MB; Paulus MP
[Ad] Address:Laureate Institute for Brain Research, Tulsa, Oklahoma, United States of America.
[Ti] Title:Examining the short-term anxiolytic and antidepressant effect of Floatation-REST.
[So] Source:PLoS One;13(2):e0190292, 2018.
[Is] ISSN:1932-6203
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Floatation-REST (Reduced Environmental Stimulation Therapy) reduces sensory input to the nervous system through the act of floating supine in a pool of water saturated with Epsom salt. The float experience is calibrated so that sensory signals from visual, auditory, olfactory, gustatory, thermal, tactile, vestibular, gravitational and proprioceptive channels are minimized, as is most movement and speech. This open-label study aimed to examine whether Floatation-REST would attenuate symptoms of anxiety, stress, and depression in a clinical sample. Fifty participants were recruited across a spectrum of anxiety and stress-related disorders (posttraumatic stress, generalized anxiety, panic, agoraphobia, and social anxiety), most (n = 46) with comorbid unipolar depression. Measures of self-reported affect were collected immediately before and after a 1-hour float session, with the primary outcome measure being the pre- to post-float change score on the Spielberger State Anxiety Inventory. Irrespective of diagnosis, Floatation-REST substantially reduced state anxiety (estimated Cohen's d > 2). Moreover, participants reported significant reductions in stress, muscle tension, pain, depression and negative affect, accompanied by a significant improvement in mood characterized by increases in serenity, relaxation, happiness and overall well-being (p < .0001 for all variables). In reference to a group of 30 non-anxious participants, the effects were found to be more robust in the anxious sample and approaching non-anxious levels during the post-float period. Further analysis revealed that the most severely anxious participants reported the largest effects. Overall, the procedure was well-tolerated, with no major safety concerns stemming from this single session. The findings from this initial study need to be replicated in larger controlled trials, but suggest that Floatation-REST may be a promising technique for transiently reducing the suffering in those with anxiety and depression. TRIAL REGISTRATION: ClinicalTrials.gov NCT03051074.
[Mh] MeSH terms primary: Anxiety/therapy
Depression/therapy
Sensory Deprivation
[Mh] MeSH terms secundary: Adult
Female
Humans
Male
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE; RESEARCH SUPPORT, NON-U.S. GOV'T
[Em] Entry month:1803
[Cu] Class update date: 180309
[Lr] Last revision date:180309
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[Da] Date of entry for processing:180203
[Cl] Clinical Trial:ClinicalTrial
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.1371/journal.pone.0190292

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[PMID]: 29385009
[Au] Autor:Mei C; Anderson V; Waugh MC; Cahill L; Morgan AT; TBI Guideline Development Group
[Ad] Address:Murdoch Children's Research Institute, Melbourne, Victoria, Australia (Drs Mei, Anderson, and Morgan); University of Melbourne, Melbourne, Victoria, Australia (Drs Anderson and Morgan); The Royal Children's Hospital, Melbourne, Victoria, Australia (Dr Anderson); Children's Hospital at Westmead, Sydney, New South Wales, Australia (Dr Waugh); and Lady Cilento Children's Hospital, Brisbane, Queensland, Australia (Dr Cahill).
[Ti] Title:Evidence- and Consensus-Based Guidelines for the Management of Communication and Swallowing Disorders Following Pediatric Traumatic Brain Injury.
[So] Source:J Head Trauma Rehabil;, 2018 Jan 30.
[Is] ISSN:1550-509X
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:OBJECTIVE: Evidence-based management guidelines for communication and swallowing disorders following pediatric traumatic brain injury (TBI) are scarcely available, potentially resulting in suboptimal outcomes. To improve clinical care of this population, a multidisciplinary guideline development committee was formed to develop evidence-based recommendation (EBR) and consensus-based recommendation (CBR) for the management of speech, language, and swallowing disorders during the first year of recovery. METHODS: A 3-round Delphi survey was completed by the committee to reach agreement (80% consensus) for the CBRs. Systematic review evidence guided development of EBRs, devised using the National Health and Medical Research Council statement form. RESULTS: Altogether, 30 recommendations (5 EBRs and 25 CBRs) were developed to guide management of speech, language, and swallowing disorders, including prediction of these disorders; health team required, optimal timing of assessment; assessment tools; intervention strategies and commencement of treatment; and key information to support parents. CONCLUSION: The developed recommendations provide a basis for the systematic management of communication and swallowing disorders to be refined as new evidence emerges. Key recommendations include screening of children with moderate/severe TBI for these disorders acutely using specified measures. Patients with severe TBI and prolonged ventilation are a particular at-risk group and should be considered for early referral to speech-language pathology to support timely diagnosis and management. No evidence was identified to support an EBR for treatment, highlighting a key area for research.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1802
[Cu] Class update date: 180309
[Lr] Last revision date:180309
[St] Status:Publisher
[do] DOI:10.1097/HTR.0000000000000366

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Cardoso, Ana Cláudia Vieira

[PMID]: 29236907
[Au] Autor:Picoloto LA; Cardoso ACV; Cerqueira AV; Oliveira CMC
[Ad] Address:Faculdade de Filosofia e Ciências da Universidade Estadual Paulista - UNESP - Marília (SP), Brasil.
[Ti] Title:Efeito da retroalimentação auditiva atrasada na gagueira com e sem alteração do processamento auditivo central. Effect of delayed auditory feedback on stuttering with and without central auditory processing disorders.
[So] Source:Codas;29(6):e20170038, 2017 Dec 07.
[Is] ISSN:2317-1782
[Cp] Country of publication:Brazil
[La] Language:por; eng
[Ab] Abstract:PURPOSE: To verify the effect of delayed auditory feedback on speech fluency of individuals who stutter with and without central auditory processing disorders. METHODS: The participants were twenty individuals with stuttering from 7 to 17 years old and were divided into two groups: Stuttering Group with Auditory Processing Disorders (SGAPD): 10 individuals with central auditory processing disorders, and Stuttering Group (SG): 10 individuals without central auditory processing disorders. Procedures were: fluency assessment with non-altered auditory feedback (NAF) and delayed auditory feedback (DAF), assessment of the stuttering severity and central auditory processing (CAP). Phono Tools software was used to cause a delay of 100 milliseconds in the auditory feedback. The "Wilcoxon Signal Post" test was used in the intragroup analysis and "Mann-Whitney" test in the intergroup analysis. RESULTS: The DAF caused a statistically significant reduction in SG: in the frequency score of stuttering-like disfluencies in the analysis of the Stuttering Severity Instrument, in the amount of blocks and repetitions of monosyllabic words, and in the frequency of stuttering-like disfluencies of duration. Delayed auditory feedback did not cause statistically significant effects on SGAPD fluency, individuals with stuttering with auditory processing disorders. CONCLUSION: The effect of delayed auditory feedback in speech fluency of individuals who stutter was different in individuals of both groups, because there was an improvement in fluency only in individuals without auditory processing disorder.
[Mh] MeSH terms primary: Auditory Perceptual Disorders/physiopathology
Stuttering/physiopathology
[Mh] MeSH terms secundary: Adolescent
Child
Feedback, Sensory/physiology
Female
Humans
Male
Severity of Illness Index
Speech Perception/physiology
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1803
[Cu] Class update date: 180309
[Lr] Last revision date:180309
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[Da] Date of entry for processing:171214
[St] Status:MEDLINE

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[PMID]: 29236903
[Au] Autor:Barberena LDS; Simoni SN; Souza RCS; Moraes DAO; Berti LC; Keske-Soares M
[Ad] Address:Departamento de Fonoaudiologia, Universidade Federal de Santa Maria - UFSM - Santa Maria (RS), Brasil.
[Ti] Title:Análise quantitativa das curvas de língua na avaliação ultrassonográfica da fala para o som [j] em adultos e crianças. Ultrasound analysis of tongue contour for the sound [j] in adults and children.
[So] Source:Codas;29(6):e20160214, 2017 Dec 11.
[Is] ISSN:2317-1782
[Cp] Country of publication:Brazil
[La] Language:por; eng
[Ab] Abstract:PURPOSE: Analyze and compare the mean tongue contours and articulatory gestures in the production of the sound [j] in adults and children with typical and atypical speech development. The children with atypical development presented speech sound disorders. METHODS: The diagnosis was determined by speech assessments. The study sample was composed of 90 individuals divided into three groups: 30 adults with typical speech development aged 19-44 years (AT), 30 children with typical speech development (CT), and 30 children with speech sound disorders, named as atypical in this study, aged four years to eight years and eleven months (CA). Ultrasonography assessment of tongue movements was performed for all groups. Mean tongue contours were compared between three groups in different vocalic contexts following the sound [j]. The maximum elevation of the tongue tip was considered for delimitation of gestures using the Articulate Assistant Advanced (AAA) software and images in sagittal plane/Mode B. The points that intercepted the language curves were analyzed by the statistical tool R. The graphs of tongue contours were obtained adopting a 95% confidence interval. After that, the regions with significant statistical differences (p<0.05) between the CT and CA groups were obtained. RESULTS: The mean tongue contours demonstrated the gesture for the sound [j] in the comparison between typical and atypical children. For the semivowel [j], there is an articulatory gesture of tongue and dorsum towards the center of ​​the hard palate, with significant differences observed between the children. CONCLUSION: The results showed differences between the groups of children regarding the ability to refine articulatory gestures.
[Mh] MeSH terms primary: Speech Sound Disorder/diagnostic imaging
Tongue
[Mh] MeSH terms secundary: Adult
Articulation Disorders/diagnostic imaging
Brazil
Case-Control Studies
Child
Child, Preschool
Female
Humans
Male
Tongue/anatomy & histology
Tongue/diagnostic imaging
Tongue/physiopathology
Ultrasonography
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1803
[Cu] Class update date: 180309
[Lr] Last revision date:180309
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[Da] Date of entry for processing:171214
[St] Status:MEDLINE

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[PMID]: 29442165
[Au] Autor:Uloza V; Latoszek BBV; Ulozaite-Staniene N; Petrauskas T; Maryn Y
[Ad] Address:Department of Otolaryngology, Lithuanian University of Health Sciences, Kaunas, Lithuania.
[Ti] Title:A comparison of Dysphonia Severity Index and Acoustic Voice Quality Index measures in differentiating normal and dysphonic voices.
[So] Source:Eur Arch Otorhinolaryngol;275(4):949-958, 2018 Apr.
[Is] ISSN:1434-4726
[Cp] Country of publication:Germany
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:PURPOSE: The aim of the study was to investigate and compare the feasibility and robustness of the Acoustic Voice Quality Index (AVQI) and the Dysphonia Severity Index (DSI) in diagnostic accuracy, differentiating normal and dysphonic voices. METHODS: A group of 264 subjects with normal voices (n = 105) and with various voice disorders (n = 159) were asked to read aloud a text and to sustain the vowel /a/. Both speech tasks were concatenated, and perceptually rated for dysphonia severity by five voice clinicians. They rated the Grade (G) and the overall dysphonia severity with a visual analog scale (VAS). All concatenated voice samples were acoustically analyzed to receive an AVQI score. For DSI analysis, the required voice parameters were obtained from the sustained phonation of the vowel /a/. RESULTS: The results achieved significant and marked concurrent validity between both auditory-perceptual judgment procedures and both acoustic voice measures. The DSI threshold (i.e., DSI = 3.30) pertaining to G obtained reasonable sensitivity of 85.8% and specificity of 83.4%. For VAS , the DSI threshold of 3.30 was determined also with reasonable sensitivity of 70.3% and excellent specificity of 93.9%. Also, the AVQI threshold (i.e., AVQI = 3.31) pertaining to G demonstrated reasonable sensitivity of 78.1% and excellent specificity of 92.0%. For VAS , an AVQI threshold of 3.33 was determined with excellent sensitivity of 97.0% and reasonable specificity of 81.8%. CONLUSION: The outcomes of the present study indicate comparable results between DSI and AVQI with a high level of validity to discriminate between normal and dysphonic voices. However, a higher level of accuracy was yielded for AVQI as a correlate of auditory perceptual judgment suggesting a reliable voice screening potential of AVQI.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1802
[Cu] Class update date: 180309
[Lr] Last revision date:180309
[St] Status:In-Process
[do] DOI:10.1007/s00405-018-4903-x

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[PMID]: 29437235
[Au] Autor:Rangel-Sosa MM; Figuera-Villanueva LE; González-Ramos IA; Pérez-Páramo YX; Martínez-Jacobo LA; Arnaud-López L; Nastasi-Catanese JA; Rivas-Estilla AM; Galán-Huerta KA; Rojas-Martínez A; Ortiz-López R; Córdova-Fletes C
[Ad] Address:Departamento de Bioquímica y Medicina Molecular, Facultad de Medicina, Universidad Autónoma de Nuevo León, Monterrey, Mexico.
[Ti] Title:Exome sequencing reveals three homozygous missense variants in SNRPA in two sisters with syndromic intellectual disability.
[So] Source:Clin Genet;, 2018 Feb 13.
[Is] ISSN:1399-0004
[Cp] Country of publication:Denmark
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Splicing-related gene mutations might affect the expression of a single gene or multiple genes and cause clinically heterogeneous diseases. With the advent of next-generation sequencing, several splicing gene mutations have been exposed, yet most major spliceosome genes have no reports of germline mutations and therefore, their effects are largely unknown. We describe the previously unreported concurrence of intellectual disability, short stature, poor speech, and minor craniofacial and hand anomalies in 2 female siblings with 3 homozygous missense variants in SNRPA (a component of the U1 small nuclear ribonucleoprotein complex) characterized by homozygosity mapping and whole exome sequencing. Combined, c.97A>G, c.98T>C, and c.100T>A, in exon 2 of SNRPA lead to p.Ile33Ala and p.Phe34Ile exchanges, which were predicted in silico to be deleterious. Although both patients exhibited some clinical features seen in other spliceosomal disorders, their complete clinical phenotype appears to be rather uncommon, a finding that may further support the notion that mutations in components of the major spliceosome do not strictly lead to the same syndromes/phenotypes.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1802
[Cu] Class update date: 180309
[Lr] Last revision date:180309
[St] Status:Publisher
[do] DOI:10.1111/cge.13235

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[PMID]: 29400043
[Au] Autor:Ruiz Y; Orive D; Coulombeau B; Perouse R
[Ti] Title:[Dysphonia in children: Retrospective and comparative study between the late 1980s and today].
[So] Source:Rev Laryngol Otol Rhinol (Bord);136(5):185-92, 2015.
[Is] ISSN:0035-1334
[Cp] Country of publication:France
[La] Language:fre
[Ab] Abstract:Child dysphonia is a frequent pathological situation which concerns 6 to 38 percent of a school attending population. Thus it demands a specific and adapted treatment. Because of its direct consequences on social, family and school lives, parents often seek advice from a speech specialist. This study focuses on the specificities of those individuals having diagnosed child dysphonia, as well as the treatment which can be given to them. Our work covers a period of twenty years of comparative studies. We have read through dr Coulombeau's files, from 2005 to 2011, and we have made up a series of questions addressed to the speech therapists having speech impaired children in their practice. We have cross-examined these data with those of Dr Cornut's, covering a period of seven years (1985-1991). The qualitative and quantitative studies which have been carried out enabled us to highlight the fact there has been a constant background of child dysphonia and an evolution in the offered treatments. Indeed, we have realised that the number of individuals having diagnosed child dysphonia are less and less operated on. In the same time people tend to ignore the offered treatments. Though the follow-ups to a prior visit at a speech therapist have decreased for twenty years, it still remains the most common treatment. Our analysis does not focus on the effects of the given treatments on a long term basis. It thus appears that a study consisting in analysing the development of these children through adulthood would be greatly accurate.
[Mh] MeSH terms primary: Dysphonia/therapy
[Mh] MeSH terms secundary: Dysphonia/diagnosis
Humans
Referral and Consultation/trends
Retrospective Studies
Speech Therapy/trends
Watchful Waiting/trends
[Pt] Publication type:COMPARATIVE STUDY; JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1803
[Cu] Class update date: 180308
[Lr] Last revision date:180308
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[Da] Date of entry for processing:180206
[St] Status:MEDLINE

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[PMID]: 29400042
[Au] Autor:Vatin L; Lagier A; Legou T; Galant C; Arnaud-Pellet MN; Hadj M; Cheynet F; Chossegros C; Giovanni A
[Ti] Title:[Dynamic palatography: Diagnostic tool for dysfunc­tional swallowing? Feasibility study].
[So] Source:Rev Laryngol Otol Rhinol (Bord);136(5):181-4, 2015.
[Is] ISSN:0035-1334
[Cp] Country of publication:France
[La] Language:fre
[Ab] Abstract:Objective: Dysfunctional swallowing may cause transverse occlusal disorders. The speech re-education of dysfunctional swallowing aims to correct or prevent the recurrence of occlu­sal disorders. The main objective was to test the dynamic palato­graphy as a diagnosis and quantification tool of the dysfunctional swallowing. Material and methods: The study was prospective and descriptive. Twelve average 23.5 years old women with a clinical dysfunctional swallowing have been included between January and May 2014. None was aware of presenting an atypical swallowing or dento-facial dysmorphism of class II. The dynamic palatography device measured the pressure force of the language on the palate during the lingual rest, swallowing saliva and water. Parameters measured were the duration and magnitude of support of the tongue on the palate. Results: Dynamic palatography showed a trend to predominant anterior contact during rest position (25%), and lower position of the language with little contact during swallo­wing of saliva and water. Discussion: Palatography results are consistent with the clinical diagnostic criteria of atypical swallo­wing. Our palatography tool has the advantage of being unobtrusive in the mouth compared to other pre existing systems. This device should be tested on larger patient popu­la­tions and could enable monitore atypical swallowing rehabili­ta­tion efficiency. The palatography could complete the swallo­wing assessment and be a monitoring and rehabilitation tool in real time.
[Mh] MeSH terms primary: Deglutition Disorders/diagnosis
Speech Production Measurement/instrumentation
[Mh] MeSH terms secundary: Adolescent
Adult
Feasibility Studies
Female
Humans
Prospective Studies
Young Adult
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1803
[Cu] Class update date: 180308
[Lr] Last revision date:180308
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[Da] Date of entry for processing:180206
[St] Status:MEDLINE

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[PMID]: 29516757
[Au] Autor:Beales A; Whitworth A; Cartwright J; Panegyres PK; Kane RT
[Ad] Address:a School of Psychology and Speech Pathology , Curtin University , Perth , Australia and.
[Ti] Title:Determining stability in connected speech in primary progressive aphasia and Alzheimer's disease.
[So] Source:Int J Speech Lang Pathol;:1-10, 2018 Mar 08.
[Is] ISSN:1754-9515
[Cp] Country of publication:England
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:PURPOSE: Using connected speech to assess progressive language disorders is confounded by uncertainty around whether connected speech is stable over successive sampling, and therefore representative of an individual's performance, and whether some contexts and/or language behaviours show greater stability than others. METHOD: A repeated measure, within groups, research design was used to investigate stability of a range of behaviours in the connected speech of six individuals with primary progressive aphasia and three individuals with Alzheimer's disease. Stability was evaluated, at a group and individual level, across three samples, collected over 3 weeks, involving everyday monologue, narrative and picture description, and analysed for lexical content, fluency and communicative informativeness and efficiency. RESULT: Excellent and significant stability was found on the majority of measures, at a group and individual level, across all genres, with isolated measures (e.g. nouns use, communicative efficiency) showing good, but greater variability, within one of the three genres. CONCLUSION: Findings provide evidence of stability on measures of lexical content, fluency and communicative informativeness and efficiency. While preliminary evidence suggests that task selection is influential when considering stability of particular connected speech measures, replication over a larger sample is necessary to reproduce findings.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1803
[Cu] Class update date: 180308
[Lr] Last revision date:180308
[St] Status:Publisher
[do] DOI:10.1080/17549507.2018.1442498


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