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[PMID]: 29510737
[Au] Autor:Falchi L; Galleri G; Dore GM; Zedda MT; Pau S; Bogliolo L; Ariu F; Pinna A; Nieddu S; Innocenzi P; Ledda S
[Ad] Address:Dipartimento di Medicina Veterinaria, Università degli Studi di Sassari, Sassari, Italy. lfalchi@uniss.it.
[Ti] Title:Effect of exposure to CeO nanoparticles on ram spermatozoa during storage at 4 °C for 96 hours.
[So] Source:Reprod Biol Endocrinol;16(1):19, 2018 Mar 06.
[Is] ISSN:1477-7827
[Cp] Country of publication:England
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:BACKGROUND: Cerium oxide nanoparticles (CeO NPs) are able to store and release oxygen, conferring them scavenger activity against oxidative stress. However, their effects in reproductive systems are not yet well understood. The aim of the study was to investigate the effects of exposure of refrigerated ram semen to CeO NPs for 96 h on the main structural and kinematic parameters of spermatozoa. METHODS: The ejaculates of 5 Sarda rams were collected, pooled and diluted in a soybean lecithin extender. Samples were exposed to increasing doses of CeO NPs (0, 44 and 220 µg/mL) and stored at 4 °C for 96 h. Analyses of kinematic parameters (computer assisted sperm analysis, CASA), integrity of membranes (PI/PSA staining), ROS production (H DCFDA staining) and DNA damage (sperm chromatin structure assay with acridine orange, SCSA) were performed every 24 h (0, 24, 48, 72 and 96 h of incubation). The experiment was carried out in 6 replicates. Data were analysed by repeated measures ANOVA with Bonferroni's as post hoc test. When the assumption of normality was not met (ROS), non-parametric Kruskal-Wallis rank test was carried out. RESULTS: Exposure of ram spermatozoa to increasing doses of CeO NPs had a beneficial effect on the main motility parameters from 48 h of incubation onward. Velocity of sperm cells was enhanced in the groups exposed to CeO NPs compared to the control. Incubation with NPs had beneficial effects on the integrity of plasma membranes of spermatozoa, with higher percentage of damaged cells in the control group compared to the exposed ones. Production of ROS was not affected by exposure to NPs and its levels rose at 96 h of incubation. The integrity of DNA remained stable throughout the 96 h of storage regardless of co-incubation with NPs. CONCLUSIONS: We reported beneficial effects of CeO NPs on kinematic and morphologic parameters of ram semen, such as motility and membrane integrity following 96 h of exposure. Furthermore, we also proved no genotoxic effects of CeO NPs. These effects could not be related to an antioxidant activity of CeO NPs, since ROS levels in exposed cells were similar to those of unexposed ones.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1803
[Cu] Class update date: 180311
[Lr] Last revision date:180311
[St] Status:In-Process
[do] DOI:10.1186/s12958-018-0339-9

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[PMID]: 29385186
[Au] Autor:Eladak S; Moison D; Guerquin MJ; Matilionyte G; Kilcoyne K; N'Tumba-Byn T; Messiaen S; Deceuninck Y; Pozzi-Gaudin S; Benachi A; Livera G; Antignac JP; Mitchell R; Rouiller-Fabre V; Habert R
[Ad] Address:Univ. Paris Diderot, Sorbonne Paris Cité, Laboratory of Development of the Gonads, Unit of Genetic Stability, Stem Cells and Radiation, Fontenay-aux-Roses, France.
[Ti] Title:Effects of environmental Bisphenol A exposures on germ cell development and Leydig cell function in the human fetal testis.
[So] Source:PLoS One;13(1):e0191934, 2018.
[Is] ISSN:1932-6203
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:BACKGROUND: Using an organotypic culture system termed human Fetal Testis Assay (hFeTA) we previously showed that 0.01 µM BPA decreases basal, but not LH-stimulated, testosterone secreted by the first trimester human fetal testis. The present study was conducted to determine the potential for a long-term antiandrogenic effect of BPA using a xenograft model, and also to study the effect of BPA on germ cell development using both the hFETA and xenograft models. METHODS: Using the hFeTA system, first trimester testes were cultured for 3 days with 0.01 to 10 µM BPA. For xenografts, adult castrate male nude mice were injected with hCG and grafted with first trimester testes. Host mice received 10 µM BPA (~ 500 µg/kg/day) in their drinking water for 5 weeks. Plasma levels of total and unconjugated BPA were 0.10 µM and 0.038 µM respectively. Mice grafted with second trimester testes received 0.5 and 50 µg/kg/day BPA by oral gavage for 5 weeks. RESULTS: With first trimester human testes, using the hFeTA model, 10 µM BPA increased germ cell apoptosis. In xenografts, germ cell density was also reduced by BPA exposure. Importantly, BPA exposure significantly decreased the percentage of germ cells expressing the pluripotency marker AP-2γ, whilst the percentage of those expressing the pre-spermatogonial marker MAGE-A4 significantly increased. BPA exposure did not affect hCG-stimulated androgen production in first and second trimester xenografts as evaluated by both plasma testosterone level and seminal vesicle weight in host mice. CONCLUSIONS: Exposure to BPA at environmentally relevant concentrations impairs germ cell development in first trimester human fetal testis, whilst gonadotrophin-stimulated testosterone production was unaffected in both first and second trimester testis. Studies using first trimester human fetal testis demonstrate the complementarity of the FeTA and xenograft models for determining the respective short-term and long term effects of environmental exposures.
[Mh] MeSH terms primary: Benzhydryl Compounds/toxicity
Environmental Pollutants/toxicity
Leydig Cells/drug effects
Phenols/toxicity
Spermatozoa/drug effects
Testis/drug effects
[Mh] MeSH terms secundary: Animals
Female
Heterografts
Humans
Male
Mice
Mice, Nude
Pregnancy
Pregnancy Trimester, First
Pregnancy Trimester, Second
Radioimmunoassay
Real-Time Polymerase Chain Reaction
Reverse Transcriptase Polymerase Chain Reaction
Testis/cytology
Testis/embryology
Testosterone/blood
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Nm] Name of substance:0 (Benzhydryl Compounds); 0 (Environmental Pollutants); 0 (Phenols); 3XMK78S47O (Testosterone); MLT3645I99 (bisphenol A)
[Em] Entry month:1803
[Cu] Class update date: 180309
[Lr] Last revision date:180309
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[Da] Date of entry for processing:180201
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.1371/journal.pone.0191934

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[PMID]: 28450256
[Au] Autor:Dietrich MA; Irnazarow I; Ciereszko A
[Ad] Address:Department of Gametes and Embryo Biology, Institute of Animal Reproduction and Food Research, Polish Academy of Sciences, Tuwima 10, 10-748 Olsztyn, Poland. Electronic address: m.dietrich@pan.olsztyn.pl.
[Ti] Title:Proteomic identification of seminal plasma proteins related to the freezability of carp semen.
[So] Source:J Proteomics;162:52-61, 2017 Jun 06.
[Is] ISSN:1876-7737
[Cp] Country of publication:Netherlands
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:The variation in sperm freezability among individuals within a fish species is a major factor justifying the identification of useful predictive indicators of cryopreservation success. It is unknown at present whether the protein composition of fish seminal plasma affects sperm freezability. Therefore, the aims of this study were to compare the proteome of carp seminal plasma from semen rated as good (GF) and poor (PF) freezability by two-dimensional difference gel electrophoresis followed by MALDI-TOF/TOF mass spectrometry. The semen was classified as GF and PF based on sperm motility assessment after freeze/thawing. Five spots representing three proteins were more abundant in GF, while ten spots representing seven proteins were more abundant in PF seminal plasma. The majority of proteins present in higher abundance in PF seminal plasma were associated with the innate immune response. On the other hand, higher freezability was associated with proteins involved in the maintenance of sperm membrane integrity and antioxidative protection. These results indicate that carp semen freezability levels may be related to different seminal plasma protein profiles. Lower usefulness of spermatozoa in cryopreservation may be related to previous infection or stress leading to sublethal changes to sperm structure. SIGNIFICANCE: Sperm quality parameters such as motility, viability and sperm concentration have been used as predictive tools of sperm cryopreservation potential in fish species However, the usefulness of initial motility parameters as indicators of freezability varies among fish species and between individuals within a species. Recent studies in mammals revealed that male-to-male variability in cryoresistance can be attributed to differences in seminal plasma protein composition. To the best of our knowledge, no proteomic studies linking the protein composition of fish seminal plasma and freezing resilience have been performed in fish. Our results indicate for the first time that factors regulating how carp semen tolerate cryopreservation may be related to the different protein profiles of carp seminal plasma. The obtained results provide new insight into understanding the molecular mechanisms underlying cryoresistance of carp semen and provide a tool for the improvement of a long-term sperm preservation procedure.
[Mh] MeSH terms primary: Carps
Freezing
Semen/chemistry
Seminal Plasma Proteins/analysis
[Mh] MeSH terms secundary: Animals
Cryopreservation
Male
Proteomics/methods
Semen/cytology
Spermatozoa/cytology
Tandem Mass Spectrometry
Two-Dimensional Difference Gel Electrophoresis
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Nm] Name of substance:0 (Seminal Plasma Proteins)
[Em] Entry month:1803
[Cu] Class update date: 180309
[Lr] Last revision date:180309
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[Da] Date of entry for processing:170429
[St] Status:MEDLINE

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[PMID]: 29518349
[Au] Autor:Gallego V; Asturiano JF
[Ti] Title:Sperm motility in fish: technical applications and perspectives through CASA-Mot systems.
[So] Source:Reprod Fertil Dev;, 2018 Mar 09.
[Is] ISSN:1031-3613
[Cp] Country of publication:Australia
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Although a relatively high number of sperm quality biomarkers have been reported over the years in several fish species, sperm motility is nowadays considered the best biomarker for fish spermatozoa. The first scientific reports focusing on fish sperm motility date from a century ago, but the objective assessment allowed by computer-aided sperm analysis (CASA-Mot) systems was not applied to fish species until the mid-1980s. Since then, a high number of sperm kinetic parameters from more than 170 fish species have been reported in more than 700 scientific articles, covering a wide range of topics, such as sperm physiology, sperm storage, broodstock management, the phenomenon of sperm competition, ecotoxicology and understanding the life cycle of the species. The sperm kinetic parameters provided by CASA-Mot systems can serve as powerful and useful tools for aquaculture and ecological purposes, and this review provides an overview of the major research areas in which fish sperm motility assessment by a CASA-Mot system has been used successfully.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1803
[Cu] Class update date: 180308
[Lr] Last revision date:180308
[St] Status:Publisher
[do] DOI:10.1071/RD17460

  5 / 61314 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29451144
[Au] Autor:Ding SS; Sun P; Zhang Z; Liu X; Tian H; Huo YW; Wang LR; Han Y; Xing JP
[Ad] Address:Department of Urology, School of Medicine, The First Affiliated Hospital, Xi'an Jiaotong University, Xi'an, Shaanxi 710061, China.
[Ti] Title:Moderate Dose of Trolox Preventing the Deleterious Effects of Wi-Fi Radiation on Spermatozoa through Reduction of Oxidative Stress Damage.
[So] Source:Chin Med J (Engl);131(4):402-412, 2018 Feb 20.
[Is] ISSN:0366-6999
[Cp] Country of publication:China
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Background: The worsening of semen quality, due to the application of Wi-Fi, can be ameliorated by Vitamin E. This study aimed to demonstrate whether a moderate dose of trolox, a new Vitamin E, inhibits oxidative damage on sperms in vitro after exposure to Wi-Fi radiation. Methods: Each of the twenty qualified semen, gathered from June to October 2014 in eugenics clinic, was separated into four aliquots, including sham, Wi-Fi-exposed, Wi-Fi plus 5 mmol/L trolox, and Wi-Fi plus 10 mmol/L trolox groups. At 0 min, all baseline parameters of the 20 samples were measured in sequence. Reactive oxygen species, glutathione, and superoxide dismutase were evaluated in the four aliquots at 45 and 90 min, as were sperm DNA fragments, sperm mitochondrial potential, relative amplification of sperm mitochondrial DNA, sperm vitality, and progressive and immotility sperm. The parameters were analyzed by one-way analysis of variance and Tukey's posttest. Results: Among Wi-Fi plus 5 mmol/L trolox, Wi-Fi-exposed and Wi-Fi plus 10 mmol/L trolox groups, reactive oxygen species levels (45 min: 3.80 ± 0.41 RLU·10 ·ml vs. 7.50 ± 0.35 RLU·10 ·ml vs. 6.70 ± 0.47 RLU·10 ·ml , P < 0.001; 90 min: 5.40 ± 0.21 RLU·10 ·ml vs. 10.10 ± 0.31 RLU·10 ·ml vs. 7.00 ± 0.42 RLU·10 ·ml , P < 0.001, respectively), percentages of tail DNA (45 min: 16.8 ± 2.0% vs. 31.9 ± 2.5% vs. 61.3 ± 1.6%, P < 0.001; 90 min: 19.7 ± 1.5% vs. 73.7 ± 1.3% vs. 73.1 ± 1.1%, P < 0.001, respectively), 8-hydroxy-2'-deoxyguanosine (45 min: 51.89 ± 1.46 pg/ml vs. 104.89 ± 2.19 pg/ml vs. 106.11 ± 1.81 pg/ml , P = 0.012; 90 min: 79.96 ± 1.73 pg/ml vs. 141.73 ± 2.90 pg/ml vs. 139.06 ± 2.79 pg/ml; P < 0.001), and percentages of immotility sperm (45 min: 27.7 ± 2.7% vs. 41.7 ± 2.2% vs. 41.7 ± 2.5%; 90 min: 29.9 ± 3.3% vs. 58.9 ± 4.0% vs. 63.1 ± 4.0%; all P < 0.001) were lowest, and glutathione peroxidase (45 min: 60.50 ± 1.54 U/ml vs. 37.09 ± 1.77 U/ml vs. 28.18 ± 1.06 U/ml; 90 min: 44.61 ± 1.23 U/ml vs. 16.86 ± 0.93 U/ml vs. 29.94 ± 1.56 U/ml; all P < 0.001), percentages of head DNA (45 min: 83.2 ± 2.0% vs. 68.2 ± 2.5% vs. 38.8 ± 1.6%; 90 min: 80.3 ± 1.5% vs. 26.3 ± 1.3% vs. 26.9 ± 1.1%; all P < 0.001), percentages of sperm vitality (45 min: 89.5 ± 1.6% vs. 70.7 ± 3.1% vs. 57.7 ± 2.4%; 90 min: 80.8 ± 2.2% vs. 40.4 ± 4.0% vs. 34.7 ± 3.9%; all P < 0.001), and progressive sperm (45 min: 69.3 ± 2.7% vs. 55.8 ± 2.2% vs. 55.4 ± 2.5%; 90 min: 67.2 ± 3.3% vs. 38.2 ± 4.0% vs. 33.9 ± 4.0%; all P < 0.001) were highest in Wi-Fi plus 5 mmol/L trolox group at 45 and 90 min, respectively. Other parameters were not affected, while the sham group maintained the baseline. Conclusion: This study found that 5 mmol/L trolox protected the Wi-Fi-exposed semen in vitro from the damage of electromagnetic radiation-induced oxidative stress.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1802
[Cu] Class update date: 180309
[Lr] Last revision date:180309
[St] Status:In-Process
[do] DOI:10.4103/0366-6999.225045

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[PMID]: 29514896
[Au] Autor:Andreassen M; Juul A; Feldt-Rasmussen U; Joergensen N
[Ad] Address:M Andreassen, Department of Endocrinology , Rigshospitalet, Copenhagen University Hospital , 2100 Copenhagen , Denmark mikkel.andreassen.01@regionh.dk.
[Ti] Title:Semen quality in patients with pituitary disease and adult-onset hypogonadotropic hypogonadism.
[So] Source:Endocr Connect;, 2018 Mar 07.
[Is] ISSN:2049-3614
[Cp] Country of publication:England
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:OBJECTIVE: Gonadotropins (luteinizing hormone (LH) and follicle stimulating hormone (FSH)) are released from the pituitary gland and stimulate Leydig cells to produce testosterone and initiates spermatogenesis. Little is known about how and when the deterioration of semen quality occurs in patients with adult onset gonadotropin insufficiency Design and methods: A retrospective study comprising 20 testosterone deficient men (median age 29 years) with acquired pituitary disease, who delivered semen for cryopreservation before initiation of testosterone therapy. Semen variables and hormone concentrations were compared to those of young healthy men (n=340) Results: Thirteen of 20 patients (65%) and 82% of controls had total sperm counts above 39 million and progressive motile spermatozoa above 32% (p=0.05). For the individual semen variables there were no significant differences in semen volume (median (intraquartile range)) 3.0 (1.3-6.8) vs. 3.2 (2.3-4.3) mL, p=0.47), sperm concentration 41 (11-71) vs. 43 (22-73) mill/mL (p=0.56) or total sperm counts (p=0.66). One patient had azoospermia. Patients vs. controls had lower serum testosterone 5.4 (2.2-7.6) vs. 19.7 (15.5-24.5) nmol/L (p=0.001), calculated free testosterone (cfT) 145 (56-183) vs. 464 (359-574) pmol/L (p<0.001), LH 1.5 (1.1-2.1) vs. 3.1 (2.3-4.0) U/L (p=0.002), and inhibin b (p<0.001). Levels of FSH were similar (p=0.63). Testosterone/LH ratio and cfT/LH ratio were reduced in patients (both p<0.001) Conclusions Despite Leydig cell insufficiency in patients with acquired pituitary insufficiency, the majority presented with normal semen quality based on determination of the number of progressively motile spermatozoa. In addition, the data suggest reduced LH bioactivity in patients with pituitary insufficiency.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1803
[Cu] Class update date: 180308
[Lr] Last revision date:180308
[St] Status:Publisher

  7 / 61314 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29514735
[Au] Autor:Holt WV; Satake N
[Ti] Title:Making the most of sperm activation responses: experiments with boar spermatozoa and bicarbonate.
[So] Source:Reprod Fertil Dev;, 2018 Mar 08.
[Is] ISSN:1031-3613
[Cp] Country of publication:Australia
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Attempting to extract useful and reliable information about semen quality and its fertility potential remains a difficult exercise, partly because the sperm heterogeneity within samples often renders simple statistical analyses rather meaningless. In fact, a mean and standard deviation may reflect neither the very fast swimming activities of the most active cells nor the slow and sluggish activities of others. Herein we propose that the information value within semen samples can be maximised if current knowledge about sperm activation mechanisms is exploited before undertaking the measurements. We explain, using boar semen as an example, that estimating and defining relative sperm subpopulation sizes, after activation by bicarbonate, provides a means of quantifying sperm quality. Although such estimates may indeed be related to in vivo fertility, the general approach also suggests potential new avenues that could be exploited for the elaboration of novel in vitro tests for the characterisation of toxic environmental chemicals and, indeed, to reduce the number of animals used in such testing programs.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1803
[Cu] Class update date: 180308
[Lr] Last revision date:180308
[St] Status:Publisher
[do] DOI:10.1071/RD17476

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[PMID]: 29453757
[Au] Autor:Sharma S; Hanukoglu A; Hanukoglu I
[Ad] Address:Laboratory of Cell Biology, Ariel University, 40700, Ariel, Israel.
[Ti] Title:Localization of epithelial sodium channel (ENaC) and CFTR in the germinal epithelium of the testis, Sertoli cells, and spermatozoa.
[So] Source:J Mol Histol;49(2):195-208, 2018 Apr.
[Is] ISSN:1567-2387
[Cp] Country of publication:Netherlands
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Spermatogenesis starts within the seminiferous tubules of the testis by mitotic division of spermatogonia that produces spermatocytes. Meiotic division of these spermatocytes produces haploid spermatids that differentiate into spermatozoa. In this study, we examined the expression of ENaC and CFTR (a Cl channel) in rat testicular sections using confocal microscopic immunofluorescence. The structural integrity of the seminiferous tubule sections was verified by precise phalloidin staining of the actin fibers located abundantly at both basal and adluminal tight junctions. The acrosome forming regions in the round spermatids were stained using an FITC coupled lectin (wheat germ agglutinin). In all phases of the germ cells (spermatogonia, spermatocytes, and spermatids) ENaC was localized in cytoplasmic pools. Prior to spermiation, ENaC immunofluorescence appeared along the tails of the spermatids. In spermatozoa isolated from the epididymis, ENaC was localized at the acrosome and a central region of the sperm flagellum. The mature sperm are transcriptionally silent. Hence, we suggest that ENaC subunits in cytoplasmic pools in germ cells serve as the source of ENaC subunits located along the tail of spermatozoa. The locations of ENaC is compatible with a possible role in the acrosomal reaction and sperm mobility. In contrast to ENaC, CFTR immunofluorescence was most strongly observed specifically within the Sertoli cell nuclei. Based on the nuclear localization of CFTR we suggest that, in addition to its role as an ion channel, CFTR may have an independent role in gene regulation within the nuclei.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1802
[Cu] Class update date: 180308
[Lr] Last revision date:180308
[St] Status:In-Process
[do] DOI:10.1007/s10735-018-9759-2

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[PMID]: 29420752
[Au] Autor:Berkovitz A; Dekel Y; Goldstein R; Bsoul S; Machluf Y; Bercovich D
[Ad] Address:Sackler Faculty of Medicine, Tel Aviv University, PO Box 39040, Tel Aviv 6997801, Israel.
[Ti] Title:The significance of human spermatozoa vacuoles can be elucidated by a novel procedure of array comparative genomic hybridization.
[So] Source:Hum Reprod;, 2018 Feb 06.
[Is] ISSN:1460-2350
[Cp] Country of publication:England
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:STUDY QUESTION: Is there an association between spermatozoon genomic stability and vacuolar morphology and location? SUMMARY ANSWER: The genomic stability of spermatozoa is associated with specific characteristics of vacuolar morphology (depth) and location (cellular compartment, i.e. nucleus and equatorial region). WHAT IS KNOWN ALREADY: Genetic anomalies in sperm are correlated with semen abnormalities, yet the advantage of morphologically based selection of spermatozoa for IVF according to current criteria is controversial. Selection criteria based on the number of vacuoles and their size have been proposed and are widely applied. Nevertheless, it has not improved the ICSI success rates, suggesting the currently used vacuole criteria are incomplete. STUDY DESIGN, SIZE, DURATION: Normal sperm according to Motile Sperm Organelle Morphology Examination criteria (MSOME) and common vacuole grading were evaluated. An additional evaluation of sperm vacuole morphology according to novel vacuole criteria (i.e. location and depth) was conducted. An assessment to align these specific vacuolar morphology features with genomic stability was conducted among spermatozoa from infertile patients and healthy fertile donors aged 24-38 between June 2015 and July 2016. PARTICIPANTS/MATERIALS, SETTING, METHODS: Single spermatozoa (n = 53) from 16 infertile patients and 14 fertile donors were morphologically and genetically evaluated. Each spermatozoon was examined morphologically, by ultra-magnification ×6300, and genetically by a novel comparative genomic hybridization protocol, without the use of reference DNA, to assess chromosomal instability as evident by copy number variations (CNV). MAIN RESULTS AND THE ROLE OF CHANCE: We established an association between genomic stability and vacuolar morphology as a base for a new classification according to novel vacuolar criteria, specifically depth and location. Genomic instability was found to be related to these two main features of vacuoles and, surprisingly not to the number and size of vacuoles as in the previously proposed classifications. High CNV spermatozoa were characterized by vacuoles located in the nucleus and/or equatorial segment or by deep vacuoles, while, low CNV spermatozoa were characterized by a complete lack of vacuoles or non-deep vacuoles not located in the nucleus/equatorial segment. A putative threshold of ~265 CNV was deduced to distinguish between genetically stable and unstable spermatozoa, and 94% of the tested spermatozoa segregated accordingly. LIMITATIONS REASONS FOR CAUTION: A relatively small sample of spermatozoa were examined-53 in total. However, the association between vacuoles location and morphology and genomic stability was significant. This is the first study evaluating spermatozoon genomic stability with respect to vacuole morphology according to novel vacuole criteria (i.e. location and depth) and further investigation is warranted to verify the value of these criteria in larger sample size clinical studies. WIDER IMPLICATIONS OF THE FINDINGS: Our results, which are based on spermatozoon vacuoles morphological classification and genomic parameters, indicate an association between vacuoles morphology and location and genomic stability. The data presented herein suggest the existence of subpopulations of spermatozoa potentially appropriate for IVF-ICSI, as they appear normal according to the current MSOME and vacuoles classification, however they are almost certainly genetically damaged. As current criteria have yet to achieve an unequivocal evaluation of the implantation potential of a given spermatozoon, we propose novel criteria, based on specific vacuolar morphological traits; depth and location, as these were found aligned with genomic findings. STUDY FUNDING/COMPETING INTEREST(S): No funding was received for this study. The authors have no conflict of interest to declare. TRIAL REGISTRATION NUMBER: N/A.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1802
[Cu] Class update date: 180308
[Lr] Last revision date:180308
[St] Status:Publisher
[do] DOI:10.1093/humrep/dey019

  10 / 61314 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29329387
[Au] Autor:Fang J; Zhang J; Zhu F; Yang X; Cui Y; Liu J
[Ad] Address:State Key Laboratory of Reproductive Medicine, Clinical Center of Reproductive Medicine, The First Affiliated Hospital of Nanjing Medical University, Nanjing 210029, China.
[Ti] Title:Patients with acephalic spermatozoa syndrome linked to SUN5 mutations have a favorable pregnancy outcome from ICSI.
[So] Source:Hum Reprod;, 2018 Jan 10.
[Is] ISSN:1460-2350
[Cp] Country of publication:England
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:STUDY QUESTION: Are Sad1 and UNC84 domain containing 5 (SUN5) mutations associated with the outcomes of ICSI in patients with acephalic spermatozoa syndrome (ASS)? SUMMARY ANSWER: Despite highly abnormal sperm morphology, ASS patients with SUN5 mutations have a favorable pregnancy outcome following ICSI. WHAT IS KNOWN ALREADY: ASS is a rare cause of infertility characterized by the production of a majority of headless spermatozoa, along with a small proportion of intact spermatozoa with an abnormal head-tail junction. Previous studies have demonstrated that SUN5 mutations may cause ASS. Several studies showed that ICSI could help patients with ASS father children. STUDY DESIGN, SIZE, DURATION: This retrospective cohort study included 11 infertile ASS males with SUN5 mutations. Five of them underwent five ICSI cycles. Their ICSI results were compared to men with ASS without SUN5 mutations (n = 3) and to men with multiple morphological abnormalities of the sperm flagella (MMAF) (n = 9). All ICSI treatments were completed between Jan 2011 and May 2017. PARTICIPANTS/MATERIALS, SETTING, METHODS: Sanger DNA sequencing was used to detect mutations in SUN5. Clinical and biological data were collected from patients at the fertility center. MAIN RESULTS AND THE ROLE OF CHANCE: Sanger sequencing validated 11 patients with SUN5 mutations. Three novel mutations in SUN5 (c.829C>T [p.Q277*]; c.1067G>A [p.R356H]; c.211+1 insGT [p.S71Cfs11*]) were identified in three patients. The rates of fertilization, good-quality embryos and pregnancy for five patients with SUN5 mutations following ICSI were 81.5%, 81.8% and 100%, respectively. The rates of fertilization and good-quality embryos in patients with MMAF were significantly lower compared with ASS patients (65.6 versus 82.4%, P = 0.039 and 53.6 versus 85.2%, P = 0.031, respectively). There were no differences in ICSI results between ASS patients with and without SUN5 mutations. LIMITATIONS, REASONS FOR CAUTION: Only a small number patients with SUN5 mutations was available because of its rare incidence. WIDER IMPLICATIONS OF THE FINDINGS: Patients with ASS can be effectively treated with ICSI. SUN5 mutations may be one of the genetic causes of ASS. STUDY FUNDING/COMPETING INTEREST(S): This study was supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (81401251, 81370754, and 81170559), the Jiangsu Province Special Program of Medical Science (BL2012009, ZX201110, FXK201221) and a project funded by PAPD of the Priority Academic Program Development of Jiangsu High Education Institutions (JX10231802). None of the authors have any competing interests.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1801
[Cu] Class update date: 180308
[Lr] Last revision date:180308
[St] Status:Publisher
[do] DOI:10.1093/humrep/dex382


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