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[PMID]: 29508631
[Au] Autor:Kularatne SAM; Shahmy S; Rathnayake SS; Dawson AH
[Ad] Address:a Faculty of Medicine , University of Peradeniya , Peradeniya , Sri Lanka.
[Ti] Title:Clinico-epidemiology of arthropod stings and bites in primary hospitals of North Western province of Sri Lanka.
[So] Source:Clin Toxicol (Phila);:1-6, 2018 Mar 06.
[Is] ISSN:1556-9519
[Cp] Country of publication:England
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:OBJECTIVE: Arthropod stinging and bites are common environmental hazards in Sri Lanka. However, their medical importance has not been fully evaluated yet. This study aims to study the burden, epidemiology, and outcome of stings and bites in primary hospitals in the Kurunegala district in North Western Province (NWP) of Sri Lanka. METHODOLOGY: The study was conducted one year from 25th May 2013 to 25th May 2014. Details of all stings and bites admissions and their outcomes were retrospectively extracted from hospital records in all 44 primary hospitals in the district. RESULTS: There were 623 stings and bites with population incidence of 38/100,000 (95% CI 27-52). There were no deaths. Median age was 38 years (IQR: 19-53 years), and 351 (56%) were males. Most of stings and bites (75%) occurred in the daytime. Median time to hospital arrival was 55 minutes (IQR: 30 min to 2 h). The offending arthropods had been identified in 557 (89%) cases, of them, 357 (57%) were Hymenoptera (hornet and bees), 99 centipedes, 61 spiders and 40 scorpions. Local pain occurred in 346 (56%) cases - centipede 69 (70%), Scorpion 24 (60%), spider 36 (59%), Hymenoptera 187 (52%) and unidentified 30 (45%). Hymenoptera stings and spider bites occurred between 06 am to 12 noon, and scorpion stings and centipede bites mostly occurred between 06 pm to 12 midnight. Mild, moderate to severe anaphylaxis reactions occurred in 173 (28%) patients including 110 Hymenoptera stings - mild 39, moderate 62 and severe 9. From primary hospitals, 53(9%) cases had been transferred to tertiary care units for further management. Of them, 41 cases were Hymenoptera stings and 24 (58%) of them had mild, moderate to severe anaphylaxis. In the entire group, 27% severe cases received adrenaline. CONCLUSIONS: The primary hospitals in NW province of Sri Lanka manage large numbers of arthropod stings and bites. These include Hymenoptera (hornet and bee), centipedes, spiders, and scorpions. Pain, swellings and anaphylactic reactions were the most common adverse effects.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1803
[Cu] Class update date: 180306
[Lr] Last revision date:180306
[St] Status:Publisher
[do] DOI:10.1080/15563650.2018.1447120

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[PMID]: 29429505
[Au] Autor:Seneschal J
[Ad] Address:Centre de référence des maladies rares de la peau, hôpital Saint-André, CHU de Bordeaux, BMGIC, INSERM U1035, équipe immunodermatologie ATIP-AVENIR, France. Electronic address: julien.seneschal@chu-bordeaux.fr.
[Ti] Title:Quoi de neuf en recherche dermatologique ? [What's new in dermatological research?]
[So] Source:Ann Dermatol Venereol;143 Suppl 3:S19-S22, 2016 Dec.
[Is] ISSN:0151-9638
[Cp] Country of publication:France
[La] Language:fre
[Ab] Abstract:Many research studies dedicated to skin have been published in 2016 in high impact factor journals. This article summarises a selection of research works published between December 2015 and September 2016. New insights into the understanding of the mechanisms involved in psoriasis and atopic dermatitis can lead to better management of these chronic inflammatory disorders. Moreover, a better understanding of the relation between the host and the environment could lead to new therapeutic strategies. Finally, new devices first dedicated to skin inflammatory diseases have been developed with success that could be extended to other chronic inflammatory disorders.
[Mh] MeSH terms primary: Skin Diseases
[Mh] MeSH terms secundary: Animals
Bone Resorption/physiopathology
Dermatology
Genetic Engineering
Genetic Therapy
Humans
Inflammation/physiopathology
Insect Bites and Stings/immunology
Janus Kinase 3/antagonists & inhibitors
Microbiota
Protein Kinase Inhibitors/therapeutic use
Skin Diseases/diagnosis
Skin Diseases/immunology
Skin Diseases/therapy
Spider Venoms/therapeutic use
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE; REVIEW
[Nm] Name of substance:0 (Protein Kinase Inhibitors); 0 (Spider Venoms); EC 2.7.10.2 (Janus Kinase 3)
[Em] Entry month:1802
[Cu] Class update date: 180221
[Lr] Last revision date:180221
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[Da] Date of entry for processing:180213
[St] Status:MEDLINE

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[PMID]: 28450682
[Au] Autor:Hifumi T; Yamamoto A; Ato M; Sawabe K; Morokuma K; Morine N; Kondo Y; Noda E; Sakai A; Takahashi J; Umezawa K
[Ad] Address:Emergency Medical Center, Kagawa University Hospital, Kagawa, Japan.
[Ti] Title:Clinical Serum Therapy: Benefits, Cautions, and Potential Applications.
[So] Source:Keio J Med;66(4):57-64, 2017 Dec 25.
[Is] ISSN:1880-1293
[Cp] Country of publication:Japan
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Blood serum from immunized humans or animals (e.g., horses) contains relevant antibodies and has been used as serum therapy to treat many diseases or envenomation events. The effectiveness of blood serum was initially discovered in 1890 when Kitasato and von Behring observed the effectiveness of this type of therapy against diphtheria and tetanus. Serum therapies played an important role in the advancement of modern medicine prior to the development of penicillin and steroids. At present, several types of serum therapy remain in clinical use. However, some physicians have a limited understanding of the nature and the benefits of serum therapy and the factors that require particular attention. In this review, we set out to clarify the benefits, cautions, and potential applications of serum therapy in the context of conditions such as gas gangrene, diphtheria, botulism, and tetanus and bites from three snake species (mamushi, habu, and yamakagashi) and the redback spider. It is hoped that this review will help clinicians to learn about clinical serum therapies and become familiar with their applications.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1704
[Cu] Class update date: 171225
[Lr] Last revision date:171225
[St] Status:In-Process
[do] DOI:10.2302/kjm.2016-0017-IR

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[PMID]: 29069933
[Au] Autor:Dunbar JP; Afoullouss S; Sulpice R; Dugon MM
[Ad] Address:a Venom Systems & Proteomics Lab, School of Natural Sciences , National University of Ireland Galway , Galway, Republic of Ireland.
[Ti] Title:Envenomation by the noble false widow spider Steatoda nobilis (Thorell, 1875) - five new cases of steatodism from Ireland and Great Britain.
[So] Source:Clin Toxicol (Phila);:1-3, 2017 Oct 26.
[Is] ISSN:1556-9519
[Cp] Country of publication:England
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:OBJECTIVE: The noble false widow Steatoda nobilis is the only medically significant spider known to occur in the British Isles and Ireland, with a single case of steatodism ever reported from Great Britain. We present here five new cases of envenomations by S. nobilis, three from Ireland and two from Great Britain and describe symptoms not previously reported for the genus Steatoda. CASE PRESENTATION: Four adult males and one adult female with confirmed S. nobilis bites reported their symptoms to the authors. General practitioner chart was obtained for case #3. In all five cases, envenomations were immediately followed by a sharp and prolonged onset of pain, mild to extensive erythema and localised to extensive swelling around the bite site. Additional symptoms include moderate to intense pruritus, vasodilation of the capillaries around the bite site and a possible minor necrotic wound. CONCLUSION: In all cases, symptoms subsided within 48-72 h and no further complications were reported. Envenomations by S. nobilis seem to produce symptoms similar (but not identical) to those previously reported from other Steatoda sp. Considering their benign outcome, envenomations by S. nobilis should still be regarded as of moderate medical importance, requiring monitoring and pain management strategies.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1710
[Cu] Class update date: 171026
[Lr] Last revision date:171026
[St] Status:Publisher
[do] DOI:10.1080/15563650.2017.1393084

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[PMID]: 29025444
[Au] Autor:Coetzee M; Dippenaar A; Frean J; Hunt RH
[Ad] Address:Wits Research Institute for Malaria, School of Pathology, Faculty of Health Sciences, University of the Witwatersrand, Johannesburg, South Africa; Centre for Emerging, Zoonotic and Parasitic Diseases, National Institute for Communicable Diseases, Johannesburg, South Africa. maureen.coetzee@wits.ac.za.
[Ti] Title:First report of clinical presentation of a bite by a running spider, Philodromus sp. (Araneae: Philodromidae), with recommendations for spider bite management.
[So] Source:S Afr Med J;107(7):576-577, 2017 Jun 30.
[Is] ISSN:0256-9574
[Cp] Country of publication:South Africa
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:This article describes the clinical progression of symptoms over a period of 5 days of a bite inflicted by a Philodromus sp. spider. Commonly known as 'running spiders', these are not considered to be harmful to humans. This report, however, is the first description of an actual bite by a member of this group of spiders showing cytotoxic envenomation. Management of the bites should be as recommended for other cytotoxic spider bites.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1710
[Cu] Class update date: 171120
[Lr] Last revision date:171120
[St] Status:In-Process
[do] DOI:10.7196/SAMJ.2017.v107i7.12422

  6 / 1271 MEDLINE  
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SciELO Chile full text

[PMID]: 28991316
[Au] Autor:Villagra V; Cáceres D; Alvarado S; Salinas E; Caldera ML; Lucero E; Viviani P; Torres M
[Ad] Address:Escuela de Salud Pública, Facultad de Medicina, Universidad de Chile, Santiago, Chile.
[Ti] Title:Caracterización epidemiológica de mordeduras en personas, según registro de atención de urgencia: Provincia de Los Andes, Chile. [Epidemiological characterization of bites on people, as emergency care record: Province of Los Andes, Chile].
[So] Source:Rev Chilena Infectol;34(3):212-220, 2017 Jun.
[Is] ISSN:0717-6341
[Cp] Country of publication:Chile
[La] Language:spa
[Ab] Abstract:BACKGROUND: Bites constitute a public health problem worldwide. AIM: To characterize epidemiologically bites by animals happened in the province of Los Andes (2005-2007). METHOD: Descriptive, retrospective epidemiological study. Studied variables: Bitten person (BP), accident by bite, biting animal and bite. It was not feasible to obtain more updated information by law of patient protection. RESULTS: 2,360 BP were assisted in the emergency unit of San Juan de Dios Hospital and Rio Blanco clinic. An annual average rate of 729 BP/100,000 inhabitants and 1.99 daily average was recorded. The male gender was most affected (53.5%) and the age group from 6 to 10 years old. (Rate: .521/100,000). Most frequent topographic location was the lower limb, except in children under 5 year olds in whom predominated head and neck. The biting animal according to frequency was: the dog (67.1%) spider (7.1%) and cat (3.9%). The animal property was 35.6% known and 30.7% own. The most frequent problems were: nonspecific allergy; toxic effect by spider bites and among the infections, the disease made by cat’s scratch stands out. Regarding the record system, the biting animal complaint was applied to 47.6% of the BP and the 92.8% of the recorded information was incomplete. CONCLUSIONS: Bites reported higher rates in the province of Los Andes than the average of the country (729 versus 188/100,000), standing out the higher magnitude in 6 to 10 year-old-children. It is noticed that the record is low and incomplete. In this province, no bite control programs or updated studies have been carried out.
[Pt] Publication type:ENGLISH ABSTRACT; JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1710
[Cu] Class update date: 171009
[Lr] Last revision date:171009
[St] Status:In-Process

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[PMID]: 28894524
[Au] Autor:Sanaei-Zadeh H
[Ad] Address:Associate Professor, Emergency Room, Division of Medical Toxicology, Hazrat Ali-Asghar (p) Hospital, Shiraz University of Medical Sciences, Shiraz, Iran.
[Ti] Title:Spider Bite in Iran.
[So] Source:Electron Physician;9(7):4703-4707, 2017 Jul.
[Is] ISSN:2008-5842
[Cp] Country of publication:Iran
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Some of the world's most dangerous spiders have been certified in some areas of Iran. Spider bites are common in some geographical areas, and are sporadic in some regions. Spider bites can be classified as latrodectism or loxoscelism. If the patient had not seen the spider, the clinical manifestations of latrodectism could be easily mistaken for other types of bite or sting; or an infectious disease, and withdrawal symptoms, and also loxoscelism could be mistaken for cellulitis, various types of skin infection, or even a sting from a Gadim scorpion ( ). Given the nonspecific presentation of spider bites, one must keep the diagnosis in mind, and question patients, regarding possible exposure to spiders. Physicians recommend becoming familiar with the geographical distribution of Iranian dangerous spiders, clinical manifestations, and management of their bites. The most useful treatment for spider bite is anti-venom administration. Producing spider bite anti-venom in the Razi Vaccine and Serum Research Institute is under investigation.
[Pt] Publication type:EDITORIAL
[Em] Entry month:1709
[Cu] Class update date: 170914
[Lr] Last revision date:170914
[St] Status:PubMed-not-MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.19082/4703

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[PMID]: 28866287
[Au] Autor:Hauke TJ; Herzig V
[Ad] Address:Department of Pharmacy - Center of Drug Research, Ludwig-Maximilians-Universität München, 81377 Munich, Germany.
[Ti] Title:Dangerous arachnids-Fake news or reality?
[So] Source:Toxicon;138:173-183, 2017 Nov.
[Is] ISSN:1879-3150
[Cp] Country of publication:England
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:The public perception of spiders and scorpions is skewed towards the potential harm they can inflict in humans, despite recent scientific evidence that arachnid venom components might be useful as bioinsecticides or even human therapeutics. Nevertheless, arachnids are becoming more popular as pets in Europe, America and Asia, raising the question for regulatory agencies in these regions as to whether they need to take measurements to protect their citizens. In order to decide upon the necessary regulatory steps, they first need to determine which arachnids are actually dangerous to humans. This review therefore provides an overview of the current literature on verified bites and stings from spiders and scorpions with the aim of assessing their potential danger for human health. As a guideline, we also provide a list of those arachnid genera that we consider as potentially dangerous, which includes 10 spider and 11 scorpion genera. The arachnid genera classified as dangerous comprise less than a quarter of all extant scorpion species and only 0.5% of all spiders species, with the actual number most likely being much lower than that, as not all species in those genera might turn out to pose an actual threat for humans. In conclusion, we found that only a small percentage of scorpions and a minute percentage of all spiders can be considered as potentially dangerous to humans. While in some countries of origin the high incidence of envenomations by dangerous arachnids can result in a serious problem to the health system, we assessed the risk that the same species pose when kept as pets under controlled maintenance conditions as significantly lower.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE; REVIEW
[Em] Entry month:1709
[Cu] Class update date: 171001
[Lr] Last revision date:171001
[St] Status:In-Process

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[PMID]: 28811247
[Au] Autor:Andreev-Andrievskiy A; Popova A; Lagereva E; Osipov D; Berkut A; Grishin E; Vassilevski A
[Ad] Address:Biological Faculty, M.V. Lomonosov Moscow State University, Moscow, Russia; Institute for Biomedical Problems of the Russian Academy of Sciences, Moscow, Russia.
[Ti] Title:Pharmacological analysis of Poecilotheria spider venoms in mice provides clues for human treatment.
[So] Source:Toxicon;138:59-67, 2017 Nov.
[Is] ISSN:1879-3150
[Cp] Country of publication:England
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Bites of tiger spiders belonging to Poecilotheria genus cause moderate to severe pain and long-lasting local or generalized muscle cramps in humans. Bites occur in regions of the spiders' natural habitat, India and Sri Lanka, but the popularity of these colorful tarantulas as pets leads to reports of envenomation cases worldwide. Treatment is predominantly symptomatic and often inadequate since there is almost no clinical or toxicology research data available, and physicians outside India or Sri Lanka typically have no experience in treating such cases. We report toxicity studies of venom from nine Poecilotheria species in laboratory mice (Mus musculus Balb/C males). LD values are 5-14 mg of lyophilized crude venom per 1 kg (i.v.). The major symptoms of envenomation include tonic-clonic seizures, jerks, characteristic motor stereotypy, and hyperalgesia and point to voltage-gated sodium channels as a potential target of the venom components. Poecilotheria fasciata venom effects were studied in detail at a sub-lethal dose of 5 mg/kg (LD = 12 mg/kg). 13 widely used pharmacological agents (atropine, chloropyramine, chlorpromazine, diazepam, ethanol, flupirtine, haloperidol, ketotifen, lamotrigine, oxcarbazepine, tolperisone, xylazine, and CaCl ) were checked for ability to suppress the envenomation symptoms. Chlorpromazine (10 mg/kg, i.p.), oxcarbazepine (60 mg/kg, p.o.), tolperisone (50 mg/kg, s.c.) and xylazine (2.5 mg/kg, i.p.) were found effective as a pretreatment to mitigate muscle cramps and motor stereotypy. When administered after envenomation chlorpromazine (5 mg/kg, i.v.) effectively reduced the cramps, while oxcarbazepine (30 mg/kg, i.v.) and xylazine (1 mg/kg, i.v.) suppressed the stereotypy.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1708
[Cu] Class update date: 171001
[Lr] Last revision date:171001
[St] Status:In-Process

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Teixeira, Manoel Jacobsen
SciELO Brazil full text

[PMID]: 28562767
[Au] Autor:Medeiros CR; Brioschi ML; Souza SN; Teixeira MJ
[Ad] Address:Hospital Vital Brazil, Instituto Butantan, São Paulo, SP, Brasil.
[Ti] Title:Infrared thermography to diagnose and manage venomous animal bites and stings.
[So] Source:Rev Soc Bras Med Trop;50(2):260-264, 2017 Mar-Apr.
[Is] ISSN:1678-9849
[Cp] Country of publication:Brazil
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:INTRODUCTION: Infrared imaging (IR) is a noninvasive technique that quantifies body surface temperature, producing a digital color image. IR has been used to study diseases in which skin temperature can reflect the presence of inflammation. METHODS: This was an observational pilot study of eight patients envenomed by snakes, spiders, and scorpions. All patients were examined using a thermal camera. RESULTS: In all cases, we obtained infrared images that corroborated clinical findings indicating localized effects of venom, specifically inflammation. CONCLUSIONS: IR has potential for use as a research, diagnostic, and monitoring tool for localized effects of animal venoms.
[Mh] MeSH terms primary: Scorpion Stings/diagnosis
Snake Bites/diagnosis
Spider Bites/diagnosis
Thermography/methods
[Mh] MeSH terms secundary: Adult
Female
Humans
Male
Pilot Projects
Scorpion Stings/complications
Snake Bites/complications
Spider Bites/complications
[Pt] Publication type:CASE REPORTS; JOURNAL ARTICLE; OBSERVATIONAL STUDY
[Em] Entry month:1707
[Cu] Class update date: 170705
[Lr] Last revision date:170705
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[Da] Date of entry for processing:170601
[St] Status:MEDLINE


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