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[PMID]: 29524424
[Au] Autor:Shinohara Y; Tsukimoto M
[Ad] Address:Department of Radiation Biosciences, Faculty of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Tokyo University of Science, 2641 Yamazaki, Noda-shi, Chiba, Japan.
[Ti] Title:Guanine and inosine nucleotides/nucleosides suppress murine T cell activation.
[So] Source:Biochem Biophys Res Commun;, 2018 Mar 07.
[Is] ISSN:1090-2104
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Damaged tissues and cells release intracellular purine nucleotides, which serve as intercellular signaling factors. We previously showed that exogenously added adenine nucleotide (250 µM ATP) suppressed the activation of murine splenic T lymphocytes. Here, we examined the effects of other purine nucleotides/nucleosides on mouse T cell activation. First, we found that pretreatment of mouse spleen T cells with 250 µM GTP, GDP, GMP, guanosine, ITP, IDP, IMP or inosine significantly reduced the release of stimulus-inducible cytokine IL-2. This suppression of IL-2 release was not caused by induction of cell death. Further studies with GTP, ITP, guanosine and inosine showed that pretreatment with these nucleotides/nucleosides also suppressed release of IL-6. However, these nucleotides/nucleosides did not suppress stimulus-induced phosphorylation of ERK1/2, suggesting that the suppression of the release of inflammatory cytokines does not involve inhibition of ERK1/2 signaling. In contrast to ATP pretreatment at the same concentration, guanine or inosine nucleotides/nucleosides did not attenuate the expression of CD25. Our findings indicate that exogenous guanine or inosine nucleotides/nucleosides can suppress inflammatory cytokine release from T cells, and may be promising candidates for use as supplementary agents in the treatment of T cell-mediated immune diseases.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1803
[Cu] Class update date: 180310
[Lr] Last revision date:180310
[St] Status:Publisher

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[PMID]: 29521825
[Au] Autor:Vasey CE; Rajaratnam S; O'Grady G; Hulme-Moir M
[Ad] Address:Colorectal Surgical Unit, North Shore Hospital, Auckland, New Zealand.
[Ti] Title:Lymphatic Drainage of the Splenic Flexure Defined by Intraoperative Scintigraphic Mapping.
[So] Source:Dis Colon Rectum;61(4):441-446, 2018 Apr.
[Is] ISSN:1530-0358
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:BACKGROUND: The optimal surgical management of splenic flexure cancer is debated, partly because of an incomplete understanding of the lymphatic drainage of this region. OBJECTIVE: This study aimed to evaluate the normal lymphatic drainage of the human splenic flexure using laparoscopic scintigraphic mapping. DESIGN: This was a clinical trial. SETTINGS: The study was conducted at a single tertiary care center. PATIENTS: Thirty consecutive patients undergoing elective colorectal resections without splenic flexure pathology were recruited. INTERVENTION: Technetium-99m was injected subserosally at the splenic flexure. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Lymphatic scintigraphic mapping was undertaken at 15, 30, and 60 minutes using a laparoscopic gamma probe at the left branch of the middle colic, left colic, inferior mesenteric, and ileocolic (control) lymphovascular pedicles. RESULTS: Lymphatic drainage at 60 minutes was strongly dominant in the direction of the left colic pedicle (96% of patients), with a median gamma count of 284 (interquartile range, 113-413), versus the left branch of the middle colic count of 31 (interquartile range, 15-49; p < 0.0001). This equated to a median 9.2-times greater flow to the left colic versus the middle colic. Counts at the left colic were greater than all of the other mapped sites at 15, 30, and 60 minutes (p < 0.001), whereas middle colic and inferior mesenteric artery counts were equivalent. The protocol increased operative duration by 20 to 30 minutes without complications. LIMITATIONS: These results report lymphatic drainage from patients with normal splenic flexures, and caution is necessary when extrapolating to patients with splenic flexure cancers. CONCLUSIONS: The lymphatic drainage of the normal splenic flexure is preferentially directed toward the left colic in the high majority of cases. Retrieving these nodes should be prioritized in splenic flexure cancer resections, with important secondary emphasis on left middle colic nodes, supporting segmental (left hemicolectomy) resection as the procedure of choice. Additional development of colonic sentinel node mapping using these techniques may contribute to individualized surgical therapy morbidity. See Video Abstract at http://links.lww.com/DCR/A495.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1803
[Cu] Class update date: 180309
[Lr] Last revision date:180309
[St] Status:In-Data-Review
[do] DOI:10.1097/DCR.0000000000000986

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[PMID]: 29265378
[Au] Autor:Baldissera MD; Souza CF; Bottari NB; Verdi CM; Santos RCV; Vizzotto BS; Baldisserotto B
[Ad] Address:Department of Microbiology and Parasitology, Universidade Federal de Santa Maria, Santa Maria, Rio Grande do Sul, Brazil.
[Ti] Title:Purinergic signalling displays an anti-inflammatory profile in the spleen of fish experimentally infected with Aeromonas caviae: Modulation of the immune response.
[So] Source:J Fish Dis;41(4):683-687, 2018 Apr.
[Is] ISSN:1365-2761
[Cp] Country of publication:England
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Extracellular adenosine triphosphate (ATP) and its metabolite adenosine (Ado) are recognized as key mediators of immune and inflammatory responses. Depending on its concentration, ATP may act as an immunostimulant or immunodepressant, while Ado levels display an anti-inflammatory profile. The aim of this study was to evaluate whether splenic purinergic signalling is capable of modulating immune and inflammatory responses in fish experimentally infected with Aeromonas caviae. Triphosphate diphosphohydrolase (NTPDase) and 5'-nucleotidase activities increased in the spleen of silver catfish (Rhamdia quelen) experimentally infected with A. caviae compared with the uninfected control group. Moreover, splenic Ado levels increased in the infected animals relative to the uninfected control group. Based on these lines of evidence, our findings revealed that adenine nucleotide hydrolysis is modified in the spleen of fish infected with A. caviae attempting to restrict the inflammatory process through the upregulation of NTPDase and 5'-nucleotidase activities, which occurs in an attempt to hydrolyse the excessive ATP in the extracellular environment and rapidly hydrolyse AMP to form Ado. In summary, purinergic signalling can modulate immune and inflammatory responses during A. caviae infection.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1712
[Cu] Class update date: 180309
[Lr] Last revision date:180309
[St] Status:In-Process
[do] DOI:10.1111/jfd.12773

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[PMID]: 29429163
[Au] Autor:Wu YL; Wu F; Yang L; Sun H; Yan XC; Duan GJ
[Ad] Address:Department of Pathology, the First Affiliated Hospital, Army Medical University (Third Military Medical University), PLA, Chongqing 400038, China.
[Ti] Title:[Clinicopathologic features and prognosis of inflammatory pseudotumor-like follicular dendritic cell sarcomas in liver and spleen: an analysis of seven cases].
[So] Source:Zhonghua Bing Li Xue Za Zhi;47(2):114-118, 2018 Feb 08.
[Is] ISSN:0529-5807
[Cp] Country of publication:China
[La] Language:chi
[Ab] Abstract:To investigate the clinicopathological features and prognostic parameters of the inflammatory pseudotumor-like follicular dendritic cell sarcoma (IPT-like FDCS) of liver and spleen. Ninteen cases of inflammatory pseudotumor (IPT) and 5 cases of IPT-like FDCS of the liver and spleen were collected at the First Affiliated Hospital, Army Medical University from 2006 to 2016. HE sections, immunohistochemical staining, and Epstein-Barr virus encoded nuclear RNA (EBER) in situ hybridization were reviewed along with a summary of the literature. Among the previously diagnosed 19 cases of IPT of the liver and spleen, 2 cases were misdiagnosed (the ratio of 2/19). Among 7 new cases including 3 males and 4 females, 3 cases involved the liver and 4 cases involved the spleen. The age range was 37-64 years (mean 53 years). The maximum tumor diameter ranged from 3.0 to 11.0 cm (mean 6.5 cm). Surgical resections were performed in all patients with follow-up time ranging from 3 to 84 months.All patients were disease-free.7 new cases were all positive for EBER, and showed the expression of at least one of the FDC markers, including CD21, CD23, and CD35. The rest of 17 cases of IPT were all negative for EBER and essentially negative for FDC markers, but were all positive for SMA. IPT-like FDCS of the liver and spleen is a rare low-grade malignant tumor morphologically mimicking inflammatory pseudotumor, and is easy to be misdiagnosis due to under-recognition. EBER in situ hybridization and FDC markers are indispensable for confirming the diagnosis.
[Mh] MeSH terms primary: Granuloma, Plasma Cell/pathology
Liver Diseases/pathology
Splenic Diseases/pathology
[Mh] MeSH terms secundary: Adult
Dendritic Cell Sarcoma, Follicular/pathology
Female
Herpesvirus 4, Human/genetics
Humans
In Situ Hybridization
Male
Middle Aged
Prognosis
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1803
[Cu] Class update date: 180306
[Lr] Last revision date:180306
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[Da] Date of entry for processing:180213
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.3760/cma.j.issn.0529-5807.2018.02.007

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[PMID]: 29506845
[Au] Autor:Tranchart H; Gaillard M; Diop PS; Goulinet S; Lainas P; Dagher I
[Ad] Address:INSERM U1193, Paul Brousse Hospital, Villejuif, France; Department of Minimally Invasive Surgery, Antoine Béclère Hospital, AP-HP, Paris-Sud University, Clamart, France. Electronic address: hadrien.tranchart@aphp.fr.
[Ti] Title:Transplantation of genetically modified hepatocytes after liver preconditioning in Watanabe heritable hyperlipidemic rabbit.
[So] Source:J Surg Res;224:23-32, 2018 Apr.
[Is] ISSN:1095-8673
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:BACKGROUND: Hepatocyte transplantation is a potentially less invasive alternative to liver transplantation for treating inherited metabolic liver diseases. We developed an autotransplantation protocol of ex vivo genetically modified hepatocytes combining lentiviral transduction and transplantation after liver preconditioning by partial portal vein embolization. We investigated the metabolic efficiency of this approach in Watanabe rabbits, animal model of familial hypercholesterolemia. METHODS: Our autotransplantation experimental protocol was used in two groups of rabbits (n = 10), experimental and sham, receiving transduced and control hepatocytes, respectively. Isolated hepatocytes from left liver lobes were transduced using recombinant lentiviruses. Median lobe portal branches were embolized under fluoroscopic control. Functional measurement of low-density lipoprotein (LDL) receptor expression was assessed by LDL internalization assays. Cholesterol level evolution was monitored. Rabbits were killed 20 wk after the procedure. RESULTS: Three rabbits of each group died several hours after hepatocyte transplantation; autopsy revealed portal vein thrombosis in two rabbits from each group. The protocol was therefore modified with hepatocytes being transplanted through splenic injection. Lentiviral hepatocyte transduction efficacy was 64.5%. Fluorescence microscopy revealed Dil-LDL internalization of transduced hepatocytes. Seven rabbits in each group were considered for lipid analysis. Four weeks after autotransplantation, median total cholesterol level decreased in the experimental group, without reaching statistical significance (8.9 [8.0-9.8] g/L versus 6.3 [0.5-8.3]; P = 0.171). In the experimental group, enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay detected significant antibody expression against human low-density lipoprotein receptor. CONCLUSIONS: Autotransplantation protocol allowed a nonstatistically significant improvement of the lipid profile in Watanabe rabbits. Further experiments involving a larger number of animals are necessary to confirm or refute our findings.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1803
[Cu] Class update date: 180306
[Lr] Last revision date:180306
[St] Status:In-Data-Review

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[PMID]: 29491102
[Au] Autor:Iguchi K; Kunisaki C; Sato S; Tanaka Y; Miyamoto H; Kosaka T; Akiyama H; Endo I; Rino Y; Masuda M
[Ad] Address:Department of Surgery, Gastroenterological Center, Yokohama City University Medical Center, Yokohama, Japan.
[Ti] Title:Evaluation of Optimal Lymph Node Dissection in Remnant Gastric Cancer Based on Initial Distal Gastrectomy.
[So] Source:Anticancer Res;38(3):1677-1683, 2018 03.
[Is] ISSN:1791-7530
[Cp] Country of publication:Greece
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:BACKGROUND/AIM: The purpose of this study was to reveal the optimal lymph node (LN) dissection in remnant gastric cancer (RGC) patients. PATIENTS AND METHODS: We retrospectively analyzed 46 RGC patients divided into two groups: patients who underwent initial gastrectomy for benign (group B) and malignant (group M) diseases. RESULTS: Metastasis was more frequently observed at the left (nos. 2, 4sa, 4sb, 10, and 11p/d) and right (nos. 1, 3, 4d, 7, 8a, and 12a) side LNs of RGC in groups M and B. Modified IEBLD scores (frequency of LN metastasis by median survival time of patients with metastatic LNs) were high at station nos. 10 (4.7), 11p/d (4.3/9.9), and 16 (4.3) in group M and nos. 1 (2.1), 7 (1.9) and mesojejunal (3.0) in group B. CONCLUSION: After lymphadenectomy for initial gastric cancer, lymphatic flow toward the splenic artery was predominant. Therefore, splenectomy with para-aortic LN dissection is an option.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1803
[Cu] Class update date: 180305
[Lr] Last revision date:180305
[St] Status:In-Process

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[PMID]: 29500125
[Au] Autor:Khan R; Ali A
[Ad] Address:Division of Hematology, Oncology and Blood & Bone Marrow Transplant Unit, University of Iowa Hospitals and Clinics, Iowa City, IA, USA. Electronic address: rafiullah@uiowa.edu.
[Ti] Title:Non-traumatic splenic rupture in a patient with human granulocytic anaplasmosis and focused review of the literature.
[So] Source:Ticks Tick Borne Dis;, 2018 Feb 22.
[Is] ISSN:1877-9603
[Cp] Country of publication:Netherlands
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:We report a rare case of a 53-year-old man with no significant past medical history who reported multiple tick bites within a 2-month period. The patient reported not "feeling well" for the 2 ½ weeks. He complained of generalized body aches, pains, and chills. He did not report nausea, vomiting, or yellowish discoloration of the eyes or skin. He presented to the emergency room with syncope preceded by severe abdominal pain. Upon presentation, he was pale and hypotensive. He had not experienced any trauma. Computed tomography revealed a splenic rupture, hemoperitoneum, and active extravasation of contrast material. The estimated amount of hemoperitoneum was 1.5 liters of blood. Subsequently, an infectious disease work-up revealed a positive Anaplasma phagocytophilum polymerase reaction in blood. The patient was aggressively resuscitated, and a splenectomy was performed followed by doxycycline therapy. He successfully recovered.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1803
[Cu] Class update date: 180303
[Lr] Last revision date:180303
[St] Status:Publisher

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[PMID]: 29465601
[Au] Autor:Wang P; Xie R; Zhao Z; Ren J; Fei J
[Ad] Address:Department of General Surgery, Ruijin Hospital Affiliated to Shanghai Jiao Tong University School of Medicine, Shanghai, China.
[Ti] Title:Postoperative hemorrhage caused by portal hypertension associated with autoimmune pancreatitis: A case report.
[So] Source:Medicine (Baltimore);97(8):e9982, 2018 Feb.
[Is] ISSN:1536-5964
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:RATIONALE: Autoimmune pancreatitis is a form of chronic pancreatitis, characterized by diffused enlargement of the pancreas and irregular narrowing of the main pancreatic duct. The theory that portal hypertension is associated with autoimmune pancreatitis has not been emphasized. In addition, only a few studies report that the gastrointestinal tract hemorrhage caused by portal hypertension is associated with autoimmune pancreatitis. PATIENT CONCERNS: The patient was a 61-year-old male with pancreas occupying lesion detected in a physical examination. Preoperative CT showed portal vein diameter increased significantly (1.6 cm) and the junction of splenic and portal vein was capsuled by lesions and the splenic vein became thin. The Whippie procedure was performed for the correction of the lesion. The pancreatic tissue showed chronic inflammation and lymphocytic infiltration and fibrosis, and abundant IgG4 cells. After the surgery, the patient suffered twice from postoperative hemorrhage (9 and 16 mos). DIAGNOSES: Postoperative hemorrhage, autoimmune pancreatitis. INTERVENTION: Electronic gastroscopy, exploratory laparotomy, and titanium clips were used simultaneously to stop the bleeding. OUTCOMES: The patient recovered well after the surgery. LESSONS: In this study, we present the case of repeated postoperative hemorrhage (9 and 16 mos). We discussed the correlation between postoperative hemorrhage and autoimmune pancreatitis, and the cause of postoperative hemorrhage.
[Mh] MeSH terms primary: Autoimmune Diseases/complications
Hypertension, Portal/surgery
Pancreas/surgery
Pancreatitis, Chronic/complications
Postoperative Hemorrhage/immunology
[Mh] MeSH terms secundary: Autoimmune Diseases/immunology
Humans
Hypertension, Portal/immunology
Male
Middle Aged
Pancreatitis, Chronic/immunology
Postoperative Hemorrhage/therapy
[Pt] Publication type:CASE REPORTS; JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1803
[Cu] Class update date: 180302
[Lr] Last revision date:180302
[Js] Journal subset:AIM; IM
[Da] Date of entry for processing:180222
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.1097/MD.0000000000009982

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[PMID]: 29444079
[Au] Autor:Mukhtar M; Ali SS; Boshara SA; Albertini A; Monnerat S; Bessell P; Mori Y; Kubota Y; Ndung'u JM; Cruz I
[Ad] Address:Institute of Endemic Diseases, University of Khartoum, Khartoum, Sudan.
[Ti] Title:Sensitive and less invasive confirmatory diagnosis of visceral leishmaniasis in Sudan using loop-mediated isothermal amplification (LAMP).
[So] Source:PLoS Negl Trop Dis;12(2):e0006264, 2018 Feb.
[Is] ISSN:1935-2735
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:BACKGROUND: Confirmatory diagnosis of visceral leishmaniasis (VL), as well as diagnosis of relapses and test of cure, usually requires examination by microscopy of samples collected by invasive means, such as splenic, bone marrow or lymph node aspirates. This causes discomfort to patients, with risks of bleeding and iatrogenic infections, and requires technical expertise. Molecular tests have great potential for diagnosis of VL using peripheral blood, but require well-equipped facilities and trained personnel. More user-friendly, and field-amenable options are therefore needed. One method that could meet these requirements is loop-mediated isothermal amplification (LAMP) using the Loopamp Leishmania Detection Kit, which comes as dried down reagents that can be stored at room temperature, and allows simple visualization of results. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: The Loopamp Leishmania Detection Kit (Eiken Chemical Co., Japan), was evaluated in the diagnosis of VL in Sudan. A total of 198 VL suspects were tested by microscopy of lymph node aspirates (the reference test), direct agglutination test-DAT (in house production) and rK28 antigen-based rapid diagnostic test (OnSite Leishmania rK39-Plus, CTK Biotech, USA). LAMP was performed on peripheral blood (whole blood and buffy coat) previously processed by: i) a direct boil and spin method, and ii) the QIAamp DNA Mini Kit (QIAgen). Ninety seven of the VL suspects were confirmed as cases by microscopy of lymph node aspirates. The sensitivity and specificity for each of the tests were: rK28 RDT 98.81% and 100%; DAT 88.10% and 78.22%; LAMP-boil and spin 97.65% and 99.01%; LAMP-QIAgen 100% and 99.01%. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Due to its simplicity and high sensitivity, rK28 RDT can be used first in the diagnostic algorithm for primary VL diagnosis, the excellent performance of LAMP using peripheral blood indicates that it can be also included in the algorithm for diagnosis of VL as a simple test when parasitological confirmatory diagnosis is required in settings that are lower than the reference laboratory, avoiding the need for invasive lymph node aspiration.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1802
[Cu] Class update date: 180227
[Lr] Last revision date:180227
[St] Status:In-Data-Review
[do] DOI:10.1371/journal.pntd.0006264

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[PMID]: 29484729
[Au] Autor:Lee JW; Wu Q; Jang YP; Choung SY
[Ad] Address:Department of Life and Nanopharmaceutical Sciences, Graduate School, Kyung Hee University, 26, Kyungheedae-ro, Dongdaemun-gu, Seoul, 02447, Republic of Korea.
[Ti] Title:Pinus densiflora bark extract ameliorates 2,4-dinitrochlorobenzene-induced atopic dermatitis in NC/Nga mice by regulating Th1/Th2 balance and skin barrier function.
[So] Source:Phytother Res;, 2018 Feb 27.
[Is] ISSN:1099-1573
[Cp] Country of publication:England
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Korean red pine (Pinus densiflora) bark has been traditionally used in Korea and other parts of East Asia to relieve inflammatory diseases. Although many studies using P. densiflora bark have been reported, its effect on atopic dermatitis (AD) has not been elucidated. Thus, we investigated whether the P. densiflora bark extract (PBE) has potential to attenuate AD symptoms and elucidated the molecular mechanism. Oral administration of PBE to mice with 2,4-dinitrochlorobenzene (DNCB)-induced AD lessened dermatitis scores and scratching behavior and significantly reduced measures of epidermal thickness, infiltration of mast cells and eosinophils, levels of immunoglobulin E (IgE), and IgG /IgG ratio in serum. PBE not only inhibited IL-4, IL-5, and IL-13 but also increased IFN-γ in splenic production. Furthermore, PBE significantly suppressed mRNA expression of thymic stromal lymphopoietin and further downregulated the mRNA expression of Th2 and Th17 cytokines such as IL-4, IL-13, IL-17, IL-31, and TNF-α. In addition, the protein expressions of filaggrin, involucrin, and loricrin in lesional skin were recovered by PBE. These results suggest that PBE attenuates DNCB-induced AD via regulating Th1/Th2 balance and skin barrier function.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1802
[Cu] Class update date: 180227
[Lr] Last revision date:180227
[St] Status:Publisher
[do] DOI:10.1002/ptr.6061


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