Database : MEDLINE
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[PMID]: 28782430
[Au] Autor:Alvarez E; Dreyfus J; Carlson T; Pinkerton ME; Shaffer K
[Ad] Address:Departments of Veterinary Clinical Sciences, School of Veterinary Medicine, University of Wisconsin, Madison, WI (Alvarez, Shaffer).
[Ti] Title:Well-differentiated inflammatory liposarcoma with metastasis in a 6-y-old cat.
[So] Source:J Vet Diagn Invest;29(6):896-899, 2017 Nov.
[Is] ISSN:1943-4936
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Liposarcomas are rare malignant tumors showing adipocytic differentiation. We report a well-differentiated liposarcoma in a 6-y-old, male neutered cat with a prominent inflammatory component and metastatic spread to the lungs. The patient was initially presented because of fever, lethargy, and a firm subcutaneous inguinal mass. A Tru-cut biopsy of the mass revealed a mixture of well-differentiated adipocytes and lymphoplasmacytic-histiocytic inflammation, interpreted as panniculitis. The mass was surgically excised but recurred 4 mo later. A second excisional biopsy yielded similar histologic findings. A third recurrence of the mass was associated with lung nodules. Histopathology of the recurring and metastatic masses confirmed the diagnosis of well-differentiated inflammatory liposarcoma with pulmonary metastases. The neoplasm had an intense inflammatory component, which obscured the underlying features of liposarcoma and made differentiation from steatitis difficult. This inflammatory variant of a well-differentiated liposarcoma should be considered as a differential in tumorous steatitis-like lesions.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1708
[Cu] Class update date: 171019
[Lr] Last revision date:171019
[St] Status:In-Process
[do] DOI:10.1177/1040638717725349

  2 / 110 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 28737156
[Au] Autor:Dabrowski J; Oberholster P; Steyl J; Osthoff G; Hugo A; Power DM; van Wyk JH
[Ad] Address:Sustainability Research Unit, Nelson Mandela Metropolitan University, Private Bag x6531, George 6530, South Africa.
[Ti] Title:Thyroid function of steatitis-affected Mozambique tilapia Oreochromis mossambicus from a sub-tropical African reservoir.
[So] Source:Dis Aquat Organ;125(2):101-113, 2017 07 24.
[Is] ISSN:0177-5103
[Cp] Country of publication:Germany
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Thyroid function and nutritional indicators were measured in obese, steatitis-affected Mozambique tilapia Oreochromis mossambicus from Loskop Reservoir (LR), South Africa. Plasma thyroid hormones (especially T3) and thyroid follicle histomorphology revealed high levels of activity in every aspect of the thyroid cascade measured in fish from LR compared to a reference population of steatitis-free fish. Concurrent measurements of nutritional state including plasma lipids, liver lipid content and hepatocyte size showed that fish from LR had significant energy stores indicative of abundant nutritional intake. There were distinct sex and seasonal differences, with the highest plasma lipids and T3 levels observed in steatitis-affected females during spring and summer. Positive correlations were observed between plasma lipids (especially cholesterol) and T3 concentrations in fish from both populations, indicating a link between lipid metabolism and thyroid function. There was no direct evidence of thyroid disruption, but this cannot be ruled out until further research determines the factors that underlie the homeostatic shift leading to elevated plasma and liver lipids and T3 levels in steatitis-affected tilapia.
[Mh] MeSH terms primary: Fish Diseases/etiology
Obesity/veterinary
Steatitis/metabolism
Thyroid Gland/physiology
Tilapia
[Mh] MeSH terms secundary: Animals
Cholesterol/blood
Liver/chemistry
Liver/metabolism
Triglycerides/blood
Water
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE; RESEARCH SUPPORT, NON-U.S. GOV'T
[Nm] Name of substance:0 (Triglycerides); 059QF0KO0R (Water); 97C5T2UQ7J (Cholesterol)
[Em] Entry month:1710
[Cu] Class update date: 171013
[Lr] Last revision date:171013
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[Da] Date of entry for processing:170725
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.3354/dao03138

  3 / 110 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 28231818
[Au] Autor:Azeez OI; Myburgh JG; Meintjes RA; Oosthuizen MC; Chamunorwa JP
[Ad] Address:Anatomy and Physiology Department, Faculty of Veterinary Science, University of Pretoria, Onderstepoort 0110, Pretoria, South Africa. odunayoazeez@yahoo.com.
[Ti] Title:Histomorphology, ultrastructure and fatty acid composition of the adipose tissue in pansteatitis, the potentials in understanding the underlying mechanism and diagnosis of pansteatitis in the Nile crocodile.
[So] Source:Lipids Health Dis;16(1):47, 2017 Feb 23.
[Is] ISSN:1476-511X
[Cp] Country of publication:England
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:BACKGROUND: In an effort to characterize the fat body and other adipose tissue in the Nile crocodile and the effects of pansteatitis on the structure and composition of the adipose tissue, we evaluated the regional variation in structure and fatty acid composition of healthy farmed crocodiles and those affected by pansteatitis. METHODS: Adipose tissue samples were collected from the subcutaneous, visceral and intramuscular fat and the abdominal fat body of ten 4-year old juvenile crocodiles from Izinthaba Crocodile Farm, Pretoria, South Africa while pansteatitis samples were collected from visceral and intramuscular fat of crocodiles that had died of pansteatitis at the Olifant River, Mpumalanga, also in South Africa. Histomorphology, ultrastrustucture and fatty acid composition by fatty acid methyl ester (FAME) analysis were conducted. RESULTS: Histological examination showed regional variations in the adipose tissue especially in the collagen content of the ECM, tissue perfusion and division into lobes and lobules by fibrous capsule. Considerable fibrosis, mononuclear cell infiltration especially by macrophages and lymphocytes and toxic changes in the nucleus were observed in the pansteatitis samples. Regional variation in lipid composition especially in Myristoleic (C14:1), Erucic acid (C22:1n9), and Docosadienoic acid (C22:2n6) was observed. Most of the saturated and trans fatty acids were found in significant quantities in the pansteatitis samples, but had very low levels of the cis fatty acid and the essential fatty acids with C18 backbone. CONCLUSION: This study demonstrates that there exists some regional variation in histomorphology and fatty acid composition in the healthy adipose tissue of the Nile crocodile. It also showed that pansteatitis in the Nile crocodile might have been triggered by sudden change in energy balance from consumption of dead fish; and probable exposure to toxic environmental conditions with the evidence of up scaled monounsaturated long chain fatty acids composition and toxic changes in the leucocytes observed in pansteatitis in the present study.
[Mh] MeSH terms primary: Alligators and Crocodiles
Intra-Abdominal Fat/pathology
Steatitis/pathology
Subcutaneous Fat/pathology
[Mh] MeSH terms secundary: Animals
Fatty Acids/metabolism
Intra-Abdominal Fat/metabolism
Muscle, Skeletal/metabolism
Muscle, Skeletal/pathology
Organ Specificity
Steatitis/metabolism
Subcutaneous Fat/metabolism
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Nm] Name of substance:0 (Fatty Acids)
[Em] Entry month:1706
[Cu] Class update date: 170612
[Lr] Last revision date:170612
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[Da] Date of entry for processing:170225
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.1186/s12944-016-0405-2

  4 / 110 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 27613492
[Au] Autor:Hahn H; Pey P; Baril A; Charpentier J; Desquilbet L; Le Poder S; Château-Joubert S; Laloy E; Freiche V
[Ad] Address:1 Department of Medical Imaging, University Paris-Est Créteil, National Veterinary School of Alfort, Maisons-Alfort, France.
[Ti] Title:Ultrasonographic, endoscopic and histological appearances of the caecum in cats presenting with chronic clinical signs of caecocolic disease.
[So] Source:J Feline Med Surg;19(2):94-104, 2017 Feb.
[Is] ISSN:1532-2750
[Cp] Country of publication:England
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Objectives This study aimed to describe the ultrasonographic, endoscopic and histological characteristics of the caecum and ileocaecocolic junction in cats suffering from chronic clinical signs compatible with caecocolic disease. Methods Cats presenting with clinical signs suggestive of a caecocolic disease were prospectively recruited. All cats underwent an ultrasonographic examination of the caecum, ileum, colon, ileocolic lymph nodes and local mesenteric fat, in addition to comprehensive abdominal ultrasonography. This was followed by a colonoscopy with a macroscopic assessment of the caecocolic mucosa; caecocolic tissue samples were systematically collected for histologic analysis. Results Eighteen cats were included. Eleven of 18 cats had ultrasonographic abnormalities adjacent to the ileocaecocolic junction (lymphadenopathy, local steatitis) and 13/18 cats had abnormalities directly related to the junction (wall thickening, loss of wall layering). Seventeen of 18 cats had at least one ultrasonographic abnormality. Endoscopically, hyperaemia, oedema, discoloration and/or erosions were found in all cats. Each cat was classified as having mild or moderate-to-severe lesions according to endoscopic results; no classification could be established statistically for ultrasonographic results. The accentuation of the dimpled pattern tended to be inversely related to the severity of endoscopic lesion scoring. Histologically, a large proportion of cats showed typhlitis (13/16), one had lymphoma and two were normal. All cats with typhlitis also had colitis. There was only slight agreement between endoscopic and histological caecal results regarding the severity of lesions. Loss of caecal wall layering on ultrasound was found in 7/18 cats and, surprisingly, did not appear as a reliable predictor of the severity of inflammation or of malignancy; neither did local steatitis nor lymph node size. Conclusions and relevance Ultrasonography and endoscopy should not be used as the sole methods to investigate the ileocaecocolic region in cats with clinical signs suggestive of caecocolic disease. The presence of chronic clinical signs should routinely prompt histological biopsy.
[Mh] MeSH terms primary: Cat Diseases/physiopathology
Cecal Diseases/veterinary
[Mh] MeSH terms secundary: Animals
Biopsy/veterinary
Cat Diseases/diagnostic imaging
Cats
Cecal Diseases/physiopathology
Colonoscopy/veterinary
Female
Male
Prospective Studies
Retrospective Studies
Severity of Illness Index
Typhlitis/physiopathology
Typhlitis/veterinary
Ultrasonography/veterinary
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1707
[Cu] Class update date: 170731
[Lr] Last revision date:170731
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[Da] Date of entry for processing:160911
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.1177/1098612X16663594

  5 / 110 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 27550155
[Au] Autor:Chen F; Gao J; Wu D; Xu L; Han W; Zhang D; Bi X; He M; Pan Y
[Ad] Address:Chongqing Medical University, Chongqing, 400016, People's Republic of China.
[Ti] Title:Clinical and Pathologic Features of a Suspected Selenium Deficiency in Captive Plains Zebras.
[So] Source:Biol Trace Elem Res;176(1):114-119, 2017 Mar.
[Is] ISSN:1559-0720
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Previous studies have shown that selenium (Se) deficiency is associated with nutritional myopathy, known as white muscle disease (WMD), in horses. However, correlations between Se deficiency and clinical findings, such as hematologic biochemical values and pathological features, have not been evaluated in captive plains zebras. The purpose of the present study was to investigate the clinical and pathologic features that may be caused by a Se deficiency in the captive plains zebra. Clinical findings, feed analyses, hematologic biochemical analyses, response to treatment, and pathologic examination were assessed in six affected plains zebras. The dietary concentration of Se in feed was also tested. Sudden death occurred in two cases during the first day of the onset of symptoms. Two zebras died at 4 days and two zebras survived after treatment. The clinical signs in affected animals were characterized by general weakness, astasia, and abnormal postural positions. The Se concentration in hay from the breeding stable was low, based on the reference value. Glutathione peroxidase (GSH-Px) activity was lower compared with the equine reference value. Multiple areas of subcutaneous steatitis and pale skeletal muscle and myocardium were revealed at gross necropsy. Degeneration and necrosis of myocardial and skeletal muscles, as well as congestion of the liver, lung, and kidney were found via histopathological examination. No suspected bacterial infections were found. Feed analyses, response to treatment, serum GSH-Px activity, and pathological features suggest that Se deficiency may have caused the disease in the six affected captive plains zebra.
[Mh] MeSH terms primary: Animal Diseases/metabolism
Equidae
Selenium/analysis
Selenium/deficiency
Steatitis/metabolism
[Mh] MeSH terms secundary: Animal Diseases/blood
Animal Diseases/diagnosis
Animal Feed/analysis
Animals
Autopsy/veterinary
Diet
Female
Glutathione Peroxidase/blood
Glutathione Peroxidase/metabolism
Kidney/pathology
Liver/pathology
Lung/pathology
Male
Muscle, Skeletal/pathology
Myocardium/pathology
Selenium/administration & dosage
Steatitis/blood
Steatitis/diagnosis
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Nm] Name of substance:EC 1.11.1.9 (Glutathione Peroxidase); H6241UJ22B (Selenium)
[Em] Entry month:1702
[Cu] Class update date: 170227
[Lr] Last revision date:170227
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[Da] Date of entry for processing:160824
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.1007/s12011-016-0820-2

  6 / 110 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 27115488
[Au] Autor:Bowden JA; Cantu TM; Chapman RW; Somerville SE; Guillette MP; Botha H; Hoffman A; Luus-Powell WJ; Smit WJ; Lebepe J; Myburgh J; Govender D; Tucker J; Boggs AS; Guillette LJ
[Ad] Address:National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST), Material Measurement Laboratory, Chemical Sciences Division, Environmental Chemical Sciences Group, Hollings Marine Laboratory, Charleston, South Carolina, United States of America.
[Ti] Title:Predictive Blood Chemistry Parameters for Pansteatitis-Affected Mozambique Tilapia (Oreochromis mossambicus).
[So] Source:PLoS One;11(4):e0153874, 2016.
[Is] ISSN:1932-6203
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:One of the largest river systems in South Africa, the Olifants River, has experienced significant changes in water quality due to anthropogenic activities. Since 2005, there have been various "outbreaks" of the inflammatory disease pansteatitis in several vertebrate species. Large-scale pansteatitis-related mortality events have decimated the crocodile population at Lake Loskop and decreased the population at Kruger National Park. Most pansteatitis-related diagnoses within the region are conducted post-mortem by either gross pathology or histology. The application of a non-lethal approach to assess the prevalence and pervasiveness of pansteatitis in the Olifants River region would be of great importance for the development of a management plan for this disease. In this study, several plasma-based biomarkers accurately classified pansteatitis in Mozambique tilapia (Oreochromis mossambicus) collected from Lake Loskop using a commercially available benchtop blood chemistry analyzer combined with data interpretation via artificial neural network analysis. According to the model, four blood chemistry parameters (calcium, sodium, total protein and albumin), in combination with total length, diagnose pansteatitis to a predictive accuracy of 92 percent. In addition, several morphometric traits (total length, age, weight) were also associated with pansteatitis. On-going research will focus on further evaluating the use of blood chemistry to classify pansteatitis across different species, trophic levels, and within different sites along the Olifants River.
[Mh] MeSH terms primary: Blood Chemical Analysis/veterinary
Fish Diseases/blood
Panniculitis/veterinary
Steatitis/blood
Tilapia/blood
[Mh] MeSH terms secundary: Animals
Biomarkers/blood
Blood Chemical Analysis/methods
Blood Chemical Analysis/statistics & numerical data
Blood Proteins/analysis
Calcium/blood
Female
Fish Diseases/diagnosis
Fish Diseases/etiology
Fish Proteins/blood
Male
Panniculitis/blood
Panniculitis/diagnosis
Rivers
Serum Albumin/analysis
Sodium/blood
South Africa
Steatitis/diagnosis
Steatitis/etiology
Water Pollution, Chemical/adverse effects
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE; RESEARCH SUPPORT, NON-U.S. GOV'T
[Nm] Name of substance:0 (Biomarkers); 0 (Blood Proteins); 0 (Fish Proteins); 0 (Serum Albumin); 9NEZ333N27 (Sodium); SY7Q814VUP (Calcium)
[Em] Entry month:1702
[Cu] Class update date: 170227
[Lr] Last revision date:170227
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[Da] Date of entry for processing:160427
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.1371/journal.pone.0153874

  7 / 110 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 26858440
[Au] Autor:Liu W; Struik D; Nies VJ; Jurdzinski A; Harkema L; de Bruin A; Verkade HJ; Downes M; Evans RM; van Zutphen T; Jonker JW
[Ad] Address:Center for Liver, Digestive and Metabolic Diseases, Department of Pediatrics, University of Groningen, University Medical Center Groningen, 9713 GZ Groningen, The Netherlands;
[Ti] Title:Effective treatment of steatosis and steatohepatitis by fibroblast growth factor 1 in mouse models of nonalcoholic fatty liver disease.
[So] Source:Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A;113(8):2288-93, 2016 Feb 23.
[Is] ISSN:1091-6490
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is the most common chronic liver disorder and is strongly associated with obesity and type 2 diabetes. Currently, there is no approved pharmacological treatment for this disease, but improvement of insulin resistance using peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-γ (PPARγ) agonists, such as thiazolidinediones (TZDs), has been shown to reduce steatosis and steatohepatitis effectively and to improve liver function in patients with obesity-related NAFLD. However, this approach is limited by adverse effects of TZDs. Recently, we have identified fibroblast growth factor 1 (FGF1) as a target of nuclear receptor PPARγ in visceral adipose tissue and as a critical factor in adipose remodeling. Because FGF1 is situated downstream of PPARγ, it is likely that therapeutic targeting of the FGF1 pathway will eliminate some of the serious adverse effects associated with TZDs. Here we show that pharmacological administration of recombinant FGF1 (rFGF1) effectively improves hepatic inflammation and damage in leptin-deficient ob/ob mice and in choline-deficient mice, two etiologically different models of NAFLD. Hepatic steatosis was effectively reduced only in ob/ob mice, suggesting that rFGF1 stimulates hepatic lipid catabolism. Potentially adverse effects such as fibrosis or proliferation were not observed in these models. Because the anti-inflammatory effects were observed in both the presence and absence of the antisteatotic effects, our findings further suggest that the anti-inflammatory property of rFGF1 is independent of its effect on lipid catabolism. Our current findings indicate that, in addition to its potent glucose-lowering and insulin-sensitizing effects, rFGF1 could be therapeutically effective in the treatment of NAFLD.
[Mh] MeSH terms primary: Fibroblast Growth Factor 1/therapeutic use
Non-alcoholic Fatty Liver Disease/drug therapy
[Mh] MeSH terms secundary: Animals
Choline Deficiency/complications
Disease Models, Animal
Gene Expression
Human Umbilical Vein Endothelial Cells
Humans
Leptin/deficiency
Male
Mice
Mice, Inbred C57BL
Mice, Obese
Non-alcoholic Fatty Liver Disease/metabolism
Non-alcoholic Fatty Liver Disease/pathology
RAW 264.7 Cells
Recombinant Proteins/therapeutic use
Vascular Cell Adhesion Molecule-1/genetics
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE; RESEARCH SUPPORT, N.I.H., EXTRAMURAL; RESEARCH SUPPORT, NON-U.S. GOV'T
[Nm] Name of substance:0 (Leptin); 0 (Recombinant Proteins); 0 (Vascular Cell Adhesion Molecule-1); 104781-85-3 (Fibroblast Growth Factor 1)
[Em] Entry month:1607
[Cu] Class update date: 170220
[Lr] Last revision date:170220
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[Da] Date of entry for processing:160210
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.1073/pnas.1525093113

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[PMID]: 26720078
[Au] Autor:Stelmach DK; Jiménez DA; Andrade N; Clarke KM
[Ti] Title:What Is Your Diagnosis? Small intestinal incarceration and surrounding steatitis within a left inguinal hernia.
[So] Source:J Am Vet Med Assoc;248(2):149-51, 2016 Jan 15.
[Is] ISSN:1943-569X
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Mh] MeSH terms primary: Dog Diseases/diagnosis
Hernia, Inguinal/veterinary
Intestinal Obstruction/veterinary
Intestine, Small/pathology
Lacerations/veterinary
[Mh] MeSH terms secundary: Animals
Dog Diseases/pathology
Dog Diseases/surgery
Dogs
Female
Hernia, Inguinal/complications
Intestinal Obstruction/diagnosis
Intestinal Obstruction/pathology
Intestinal Obstruction/surgery
Lacerations/diagnosis
Steatitis
[Pt] Publication type:CASE REPORTS; JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1609
[Cu] Class update date: 160101
[Lr] Last revision date:160101
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[Da] Date of entry for processing:160101
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.2460/javma.248.2.149

  9 / 110 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 25413848
[Au] Autor:Truter JC; van Wyk JH; Oberholster PJ; Botha AM; Luus-Powell WJ
[Ad] Address:Department of Botany and Zoology, Stellenbosch University, Stellenbosch, South Africa.
[Ti] Title:The expression of selected genes linked to metabolic homeostasis in obese pansteatitis-suffering Mozambique tilapia, Oreochromis mossambicus (Peters).
[So] Source:J Fish Dis;39(1):69-85, 2016 Jan.
[Is] ISSN:1365-2761
[Cp] Country of publication:England
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:The Oreochromis mossambicus (Peters) population inhabiting Lake Loskop, South Africa, is characterized by a high incidence of obesity and pansteatitis. We investigated potential links between the impaired health of Lake Loskop O. mossambicus and the endocrine system by assessing the expression of selected genes associated with the thyroid and adrenal endocrine axes as well as peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma (pparg). Moreover, contaminant-induced thyroid and/or metabolic modulation in Lake Loskop water was evaluated using juvenile O. mossambicus in laboratory exposures. The expression of thyroid hormone receptor alpha (thra) and type 2 deiodinase (dio2) was higher in Lake Loskop O. mossambicus than fish from another population, suggesting a degree of thyroid disruption. The altered gene expression may be a consequence, rather than cause of obesity. Expression of dio2 and pparg was higher in juvenile O. mossambicus exposed to unfiltered compared to filtered lake water, and our data suggest fasting as causative factor. Micro-organism abundance can therefore be a confounding factor in studies applying molecular markers to test for thyroid modulation by environmental waters. Pansteatitis was not a significant source of variance in the expression of any of the genes investigated, suggesting that the disease is not associated with disrupted endocrine signalling.
[Mh] MeSH terms primary: Fish Diseases/genetics
Metabolic Diseases/veterinary
Obesity/veterinary
Steatitis/genetics
Tilapia/genetics
[Mh] MeSH terms secundary: Analysis of Variance
Animals
Fish Diseases/etiology
Homeostasis
Lakes/chemistry
Linear Models
Metabolic Diseases/complications
Metabolic Diseases/genetics
Metals/analysis
Obesity/complications
Obesity/genetics
Phytoplankton/classification
South Africa
Steatitis/etiology
Stramenopiles/classification
Tilapia/metabolism
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE; RESEARCH SUPPORT, NON-U.S. GOV'T
[Nm] Name of substance:0 (Metals)
[Em] Entry month:1612
[Cu] Class update date: 161230
[Lr] Last revision date:161230
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[Da] Date of entry for processing:141122
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.1111/jfd.12324

  10 / 110 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 26668668
[Au] Autor:Nishizawa T; Neagari Y; Miura T; Asayama M; Murata K; Harada K; Shirai M
[Ad] Address:College of Agriculture, Ibaraki University, Ibaraki 300-0393, Japan.
[Ti] Title:Molecular Analysis of the Cyanobacterial Community in Gastric Contents of Egrets with Symptoms of Steatitis.
[So] Source:Open Microbiol J;9:160-6, 2015.
[Is] ISSN:1874-2858
[Cp] Country of publication:Netherlands
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Many deaths of wild birds that have drunk water contaminated with hepatotoxic microcystin-producing cyanobacteria have been reported. A mass death of egrets and herons with steatitis were found at the agricultural reservoir occurring cyanobacterial waterblooms. This study aimed to verify a hypothesis that the egrets and herons which died in the reservoir drink microcystin-producing cyanobacteria and microcystin involves in the cause of death as well as the symptoms of steatitis. The cyanobacterial community in gastric contents of egrets and herons that died from steatitis was assessed using cyanobacterial 16S rRNA-based terminal-restriction fragment length polymorphism (T-RFLP) profiling and a cyanobacterial 16S rRNA-based clone library analysis. In addition, PCR amplification of the mcyB-C region and the mcyG gene, involved in microcystin biosynthesis, was examined. The cyanobacterial community in the gastric contents of two birds showed a simplistic composition. A comparison of cyanobacterial T-RFLP profiling and cloned sequences suggested that the genus Microcystis predominated in both samples of egrets died. Although we confirmed that two egrets which died in the reservoir have taken in cyanobacterial waterblooms containing the genus Microcystis, no mcy gene was detected in both samples according to the mcy gene-based PCR analysis. This study is the first to show the profiling and traceability of a cyanobacterial community in the gastric contents of wild birds by molecular analysis. Additionally, we consider causing symptoms of steatitis in the dead egrets.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1512
[Cu] Class update date: 170220
[Lr] Last revision date:170220
[Da] Date of entry for processing:151216
[St] Status:PubMed-not-MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.2174/1874285801509010160


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