Database : MEDLINE
Search on : Strongyloidiasis [Words]
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Costa-Cruz, Julia Maria
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[PMID]: 29454735
[Au] Autor:Gonzaga HT; Nunes DDS; Ribeiro VDS; Feliciano ND; Cunha-Junior JPD; Costa-Cruz JM
[Ad] Address:Instituto de Ciências Biomédicas, Universidade Federal de Uberlândia, Av. Pará 1720, 38400-902, Uberlândia, MG, Brazil.
[Ti] Title:Metaperiodate deglycosylation of Strongyloides venezuelensis larvae: Immunochemical characterization and antigen production for human strongyloidiasis diagnosis.
[So] Source:Acta Trop;182:27-33, 2018 Feb 15.
[Is] ISSN:1873-6254
[Cp] Country of publication:Netherlands
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Strongyloidiasis is an important helminthiasis affecting million people worldwide. The aim of this study was to use sodium metaperiodate (MP) treatment to immunochemically characterize Strongyloides venezuelensis filariform larvae and use MP-treated heterologous antigen to detect IgG and subclasses in serum. Samples from individuals with definitive diagnosis of strongyloidiasis (n = 50), other parasitic diseases (n = 60) and negative endemic (n = 50) were tested. TG-ROC and two-way ANOVA were applied. MP-treatment resulted on differential localization of carbohydrates at larval structure and no carbohydrate content in saline extract (SE). Electrophoretic profiles were similar before and after treatment. ELISA sensitivity and specificity were: 90%; 88.2% for SE and 92.0%; 94.6% for MP, respectively. When using MP treated antigen we observed reduction in IgG1 and IgG3 detection in strongyloidiasis group and decrease of cross reactions in control groups. Our data demonstrate the role of carbohydrate residues in cross reactions and on the recognition of anti-Strongyloides IgG and its subclasses.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1802
[Cu] Class update date: 180309
[Lr] Last revision date:180309
[St] Status:Publisher

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[PMID]: 29360939
[Au] Autor:Repetto SA; Ruybal P; Batalla E; López C; Fridman V; Sierra M; Radisic M; Bravo PM; Risso MG; González Cappa SM; Alba Soto CD
[Ad] Address:Facultad de Medicina, Instituto de Investigaciones en Microbiología y Parasitología Médica, Consejo Nacional de Investigaciones Científicas y Técnicas.
[Ti] Title:Strongyloidiasis Outside Endemic Areas: Long-term Parasitological and Clinical Follow-up After Ivermectin Treatment.
[So] Source:Clin Infect Dis;, 2018 Jan 19.
[Is] ISSN:1537-6591
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Background: Strongyloides stercoralis affects 30-100 million people worldwide. The first-line therapy is ivermectin. Cure is defined as the absence of larvae by parasitological methods 1 year after treatment. To date, no longitudinal parasitological studies for longer periods of time have been conducted to confirm its cure. Here, we evaluated treatment response in long-term follow-up patients with chronic infection using parasitological and molecular methods for larvae or DNA detection. Methods: A prospective, descriptive, observational study was conducted between January 2009 and September 2015 in Buenos Aires, Argentina. Twenty-one patients with S. stercoralis diagnosis were evaluated 30, 60, and 90 days as well as 1, 2, 3, and/or 4 years after treatment by conventional methods (fresh stool, Ritchie method, agar plate culture), S. stercoralis-specific polymerase chain reaction (PCR) in stool DNA, and eosinophil values. Results: During follow-up, larvae were detected by conventional methods in 14 of 21 patients. This parasitological reactivation was observed starting 30 days posttreatment (dpt) and then at different times since 90 dpt. Eosinophil values decreased (P = .001) 30 days after treatment, but their levels were neither associated with nor predicted these reactivations. However, S. stercoralis DNA was detected by PCR in all patients, both in their first and subsequent stool samples, thus reflecting the poor efficacy of ivermectin at eradicating parasite from host tissues. Asymptomatic eosinophilia was the most frequent clinical form among chronically infected patients. Conclusions: These results suggest that the parasitological cure is unlikely. Strongyloidiasis must be considered a chronic infection and ivermectin administration schedules should be reevaluated.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1801
[Cu] Class update date: 180308
[Lr] Last revision date:180308
[St] Status:Publisher
[do] DOI:10.1093/cid/cix1069

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[PMID]: 29512242
[Au] Autor:Abanyie FA; Valice E; Delli Carpini KW; Gray EB; McAuliffe I; Chin-Hong PV; Handali S; Montgomery SP; Huprikar S
[Ad] Address:Center for Global Health, Division of Parasitic Diseases and Malaria, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Atlanta, GA, USA.
[Ti] Title:Organ Donor Screening Practices for Strongyloides stercoralis Infection among US Organ Procurement Organizations.
[So] Source:Transpl Infect Dis;, 2018 Mar 07.
[Is] ISSN:1399-3062
[Cp] Country of publication:Denmark
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:BACKGROUND: Targeted donor screening for strongyloidiasis performed at the time of organ procurement can prevent this life-threatening donor-derived infection. METHOD: The Association of Organ Procurement Organizations surveyed members to determine the number of U.S. organ procurement organizations (OPOs) performing donor screening for Strongyloides infection and their screening practices. RESULTS: All 58 OPOs responded to the survey. Only six (10%) currently screen donors for strongyloidiasis; most OPOs started 6-36 months before the survey, one started 6 years prior. All used risk-based criteria to determine which donors to screen, though the criteria varied among OPOs. A median of 56 donors have been screened at each OPO since initiating their screening programs, with a median of two infected donors (range: 0-13) identified. Overall, 53 organs have been transplanted from 22 infected donors, including hearts, lungs, kidneys, and livers. Of 52 OPOs not currently screening, 20 had considered screening and one plans to start screening in the near future. Of those considering risk-based screening, most had not decided on the criteria. Uncertainty about the benefits of and guidelines for screening, and misconceptions about the interpretation of test results were concerns shared by non-screening OPOs. CONCLUSION: Continued education and advocacy on the importance of targeted donor screening is needed. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1803
[Cu] Class update date: 180307
[Lr] Last revision date:180307
[St] Status:Publisher
[do] DOI:10.1111/tid.12865

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[PMID]: 29505750
[Au] Autor:Kanth P; Affolter K
[Ad] Address:Department of Gastroenterology, University of Utah, Salt Lake City, Utah; Huntsman Cancer Institute, Salt Lake City, Utah.
[Ti] Title:Worming Your Way Through the Gastrointestinal Tract: A Case of Strongyloidiasis.
[So] Source:Clin Gastroenterol Hepatol;, 2018 Mar 02.
[Is] ISSN:1542-7714
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1803
[Cu] Class update date: 180305
[Lr] Last revision date:180305
[St] Status:Publisher

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[PMID]: 29493782
[Au] Autor:Kleinschmidt LM; Kinney ME; Hanley CS
[Ad] Address:Animal Health Department, Saint Louis Zoo, Saint Louis, MO, USA.
[Ti] Title:Treatment of disseminated Strongyloides spp. infection in an infant Sumatran orangutan (Pongo abelii).
[So] Source:J Med Primatol;, 2018 Mar 01.
[Is] ISSN:1600-0684
[Cp] Country of publication:Denmark
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Strongyloides nematodes have been reported in all species of great apes with orangutans ≤5 years old most susceptible to severe clinical disease. This brief communication describes the first published case of antemortem diagnosis and treatment of disseminated strongyloidiasis in a clinically affected 5-month-old Sumatran orangutan (Pongo abelii).
[Pt] Publication type:CASE REPORTS
[Em] Entry month:1803
[Cu] Class update date: 180301
[Lr] Last revision date:180301
[St] Status:Publisher
[do] DOI:10.1111/jmp.12338

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[PMID]: 29385128
[Au] Autor:Puerta-Alcalde P; Gomez-Junyent J; Requena-Mendez A; Pinazo MJ; Álvarez-Martínez MJ; Rodríguez N; Gascon J; Muñoz J
[Ad] Address:Infectious Diseases Department, Hospital Clínic-IDIBAPS, Barcelona, Spain.
[Ti] Title:High prevalence of S. Stercoralis infection among patients with Chagas disease: A retrospective case-control study.
[So] Source:PLoS Negl Trop Dis;12(1):e0006199, 2018 Jan.
[Is] ISSN:1935-2735
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:BACKGROUND: We evaluate the association between Trypanosoma cruzi infection and strongyloidiasis in a cohort of Latin American (LA) migrants screened for both infections in a non-endemic setting. METHODOLOGY: Case-control study including LA individuals who were systematically screened for T. cruzi infection and strongyloidiasis between January 2013 and April 2015. Individuals were included as cases if they had a positive serological result for Strongyloides stercoralis. Controls were randomly selected from the cohort of individuals screened for T. cruzi infection that tested negative for S. stercoralis serology. The association between T. cruzi infection and strongyloidiasis was evaluated by logistic regression models. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: During the study period, 361 individuals were screened for both infections. 52 (14.4%) individuals had a positive serological result for strongyloidiasis (cases) and 104 participants with negative results were randomly selected as controls. 76 (48.7%) indiviuals had a positive serological result for T. cruzi. Factors associated with a positive T. cruzi serology were Bolivian origin (94.7% vs 78.7%; p = 0.003), coming from a rural area (90.8% vs 68.7%; p = 0.001), having lived in an adobe house (88.2% vs 70%; p = 0.006) and a referred contact with triatomine bugs (86.7% vs 63.3%; p = 0.001). There were more patients with a positive S. stercoralis serology among those who were infected with T. cruzi (42.1% vs 25%; p = 0.023). Epidemiological variables were not associated with a positive strongyloidiasis serology. T. cruzi infection was more frequent among those with strongyloidiasis (61.5% vs 42.3%; p = 0.023). In multivariate analysis, T. cruzi infection was associated with a two-fold increase in the odds of strongyloidiasis (OR 2.23; 95% CI 1.07-4.64; p = 0.030). CONCLUSIONS: T. cruzi infection was associated with strongyloidiasis in LA migrants attending a tropical diseases unit even after adjusting for epidemiological variables. These findings should encourage physicians in non-endemic settings to implement a systematic screening for both infections in LA individuals.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1802
[Cu] Class update date: 180301
[Lr] Last revision date:180301
[St] Status:In-Data-Review
[do] DOI:10.1371/journal.pntd.0006199

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[PMID]: 29474356
[Au] Autor:Martinez-Perez A; Roure Díez S; Belhasen-Garcia M; Torrús-Tendero D; Perez-Arellano JL; Cabezas T; Soler C; Díaz-Menéndez M; Navarro M; Treviño B; Salvador-Vélez F; Soil-Transmitted Helminths' Study Group of the Spanish Society of Tropical Medicine and International Health (SEMTSI)
[Ad] Address:Consorcio de Atención Primaria en Salud Barcelona Esquerra, Barcelona, Spain.
[Ti] Title:Management of severe strongyloidiasis attended at reference centers in Spain.
[So] Source:PLoS Negl Trop Dis;12(2):e0006272, 2018 Feb 23.
[Is] ISSN:1935-2735
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:INTRODUCTION: Strongyloides stercoralis is a globally distributed nematode that causes diverse clinical symptoms in humans. Spain, once considered an endemic country, has experienced a recent increase in imported cases. The introduction of serology helps diagnosis and is currently replacing microbiological techniques in some settings, but its sensitivity is variable and can be low in immunocompromised patients. Diagnosis can only be confirmed by identification of larvae. Often, this "gold standard" can only be achieved in severe cases, such as disseminated S.stercoralis infection, or S.stercoralis hyperinfection syndrome, where parasite load is high. In addition, these clinical presentations are not well-defined. Our aim is to describe severe cases of S.stercoralis, their epidemiological profile, and their clinical details. METHODS: An observational retrospective study of disseminated S.stercoralis infection, or hyperinfection syndrome. Inclusion criteria: aged over 18, with a diagnosis of disseminated S.stercoralis infection, or hyperinfection syndrome, confirmed by visualization of larvae. Patients were identified through revision of clinical records for the period 2000-2015, in collaboration with eight reference centers throughout Spain. RESULTS: From the period 2000-2015, eighteen cases were identified, 66.7% of which were male, with a median age of 40 (range 21-70). Most of them were foreigners (94.4%), mainly from Latin America (82.3%) or Western Africa (17.6%). Only one autochthonous case was identified, from 2006. Immunosuppressive conditions were present in fourteen (77%) patients, mainly due steroids use and to retroviral coinfections (four HIV, two HTLV). Transplant preceded the clinical presentation in four of them. Other comorbidities were coinfection with HBV, Trypanosoma cruzi, Mycobacterium leprae or Aspergillus spp. All presented with digestive disorders, with 55.6% also presenting malaise. 44.4% of cases had fever, 27.8% skin complaints, and 16.7% respiratory or neurological disorders. One patient presented anemia, and one other nephrotic syndrome. Diagnosis was confirmed by identification of larvae in fresh stool samples (n = 16; 88.9%), concentration techniques (n = 6; 33.3%), larval culture (n = 5; 29.4%), or digestive biopsies (n = 8; 44%). S.stercoralis forms were identified during necropsy in one case. In addition, ten (55%) had a positive serology. All the cases were treated with ivermectin, six (33%) also received albendazole and one case received thiabendazole followed by ivermectin. All needed inpatient management, involving a mean hospitalization stay of 25 days (range 1-164). Two cases received intensive care and eventually died. CONCLUSIONS: Only eighteen cases of disseminated S.stercoralis infection/hyperinfection syndrome were identified from the 15-year period, most of which were considered to have been imported cases. Among those, immunosuppression was frequent, and mortality due to S.stercoralis was lower than previously described.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1802
[Cu] Class update date: 180223
[Lr] Last revision date:180223
[St] Status:Publisher
[do] DOI:10.1371/journal.pntd.0006272

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[PMID]: 29441550
[Au] Autor:Reinehr CPH; Barone CR; Naspolini AP; Cartell A; Bakos RM
[Ad] Address:Department of Dermatology, Hospital de Clínicas de Porto Alegre, Porto Alegre, Rio Grande do Sul, Brazil.
[Ti] Title:Image Gallery: Periumbilical purpura: a dermatological clue for disseminated strongyloidiasis.
[So] Source:Br J Dermatol;178(2):e145, 2018 Feb.
[Is] ISSN:1365-2133
[Cp] Country of publication:England
[La] Language:eng
[Pt] Publication type:LETTER
[Em] Entry month:1802
[Cu] Class update date: 180214
[Lr] Last revision date:180214
[St] Status:In-Data-Review
[do] DOI:10.1111/bjd.16160

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[PMID]: 29436335
[Au] Autor:Arifin N; Yunus MH; Nolan TJ; Lok JB; Noordin R
[Ad] Address:Institute for Research in Molecular Medicine (INFORMM), Universiti Sains Malaysia, Penang, Malaysia.
[Ti] Title:Identification and Preliminary Evaluation of a Novel Recombinant Protein for Serodiagnosis of Strongyloidiasis.
[So] Source:Am J Trop Med Hyg;, 2018 Feb 12.
[Is] ISSN:1476-1645
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:is a human parasite that can cause a long-term infection. In immunosuppressed patients, strongyloidiasis may be fatal when there is overwhelming autoinfection resulting in the migration of large numbers of larvae through many organs. Definitive diagnosis is still a challenge, and a combination of symptoms, microscopic identification, and serology test results are often used to arrive at a clinical decision. However, intermittent larval excretion, low parasite burden, and occult infections are challenges with parasitological diagnosis of infection with . Meanwhile, serologic tests using IgG and parasite antigen extract have problems of cross-reactivity with other helminthic infections. Recombinant antigen-based serodiagnosis is a good alternative to overcome the laboratory diagnostic issues. Herein, we report on the isolation of cDNA clone encoding an antigen of potential diagnostic value identified from immunoscreening of a cDNA library. The translated protein had highest similarity to immunoglobulin-binding protein 1. The recombinant antigen produced, rSs1a, was assessed using western blot and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. The latter showed 96% diagnostic sensitivity and 93% specificity; thus, rSs1a has good potential for use in serodiagnosis of human strongyloidiasis.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1802
[Cu] Class update date: 180213
[Lr] Last revision date:180213
[St] Status:Publisher
[do] DOI:10.4269/ajtmh.17-0697

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[PMID]: 29384908
[Au] Autor:Tariq H; Kamal MU; Reddy P; Bajantri B; Niazi M; Matela A; Zeana C; Ihimoyan A; Dev A; Chilimuri S
[Ad] Address:Department of Medicine.
[Ti] Title:Anemia, intractable vomiting, chronic diarrhea, and syndrome of inappropriate antidiuretic secretion: a diagnostic dilemma: Disseminated strongyloidosis in a patient with newly diagnosed HTLV infection-case report and review of literature.
[So] Source:Medicine (Baltimore);96(52):e9229, 2017 Dec.
[Is] ISSN:1536-5964
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:RATIONALE: Strongyloidiasis hyperinfection and disseminated disease have high mortality rates due to several complications and early detection of Strongyloides infection is therefore prudent. PATIENT CONCERNS: A 37-year-old male patient came with chronic diarrhea, intractable vomiting and was found to have hyponatremia, and anemia on the initial laboratory tests. DIAGNOSES: Further work up revealed syndrome of inappropriate antidiuretic secretion to be the cause of the hyponatremia in addition to gastrointestinal loses. His hospital course was complicated by persistent hyponatremia and later development of partial small bowel obstruction. INTERVENTIONS: Considering his symptoms we had a suspicion of small bowel pathology for which he underwent an esophagogastroduodenoscopywith biopsies that revealed strongyloidosis as the cause of his symptoms. He was also found to have human T-cell lymphotropic virus infection, likely contributing to the disseminated disease. OUTCOMES: He was started on ivermectin with complete resolution of symptoms and improvement of hyponatremia. LESSONS: It is very important to suspect Strongyloides infection in a patient presenting with syndrome ofinappropriate antidiuretic secretion as hyperinfection and disseminated disease can be life threatening without antihelmintic therapy.
[Mh] MeSH terms primary: Anemia/etiology
Diarrhea/etiology
HTLV-I Infections/complications
Inappropriate ADH Syndrome/etiology
Strongyloidiasis/diagnosis
Vomiting/etiology
[Mh] MeSH terms secundary: Adult
Animals
HTLV-I Infections/diagnosis
Humans
Inappropriate ADH Syndrome/diagnosis
Inappropriate ADH Syndrome/therapy
Male
Strongyloides stercoralis
Strongyloidiasis/complications
Strongyloidiasis/therapy
[Pt] Publication type:CASE REPORTS; JOURNAL ARTICLE; REVIEW
[Em] Entry month:1802
[Cu] Class update date: 180209
[Lr] Last revision date:180209
[Js] Journal subset:AIM; IM
[Da] Date of entry for processing:180201
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.1097/MD.0000000000009229


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