Database : MEDLINE
Search on : Sulfasalazine [Words]
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[PMID]: 29458149
[Au] Autor:Zheng Y; Ritzenthaler JD; Burke TJ; Otero J; Roman J; Watson WH
[Ad] Address:Department of Pharmacology and Toxicology, University of Louisville School of Medicine, 505 South Hancock Street, Louisville, KY 40202, United States. Electronic address: y0zhen14@exchange.louisville.edu.
[Ti] Title:Age-dependent oxidation of extracellular cysteine/cystine redox state (E (Cys/CySS)) in mouse lung fibroblasts is mediated by a decline in Slc7a11 expression.
[So] Source:Free Radic Biol Med;118:13-22, 2018 Feb 16.
[Is] ISSN:1873-4596
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Aging is associated with progressive oxidation of the extracellular environment. The redox state of human plasma, defined by the concentrations of cysteine (Cys) and cystine (CySS), becomes more oxidized as we age. Recently, we showed that fibroblasts isolated from the lungs of young and old mice retain this differential phenotype; old cells produce and maintain a more oxidizing extracellular redox potential (E (Cys/CySS)) than young cells. Microarray analysis identified down-regulation of Slc7a11, the light subunit of the CySS/glutamate transporter, as a potential mediator of age-related oxidation in these cells. The purpose of the present study was to investigate the mechanistic link between Slc7a11 expression and extracellular E (Cys/CySS). Sulforaphane treatment or overexpression of Slc7a11 was used to increase Slc7a11 in lung fibroblasts from old mice, and sulfasalazine treatment or siRNA-mediated knock down was used to decrease Slc7a11 in young fibroblasts. Slc7a11 mRNA levels were measured by real-time PCR, Slc7a11 activity was determined by measuring the rate of glutamate release, Cys, CySS, glutathione (GSH) and its disulfide (GSSG) were measured by HPLC, and E (Cys/CySS) was calculated from the Nernst equation. The results showed that both E (Cys/CySS) and E (GSH/GSSG) were more oxidized in the conditioned media of old cells than in young cells. Up-regulation of Slc7a11 via overexpression or sulforaphane treatment restored extracellular E (Cys/CySS) in cultures of old cells, whereas down-regulation reproduced the oxidizing E (Cys/CySS) in young cells. Only sulforaphane treatment was able to increase total GSH and restore E (GSH/GSSG), whereas overexpression, knock down and sulfasalazine had no effect on these parameters. In addition, inhibition of GSH synthesis with buthionine sulfoximine had no effect on the ability of cells to restore their extracellular redox potential in response to an oxidative challenge. In conclusion, our study reveals Slc7a11 is the key regulator of age-dependent changes in extracellular E (Cys/CySS) in primary mouse lung fibroblasts, and its effects are not dependent on GSH synthesis.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1802
[Cu] Class update date: 180310
[Lr] Last revision date:180310
[St] Status:Publisher

  2 / 5319 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29514712
[Au] Autor:Takeuchi T; Yamanaka H; Harigai M; Tamamura R; Kato Y; Ukyo Y; Nakano T; Hsu B; Tanaka Y
[Ad] Address:Keio University School of Medicine, Shinjuku-ku, Tokyo, Japan.
[Ti] Title:Sirukumab in rheumatoid arthritis refractory to sulfasalazine or methotrexate: a randomized phase 3 safety and efficacy study in Japanese patients.
[So] Source:Arthritis Res Ther;20(1):42, 2018 Mar 07.
[Is] ISSN:1478-6362
[Cp] Country of publication:England
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:BACKGROUND: Sirukumab, a high-affinity human monoclonal antibody that selectively binds to interleukin-6, has demonstrated efficacy in the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis (RA) in global phase 1 and phase 2 studies. The present study evaluated the safety and efficacy of sirukumab, as monotherapy in Japanese patients with RA refractory to methotrexate or sulfasalazine. METHODS: In this phase 3, double-blind study, 122 patients (age ≥ 20 years) were randomized (1:1, 61 patients in each arm) to sirukumab administered subcutaneously: 50 mg once every 4 weeks (q4w) or 100 mg once every 2 weeks (q2w) through 52 weeks. Disease-modifying anti-rheumatic drugs were allowed after 24 weeks. Safety was assessed and efficacy was evaluated using American College of Rheumatology (ACR) responses, Disease Activity Score C-reactive protein (DAS28-CRP) and Health Assessment Questionnaire-Disability Index (HAQ-DI). RESULTS: Amongst the 122 randomized patients, 99 (81.1%) patients completed the study. Adverse events (AEs) were reported in 114/122 (93.4%) patients and serious AEs were reported in 9/122 (7.4%) patients. No deaths, major cardiovascular AEs, serious gastrointestinal perforations or tuberculosis cases were reported during this study period. Grade 3 hematologic abnormalities (neutropenia and leukopenia) were reported in seven patients and no grade 4 abnormalities were observed. ACR20 responses were observed within 2 weeks, achieved in 47/61 (77.0%, 50 mg q4w) patients and 44/61 (72.1%, 100 mg q2w) patients at week 16 and maintained through week 52. ACR50/70, DAS28-CRP and HAQ-DI responses were also maintained through week 52 in both groups. CONCLUSIONS: Safety findings were comparable between the two treatment groups. The 52-week administration of sirukumab at 50 mg q4w and 100 mg q2w was generally tolerable and with measurable efficacy in Japanese patients with RA refractory to methotrexate and sulfasalazine. TRIAL REGISTRATION: NCT01689532 . Registered 18 September 2012.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1803
[Cu] Class update date: 180308
[Lr] Last revision date:180308
[Cl] Clinical Trial:ClinicalTrial
[St] Status:In-Data-Review
[do] DOI:10.1186/s13075-018-1536-9

  3 / 5319 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29394383
[Au] Autor:Huber F; Ehrensperger B; Hatz C; Chappuis F; Bühler S; Eperon G
[Ad] Address:Epidemiology, Biostatistics and Prevention Institute, Department of Public Health, Division of Infectious Diseases/Travel Clinic, University of Zurich, Hirschengraben 84, 8001 Zurich, Switzerland.
[Ti] Title:Safety of live vaccines on immunosuppressive or immunomodulatory therapy-a retrospective study in three Swiss Travel Clinics.
[So] Source:J Travel Med;25(1), 2018 Jan 01.
[Is] ISSN:1708-8305
[Cp] Country of publication:England
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Background: Patients increasingly benefit from immunosuppressive/immunomodulatory medications for a range of conditions allowing them a lifestyle similar to healthy individuals, including travel. However, the administration of live vaccines to immunodeficient patients bears the risk of replication of the attenuated vaccine microorganism. Therefore, live vaccines are generally contraindicated on immunosuppression. Data on live vaccinations on immunosuppressive/immunomodulatory medication are scarce. We identified all travellers seeking pre-travel advice in three Swiss travel clinics with a live vaccine during immunosuppressive/immunomodulatory therapy to ascertain experienced side effects. A retrospective and multi-centre study design was chosen to increase the sample size. Methods: This study was conducted in the travel clinics of the University of Zurich; the Swiss TPH, Basel; and Geneva University Hospitals. Travellers on immunosuppressive/immunomodulatory therapy who received live vaccines [yellow fever vaccination (YFV), measles/mumps/rubella (MMR), varicella and/ or oral typhoid vaccination (OTV)] between 2008 and 2015 were identified and interviewed. A total of 60 age- and sex-matched controls (matched to Basel/Zurich travel clinics travellers) were included. Results: Overall, 197 patients were identified. And 116 patients (59%) and 60 controls were interviewed. YFV was administered 92 times, MMR 21 times, varicella 4 times and OTV 6 times to patients on immunosuppressive/immunomodulatory therapy. Most common medications were corticosteroids (n = 45), mesalazine (n = 28) and methotrexate (n = 19). Live vaccines were also administered on biological treatment, e.g. TNF-alpha inhibitors (n = 8). Systemic reactions were observed in 12.2% of the immunosuppressed vs 13.3% of controls; local reactions in 7.8% of the immunosuppressed vs 11.7% of controls. In controls, all reactions were mild/moderate. In the immunosuppressed, 2/21 severe reactions occurred: severe local pain on interferon-beta and severe muscle/joint pain on sulfasalazine. Conclusion: Safety of live vaccines given to immunosuppressed patients cannot be concluded. However, it is re-assuring that in the examined patient groups no serious side effects or infections by the attenuated vaccine strain occurred.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1802
[Cu] Class update date: 180308
[Lr] Last revision date:180308
[St] Status:In-Data-Review
[do] DOI:10.1093/jtm/tax082

  4 / 5319 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29272488
[Au] Autor:van Gennep S; de Boer NK; D'Haens GR; Löwenberg M
[Ad] Address:Department of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, Academic Medical Center, Amsterdam, the Netherlands.
[Ti] Title:Thiopurine Treatment in Ulcerative Colitis: A Critical Review of the Evidence for Current Clinical Practice.
[So] Source:Inflamm Bowel Dis;24(1):67-77, 2017 Dec 19.
[Is] ISSN:1536-4844
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Background: Due to toxicity problems and controversial evidence, thiopurine use in ulcerative colitis (UC) has faced a lot of criticism. We present a critical review of the literature on efficacy of thiopurines in UC. Methods: Studies evaluating therapeutic efficacy of thiopurine remission induction and/or maintenance treatment in UC were identified using the Cochrane Library, MEDLINE, and EMBASE. Results: Out of 5 randomized trials on thiopurine induction treatment, 3 demonstrated a significant effect of thiopurine treatment vs mesalamine or placebo in steroid-dependent UC patients: (1) lower endoscopic activity scores, (2) higher clinical remission rates, and (3) more patients who discontinued steroids. Two found no significant difference in clinical and endoscopic remission of azathioprine compared with sulfasalazine or placebo in patients with active UC. Out of 7 randomized trials on thiopurine maintenance treatment, 4 demonstrated significant higher clinical and endoscopic remission rates in thiopurine-treated patients compared with placebo or mesalamine. Three found no significant difference in clinical and endoscopic remission of thiopurine maintenance treatment compared with sulfasalazine or placebo. Conclusions: All studies that investigated thiopurine treatment in UC had shortcomings, such as lack of sufficient power, no use of blinding, allowed concomitant treatment with steroids, and no endoscopy to confirm active disease at study entry or to evaluate therapeutic efficacy. Hence, current clinical practice of thiopurine treatment in UC is based on minimal and controversial evidence. This underscores the need for clinical studies with sufficient power and objective end points in order to determine efficacy of thiopurines in UC.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1712
[Cu] Class update date: 180308
[Lr] Last revision date:180308
[St] Status:In-Data-Review
[do] DOI:10.1093/ibd/izx025

  5 / 5319 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29512951
[Au] Autor:Dumusc A; Hügle T
[Ad] Address:Service de rhumatologie, Département de l'appareil locomoteur, CHUV, 1011 Lausanne.
[Ti] Title:Arthrite réactionnelle. [Reactive arthritis].
[So] Source:Rev Med Suisse;14(597):534-537, 2018 Mar 07.
[Is] ISSN:1660-9379
[Cp] Country of publication:Switzerland
[La] Language:fre
[Ab] Abstract:Reactive arthritis is usually regarded as a form of spondylarthritis. Patients generally present with an acute asymmetrical oligoarthritis following an episode of diarrhea or urethritis. The most frequent involved pathogens are Salmonella, Shigella, Campylobacter and Chlamydia trachomatis. Additional causative pathogens have been described. Non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs are the first line treatment for reactive arthritis, associated with physiotherapy. Occasionally, a short course of glucocorticoids or an intra-articular injection is needed. Chlamydia induced reactive arthritis should be treated with antibiotics. Some patients experience chronic persistent arthritis. These patients could benefit from a treatment with DMARDs such as sulfasalazine. In refractory cases, TNF-inhibitors are sometimes used.
[Pt] Publication type:ENGLISH ABSTRACT; JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1803
[Cu] Class update date: 180307
[Lr] Last revision date:180307
[St] Status:In-Data-Review

  6 / 5319 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29505325
[Au] Autor:D'Angelo S; Carriero A; Gilio M; Ursini F; Leccese P; Palazzi C
[Ad] Address:a Rheumatology Institute of Lucania (IReL) - Rheumatology Department of Lucania , San Carlo Hospital of Potenza and Madonna delle Grazie Hospital of Matera.
[Ti] Title:Safety of treatment options for spondyloarthritis: a narrative review.
[So] Source:Expert Opin Drug Saf;, 2018 Mar 05.
[Is] ISSN:1744-764X
[Cp] Country of publication:England
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:INTRODUCTION: Spondyloarthritis (SpA) are chronic inflammatory diseases with overlapping pathogenic mechanisms and clinical features. Treatment armamentarium against SpA includes non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, glucocorticoids, conventional disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs (DMARDs, including sulfasalazine, methotrexate, leflunomide, cyclosporine), targeted synthetic DMARDs (apremilast) and biological DMARDs (TNF inhibitors, anti-IL 12/23 and anti-IL-17 agents). Areas covered: A narrative review of published literature on safety profile of available SpA treatment options was performed. Readers will be provided with a comprehensive overview on frequent and rare adverse events associated with each drug listed in current SpA treatment recommendations. Expert opinion: The overall safety profile of such molecules is good and serious adverse events are rare but need to be promptly recognized and treated. However, the monitoring of adverse events is a major challenge for clinicians because it is not adequately addressed by current treatment recommendations. A tailored treatment is crucial and rheumatologists must accurately select patients in order to identify those more susceptible to develop adverse events.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1803
[Cu] Class update date: 180305
[Lr] Last revision date:180305
[St] Status:Publisher
[do] DOI:10.1080/14740338.2018.1448785

  7 / 5319 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29390381
[Au] Autor:Ek S; Rosenborg S
[Ad] Address:Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Center of Fetal Medicine, Karolinska University Hospital.
[Ti] Title:Mesalazine as a cause of fetal anemia and hydrops fetalis: A case report.
[So] Source:Medicine (Baltimore);96(50):e9277, 2017 Dec.
[Is] ISSN:1536-5964
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:RATIONALE: Mesalazine and its prodrug sulfasalazine are both used for inflammatory bowel disease. Sulfasalazine has been associated with hematological side-effects such as aplastic and hemolytic anemia in patients, but also in fetuses after intrauterine exposure. To our knowledge, we describe the first case of a fetus with severe anemia, and subsequent hydrops, where this drug was found at concentrations in the fetus corresponding to those in the mother and most likely responsible for the fetal condition. PATIENT CONCERNS: A uniparous woman was referred at 31 weeks of gestation due to a hydropic fetus with massive ascites and cardiomegaly. DIAGNOSES: The patient had Crohn's disease and was thus treated with 4 g mesalazine daily. The fetus had severe anemia with an initial hemoglobin level of 51 g/L. INTERVENTIONS: The maternal medication was discontinued and four intrauterine erythrocyte transfusions were given during three weeks. Plasma samples were drawn from mother and fetus during cordocentesis for later analysis of mesalazine. OUTCOMES: A healthy baby was born after 37 full weeks of gestation. Plasma levels of mesalazine were non-conspicuous in neither mother nor fetus. The mesalazine half-life in the fetus (37 h) was half that of the mother (80 h), both considerably longer than previously reported (about 19 h). LESSONS: A causal relationship must be suspected between the fetal anemia and the maternal use of mesalazine. This fetal side-effect should be considered in pregnant women on mesalazine (and its prodrug sulfasalazine).
[Mh] MeSH terms primary: Anemia/chemically induced
Anti-Inflammatory Agents, Non-Steroidal/adverse effects
Fetal Diseases/chemically induced
Hydrops Fetalis/chemically induced
Mesalamine/adverse effects
[Mh] MeSH terms secundary: Anemia/therapy
Erythrocyte Transfusion
Female
Fetal Diseases/therapy
Humans
Hydrops Fetalis/therapy
Pregnancy
Pregnancy Outcome
[Pt] Publication type:CASE REPORTS; JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Nm] Name of substance:0 (Anti-Inflammatory Agents, Non-Steroidal); 4Q81I59GXC (Mesalamine)
[Em] Entry month:1802
[Cu] Class update date: 180301
[Lr] Last revision date:180301
[Js] Journal subset:AIM; IM
[Da] Date of entry for processing:180203
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.1097/MD.0000000000009277

  8 / 5319 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29331733
[Au] Autor:Valcheva-Kuzmanova S; Kuzmanov A; Kuzmanova V; Tzaneva M
[Ad] Address:Department of Pharmacology and Clinical Pharmacology and Therapeutics, Medical University Prof. Dr. Paraskev Stoyanov, Varna, Bulgaria. Electronic address: stefkavk@yahoo.com.
[Ti] Title:Aronia melanocarpa fruit juice ameliorates the symptoms of inflammatory bowel disease in TNBS-induced colitis in rats.
[So] Source:Food Chem Toxicol;113:33-39, 2018 Mar.
[Is] ISSN:1873-6351
[Cp] Country of publication:England
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Trinitrobenzensulfonic acid (TNBS) is commonly used to induce an experimental inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) model. Oxidative stress and inflammation have been proposed as mechanisms underlying the pathophysiology of IBD. Aronia melanocarpa fruit juice (AMFJ) is extremely rich in polyphenolic substances, mainly proanthocyanidins, flavonoids and phenolic acids. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of AMFJ in a rat TNBSinduced colitis model and to compare the effect of the juice with that of sulfasalazine. Colitis was induced by TNBS in male Wistar rats. After the induction of colitis, AMFJ at three doses (2.5, 5 and 10 mL/kg) and sulfasalazine (400 mg/kg) were administered orally till the 14th experimental day. Severity of colitis was assessed by macroscopic and histopathological criteria. Oxidative stress was evaluated by the concentration of thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARS). TNBS caused severe colonic damage. AMFJ dose-dependently ameliorated TNBS-induced colitis. It improved the macroscopic and microscopic signs of colitis, and prevented the increase of colonic TBARS concentrations. Regarding different indices, the effect of AMFJ was comparable or even higher than that of sulfasalazine. In conclusion, the ameliorative effects of AMFJ in the experimental TNBSinduced colitis might be the result of its potent antioxidant and antiinflammatory properties.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1801
[Cu] Class update date: 180228
[Lr] Last revision date:180228
[St] Status:In-Process

  9 / 5319 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29331766
[Au] Autor:El-Ashmawy NE; Khedr NF; El-Bahrawy HA; El-Adawy SA
[Ad] Address:Faculty of Pharmacy, Tanta University, Tanta, El-Gharbia 31527, Egypt.
[Ti] Title:Roflumilast, type 4 phosphodiesterase inhibitor, attenuates inflammation in rats with ulcerative colitis via down-regulation of iNOS and elevation of cAMP.
[So] Source:Int Immunopharmacol;56:36-42, 2018 Mar.
[Is] ISSN:1878-1705
[Cp] Country of publication:Netherlands
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:BACKGROUND: Roflumilast (Rof), a phosphodiesterase 4 (PDE4) inhibitor, has been shown to be an effective agent in inflammatory diseases and marketed for chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. OBJECTIVE: This study was conducted to examine the potential anti-inflammatory effects of Rof in dextran sulphate sodium (DSS)-induced ulcerative colitis (UC) in rats and to investigate the molecular mechanisms underlying these effects. METHODS: Forty male Wistar rats were divided into four groups: normal control, colitis group (rats received 5% DSS in their drinking water continuously for 7 days), Rof group, and sulfasalazine (SLZ) group. The Rof (5 mg/kg) and SLZ (500 mg/kg) groups underwent pretreatment with DSS one week ahead of DSS challenge and parallel with DSS. Colitis was determined by assessing colon length, weight loss, histologic colon score, quantifying the concentration of tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α), nitric oxide (NO), cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP), myeloperoxidase (MPO) activity and inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) gene expression in colon tissue. RESULTS: Rof attenuated the severity of colitis as evidenced by increased colon length, prevention of body weight loss, and improved colon histologic score compared to DSS group. Rof also suppressed the inflammatory response induced in DSS colitis group by decreasing colon concentration of TNF-α, NO and MPO activity and down- regulation of iNOS gene expression. The level of cAMP was increased by Rof compared to DSS group. The obtained results of Rof were comparable to those exerted by SLZ. CONCLUSION: These findings revealed the beneficial effects of Rof in alleviating inflammation in DSS colitis.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1801
[Cu] Class update date: 180227
[Lr] Last revision date:180227
[St] Status:In-Process

  10 / 5319 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 28456475
[Au] Autor:Molinuevo MS; Fernández JM; Cortizo AM; McCarthy AD; Schurman L; Sedlinsky C
[Ad] Address:Laboratorio de Investigación en Osteopatías y Metabolismo Mineral, Facultad de Ciencias Exactas, Universidad Nacional de La Plata. 47 y 115, (1900) La Plata, Argentina.
[Ti] Title:Advanced glycation end products and strontium ranelate promote osteogenic differentiation of vascular smooth muscle cells in vitro: Preventive role of vitamin D.
[So] Source:Mol Cell Endocrinol;450:94-104, 2017 Jul 15.
[Is] ISSN:1872-8057
[Cp] Country of publication:Ireland
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Advanced glycation end products (AGE) have been demonstrated to induce the osteogenic trans-differentiation of vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMC). Strontium ranelate (SR) is an anti-osteoporotic agent that has both anti-catabolic and anabolic actions on bone tissue. However, in the last years SR has been associated with an increase of cardiovascular risk. We hypothesize that SR can increase the osteoblastic trans-differentiation of VSMC and the induction of extracellular calcifications, an effect that could be potentiated in the presence of AGE and inhibited by simultaneous administration of vitamin D. The present results of our in vitro experiments demonstrate that AGE and SR alone or in combination, stimulate L-type calcium channels, causing an increase in reactive oxygen species and activation of both ERK and NFkB, with the final effect of promoting the osteogenic shift of VSMC. Importantly, these in vitro effects of AGE and/or SR can be prevented by co-incubation with vitamin D.
[Mh] MeSH terms primary: Cell Differentiation/drug effects
Glycation End Products, Advanced/pharmacology
Muscle, Smooth, Vascular/cytology
Myocytes, Smooth Muscle/cytology
Osteogenesis/drug effects
Thiophenes/pharmacology
Vitamin D/pharmacology
[Mh] MeSH terms secundary: Animals
Ascorbic Acid/pharmacology
Cell Count
Cell Movement/drug effects
Core Binding Factor Alpha 1 Subunit/metabolism
Male
Models, Biological
Myocytes, Smooth Muscle/drug effects
Myocytes, Smooth Muscle/metabolism
Nifedipine/pharmacology
Oxidative Stress/drug effects
Rats, Sprague-Dawley
Reactive Oxygen Species/metabolism
Sulfasalazine/pharmacology
Vitamin E/pharmacology
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Nm] Name of substance:0 (Core Binding Factor Alpha 1 Subunit); 0 (Glycation End Products, Advanced); 0 (Reactive Oxygen Species); 0 (Thiophenes); 04NQ160FRU (strontium ranelate); 1406-16-2 (Vitamin D); 1406-18-4 (Vitamin E); 3XC8GUZ6CB (Sulfasalazine); I9ZF7L6G2L (Nifedipine); PQ6CK8PD0R (Ascorbic Acid)
[Em] Entry month:1802
[Cu] Class update date: 180223
[Lr] Last revision date:180223
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[Da] Date of entry for processing:170501
[St] Status:MEDLINE


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