Database : MEDLINE
Search on : Sulfhemoglobinemia [Words]
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[PMID]: 29060914
[Au] Autor:Van Leeuwen SR; Baranoski GVG; Kimmel BW
[Ti] Title:Three-wavelength method for the optical differentiation of methemoglobin and sulfhemoglobin in oxygenated blood.
[So] Source:Conf Proc IEEE Eng Med Biol Soc;2017:4570-4573, 2017 Jul.
[Is] ISSN:1557-170X
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Methemoglobinemia and sulfhemoglobinemia are rare, but potentially life threatening, diseases that refer to an abnormal amount of methemoglobin or sulfhemoglobin in the blood, respectively. Unfortunately, blood samples containing abnormal quantities of methemoglobin or sulfhemoglobin have similar spectral characteristics. This makes it difficult to optically differentiate them and, hence, difficult to diagnose a patient with either disease. However, performing treatments for one of the diseases without a correct diagnosis can introduce increased risk to the patient. In this paper, we propose a method for differentiating the presence of methemoglobin and sulfhemoglobin in blood, under several conditions, using reflectance values measured at three wavelengths. In order to validate our method, we perform in silico experiments considering various levels of methemoglobin and sulfhemoglobin. These experiments employ a cell-based light interaction model, known as CLBlood, which accounts for the orientation and distribution of red blood cells. We then discuss the reflectance curves produced by the experiments and evaluate the efficacy of our method. In particular, we consider various experimental conditions by modifying the flow rate, hemolysis level and incident light direction.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1710
[Cu] Class update date: 171024
[Lr] Last revision date:171024
[St] Status:In-Process
[do] DOI:10.1109/EMBC.2017.8037873

  2 / 91 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 28348950
[Au] Autor:George A; Goetz D
[Ad] Address:Department of Pediatrics, Jacobs School of Medicine and Biomedical Sciences, University at Buffalo, United States.
[Ti] Title:A case of sulfhemoglobinemia in a child with chronic constipation.
[So] Source:Respir Med Case Rep;21:21-24, 2017.
[Is] ISSN:2213-0071
[Cp] Country of publication:England
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Sulfhemoglobinemia is a rare condition in which a sulfur atom oxidizes the heme moiety in hemoglobin, making the hemoglobin incapable of carrying oxygen and leading to hypoxia and cyanosis. This condition has been described in patients taking sulfur medications or who have cultured hydrogen sulfide producing intestinal bacteria such as . This case describes a pediatric patient who was found to have cyanosis on two occasions of urinary tract infection in the setting of chronic constipation, with confirmed sulfhemoglobinemia during the second admission. Sulfhemoglobinemia due to increases in sulfur producing intestinal bacteria led to cyanosis and low oxygen saturations. The patient had an incidental finding of a pulmonary arteriovenous malformation (AVM) but had a normal PAO2 so was not hypoxemic though she was cyanotic. Low oxygen saturations by pulse oximetry may be explained by dyshemoglobinemia as opposed to true arterial hypoxemia; the importance of measuring an arterial blood gas in cases of cyanosis is paramount.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1703
[Cu] Class update date: 170816
[Lr] Last revision date:170816
[St] Status:PubMed-not-MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.1016/j.rmcr.2017.03.009

  3 / 91 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 26553186
[Au] Autor:Murphy K; Ryan C; Dempsey EM; O'Toole PW; Ross RP; Stanton C; Ryan CA
[Ad] Address:Food Biosciences Department, Teagasc Food Research Centre, Moorepark, Co Cork, Ireland; School of Microbiology, APC Microbiome Institute.
[Ti] Title:Neonatal Sulfhemoglobinemia and Hemolytic Anemia Associated With Intestinal Morganella morganii.
[So] Source:Pediatrics;136(6):e1641-5, 2015 Dec.
[Is] ISSN:1098-4275
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Sulfhemoglobinemia is a rare disorder characterized by the presence of sulfhemoglobin in the blood. It is typically drug-induced and may cause hypoxia, end-organ damage, and death through oxygen deprivation. We present here a case of non-drug-induced sulfhemoglobinemia in a 7-day-old preterm infant complicated by hemolytic anemia. Microbiota compositional analysis of fecal samples to investigate the origin of hydrogen sulphide revealed the presence of Morganella morganii at a relative abundance of 38% of the total fecal microbiota at the time of diagnosis. M morganii was not detected in the fecal samples of 40 age-matched control preterm infants. M morganii is an opportunistic pathogen that can cause serious infection, particularly in immunocompromised hosts such as neonates. Strains of M morganii are capable of producing hydrogen sulphide, and virulence factors include the production of a diffusible α-hemolysin. The infant in this case survived intact through empirical oral and intravenous antibiotic therapy, probiotic administration, and red blood cell transfusions. This coincided with a reduction in the relative abundance of M morganii to 3%. Neonatologists should have a high index of suspicion for intestinal pathogens in cases of non-drug-induced sulfhemoglobinemia and consider empirical treatment of the intestinal microbiota in this potentially lethal condition.
[Mh] MeSH terms primary: Anemia, Hemolytic/complications
Enterobacteriaceae Infections/complications
Morganella morganii
Sulfhemoglobinemia/complications
[Mh] MeSH terms secundary: Anemia, Hemolytic/therapy
Enterobacteriaceae Infections/microbiology
Enterobacteriaceae Infections/therapy
Feces/microbiology
Female
Gastrointestinal Microbiome
Humans
Infant, Newborn
Infant, Premature
Sulfhemoglobinemia/therapy
[Pt] Publication type:CASE REPORTS; JOURNAL ARTICLE; RESEARCH SUPPORT, NON-U.S. GOV'T
[Em] Entry month:1604
[Cu] Class update date: 151202
[Lr] Last revision date:151202
[Js] Journal subset:AIM; IM
[Da] Date of entry for processing:151111
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.1542/peds.2015-0996

  4 / 91 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 25938343
[Au] Autor:Chan IH; Au AC; Kwok JS; Chow EY; Chan MH
[Ad] Address:1Department of Pathology, United Christian Hospital, Kwun Tong 2Department of Chemical Pathology, The Chinese University of Hong Kong, Prince of Wales Hospital, Shatin, Hong Kong.
[Ti] Title:Co-oximetry interference.
[So] Source:Pathology;47(4):392-3, 2015 Jun.
[Is] ISSN:1465-3931
[Cp] Country of publication:England
[La] Language:eng
[Mh] MeSH terms primary: Methemoglobin/analysis
Oximetry/methods
Sulfhemoglobin/analysis
Sulfhemoglobinemia/diagnosis
[Mh] MeSH terms secundary: Azabicyclo Compounds/adverse effects
Female
Herb-Drug Interactions
Humans
Hypnotics and Sedatives/adverse effects
Middle Aged
Piperazines/adverse effects
Plant Preparations/adverse effects
Spectrophotometry
Wine/adverse effects
[Pt] Publication type:CASE REPORTS; LETTER
[Nm] Name of substance:0 (Azabicyclo Compounds); 0 (Hypnotics and Sedatives); 0 (Piperazines); 0 (Plant Preparations); 03A5ORL08Q (zopiclone); 9008-37-1 (Methemoglobin); 9010-20-2 (Sulfhemoglobin)
[Em] Entry month:1604
[Cu] Class update date: 150507
[Lr] Last revision date:150507
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[Da] Date of entry for processing:150505
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.1097/PAT.0000000000000258

  5 / 91 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 25588222
[Au] Autor:Saeedi A; Najibi A; Mohammadi-Bardbori A
[Ti] Title:Effects of long-term exposure to hydrogen sulfide on human red blood cells.
[So] Source:Int J Occup Environ Med;6(1):20-5, 2015 01.
[Is] ISSN:2008-6814
[Cp] Country of publication:Iran
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:BACKGROUND: Hydrogen sulfide (H2S) exhibits both physiological and toxicological roles in the biological systems. Acute exposure to high levels of H2S is life threatening while long-term exposure to ambient levels of H2S elicits human health effects. OBJECTIVE: To study the harmful effects of long-term exposure to low levels of H2S on human blood cells. METHODS: 110 adult workers from Iran who were occupationally exposed to 0-90 ppb H2S for 1-30 years were studied. The participants aged between 18 and 60 years and were exposed directly or indirectly to sulfur compounds (exposed group). The origin of H2S was natural gas processing plants. A control group consisting of 110 males who were not in contact with H2S was also studied. For all participants, hematological profile including total hemoglobin and red blood cell count and sulfhemoglobin, methemoglobin levels were measured. RESULTS: Among all parameters evaluated in this study the mean methemoglobin and sulfhemoglobin levels were significantly higher among workers who were exposed to sulfur compounds than the control group. Major differences throughout the study period for sulfhemoglobinemia among exposed groups were observed. CONCLUSION: Long-term exposure to even low levels of H2S in workplaces may have potential harmful effects on human health.
[Mh] MeSH terms primary: Erythrocytes/drug effects
Hydrogen Sulfide/adverse effects
Occupational Exposure/adverse effects
[Mh] MeSH terms secundary: Adult
Erythrocytes/metabolism
Humans
Iran
Male
Methemoglobin/metabolism
Natural Gas
Occupations
Sulfhemoglobin/metabolism
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE; RESEARCH SUPPORT, NON-U.S. GOV'T
[Nm] Name of substance:0 (Natural Gas); 9008-37-1 (Methemoglobin); 9010-20-2 (Sulfhemoglobin); YY9FVM7NSN (Hydrogen Sulfide)
[Em] Entry month:1507
[Cu] Class update date: 170916
[Lr] Last revision date:170916
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[Da] Date of entry for processing:150115
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.15171/ijoem.2015.482

  6 / 91 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 22975680
[Au] Autor:Baranoski GV; Chen TF; Kimmel BW; Miranda E; Yim D
[Ad] Address:University of Waterloo, Natural Phenomena Simulation Group, School of Computer Science, 200 University Avenue West, Waterloo, Ontario, Canada N2L 3G1. gvgbaran@curumin.math.uwaterloo.ca
[Ti] Title:On the noninvasive optical monitoring and differentiation of methemoglobinemia and sulfhemoglobinemia.
[So] Source:J Biomed Opt;17(9):97005, 2012 Sep.
[Is] ISSN:1560-2281
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:There are several pathologies whose study and diagnosis is impaired by a relatively small number of documented cases. A practical approach to overcome this obstacle and advance the research in this area consists in employing computer simulations to perform controlled in silico experiments. The results of these experiments, in turn, may be incorporated in the design of differential protocols for these pathologies. Accordingly, in this paper, we investigate the spectral responses of human skin affected by the presence of abnormal amounts of two dysfunctional hemoglobins, methemoglobin and sulfhemoglobin, which are associated with two life-threatening medical conditions, methemoglobinemia and sulfhemoglobinemia, respectively. We analyze the results of our in silico experiments and discuss their potential applications to the development of more effective noninvasive monitoring and differentiation procedures for these medical conditions.
[Mh] MeSH terms primary: Hemoglobins/analysis
Methemoglobinemia/diagnosis
Methemoglobinemia/metabolism
Skin/metabolism
Spectrum Analysis/methods
Sulfhemoglobinemia/diagnosis
Sulfhemoglobinemia/metabolism
[Mh] MeSH terms secundary: Diagnosis, Computer-Assisted/methods
Diagnosis, Differential
Reproducibility of Results
Sensitivity and Specificity
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE; RESEARCH SUPPORT, NON-U.S. GOV'T
[Nm] Name of substance:0 (Hemoglobins)
[Em] Entry month:1303
[Cu] Class update date: 130806
[Lr] Last revision date:130806
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[Da] Date of entry for processing:120915
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.1117/1.JBO.17.9.097005

  7 / 91 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 20146957
[Au] Autor:Dupouy J; Petureau F; Montastruc JL; Oustric S; Degano B
[Ad] Address:Service de pneumologie, centre hospitalier de Montauban, 100, rue Léon-Cladel, 82013 Montauban cedex, France.
[Ti] Title:Une cause rare de cyanose: sulfhémoglobinémie imputable au thiocolchicoside (Miorel). [A rare cause of cyanosis: Sulphaemoglobinaemia related to thiocolchicoside (Miorel)].
[So] Source:Rev Mal Respir;27(1):80-3, 2010.
[Is] ISSN:1776-2588
[Cp] Country of publication:France
[La] Language:fre
[Ab] Abstract:INTRODUCTION: An acquired abnormality of haemoglobin is among the many causes of cyanosis, especially in patients with no identified cardiorespiratory cause. CASE REPORT: A 50-year-old woman, suffering from amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, was hospitalised for dyspnoea. Physical examination revealed cyanosis that persisted despite oxygen therapy. Discordance between the reduced arterial oxygen saturation and normal arterial oxygen tension led to a search for a dyshaemoglobinaemia as a possible cause. Use of co-oxymetry with spectrophotometry revealed sulphaemoglobinaemia. Sulphaemoglobinaemia is due to irreversible incorporation of a thiol radical into the porphyrin ring of a haem group. This decreases the affinity of haemoglobin for oxygen and thus reduces oxygen carrying capacity. A drug-induced cause is often identified. However, no previously described cause for sulphaemoglobinaemia was identified in our patient. The patient was currently being treated with thiocolchicoside (Miorel((R))). Thiocolchicoside was suspected as the cause because its chemical structure contains an easily hydrolysable thiol radical. Withdrawal of thiocolchicoside led to regression of the sulphaemoglobinaemia. CONCLUSIONS: This report underlines the importance of searching for an acquired abnormality of haemoglobin (methaemoglobinaemia or sulphaemoglobinaemia) in patients with cyanosis resistant to oxygen, in the absence of any cardiorespiratory abnormality. This case is the first to suspect thiocolchicoside as a possible cause of sulphaemoglobinaemia.
[Mh] MeSH terms primary: Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis/drug therapy
Colchicine/analogs & derivatives
Cyanosis/chemically induced
Sulfhemoglobinemia/chemically induced
Sulfhydryl Compounds/blood
Tranquilizing Agents/toxicity
[Mh] MeSH terms secundary: Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis/blood
Colchicine/pharmacokinetics
Colchicine/therapeutic use
Colchicine/toxicity
Cyanosis/blood
Diagnosis, Differential
Drug Therapy, Combination
Female
Free Radicals
Humans
Middle Aged
Sulfhemoglobinemia/blood
Tranquilizing Agents/pharmacokinetics
Tranquilizing Agents/therapeutic use
[Pt] Publication type:CASE REPORTS; ENGLISH ABSTRACT; JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Nm] Name of substance:0 (Free Radicals); 0 (Sulfhydryl Compounds); 0 (Tranquilizing Agents); SML2Y3J35T (Colchicine); T1X8S697GT (thiocolchicoside)
[Em] Entry month:1005
[Cu] Class update date: 151119
[Lr] Last revision date:151119
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[Da] Date of entry for processing:100212
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.1016/j.rmr.2009.10.006

  8 / 91 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 19718386
[Au] Autor:Lim HC; Tan HH
[Ad] Address:Changi General Hospital, Department of Emergency Medicine, Singapore.
[Ti] Title:International perspective from singapore on "methemoglobinemia and sulfhemoglobinemia in two pediatric patients after ingestion of hydroxylamine sulfate".
[So] Source:West J Emerg Med;10(3):202, 2009 Aug.
[Is] ISSN:1936-900X
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1107
[Cu] Class update date: 090831
[Lr] Last revision date:090831
[Da] Date of entry for processing:090901
[St] Status:PubMed-not-MEDLINE

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[PMID]: 19718385
[Au] Autor:Gharahbaghian L; Massoudian B; Dimassa G
[Ad] Address:Stanford University Medical Center, Division of Emergency Medicine, Palo Alto, CA.
[Ti] Title:Methemoglobinemia and sulfhemoglobinemia in two pediatric patients after ingestion of hydroxylamine sulfate.
[So] Source:West J Emerg Med;10(3):197-201, 2009 Aug.
[Is] ISSN:1936-900X
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:This case report describes two pediatric cases of immediate oxygen desaturation from methemoglobinemia and sulfhemoglobinemia after one sip from a plastic water bottle containing hydroxylamine sulfate used by a relative to clean shoes. Supplemental oxygen and two separate doses of methylene blue given to one of the patients had no effect on clinical symptoms or pulse oximetry. The patients were admitted to the pediatric Intensive Care Unit (ICU) with subsequent improvement after exchange transfusion. Endoscopy showed ulcer formation in one case and sucralafate was initiated; both patients were discharged after a one-week hospital stay.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1107
[Cu] Class update date: 170220
[Lr] Last revision date:170220
[Da] Date of entry for processing:090901
[St] Status:PubMed-not-MEDLINE

  10 / 91 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 19300288
[Au] Autor:Kermani TA; Pislaru SV; Osborn TG
[Ad] Address:Division of Rheumatology, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN 55905, USA. kermani.tanaz@mayo.edu
[Ti] Title:Acrocyanosis from phenazopyridine-induced sulfhemoglobinemia mistaken for Raynaud phenomenon.
[So] Source:J Clin Rheumatol;15(3):127-9, 2009 Apr.
[Is] ISSN:1536-7355
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Rheumatologists are often asked to evaluate patients with Raynaud phenomenon. Occasionally, an alternate explanation is revealed such as acrocyanosis. Methemoglobinemia and sulfhemoglobinemia are rare causes of cyanosis that can be medication-induced. Both are known complications of therapy with phenazopyridine. We report an unusual case of a 45-year-old woman in whom sulfhemoglobinemia from chronic therapy with phenazopyridine was misdiagnosed as due to Raynaud phenomenon and limited scleroderma. This case illustrates the importance of taking into account medication-related adverse events when evaluating patients with Raynaud-like phenomenon.
[Mh] MeSH terms primary: Anesthetics, Local/adverse effects
Cyanosis/etiology
Phenazopyridine/adverse effects
Raynaud Disease/diagnosis
Sulfhemoglobinemia
[Mh] MeSH terms secundary: Adult
Diagnosis, Differential
Dyspnea/etiology
Female
Humans
Polypharmacy
Sulfhemoglobinemia/chemically induced
Sulfhemoglobinemia/complications
Sulfhemoglobinemia/diagnosis
[Pt] Publication type:CASE REPORTS; JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Nm] Name of substance:0 (Anesthetics, Local); K2J09EMJ52 (Phenazopyridine)
[Em] Entry month:0907
[Cu] Class update date: 131121
[Lr] Last revision date:131121
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[Da] Date of entry for processing:090321
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.1097/RHU.0b013e31819db6db


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