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[PMID]: 28830044
[Au] Autor:Domagalska-Szopa M; Szopa A
[Ad] Address:Department of Medical Rehabilitation, School of Health Sciences in Katowice, Medical University of Silesia, 40-752 Katowice, Medyków 12, Poland. Electronic address: mdomagalska@sum.edu.pl.
[Ti] Title:Postural orientation and standing postural alignment in ambulant children with bilateral cerebral palsy.
[So] Source:Clin Biomech (Bristol, Avon);49:22-27, 2017 Nov.
[Is] ISSN:1879-1271
[Cp] Country of publication:England
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:BACKGROUND: Standing postural alignment in children with cerebral palsy is usually altered by central postural control disorders. The primary aim of this study is to describe body alignment in a quiet standing position in ambulatory children with bilateral cerebral palsy compared with children with typical development. METHODS: Fifty-eight children with bilateral cerebral palsy (aged 7-13years) and 45 age-matched children with typical development underwent a surface topography examination based on Moiré topography and were classified according to their sagittal postural profiles. FINDINGS: The following eight grouping variables were extracted using a data reduction technique: angle of trunk inclination, pelvic tilt, and lordosis, the difference between kyphosis and lordosis, angle of vertebral lateral curvature, shoulder inclination, and shoulder and pelvic rotation. According to the cluster analysis results, 25% of the participants were classified into Cluster 1, 9% into Cluster 2, 49% in Cluster 3, and 17% in Cluster 4. INTERPRETATION: Three different postural patterns emerged in accordance with the sagittal postural profiles in children with bilateral cerebral palsy and were defined as follows: 1) a lordotic postural pattern corresponding to forward-leaning posture; 2) a swayback postural pattern corresponding to backward-leaning posture; and 3) a balanced postural pattern corresponding to balanced posture.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1708
[Cu] Class update date: 171111
[Lr] Last revision date:171111
[St] Status:In-Process

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[PMID]: 25731688
[Au] Autor:Lewis CL; Khuu A; Marinko LN
[Ad] Address:Department of Physical Therapy & Athletic Training, Boston University, Boston, MA, USA. Electronic address: lewisc@bu.edu.
[Ti] Title:Postural correction reduces hip pain in adult with acetabular dysplasia: A case report.
[So] Source:Man Ther;20(3):508-12, 2015 Jun.
[Is] ISSN:1532-2769
[Cp] Country of publication:Scotland
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Developmental dysplasia of the hip is often diagnosed in infancy, but less severe cases of acetabular dysplasia are being detected in young active adults. The purpose of this case report is to present a non-surgical intervention for a 31-year-old female with mild acetabular dysplasia and an anterior acetabular labral tear. The patient presented with right anterior hip and groin pain, and she stood with the trunk swayed posterior to the pelvis (swayback posture). The hip pain was reproduced with the anterior impingement test. During gait, the patient maintained the swayback posture and reported 6/10 hip pain. Following correction of the patient's posture, the patient's pain rating was reduced to a 2/10 while walking. The patient was instructed to maintain the improved posture. At the 1 year follow-up, she demonstrated significantly improved posture in standing and walking. She had returned to recreational running and was generally pain-free. The patient demonstrated improvement on self-reported questionnaires for pain, function, and activity. These findings suggest that alteration of posture can have an immediate and lasting effect on hip pain in persons with structural abnormality and labral pathology.
[Mh] MeSH terms primary: Acetabulum/diagnostic imaging
Arthralgia/rehabilitation
Hip Dislocation/rehabilitation
Musculoskeletal Manipulations/methods
Posture/physiology
[Mh] MeSH terms secundary: Acetabulum/abnormalities
Adult
Arthralgia/diagnosis
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Hip Dislocation/diagnostic imaging
Hip Joint
Humans
Magnetic Resonance Imaging/methods
Pain Measurement
Patient Positioning
Radiography/methods
Recovery of Function
Treatment Outcome
[Pt] Publication type:CASE REPORTS; JOURNAL ARTICLE; RESEARCH SUPPORT, N.I.H., EXTRAMURAL; RESEARCH SUPPORT, NON-U.S. GOV'T
[Em] Entry month:1703
[Cu] Class update date: 170327
[Lr] Last revision date:170327
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[Da] Date of entry for processing:150304
[St] Status:MEDLINE

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[PMID]: 25634923
[Ti] Title:Delayed swayback diagnosed in lambs with hindlimb paresis.
[So] Source:Vet Rec;176(5):118-21, 2015 Jan 31.
[Is] ISSN:2042-7670
[Cp] Country of publication:England
[La] Language:eng
[Mh] MeSH terms primary: Bird Diseases/epidemiology
Cattle Diseases/epidemiology
Sentinel Surveillance/veterinary
Sheep Diseases/epidemiology
Swine Diseases/epidemiology
[Mh] MeSH terms secundary: Animals
Animals, Wild
Cattle
Delayed Diagnosis/veterinary
Hindlimb
Horse Diseases/epidemiology
Horses
Paresis/veterinary
Sheep
Swayback/diagnosis
Swine
United Kingdom/epidemiology
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1509
[Cu] Class update date: 161125
[Lr] Last revision date:161125
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[Da] Date of entry for processing:150131
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.1136/vr.h110

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[PMID]: 25262565
[Au] Autor:Lewis CL; Sahrmann SA
[Ad] Address:Department of Physical Therapy & Athletic Training, College of Health & Rehabilitation Sciences: Sargent College, Boston University, Boston, MA, USA. Electronic address: lewisc@bu.edu.
[Ti] Title:Effect of posture on hip angles and moments during gait.
[So] Source:Man Ther;20(1):176-82, 2015 Feb.
[Is] ISSN:1532-2769
[Cp] Country of publication:Scotland
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Anterior hip pain is common in young, active adults. Clinically, we have noted that patients with anterior hip pain often walk in a swayback posture, and that their pain is reduced when the posture is corrected. The purpose of this study was to investigate a potential mechanism for the reduction in pain by testing the effect of posture on movement patterns and internal moments during gait in healthy subjects. Fifteen subjects were instructed to walk while maintaining three postures: 1) natural, 2) swayback, and 3) forward flexed. Kinematic and force data were collected using a motion capture system and a force plate. Walking in the swayback posture resulted in a higher peak hip extension angle, hip flexor moment and hip flexion angular impulse compared to natural posture. In contrast, walking in a forward flexed posture resulted in a decreased hip extension angle and decreased hip flexion angular impulse. Based on these results, walking in a swayback posture may result in increased forces required of the anterior hip structures, potentially contributing to anterior hip pain. This study provides a potential biomechanical mechanism for clinical observations that posture correction in patients with hip pain is beneficial.
[Mh] MeSH terms primary: Gait/physiology
Hip Joint/physiology
Posture/physiology
[Mh] MeSH terms secundary: Adult
Biomechanical Phenomena
Female
Healthy Volunteers
Humans
Male
Pain Measurement
Rotation
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE; RESEARCH SUPPORT, N.I.H., EXTRAMURAL
[Em] Entry month:1611
[Cu] Class update date: 170220
[Lr] Last revision date:170220
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[Da] Date of entry for processing:140929
[St] Status:MEDLINE

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[PMID]: 27000546
[Au] Autor:Angelo Rd; Silva DC; Zambaldi CF; Cantilino A; Sougey EB
[Ad] Address:Department of Physical Therapy, Universidade de Pernambuco, Petrolina, PE, Brazil.
[Ti] Title:Influence of body posture on the association between postpartum depression and pain.
[So] Source:Trends Psychiatry Psychother;36(1):32-9, 2014 Jan-Mar.
[Is] ISSN:2237-6089
[Cp] Country of publication:Portugal
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:OBJECTIVE: To determine the association between postpartum depression (PPD), intensification of back pain and exacerbation of changes in postural alignment intrinsic to puerperium. METHODS: Eighty women at 2 to 30 weeks postpartum were included in the study according to the following criteria: literate mothers, gestation of 34 to 42 weeks, and healthy live-born infants. All mothers agreed to participate in the study. Depressive symptoms were measured using the Edinburgh Postnatal Depression Scale (EPDS). Pain was assessed using a visual analogue scale (VAS) and the Nordic Musculoskeletal Questionnaire (NMQ), and posture, using real time naturalistic observation. RESULTS: There was a statistically significant association between PPD and pain intensity (p = 0.002). The upper back was the most frequent pain site among depressed women, both before (p = 0.04) and after delivery (p = 0.01). There were no associations between PPD and type of posture (p = 0.328). However, pain intensity was greater among depressed women in the swayback group (p < 0.001). CONCLUSION: The intensification of puerperal pain is closely associated with PPD. Our results suggest that back pain may be both a risk factor and a comorbidity of PPD among puerperal women and that pain and type of posture are interdependent.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1603
[Cu] Class update date: 160322
[Lr] Last revision date:160322
[Da] Date of entry for processing:160323
[St] Status:PubMed-not-MEDLINE

  6 / 107 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 23167206
[Au] Autor:Shammaa Y; Rodgers J
[Ad] Address:Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, Forth Valley Royal Hospital.
[Ti] Title:Denture fixative cream and the potential for neuropathy.
[So] Source:Dent Update;39(8):575-7, 2012 Oct.
[Is] ISSN:0305-5000
[Cp] Country of publication:England
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:UNLABELLED: The body requires zinc in small amounts to remain healthy. Because the body balances zinc and copper, people who ingest excessive zinc have resulting dangerously low levels of copper. An acute zinc overdose itself may be toxic and chronic zinc ingestion results in bone marrow suppression and degeneration of the spinal cord, usually resulting in crippling nerve damage. It's been called'human swayback disease' A case of a 54-year-old female whose nerve damage greatly reduced her mobility due to copper deficiency myelopathy as a result of the use of denture fixative cream, Fixodent, is discussed. CLINICAL RELEVANCE: Many cases of mysterious nerve damage turn out to be caused by overuse of popular denture products, e.g., Fixodent. Thus we are encouraging patients to read the manufacturer's leaflet and follow the instructions carefully.
[Mh] MeSH terms primary: Adhesives/adverse effects
Copper/deficiency
Denture Retention/methods
Spinal Cord Diseases/etiology
Zinc/adverse effects
[Mh] MeSH terms secundary: Female
Humans
Middle Aged
[Pt] Publication type:CASE REPORTS; JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Nm] Name of substance:0 (Adhesives); 789U1901C5 (Copper); J41CSQ7QDS (Zinc)
[Em] Entry month:1212
[Cu] Class update date: 140731
[Lr] Last revision date:140731
[Js] Journal subset:D
[Da] Date of entry for processing:121122
[St] Status:MEDLINE

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[PMID]: 22983845
[Au] Autor:Suttle NF
[Ad] Address:Moredun Foundation, Penicuik, Scotland. suttle_hints@hotmail.com
[Ti] Title:Copper imbalances in ruminants and humans: unexpected common ground.
[So] Source:Adv Nutr;3(5):666-74, 2012 Sep 01.
[Is] ISSN:2156-5376
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Ruminants are more vulnerable to copper deficiency than humans because rumen sulfide generation lowers copper availability from forage, increasing the risk of conditions such as swayback in lambs. Molybdenum-rich pastures promote thiomolybdate (TM) synthesis and formation of unabsorbable Cu-TM complexes, turning risk to clinical reality (hypocuprosis). Selection pressures created ruminant species with tolerance of deficiency but vulnerability to copper toxicity in alien environments, such as specific pathogen-free units. By contrast, cases of copper imbalance in humans seemed confined to rare genetic aberrations of copper metabolism. Recent descriptions of human swayback and the exploratory use of TM for the treatment of Wilson's disease, tumor growth, inflammatory diseases, and Alzheimer's disease have created unexpected common ground. The incidence of pre-hemolytic copper poisoning in specific pathogen-free lambs was reduced by an infection with Mycobacterium avium that left them more responsive to treatment with TM but vulnerable to long-term copper depletion. Copper requirements in ruminants and humans may need an extra allowance for the "copper cost" of immunity to infection. Residual cuproenzyme inhibition in TM-treated lambs and anomalies in plasma copper composition that appeared to depend on liver copper status raise this question "can chelating capacity be harnessed without inducing copper-deficiency in ruminants or humans?" A model of equilibria between exogenous (TM) and endogenous chelators (e.g., albumin, metallothionein) is used to predict risk of exposure and hypocuprosis; although risk of natural exposure in humans is remote, vulnerability to TM-induced copper deficiency may be high. Biomarkers of TM impact are needed, and copper chaperones for inhibited cuproenzymes are prime candidates.
[Mh] MeSH terms primary: Chelating Agents
Copper
Deficiency Diseases/chemically induced
Enzyme Inhibitors
Infection/metabolism
Molybdenum
Nutritional Requirements
[Mh] MeSH terms secundary: Alzheimer Disease/drug therapy
Animals
Chelating Agents/adverse effects
Chelating Agents/therapeutic use
Copper/deficiency
Copper/immunology
Copper/metabolism
Deficiency Diseases/immunology
Enzyme Inhibitors/adverse effects
Enzyme Inhibitors/therapeutic use
Hepatolenticular Degeneration/drug therapy
Humans
Infection/immunology
Inflammation/drug therapy
Molybdenum/adverse effects
Molybdenum/therapeutic use
Neoplasms/drug therapy
Ruminants
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE; REVIEW
[Nm] Name of substance:0 (Chelating Agents); 0 (Enzyme Inhibitors); 789U1901C5 (Copper); 81AH48963U (Molybdenum); 91U3TGV99T (tetrathiomolybdate)
[Em] Entry month:1301
[Cu] Class update date: 150223
[Lr] Last revision date:150223
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[Da] Date of entry for processing:120918
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.3945/an.112.002220

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[PMID]: 22437544
[Au] Autor:Ozkul IA; Alcigir G; Sepici-Dincel A; Yonguc AD; Akcora A; Turkaslan J
[Ad] Address:Department of Pathology, Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, Ankara University, 06110 Diskapi, Ankara, Turkey. ayhanozkul@gmail.com
[Ti] Title:Histopathological and biochemical findings of congenital copper deficiency: are these similar to those of caprine arthritis-encephalitis?
[So] Source:J Vet Sci;13(1):107-9, 2012 Mar.
[Is] ISSN:1976-555X
[Cp] Country of publication:Korea (South)
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:This study was done after identifying animals with a twisted carpal joint in goat herd. These included a kid goat walking on its articulus carpii and a newborn goat with a stiff leg. Necropsies of the diseased goats revealed swollen carpal joints that were twisted backwards. Arthritis was observed during microscopic examination of the carpal joints. Very low levels of eosinophil, leucocyte, and lymphocyte cell infiltration were found in the central nervous system and meninges. Serum copper levels were significantly decreased in most of the animals. All of these results led us to diagnose the animals with swayback disease.
[Mh] MeSH terms primary: Carpal Joints/pathology
Copper/deficiency
Goat Diseases/congenital
Joint Diseases/veterinary
[Mh] MeSH terms secundary: Animals
Animals, Newborn
Carpal Joints/metabolism
Copper/blood
Copper/metabolism
Female
Goat Diseases/metabolism
Goat Diseases/pathology
Goats
Joint Diseases/congenital
Joint Diseases/metabolism
Joint Diseases/pathology
Male
Pregnancy
[Pt] Publication type:CASE REPORTS; JOURNAL ARTICLE; RESEARCH SUPPORT, NON-U.S. GOV'T
[Nm] Name of substance:789U1901C5 (Copper)
[Em] Entry month:1207
[Cu] Class update date: 150225
[Lr] Last revision date:150225
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[Da] Date of entry for processing:120323
[St] Status:MEDLINE

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[PMID]: 21070278
[Au] Autor:Cook D; Gallagher PC; Bailey E
[Ad] Address:Department of Veterinary Science, MH Gluck Equine Research Center, University of Kentucky, Lexington, KY 40546-0099, USA.
[Ti] Title:Genetics of swayback in American Saddlebred horses.
[So] Source:Anim Genet;41 Suppl 2:64-71, 2010 Dec.
[Is] ISSN:1365-2052
[Cp] Country of publication:England
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Extreme lordosis, also called swayback, lowback or softback, can occur as a congenital trait or as a degenerative trait associated with ageing. In this study, the hereditary aspect of congenital swayback was investigated using whole genome association studies of 20 affected and 20 unaffected American Saddlebred (ASB) Horses for 48,165 single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs). A statistically significant association was identified on ECA20 (corrected P=0.017) for SNP BIEC2-532523. Of the 20 affected horses, 17 were homozygous for this SNP when compared to seven homozygotes among the unaffected horses, suggesting a major gene with a recessive mode of inheritance. The result was confirmed by testing an additional 13 affected horses and 166 unaffected horses using 35 SNPs in this region of ECA20 (corrected P=0.036). Combined results for 33 affected horses and 287 non-affected horses allowed identification of a region of homozygosity defined by four SNPs in the region. Based on the haplotype defined by these SNPs, 80% of the 33 affected horses were homozygous, 21% heterozygous and 9% did not possess the haplotype. Among the non-affected horses, 15% were homozygous, 47% heterozygous and 38% did not possess the haplotype. The differences between the two groups were highly significant (P<0.00001). The region defined by this haplotype includes 53 known and predicted genes. Exons from three candidate genes, TRERF1, RUNX2 and CNPY3 were sequenced without finding distinguishing SNPs. The mutation responsible for swayback may lie in other genes or in regulatory regions outside exons. This information can be used by breeders to reduce the occurrence of swayback among their livestock. This condition may serve as a model for investigation of congenital skeletal deformities in other species.
[Mh] MeSH terms primary: Horse Diseases/genetics
Lordosis/veterinary
[Mh] MeSH terms secundary: Animals
Genes, Recessive
Genetic Predisposition to Disease
Haplotypes
Horses
Lordosis/genetics
Polymorphism, Single Nucleotide
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE; RESEARCH SUPPORT, NON-U.S. GOV'T
[Em] Entry month:1504
[Cu] Class update date: 101112
[Lr] Last revision date:101112
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[Da] Date of entry for processing:101113
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.1111/j.1365-2052.2010.02108.x

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[PMID]: 19021536
[Au] Autor:Gambling L; Andersen HS; McArdle HJ
[Ad] Address:Rowett Institute of Health and Nutrition, College of Life Sciences and Medicine, University of Aberdeen, Bucksburn, Aberdeen, UK. L.Gambling@rowett.ac.uk
[Ti] Title:Iron and copper, and their interactions during development.
[So] Source:Biochem Soc Trans;36(Pt 6):1258-61, 2008 Dec.
[Is] ISSN:1470-8752
[Cp] Country of publication:England
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:During development, the fetus is entirely dependent on the mother for its nutrient requirements. Subsequently, it is a period when both are vulnerable to changes in dietary supply, especially of those nutrients that are marginal under normal circumstances. In developed countries, this applies mainly to micronutrients. Even now, iron deficiency is a common disorder, especially in pregnancy. Similarly, copper intake in the U.K. population is rarely above adequate levels. It is now becoming clear that nutrient deficiencies during pregnancy can result in problems for the offspring, in both the short- and long-term. Early studies showed that lambs born to mothers on copper-deficient pastures developed 'swayback', with neurological and muscular symptoms that could not be reversed by postnatal supplementation. Our own findings have shown that prenatal iron deficiency results in increased postnatal blood pressure, even though the offspring have normal dietary iron levels from birth. These observations emphasize the importance of iron and copper in growth and development. Complicating the situation further is the fact that copper and iron are known to interact with each other in many ways, including absorption and intracellular transport. However, their interactions during the pregnancy appear to be more complex than during the non-pregnant state. In the present review, we examine the importance of these metals and their interactions, the consequences, both short- and long-term, of deficiency and consider some possible mechanisms whereby these effects may be generated.
[Mh] MeSH terms primary: Copper/metabolism
Embryonic Development
Iron/metabolism
[Mh] MeSH terms secundary: Animals
Ceruloplasmin/metabolism
Female
Humans
Intestinal Absorption
Pregnancy
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE; RESEARCH SUPPORT, NON-U.S. GOV'T; REVIEW
[Nm] Name of substance:789U1901C5 (Copper); E1UOL152H7 (Iron); EC 1.16.3.1 (Ceruloplasmin)
[Em] Entry month:0902
[Cu] Class update date: 131121
[Lr] Last revision date:131121
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[Da] Date of entry for processing:081122
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.1042/BST0361258


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