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[PMID]: 29522648
[Au] Autor:Golding JF; Wesnes KA; Leaker BR
[Ad] Address:Department of Psychology, Faculty of Science & Technology, University of Westminster, London.
[Ti] Title:The Effects of the Selective Muscarinic M3 Receptor Antagonist Darifenacin, and of Hyoscine (scopolamine), on Motion Sickness, Skin Conductance & Cognitive Function.
[So] Source:Br J Clin Pharmacol;, 2018 Mar 09.
[Is] ISSN:1365-2125
[Cp] Country of publication:England
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:AIMS: The aim of this study was to compare the effects of the selective M3 muscarinic acetylcholine receptor antagonist Darifenacin, oral Hyoscine hydrobromide and Placebo on motion sickness induced by cross-coupled stimulation. METHODS: The effects of Darifenacin 10 mg or 20 mg, Hyoscine hydrobromide 0.6 mg and Placebo were assessed in a randomised, double-blind, 4-way cross over trial of 16 healthy subjects. Motion sickness, skin conductance (a measure of sweating) and psychomotor cognitive function tests were investigated. RESULTS: Hyoscine hydrobromide produced significantly increased tolerance to motion versus Placebo (P<0.05 to P<0.01). The motion protection effect of Darifenacin (10 or 20 mg) was approximately one third of that of Hyoscine hydrobromide, but was not significant versus Placebo. Darifenacin and Hyoscine hydrobromide both significantly reduced skin conductance versus Placebo. Darifenacin produced either no effect or an enhanced effect on cognitive function in contrast to Hyoscine hydrobromide where there was significant impairment of psychomotor performance. CONCLUSION: The results suggest that selective antagonism of the M3 receptor may not be important in the prevention of motion sickness. However selective M3 antagonism does not impair cognitive function. These observations may be important given that long term treatment with non-selective anti-muscarinic agents such as Oxybutynin may lead to an increased incidence of dementia.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1803
[Cu] Class update date: 180309
[Lr] Last revision date:180309
[St] Status:Publisher
[do] DOI:10.1111/bcp.13579

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[PMID]: 28634889
[Au] Autor:D'Amour S; Bos JE; Keshavarz B
[Ad] Address:Department of Psychology, York University, 4700 Keele St, Toronto, ON, M3J 1P3, Canada. saod16@yorku.ca.
[Ti] Title:The efficacy of airflow and seat vibration on reducing visually induced motion sickness.
[So] Source:Exp Brain Res;, 2017 Jun 20.
[Is] ISSN:1432-1106
[Cp] Country of publication:Germany
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Visually induced motion sickness (VIMS) is a well-known sensation in virtual environments and simulators, typically characterized by a variety of symptoms such as pallor, sweating, dizziness, fatigue, and/or nausea. Numerous methods to reduce VIMS have been previously introduced; however, a reliable countermeasure is still missing. In the present study, the effect of airflow and seat vibration to alleviate VIMS was investigated. Eighty-two participants were randomly assigned to one of four groups (airflow, vibration, combined airflow and vibration, and control) and then exposed to a 15 min long video of a bicycle ride shot from first-person view. VIMS was measured using the Fast Motion Sickness Scale (FMS) and the Simulator Sickness Questionnaire (SSQ). Results showed that the exposure of airflow significantly reduced VIMS, whereas the presence of seat vibration, in contrast, did not have an impact on VIMS. Additionally, we found that females reported higher FMS scores than males, however, this sex difference was not found in the SSQ scores. Our findings demonstrate that airflow can be an effective and easy-to-apply technique to reduce VIMS in virtual environments and simulators, while vibration applied to the seat is not a successful method.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1706
[Cu] Class update date: 170811
[Lr] Last revision date:170811
[St] Status:Publisher
[do] DOI:10.1007/s00221-017-5009-1

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[PMID]: 28173847
[Au] Autor:Ambaw F; Mayston R; Hanlon C; Alem A
[Ad] Address:Bahir Dar University, School of Public Health, Bahir Dar, Ethiopia. fentambaw@yahoo.com.
[Ti] Title:Burden and presentation of depression among newly diagnosed individuals with TB in primary care settings in Ethiopia.
[So] Source:BMC Psychiatry;17(1):57, 2017 Feb 07.
[Is] ISSN:1471-244X
[Cp] Country of publication:England
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:BACKGROUND: Understanding co-morbidity of depression and tuberculosis (TB) has been limited by challenges in measurement of depression due to overlapping symptoms, use of small hospital samples and uncontrolled analysis. This study was conducted to better understand the burden and presentation of depression, and associated factors in people with TB in primary care settings in Ethiopia. METHODS: We conducted a cross-sectional survey among 657 people newly diagnosed with TB. Symptoms of depression were measured using the Patient Health Questionnaire (PHQ-9). TB symptoms and other factors were captured using standardised questionnaires. The factor structure of PHQ-9 was examined. Multivariable analysis was carried out to estimate prevalence ratios. RESULTS: The prevalence of probable depression was 54.0%. The PHQ-9 had one factor structure (alpha = 0.81). Little interest or pleasure in doing things (73.0%) was the commonest depressive symptom. Older age (Adjusted Prevalence ratio (APR) = 1.19; 95%CI = 1.06, 1.33), female sex (APR = 1.23; 95%CI = 1.18, 1.27), night sweating (APR = 1.25; 95%CI = 1.16, 1.35), pain (APR = 1.69; 95%CI = 1.24, 2.29), being underweight (APR = 1.10; 95%CI = 1.07, 1.13), duration of illness (APR = 1.35; 95%CI = 1.22, 1.50), level of education (APR = 0.93; 95%CI = 0.90, 0.95), and social support (APR = 0.89; 95%CI = 0.85, 0.93) were independently associated with probable depression. CONCLUSIONS: Depression appears highly prevalent in people with TB and PHQ-9 seems to be a useful instrument to detect depression in the context of TB. The frequency of depressive symptoms would suggest that the occurrence of the symptoms in people with TB is in the usual manifestation of the disorder. Prospective studies are needed to understand the longitudinal relationship between TB and depression.
[Mh] MeSH terms primary: Cost of Illness
Depression/diagnosis
Depression/epidemiology
Primary Health Care
Tuberculosis/epidemiology
[Mh] MeSH terms secundary: Adult
Comorbidity
Cross-Sectional Studies
Ethiopia/epidemiology
Female
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Prevalence
Prospective Studies
Social Stigma
Social Support
Surveys and Questionnaires
Tuberculosis/diagnosis
Young Adult
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1708
[Cu] Class update date: 170804
[Lr] Last revision date:170804
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[Da] Date of entry for processing:170209
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.1186/s12888-017-1231-4

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[PMID]: 27826613
[Au] Autor:Welz-Kubiak K; Reich A; Szepietowski JC
[Ad] Address:Department of Dermatology, Venereology and Allergology, Wroclav Medical University, Ul. T. Chalubinskiego 1, PL-50-368 Wroclaw, Poland.
[Ti] Title:Clinical Aspects of Itch in Lichen Planus.
[So] Source:Acta Derm Venereol;97(4):505-508, 2017 Apr 06.
[Is] ISSN:1651-2057
[Cp] Country of publication:Sweden
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Lichen planus (LP) skin lesions are often accompanied by itch, but this symptom has not been thoroughly examined in LP. To better characterize itch in LP, 78 patients with LP were investigated. Itch was present in 94.9% of patients and was usually described as the most vexing symptom of LP. The mean?±?SD severity of itch according to visual analogue scale score was 6.9?±?2.8 points. Most patients experienced itching daily, pruritus episodes lasted longer than 1 min, and most often occurred in the evening. Itch was frequently described as burning and, for many patients, it was considered burdensome and annoying. The following factors most often increased the perceived severity of pruritus: sweating, high temperature, stress and hot water, while cold water and cold air often resulted in itch reduction. In conclusion, itch is the major subjective symptom of LP. Effective treatment of pruritus should be one of the main goals of LP therapy.
[Mh] MeSH terms primary: Lichen Planus/complications
Pruritus/etiology
[Mh] MeSH terms secundary: Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Cost of Illness
Female
Humans
Lichen Planus/diagnosis
Lichen Planus/psychology
Lichen Planus/therapy
Male
Middle Aged
Prognosis
Pruritus/diagnosis
Pruritus/prevention & control
Pruritus/psychology
Quality of Life
Severity of Illness Index
Sleep Wake Disorders/etiology
Sleep Wake Disorders/psychology
Surveys and Questionnaires
Young Adult
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1711
[Cu] Class update date: 171107
[Lr] Last revision date:171107
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[Da] Date of entry for processing:161110
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.2340/00015555-2563

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[PMID]: 27683882
[Au] Autor:Yakushin SB; Martinelli GP; Raphan T; Cohen B
[Ad] Address:Department of Neurology, Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, New York, New York; and.
[Ti] Title:The response of the vestibulosympathetic reflex to linear acceleration in the rat.
[So] Source:J Neurophysiol;116(6):2752-2764, 2016 Dec 01.
[Is] ISSN:1522-1598
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:The vestibulosympathetic reflex (VSR) increases blood pressure (BP) upon arising to maintain blood flow to the brain. The optimal directions of VSR activation and whether changes in heart rate (HR) are associated with changes in BP are still not clear. We used manually activated pulses and oscillatory linear accelerations of 0.2-2.5 g along the naso-occipital, interaural, and dorsoventral axes in isoflurane-anesthetized, male Long-Evans rats. BP and HR were recorded with an intra-aortic sensor and acceleration with a three-dimensional accelerometer. Linear regressions of BP changes in accelerations along the upward, downward, and forward axes had slopes of ≈3-6 mmHg · g (P < 0.05). Lateral and backward accelerations did not produce consistent changes in BP. Thus upward, downward, and forward translations were the directions that significantly altered BP. HR was unaffected by these translations. The VSR sensitivity to oscillatory forward-backward translations was ≈6-10 mmHg · g at frequencies of ≈0.1 Hz (0.2 g), decreasing to zero at frequencies above 2 Hz (1.8 g). Upward, 70° tilts of an alert rat increased BP by 9 mmHg · g without changes in HR, indicating that anesthesia had not reduced the VSR sensitivity. The similarity in BP induced in alert and anesthetized rats indicates that the VSR is relatively insensitive to levels of alertness and that the VSR is likely to cause changes in BP through modification of peripheral vascular resistance. Thus the VSR, which is directed toward the cardiovascular system, is in contrast to the responses in the alert state that can produce sweating, alterations in BP and HR, and motion sickness.
[Mh] MeSH terms primary: Acceleration
Blood Pressure/physiology
Heart Rate/physiology
Sympathetic Nervous System/physiology
Vestibule, Labyrinth/physiology
[Mh] MeSH terms secundary: Analysis of Variance
Animals
Biomechanical Phenomena
Male
Orientation
Rats
Rats, Long-Evans
Reflex
Respiration
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1709
[Cu] Class update date: 170920
[Lr] Last revision date:170920
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[Da] Date of entry for processing:160930
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.1152/jn.00217.2016

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[PMID]: 27621258
[Au] Autor:Hunter MS; Hardy C; Norton S; Griffiths A
[Ad] Address:Department of Psychology (at Guy's), Institute of Psychiatry, Psychology and Neuroscience, Kings College London, 5th Floor Bermondsey Wing, Guy's Campus, London SE1 9RT, UK.
[Ti] Title:Study protocol of a multicentre randomised controlled trial of self-help cognitive behaviour therapy for working women with menopausal symptoms (MENOS@Work).
[So] Source:Maturitas;92:186-192, 2016 Oct.
[Is] ISSN:1873-4111
[Cp] Country of publication:Ireland
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:BACKGROUND: Hot flushes and night sweats (HFNS) - the main symptoms of the menopause transition - can reduce quality of life and are particularly difficult to manage at work. A cognitive behaviour therapy (CBT) intervention has been developed specifically for HFNS that is theoretically based and shown to reduce significantly the impact of HFNS in several randomised controlled trials (RCTs). Self-help CBT has been found to be as effective as group CBT for these symptoms, but these interventions are not widely available in the workplace. This paper describes the protocol of an RCT aiming to assess the efficacy of CBT for menopausal symptoms implemented in the workplace, with a nested qualitative study to examine acceptability and feasibility. METHODS/DESIGN: One hundred menopausal working women, aged 45-60 years, experiencing bothersome HFNS for two months will be recruited from several (2-10) large organisations into a multicentre randomised controlled trial. Women will be randomly assigned to either treatment (a self-help CBT intervention lasting 4 weeks) or to a no treatment-wait control condition (NTWC), following a screening interview, consent, and completion of a baseline questionnaire. All participants will complete follow-up questionnaires at 6 weeks and 20 weeks post-randomisation. The primary outcome is the rating of HFNS; secondary measures include HFNS frequency, mood, quality of life, attitudes to menopause, HFNS beliefs and behaviours, work absence and presenteeism, job satisfaction, job stress, job performance, disclosure to managers and turnover intention. Adherence, acceptability and feasibility will be assessed at 20 weeks post-randomisation in questionnaires and qualitative interviews. Upon trial completion, the control group will also be offered the intervention. DISCUSSION: This is the first randomised controlled trial of a self-management intervention tailored for working women who have troublesome menopausal symptoms. TRIAL REGISTRATION: Clin.Gov NCT02623374.
[Mh] MeSH terms primary: Cognitive Therapy/methods
Hot Flashes/therapy
Occupational Health
Self Care
Sweating
Women, Working/psychology
[Mh] MeSH terms secundary: Affect
Female
Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice
Hot Flashes/psychology
Humans
Job Satisfaction
Menopause/psychology
Middle Aged
Presenteeism
Quality of Life
Research Design
Sick Leave
Stress, Psychological/etiology
Surveys and Questionnaires
Workplace/psychology
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE; MULTICENTER STUDY; RANDOMIZED CONTROLLED TRIAL
[Em] Entry month:1704
[Cu] Class update date: 170828
[Lr] Last revision date:170828
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[Da] Date of entry for processing:160914
[Cl] Clinical Trial:ClinicalTrial
[St] Status:MEDLINE

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[PMID]: 27203840
[Au] Autor:Metzler-Wilson K; Wilson TE
[Ad] Address:Marian University College of Osteopathic Medicine, Indianapolis, IN, USA.
[Ti] Title:Impact of calcium regulation on eccrine sweating and sweating disorders: the view from cells to glands to intact human skin.
[So] Source:Exp Physiol;101(3):345-6, 2016 Mar.
[Is] ISSN:1469-445X
[Cp] Country of publication:England
[La] Language:eng
[Mh] MeSH terms primary: Calcium/metabolism
Eccrine Glands/metabolism
Eccrine Glands/physiology
Sweating Sickness/metabolism
Sweating Sickness/physiopathology
Sweating/physiology
[Mh] MeSH terms secundary: Body Temperature Regulation/physiology
Humans
Skin/metabolism
Skin/physiopathology
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Nm] Name of substance:SY7Q814VUP (Calcium)
[Em] Entry month:1701
[Cu] Class update date: 170104
[Lr] Last revision date:170104
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[Da] Date of entry for processing:160521
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.1113/EP085639

  8 / 118 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 26436597
[Au] Autor:Davies AN; Thompson J
[Ad] Address:Department of Palliative Medicine, Royal Surrey County Hospital, Guildford, UK.
[Ti] Title:Parasympathomimetic drugs for the treatment of salivary gland dysfunction due to radiotherapy.
[So] Source:Cochrane Database Syst Rev;(10):CD003782, 2015 Oct 05.
[Is] ISSN:1469-493X
[Cp] Country of publication:England
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:BACKGROUND: This is an updated version of the original Cochrane review on parasympathomimetic drugs for the treatment of salivary gland dysfunction due to radiotherapy (published in Issue 3, 2007). Salivary gland dysfunction is a predictable side effect of radiotherapy to the head and neck region. Pilocarpine hydrochloride (a choline ester) is licensed in many countries for the treatment of radiation-induced salivary gland dysfunction. Other parasympathomimetics have also been used 'off licence' in the treatment of this condition. OBJECTIVES: To determine the efficacy and tolerability of parasympathomimetic drugs in the treatment of radiation-induced salivary gland dysfunction (specifically radiation-induced xerostomia). SEARCH METHODS: For this update, we ran searches of the Cochrane Oral Health Group Trials Register, Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL 2015, Issue 6), MEDLINE, EMBASE, and CINAHL in July 2015. We checked the reference lists of retrieved articles for additional studies, contacted experts in the field for unpublished and ongoing trials, and contacted relevant pharmaceutical companies for unpublished and ongoing trials. SELECTION CRITERIA: The selection criteria for the review were: 1) randomised controlled trials; 2) people suffering from radiation-induced salivary gland dysfunction; 3) people treated with parasympathomimetic drugs; and 4) assessable data available on primary outcome measure. DATA COLLECTION AND ANALYSIS: The two review authors independently collected data from the full-text version of relevant papers including: 1) citation details; 2) participants; 3) interventions; 4) assessments; 5) outcomes (that is efficacy, tolerability); and 6) quality issues.Due to a lack of appropriate data, we were unable to perform a meta-analysis. MAIN RESULTS: In the original review, three studies, including a total of 298 participants, fulfilled the inclusion criteria. All three studies involved the use of pilocarpine hydrochloride. We have included no additional studies in the update of the review; we have excluded eight additional studies.The data suggest that pilocarpine hydrochloride is more effective than placebo and at least as effective as artificial saliva. The response rate was 42% to 51%. The time to response was up to 12 weeks. The overall side effect rate was high, and side effects were the main reason for withdrawal (6% to 15% of participants taking 5 mg three times a day had to withdraw). The side effects were usually the result of generalised parasympathomimetic stimulation (for example sweating, headaches, urinary frequency, vasodilatation). Response rates were not dose dependent, but side effect rates were dose dependent. AUTHORS' CONCLUSIONS: There is limited evidence to support the use of pilocarpine hydrochloride in the treatment of radiation-induced xerostomia. Currently, there is little evidence to support the use of other parasympathomimetic drugs in the treatment of radiation-induced xerostomia. Available studies suggest that approximately half of patients will respond, but side effects can be problematic. The conclusions of the update are the same as the conclusions of the original review, since no new relevant studies have been published in the interim.
[Mh] MeSH terms primary: Muscarinic Agonists/therapeutic use
Parasympathomimetics/therapeutic use
Pilocarpine/therapeutic use
Radiation Injuries/drug therapy
Salivary Glands/radiation effects
Xerostomia/drug therapy
[Mh] MeSH terms secundary: Humans
Muscarinic Agonists/adverse effects
Parasympathomimetics/adverse effects
Pilocarpine/adverse effects
Randomized Controlled Trials as Topic
Saliva, Artificial/therapeutic use
Xerostomia/etiology
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE; REVIEW
[Nm] Name of substance:0 (Muscarinic Agonists); 0 (Parasympathomimetics); 0 (Saliva, Artificial); 01MI4Q9DI3 (Pilocarpine)
[Em] Entry month:1604
[Cu] Class update date: 161212
[Lr] Last revision date:161212
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[Da] Date of entry for processing:151006
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.1002/14651858.CD003782.pub3

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[PMID]: 26416360
[Au] Autor:Carnegie K; Rhee T
[Ti] Title:Reducing Visual Discomfort with HMDs Using Dynamic Depth of Field.
[So] Source:IEEE Comput Graph Appl;35(5):34-41, 2015 Sep-Oct.
[Is] ISSN:1558-1756
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Although head-mounted displays (HMDs) are ideal devices for personal viewing of immersive stereoscopic content, exposure to VR applications on them results in significant discomfort for the majority of people, with symptoms including eye fatigue, headaches, nausea, and sweating. A conflict between accommodation and vergence depth cues on stereoscopic displays is a significant cause of visual discomfort. This article describes the results of an evaluation used to judge the effectiveness of dynamic depth-of-field (DoF) blur in an effort to reduce discomfort caused by exposure to stereoscopic content on HMDs. Using a commercial game engine implementation, study participants report a reduction of visual discomfort on a simulator sickness questionnaire when DoF blurring is enabled. The study participants reported a decrease in symptom severity caused by HMD exposure, indicating that dynamic DoF can effectively reduce visual discomfort.
[Mh] MeSH terms primary: Depth Perception
Imaging, Three-Dimensional/adverse effects
Motion Sickness/etiology
Motion Sickness/prevention & control
Photic Stimulation/adverse effects
Video Games/adverse effects
[Mh] MeSH terms secundary: Adolescent
Adult
Data Display
Female
Humans
Imaging, Three-Dimensional/methods
Male
Middle Aged
Photic Stimulation/methods
User-Computer Interface
Young Adult
[Pt] Publication type:CLINICAL TRIAL; JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1607
[Cu] Class update date: 150929
[Lr] Last revision date:150929
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[Da] Date of entry for processing:150930
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.1109/MCG.2015.98

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[PMID]: 26366965
[Au] Autor:Manno M; Di Renzo G; Bianco P; Sbordone C; De Matteis F
[Ad] Address:Departments of *Public Health and †Neurosciences, Reproductive and Odontostomatological Sciences, University of Naples Federico II, Naples, Italy; and ‡School of Biological and Chemical Sciences, Birkbeck College, University of London, London, United Kingdom.
[Ti] Title:Unique Scopolamine Withdrawal Syndrome After Standard Transdermal Use.
[So] Source:Clin Neuropharmacol;38(5):204-5, 2015 Sep-Oct.
[Is] ISSN:1537-162X
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:We report the case of a 62-year-old woman who developed a withdrawal syndrome after using a standard 1.5-mg transdermal scopolamine (TDS) patch behind the ear to prevent motion sickness during sailing. The patient, who had used TDS occasionally for years without significant adverse effects, more recently, having worn a patch continuously for 7 days, approximately 24 to 36 hours after removing the patch developed dizziness, nausea, sweating, fatigue, and drowsiness. All symptoms disappeared without therapy in about 2 days. Approximately 1 year after the first episode, though, a very similar, more severe disabling reaction developed on 2 occasions. Drowsiness and malaise were accompanied by severe asthenia, orthostatic sweating, inability to stand, and hypotension. All clinical tests (electrocardiogram; spirometry; blood cell count; plasma levels of cortisol, sodium, and potassium; and liver and kidney function tests) were negative, and symptoms disappeared slowly, after several days. Although we are certain that scopolamine was responsible for the symptoms, we are less clear as to the nature of the disorder. The effects being more severe after a more prolonged use of the TDS patch, the increase in severity each successive time, and the time lag between removing the patch and appearance of symptoms all indicated a withdrawal syndrome for which several mechanisms may be suggested.
[Mh] MeSH terms primary: Scopolamine Hydrobromide/administration & dosage
Scopolamine Hydrobromide/adverse effects
Substance Withdrawal Syndrome/etiology
[Mh] MeSH terms secundary: Female
Humans
Middle Aged
Transdermal Patch
[Pt] Publication type:CASE REPORTS; JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Nm] Name of substance:451IFR0GXB (Scopolamine Hydrobromide)
[Em] Entry month:1606
[Cu] Class update date: 150917
[Lr] Last revision date:150917
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[Da] Date of entry for processing:150915
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.1097/WNF.0000000000000099


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