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[PMID]: 29515736
[Au] Autor:Boushab BM; Mohamed Limame OCM; Fatim Zahra FM; Mamoudou S; Roseline Darnycka BM; Saliou SM
[Ad] Address:Department of Internal Medicine, Aïoun Regional Hospital, Hodh El Gharbi, Mauritania.
[Ti] Title:Estimation of seroprevalence of HIV, hepatitis B and C virus and syphilis among blood donors in the hospital of Aïoun, Mauritania.
[So] Source:Pan Afr Med J;28:118, 2017.
[Is] ISSN:1937-8688
[Cp] Country of publication:Uganda
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Introduction: To estimating the seroprevalence of HIV, hepatitis B, hepatitis C and syphilis among blood donors in the Aïoun hospital. Methods: This is a retrospective study from 1 January 2010 to 31 December 2015. Results: On the five-year study period, 1,123 donors were collected. Of these, 182 were HIV-positive, an overall prevalence of 16.2% with predominance in male with a sex ratio Man/Woman of 5.2. The average age of donors was 32.7 ± 10 years (range 17-73 years). The most represented that age group 21-30 years (40.5%). The seroprevalence found were 1.2% for HIV, 11.8% for HBV, HCV 0.2% and 3% for syphilis. Co-infection was found in 0.7% of which 0.5% of dual HIV HBV/Syphilis and 0.2% in HBV/HIV. Conclusion: The transmission of infectious agents related to transfusion represents the greatest threat to transfusion safety of the recipient. Therefore, a rigorous selection and screening of blood donors are highly recommended to ensure blood safety for the recipient.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1803
[Cu] Class update date: 180311
[Lr] Last revision date:180311
[St] Status:In-Process
[do] DOI:10.11604/pamj.2017.28.118.12465

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[PMID]: 29510664
[Au] Autor:Amsalu A; Ferede G; Assegu D
[Ad] Address:Department of Medical Microbiology, University of Gondar, P.O.Box 196, Gondar, Ethiopia. ant.amsalu@gmail.com.
[Ti] Title:High seroprevalence of syphilis infection among pregnant women in Yiregalem hospital southern Ethiopia.
[So] Source:BMC Infect Dis;18(1):109, 2018 Mar 06.
[Is] ISSN:1471-2334
[Cp] Country of publication:England
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:BACKGROUND: Despite availability of effective treatment and the implementation of focused antenatal care (ANC), still the prevalence of syphilis persists in Ethiopia. Yet, data is not found in southern Ethiopia. Therefore, this study was conducted to determine the seroprevalence and associated factors of syphilis among pregnant women in Yiregalem Hospital, Southern Ethiopia. METHODS: A cross-sectional study was conducted among pregnant women from October 2015 to August 2016. Data on socio-demography and obstetric conditions of pregnant women were collected using a structured questionnaire. Serum samples were screened for syphilis using rapid plasma regain (RPR) test and those found seropositive were further confirmed by Treponema pallidum haemagglutination assay (TPHA) test following the manufacturer's instruction. HIV results were reviewed from records. The data were analyzed using SPSS version 20 software. RESULTS: Of 494 pregnant women, 204(41.3%) were first ANC visit attenders. Of these, 123(60.3%) were after the 12th gestational week. Sero-prevalence of syphilis and HIV was found to be 5.1% (25/494; 95 CI, 3.2-7.1%) and 10.3% (51/494; 95 CI, 7.7-13.2%), respectively. The overall prevalence of syphilis and HIV co-infection was 2.2% (11/494). Women with HIV infection were significantly more likely to be syphilis-seropositive (AOR = 10.3, 95%CI, 4.213-25.185) than HIV negatives. CONCLUSIONS: High seroprevalence of syphilis particularly among HIV positive women and late first ANC visit attenders in the study area calls for further ramping up of current intervention measures. Like integration of syphilis testing and treatment to the already established HIV prevention program and creating awareness about early ANC visit and follow-up.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1803
[Cu] Class update date: 180311
[Lr] Last revision date:180311
[St] Status:In-Data-Review
[do] DOI:10.1186/s12879-018-2998-8

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[PMID]: 29523617
[Au] Autor:Osman M; Hasan S; Azher Q; Elbedawi M; Bachuwa G
[Ad] Address:Hurley Medical Center, Flint, Michigan, USA.
[Ti] Title:Syphilitic gastritis: a rare presentation of secondary syphilis.
[So] Source:BMJ Case Rep;2018, 2018 Mar 09.
[Is] ISSN:1757-790X
[Cp] Country of publication:England
[La] Language:eng
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1803
[Cu] Class update date: 180310
[Lr] Last revision date:180310
[St] Status:In-Data-Review

  4 / 22536 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29509587
[Au] Autor:Spittal PM; Malamba SS; Ogwang MD; Musisi S; Ekwaru JP; Sewankambo NK; Pearce ME; Jongbloed K; Patel SH; Katamba A; Blair AH; Muyinda H; Schechter Obc MT
[Ad] Address:School of Population and Public Health, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, Canada BC Children's Hospital Research Institute, Vancouver, Canada.
[Ti] Title:Cango Lyec (Healing the Elephant): Gender differences in HIV infection in post-conflict Northern Uganda.
[So] Source:J Acquir Immune Defic Syndr;, 2018 Mar 02.
[Is] ISSN:1944-7884
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:BACKGROUND: As previously encamped resettle, potential for rapid HIV transmission in post-conflict Northern Uganda is concerning. Women in particular may be experiencing heightened vulnerability resulting from war-related sexual violence. SETTING: Cango Lyec (Healing the Elephant) Project is a cohort involving conflict-affected people in three districts in Northern Uganda. METHODS: Eight randomly selected communities were mapped and a census was conducted. Participants aged 13-49 years completed questionnaires in Luo on war-related experiences, mental health, sexual vulnerabilities, and socio-demographics. Blood samples were tested for HIV and syphilis. Baseline data from all sexually active participants was used to determine gender differences in HIV prevalence. Multivariate modeling determined correlates of HIV by gender. RESULTS: Among 2008 participants, HIV prevalence was higher among women (17.2; 95%CI:14.7-19.7) compared to men (10.6; 95%CI:8.0-13.2, <0.001). Among women, correlates of HIV included: war-related sexual assault (AOR:1.95; 95%CI:1.16-3.26); probable depression (AOR:2.22; 95%CI:1.46-3.37); probable PTSD (AOR:2.03; 95%CI:1.45-2.84); experiencing ≥12 traumatic events (AOR:2.04; 95%CI:1.31-3.18); suicide ideation (AOR:1.67; 95%CI:1.22-2.28); living in a female-headed household (AOR:2.76; 95%CI:1.70-4.49); first sexual partner ≥10 years older (AOR:1.69; 95%CI:1.07-2.67); sex exchange (AOR:5.51; 95%CI:1.76-17.31); having 2 (AOR:2.54; 95%CI:1.23-5.23) or 3+ (AOR:4.65; 95%CI:2.65-8.18) sexual partners; inconsistent condom use (AOR:0.40; 95%CI:0.29-0.57); genital ulcers (AOR:3.08; 95%CI:2.16-4.38); active syphilis (AOR:4.33; 95%CI:1.22-15.40); and ill health without medical care (AOR:2.02; 95%CI:1.22-3.34). Among men, correlates of HIV included no condom at sexual debut (AOR:1.92; 95%CI:1.30-2.83) and genital ulcers (AOR:4.40; 95%CI:1.35-14.40). CONCLUSION: Women are disproportionately impacted by HIV, trauma, and depression in this conflict-affected population. Trauma-informed HIV prevention and culturally-safe mental health initiatives are urgently required.This is an open-access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution-Non Commercial-No Derivatives License 4.0 (CCBY-NC-ND) , where it is permissible to download and share the work provided it is properly cited. The work cannot be changed in any way or used commercially without permission from the journal.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1803
[Cu] Class update date: 180309
[Lr] Last revision date:180309
[St] Status:Publisher
[do] DOI:10.1097/QAI.0000000000001671

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[PMID]: 29278678
[Au] Autor:Young SD; Mercer N; Weiss RE; Torrone EA; Aral SO
[Ad] Address:Department of Family Medicine, University of California, Los Angeles, California, USA. Electronic address: Sdyoung@mednet.ucla.edu.
[Ti] Title:Using social media as a tool to predict syphilis.
[So] Source:Prev Med;109:58-61, 2018 Apr.
[Is] ISSN:1096-0260
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Syphilis rates have been rapidly rising in the United States. New technologies, such as social media, might be used to anticipate and prevent the spread of disease. Because social media data collection is easy and inexpensive, integration of social media data into syphilis surveillance may be a cost-effective surveillance strategy, especially in low-resource regions. People are increasingly using social media to discuss health-related issues, such as sexual risk behaviors, allowing social media to be a potential tool for public health and medical research. This study mined Twitter data to assess whether social media could be used to predict syphilis cases in 2013 based on 2012 data. We collected 2012 and 2013 county-level primary and secondary (P&S) and early latent syphilis cases reported to the Center for Disease Control and Prevention, along with >8500 geolocated tweets in the United States that were filtered to include sexual risk-related keywords, including colloquial terms for intercourse. We assessed the relationship between syphilis-related tweets and actual case reports by county, controlling for socioeconomic indicators and prior year syphilis cases. We found a significant positive relationship between tweets and cases of P&S and early latent syphilis. This study shows that social media may be an additional tool to enhance syphilis prediction and surveillance.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1712
[Cu] Class update date: 180310
[Lr] Last revision date:180310
[St] Status:In-Data-Review

  6 / 22536 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29519910
[Au] Autor:Rockwood N; Nwokolo N
[Ad] Address:Chelsea and Westminster Hospital NHS Foundation Trust, London, UK.
[Ti] Title:Syphilis the great pretender: when is cancer not cancer?
[So] Source:Sex Transm Infect;, 2018 Mar 08.
[Is] ISSN:1472-3263
[Cp] Country of publication:England
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:The number of cases of syphilis continues to rise in the UK, USA and elsewhere and may present to a variety of clinical specialties. We report a complex case of early acquired disseminated syphilis causing an ulceronodular rash (lues maligna), orchitis, osteitis and lung nodules in an immunocompetent man who has sex with men who presented to the genitourinary medicine clinic. Syphilis should be considered in the differential diagnoses of multiple clinical presentations and optimal management should involve multidisciplinary care.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1803
[Cu] Class update date: 180309
[Lr] Last revision date:180309
[St] Status:Publisher

  7 / 22536 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29519255
[Au] Autor:Rissewijck J; Siezenga MA
[Ad] Address:Ziekenhuis Gelderse Vallei, afd. Interne Geneeskunde, Ede.
[Ti] Title:Oogzenuwontsteking door lues. [Optic nerve infection caused by syphilis].
[So] Source:Ned Tijdschr Geneeskd;162(0):D1735, 2018.
[Is] ISSN:1876-8784
[Cp] Country of publication:Netherlands
[La] Language:dut
[Ab] Abstract:BACKGROUND: Syphilis, 'the great imitator', can present with a variety of symptoms. CASE DESCRIPTION: A 54-year-old woman attended the hospital clinic for vision problems, preceded by mouth ulcers. Following extensive serological investigations, the diagnosis 'syphilitic optic neuritis' was made. CONCLUSION: It is important to be thoughtful of systemic causes, like syphilis, when patients present with local symptomatology.
[Pt] Publication type:ENGLISH ABSTRACT; JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1803
[Cu] Class update date: 180309
[Lr] Last revision date:180309
[St] Status:In-Data-Review

  8 / 22536 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29399706
[Au] Autor:Rothschild BM
[Ad] Address:Department of Vertebrate Paleontology, Carnegie Museum, Pittsburgh, PA, 15213, USA. spondylair@gmail.com.
[Ti] Title:Differential diagnostic perspectives provided by en face microscopic examination of articular surface defects.
[So] Source:Clin Rheumatol;37(3):831-836, 2018 Mar.
[Is] ISSN:1434-9949
[Cp] Country of publication:Germany
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Surface defects have a central position in diagnosis of articular pathology. Recognizing the limitations of standard radiologic techniques and those imposed by positioning and averaging artifacts on CT evaluation, direct visualization of surface defects was pursued to identify disease characteristics that would facilitate interpretation of radiologic findings. Epi-illumination surface microscopy was utilized to examine macroscopically recognized articular surface defects in individuals in the Hamann-Todd, Terry, and Huntington human skeletal collections with previously verified diagnoses of rheumatoid arthritis, spondyloarthropathy, juvenile inflammatory arthritis (JIA), calcium pyrophosphate deposition disease (CPPD), gout, metastatic cancer, multiple myeloma, septic arthritis, tuberculosis, fungal arthritis, histiocytosis and sickle cell anemia (Rothschild and Rothschild Clin Infect Dis 20(5):1402-1408, 1995; Rothschild et al. Amer J Phys Anthropol 82(4):441-449, 1990; Rothschild and Rothschild Amer J Phys Anthropol 96(4):357-563, 1995; Rothschild and Woods Clin Exp Rheumatol 10(2):117-122, 1992; Barrett and Keat Radiographics 24(6):1679-1691, 2004; Rothschild and Heathcote Amer J Phys Anthropol 98(4):519-525, 1995; Rothschild and Woods Am J Phys Anthropol 85:25-34, 1991; Hershkovitz et al. Amer J Phys Anthropol 106(1):47-60, 1998; Winland et al. Amer J Phys Anthropol 24:S243, 1997; Rothschild et al. Clin Exp Rheumatol 10(6):557-564, 1992; Rothschild and Martin , 2006; Rothschild et al. Amer J Phys Anthropol 102(2):249-264, 1997). Observed alterations were compared with standard radiographs. Fronts of resorption distinguished inflammatory arthritis from those caused by the other disorders studied. Multiple myeloma, fungal disease, and gout are expansile character; the latter accompanied by reactive new bone formation more prominent than that noted with spondyloarthropathy and JIA. Those were clearly distinguished from the crumbling alterations found with CPPD. Histiocytosis had a unique crenulated appearance, while nodules were prominent with syphilis. Defects in sickle cell anemia had ivory fragments at their base. These findings provided explanation for radiologic observations. Direct surface microscopy revealed characteristics apparently pathognomonic for specific disorders and facilitated distinguishing among them. The technique provides visualization an order of magnitude greater than that available with clinical radiologic techniques and identifies new characteristics which should facilitate clinical diagnoses. This demonstrates that there would be value to the development of higher resolution, clinically applicable imaging techniques.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1802
[Cu] Class update date: 180309
[Lr] Last revision date:180309
[St] Status:In-Process
[do] DOI:10.1007/s10067-018-4001-x

  9 / 22536 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29337848
[Au] Autor:Parczewski M; Cielniak I; Kordek J; Aksak-Was B; Urbanska A; Leszczyszyn-Pynka M; Siwak E; Bociaga-Jasik M; Nowak A; Szymczak A; Zalewska M; Lojewski W; Vandamme AM; Lübke N; Cuypers L
[Ad] Address:Department of Infectious, Tropical Diseases and Immune Deficiency, Pomeranian Medical University, Szczecin, Poland.
[Ti] Title:Transmission Networks of HCV Genotype 1a Enriched With Pre-existing Polymorphism Q80K Among HIV-Infected Patients With Acute Hepatitis C in Poland.
[So] Source:J Acquir Immune Defic Syndr;77(5):514-522, 2018 Apr 15.
[Is] ISSN:1944-7884
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:BACKGROUND: Hepatitis C virus (HCV) resistance-associated variants (RAVs) have been shown to adversely affect treatment response of direct-acting antivirals. Identifying pre-existing RAVs and transmission networks among HIV/HCV genotype 1 (G1)-infected patients from Poland will assist in shaping surveillance strategies for HCV. METHODS: NS3 and NS5A sequences were obtained from samples of 112 direct-acting antiviral-naive G1 patients (45 G1a and 67 G1b), of which 74 were chronically infected and 38 were diagnosed with acute hepatitis C (AHC). RAVs were identified using geno2pheno, and 98 concatenated NS3/NS5A alignments were constructed to identify transmission clusters using a maximum likelihood approach. RESULTS: G1a was notably more prevalent compared with G1b among men-having-sex-with-men (MSM) (60.0% vs. 31.3%, P = 0.004), AHC cases (46.7% vs. 25.4%, P = 0.019), and patients diagnosed with syphilis (52.2% vs. 24.5%, P = 0.009). The overall NS3/NS5A RAVs frequency was 14.3% with variants occurring more often in G1a compared with G1b (27.5% vs. 5.2%, P = 0.005), mostly for NS3 due to the high prevalence of polymorphism Q80K. NS5A RAVs were only found in 2.9% of sequences. Significant clustering was observed for 73.5% of the Polish sequences, however, more common in G1a MSM compared with G1b (50.0% vs. 25.9%, P = 0.02). The identified clusters contained sequences originating from up to 5 Polish cities, located within a mean distance of 370 km. CONCLUSIONS: Close clustering of Polish strains suggests the presence of compartmentalized epidemics of MSM that fuel the spread of G1a variants. Particularly patients with AHC form a national transmission network, including clusters enriched with the NS3 Q80K polymorphism.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1801
[Cu] Class update date: 180309
[Lr] Last revision date:180309
[St] Status:In-Data-Review
[do] DOI:10.1097/QAI.0000000000001628

  10 / 22536 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29304083
[Au] Autor:Adachi K; Xu J; Yeganeh N; Camarca M; Morgado MG; Watts DH; Mofenson LM; Veloso VG; Pilotto JH; Joao E; Gray G; Theron G; Santos B; Fonseca R; Kreitchmann R; Pinto J; Mussi-Pinhata MM; Ceriotto M; Machado DM; Bryson YJ; Grinsztejn B; Moye J; Klausner JD; Bristow CC; Dickover R; Mirochnick M; Nielsen-Saines K; NICHD HPTN 040 Study Team
[Ad] Address:David Geffen UCLA School of Medicine, Los Angeles, CA, United States of America.
[Ti] Title:Combined evaluation of sexually transmitted infections in HIV-infected pregnant women and infant HIV transmission.
[So] Source:PLoS One;13(1):e0189851, 2018.
[Is] ISSN:1932-6203
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:BACKGROUND: Sexually transmitted infections (STIs) including Chlamydia trachomatis (CT), Neisseria gonorrhoeae (NG), Treponema pallidum (TP), and cytomegalovirus (CMV) may lead to adverse pregnancy and infant outcomes. The role of combined maternal STIs in HIV mother-to-child transmission (MTCT) was evaluated in mother-infant pairs from NICHD HPTN 040. METHODOLOGY: Urine samples from HIV-infected pregnant women during labor were tested by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) for CT, NG, and CMV. Infant HIV infection was determined by serial HIV DNA PCR testing. Maternal syphilis was tested by VDRL and confirmatory treponemal antibodies. RESULTS: A total of 899 mother-infant pairs were evaluated. Over 30% had at least one of the following infections (TP, CT, NG, and/or CMV) detected at the time of delivery. High rates of TP (8.7%), CT (17.8%), NG (4%), and CMV (6.3%) were observed. HIV MTCT was 9.1% (n = 82 infants). HIV MTCT was 12.5%, 10.3%, 11.1%, and 26.3% among infants born to women with CT, TP, NG or CMV respectively. Forty-two percent of HIV-infected infants were born to women with at least one of these 4 infections. Women with these infections were nearly twice as likely to have an HIV-infected infant (aOR 1.9, 95% CI 1.1-3.0), particularly those with 2 STIs (aOR 3.4, 95% CI 1.5-7.7). Individually, maternal CMV (aOR 4.4 1.5-13.0) and infant congenital CMV (OR 4.1, 95% CI 2.2-7.8) but not other STIs (TP, CT, or NG) were associated with an increased risk of HIV MTCT. CONCLUSION: HIV-infected pregnant women identified during labor are at high risk for STIs. Co-infection with STIs including CMV nearly doubles HIV MTCT risk. CMV infection appears to confer the largest risk of HIV MTCT. TRIAL REGISTRATION: NCT00099359.
[Mh] MeSH terms primary: HIV Infections/complications
HIV Infections/transmission
Infectious Disease Transmission, Vertical
Pregnancy Complications, Infectious
Sexually Transmitted Diseases/complications
[Mh] MeSH terms secundary: Adolescent
Adult
Chlamydia Infections/complications
Chlamydia trachomatis
Cross-Sectional Studies
Female
Gonorrhea/complications
Humans
Infant
Infant, Newborn
Middle Aged
Pregnancy
Retrospective Studies
Risk Factors
Syphilis/complications
Young Adult
[Pt] Publication type:CLINICAL TRIAL, PHASE III; JOURNAL ARTICLE; MULTICENTER STUDY; RANDOMIZED CONTROLLED TRIAL; RESEARCH SUPPORT, N.I.H., EXTRAMURAL; RESEARCH SUPPORT, NON-U.S. GOV'T
[Em] Entry month:1801
[Cu] Class update date: 180309
[Lr] Last revision date:180309
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[Da] Date of entry for processing:180106
[Cl] Clinical Trial:ClinicalTrial
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.1371/journal.pone.0189851


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