Database : MEDLINE
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[PMID]: 29522075
[Au] Autor:Szczygiel EJ; Cho S; Tucker RM
[Ad] Address:Department of Food Science and Human Nutrition, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI.
[Ti] Title:Characterization of the relationships between sleep duration, quality, architecture and chemosensory function in non-obese females.
[So] Source:Chem Senses;, 2018 Mar 07.
[Is] ISSN:1464-3553
[Cp] Country of publication:England
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Little is known about the relationship between sleep and chemosensation. The purpose of this study was to characterize the relationship between chemosensory function and sleep duration, quality and architecture. A total of 56 non-obese (BMI<30 kg/m2) female participants who denied having diagnosed sleep disorders completed testing. Sleep was measured for two nights using a single-channel (A1-A2) electroencephalogram-(EEG) (Zmachine). Sweet taste threshold and preference as well as olfactory threshold, recognition ability, and pleasantness ratings were evaluated. Sweet taste preference was correlated with total sleep time (TST) (P=0.0074) as well as with the sum of rapid eye movement (REM) and stage N3/slow wave sleep (SWS) duration (P=0.0008). Participants who slept more than the average TST or more than the average REM+SWS time preferred lower concentrations of sweetness (P=0.041, 0.049, respectively), than those whose sleep times fell below the means. Multiple linear regression revealed that REM and SWS predicted approximately 18% of the variance of sweet taste preference. These findings suggest that scientific and consumer studies related to sweet preference might benefit from screening participants for short sleep duration prior to testing.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1803
[Cu] Class update date: 180309
[Lr] Last revision date:180309
[St] Status:Publisher
[do] DOI:10.1093/chemse/bjy012

  2 / 5037 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29521240
[Au] Autor:Agrawal SS; Yallatikar TP; Gurjar PN
[Ad] Address:Quality Assurance, Shobhaben Pratapbhai Patel School of Pharmacy & Technology Management, Vile Parle (West), Mumbai 400056. India.
[Ti] Title:Brassica Nigra: Ethopharmacological Review Of A Routinely Used Condiment.
[So] Source:Curr Drug Discov Technol;, 2018 Mar 08.
[Is] ISSN:1875-6220
[Cp] Country of publication:United Arab Emirates
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Brassica nigra belonging to the family Brassicaceae (syn - black mustard) comprises of dried seeds and is widely cultivated in Mediterranean region and various other countries like India and Europe. B. nigra contains glycosinolates which undergoes hydrolysis in the presence of myrosinase enzyme yields allyl isothiocyante. The bitter taste and pungent odor is due to the isothiocyanates. B. Nigra shows various activities that are medically important such as anticancer, anti-bacterial, anti-fungal, anti-helminthic, protection against renal and hepatic toxicity and can also be used in diabetes treatment. Black mustards are also used in cardiovascular and neurological disorders. The present review explores the historical background including the macroscopic and microscopic characteristics, chemical constituents, pharmacological action, various evaluation parameters, formulations and uses of black mustard.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1803
[Cu] Class update date: 180309
[Lr] Last revision date:180309
[St] Status:Publisher
[do] DOI:10.2174/1570163815666180308143400

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[PMID]: 29514881
[Au] Autor:Tappy L
[Ad] Address:Physiology Department, University of Lausanne Faculty of Biology and Medicine, CH-1005 Lausanne, Switzerland luc.tappy@unil.ch.
[Ti] Title:Fructose-containing caloric sweeteners as a cause of obesity and metabolic disorders.
[So] Source:J Exp Biol;221(Pt Suppl 1), 2018 Mar 07.
[Is] ISSN:1477-9145
[Cp] Country of publication:England
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Compared with other carbohydrates, fructose-containing caloric sweeteners (sucrose, high-fructose corn syrup, pure fructose and fructose-glucose mixtures) are characterized by: a sweet taste generally associated with a positive hedonic tone; specific intestinal fructose transporters, i.e. GLUT5; a two-step fructose metabolism, consisting of the conversion of fructose carbones into ubiquitous energy substrates in splanchnic organs where fructolytic enzymes are expressed, and secondary delivery of these substrates to extrasplanchnic tissues. Fructose is a dispensable nutrient, yet its energy can be stored very efficiently owing to a rapid induction of intestinal fructose transporters and of splanchnic fructolytic and lipogenic enzymes by dietary fructose-containing caloric sweeteners. In addition, compared with fat or other dietary carbohydrates, fructose may be favored as an energy store because it uses different intestinal absorption mechanisms and different inter-organ trafficking pathways. These specific features make fructose an advantageous energy substrate in wild animals, mainly when consumed before periods of scarcity or high energy turnover such as migrations. These properties of fructose storage are also advantageous to humans who are involved in strenuous sport activities. In subjects with low physical activity, however, these same features of fructose metabolism may have the harmful effect of favoring energy overconsumption. Furthermore, a continuous exposure to high fructose intake associated with a low energy turnover leads to a chronic overproduction of intrahepatic trioses-phosphate production, which is secondarily responsible for the development of hepatic insulin resistance, intrahepatic fat accumulation, and increased blood triglyceride concentrations. In the long term, these effects may contribute to the development of metabolic and cardiovascular diseases.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE; REVIEW
[Em] Entry month:1803
[Cu] Class update date: 180308
[Lr] Last revision date:180308
[St] Status:In-Data-Review

  4 / 5037 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29247552
[Au] Autor:Lee M; Strand M
[Ad] Address:Stockholm Centre for Eating Disorders, Stockholm, Sweden.
[Ti] Title:Ehlers-Danlos syndrome in a young woman with anorexia nervosa and complex somatic symptoms.
[So] Source:Int J Eat Disord;51(3):281-284, 2018 Mar.
[Is] ISSN:1098-108X
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:The Ehler-Danlos syndromes (EDS) are a group of clinically heterogeneous connective tissue disorders characterized by joint hypermobility, hyperextensibility of the skin, and a general connective tissue fragility that can induce symptoms from multiple organ systems. We present a case of comorbid anorexia nervosa and EDS in a 23-year old woman with a multitude of somatic symptoms that were initially attributed to the eating disorder but that were likely caused by the underlying EDS. Various EDS symptoms, such as gastrointestinal complaints, smell and taste abnormalities, and altered somatosensory awareness may resemble or mask an underlying eating disorder, and vice versa. Because of the large clinical heterogeneity, correctly identifying symptoms of EDS presents a challenge for clinicians, who should be aware of this group of underdiagnosed and potentially serious syndromes. The Beighton Hypermobility Score is an easily applicable screening instrument in assessing potential EDS in patients with joint hypermobility.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1712
[Cu] Class update date: 180308
[Lr] Last revision date:180308
[St] Status:In-Data-Review
[do] DOI:10.1002/eat.22815

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[PMID]: 29323774
[Au] Autor:Vancleef L; Thijs T; Baert F; Ceulemans LJ; Canovai E; Wang Q; Steensels S; Segers A; Farré R; Pirenne J; Lannoo M; Tack J; Depoortere I
[Ad] Address:Translational Research Center for Gastrointestinal Disorders, Department of Clinical & Experimental Medicine, University of Leuven, Leuven, Belgium.
[Ti] Title:Obesity Impairs Oligopeptide/Amino Acid-Induced Ghrelin Release and Smooth Muscle Contractions in the Human Proximal Stomach.
[So] Source:Mol Nutr Food Res;62(5), 2018 Mar.
[Is] ISSN:1613-4133
[Cp] Country of publication:Germany
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:SCOPE: The satiation properties of proteins involve effects on gut peptide release and gastrointestinal motility which may be altered during obesity. This study compares the in vitro response and role of amino acid (AA) taste receptors (TASR) in the effect of AAs and a casein hydrolysate on ghrelin release and smooth muscle (SM) contractions in the proximal gut of lean and obese patients. METHODS AND RESULTS: Basal ghrelin release, measured from mucosal segments, is maximal in the fundus and decreased distally. Obesity selectively impaires the stimulatory effect of a casein hydrolyaste on ghrelin release in the fundus but does not affect its inhibitory effect in the small intestine (SI). The SM contractions induced by a casein hydrolysate and AAs are stronger in strips from the SI than from the fundus but are reduced in the stomach of obese patients. The region-dependent expression of AA-TASRs in the mucosa and SM layer is affected by obesity. Most of the AA-induced responses are reduced by the umami antagonist, lactisole. l-Met-induced responses involve bitter taste receptors. CONCLUSION: Region-specific targeting of AA taste receptors on both enteroendocrine and SM cells with specific AA-enriched diets might be a useful strategy to combat obesity as well as hypomotility disorders.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1801
[Cu] Class update date: 180306
[Lr] Last revision date:180306
[St] Status:In-Data-Review
[do] DOI:10.1002/mnfr.201700804

  6 / 5037 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 28458496
[Au] Autor:Mahalakshmi S; Kandula S; Shilpa P; Kokila G
[Ad] Address:Department of Oral Medicine and Radiology, Sri Siddhartha Dental College & Hospital, Sri Siddhartha Academy of Higher Education, Tumkur.
[Ti] Title:Chronic Recurrent Non-specific Parotitis: A Case Report and Review.
[So] Source:Ethiop J Health Sci;27(1):95-100, 2017 Jan.
[Is] ISSN:2413-7170
[Cp] Country of publication:Ethiopia
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:BACKGROUND: Chronic recurrent non-specific parotitis is characterized by recurrent episodes of swelling and pain of unknown etiology in the parotid gland. Sialography is a hallmark in the diagnosis of salivary gland disorders; newer imaging modalities like CT-Sialography, sialoendoscopy and MRI can be used. Various treatment modalities have been tried, from conservative approach to surgical excision depending on the recurrence rate and severity of the condition. Although symptomatic treatment with antibiotics and analgesic, injection of intraductal medicament, aggressive treatment like duct ligation or excision of gland are some of the treatment modalities, there is no established algorithm as to which treatment method should be opted in such clinical situation. CASE DETAIL: A 20 years old male patient reported with pain and salty taste in the mouth that had began before a week. Examination revealed an elevated right parotid papilla; ropy, cloudy appearing saliva was oozing out on milking the gland. Unstimulated and stimulated whole salivary flow rate was assessed using drooling method. Sialography was used as a diagnostic and a therapeutic aid. In our case, sialography as a treatment showed a good response with no recurrence after two years of follow-up. We highlighted the role of sialography as a therapeutic aid. CONCLUSION: Recurrent attacks significantly affect the quality of life and also lead to progressive gland destruction. Preventing or reducing the frequency of recurrence remains the goal of therapeutic procedure. Hence, conventional sialography is useful in the diagnosis and also effective as a therapeutic aid in recurrent parotitis.
[Mh] MeSH terms primary: Parotitis/diagnostic imaging
[Mh] MeSH terms secundary: Adult
Analgesics/therapeutic use
Anti-Bacterial Agents/therapeutic use
Chronic Disease
Diagnosis, Differential
Humans
Male
Parotid Gland/diagnostic imaging
Parotitis/drug therapy
Recurrence
Salivary Glands/diagnostic imaging
Sialography/methods
Young Adult
[Pt] Publication type:CASE REPORTS; JOURNAL ARTICLE; REVIEW
[Nm] Name of substance:0 (Analgesics); 0 (Anti-Bacterial Agents)
[Em] Entry month:1802
[Cu] Class update date: 180228
[Lr] Last revision date:180228
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[Da] Date of entry for processing:170502
[St] Status:MEDLINE

  7 / 5037 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29247808
[Au] Autor:Yeung AWK; Goto TK; Leung WK
[Ad] Address:Oral and Maxillofacial Radiology, Applied Oral Sciences, Faculty of Dentistry, The University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong SAR, China. Electronic address: ndyeung@hku.hk.
[Ti] Title:Affective value, intensity and quality of liquid tastants/food discernment in the human brain: An activation likelihood estimation meta-analysis.
[So] Source:Neuroimage;169:189-199, 2017 Dec 14.
[Is] ISSN:1095-9572
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:The primary dimensions of taste are affective value, intensity and quality. Numerous studies have reported the role of the insula in evaluating these dimensions of taste; however, the results were inconsistent. Therefore, in the current study, we performed meta-analyses of published data to identify locations consistently activated across studies and evaluate whether different regions of the human brain could be responsible for processing different dimensions of taste. Meta-analyses were performed on 39 experiments, with 846 total healthy subjects (without psychiatric/neurological disorders) in 34 studies reporting whole-brain results. The aim was to establish the activation likelihood estimation (ALE) of taste-mediated regional activation across the whole brain. Apart from one meta-analysis for all studies in general, three analyses were performed to reveal the clusters of activation that were attributable to processing the affective value (data from 323 foci), intensity (data from 43 foci) and quality (data from 45 foci) of taste. The ALE revealed eight clusters of activation outside the insula for processing affective value, covering the middle and posterior cingulate, pre-/post-central gyrus, caudate and thalamus. The affective value had four clusters of activation (two in each hemisphere) in the insula. The intensity and quality activated only the insula, each with one cluster on the right. The concurrence between studies was moderate; at best, 53% of the experiments contributed to the significant clusters attributable to the affective value, 60% to intensity and 50% to quality. The affective value was processed bilaterally in the anterior to middle insula, whereas intensity was processed in the right antero-middle insula, and quality was processed in the right middle insula. The right middle dorsal insula was responsible for processing both the affective value and quality of taste. The exploratory analysis on taste quality did not have a significant result if the studies using liquid food stimuli were excluded. Results from the meta-analyses on studies involving the oral delivery of liquid tastants or liquid food stimuli confirmed that the insula is involved in processing all three dimensions of taste. More experimental studies are required to investigate whether brain activations differ between liquid tastants and food. The coordinates of activated brain areas and brain maps are provided to serve as references for future taste/food studies.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1712
[Cu] Class update date: 180227
[Lr] Last revision date:180227
[St] Status:Publisher

  8 / 5037 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29476257
[Au] Autor:Du W; Xu Z; Wang W; Liu Z
[Ad] Address:Department of Anesthesiology, Shanghai First Maternity and Infant Hospital, Tongji University School of Medicine, Shanghai, 201204, China.
[Ti] Title:A case of anosmia and hypogeusia as a complication of propofol.
[So] Source:J Anesth;, 2018 Feb 23.
[Is] ISSN:1438-8359
[Cp] Country of publication:Japan
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Anesthetics represent an uncommon cause of taste and smell disorders. We describe a case of anosmia and hypogeusia for 6 weeks after recovery from a uterine curettage operation in a 32-year-old woman. The case is unusual because propofol was the only anesthetic used during surgery and anesthesia. Computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) revealed no abnormality. This case may highly suggest that propofol could induce smell and taste disorders.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1802
[Cu] Class update date: 180224
[Lr] Last revision date:180224
[St] Status:Publisher
[do] DOI:10.1007/s00540-018-2461-4

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[PMID]: 29360871
[Au] Autor:Belqaid K; Tishelman C; Orrevall Y; Månsson-Brahme E; Bernhardson BM
[Ad] Address:Medical Management Centre, Department of Learning, Informatics, Management and Ethics, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
[Ti] Title:Dealing with taste and smell alterations-A qualitative interview study of people treated for lung cancer.
[So] Source:PLoS One;13(1):e0191117, 2018.
[Is] ISSN:1932-6203
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Taste and smell alterations have been recognized as common symptoms in relation to various cancers. However, previous research suggests that patients do not receive sufficient support in managing taste and smell alterations. Therefore, the objective of this study is to investigate how persons with experience from lung cancer-related taste and smell alterations reason about resources and strategies offered and used to manage these symptoms. Data from semi-structured individual interviews with 13 women and four men were analyzed with qualitative content analysis. We used Kleinman's now classic medical anthropological model of local health care systems, consisting of the personal, professional, and folk sector, to interpret and understand how people respond to sickness experiences in their daily lives. By presenting the findings using this model, we demonstrate that most strategies for dealing with taste and smell alterations were undertaken in the personal sector, i.e. in participants' daily lives, on an individual level and in interaction with family, social networks and communities. Taste and smell alterations implied two overarching challenges: 1) adjusting to no longer being able to trust information provided by one's own senses of taste and/or smell, and 2) coming to terms with taste and smell alterations as a part of having lung cancer. Health care professionals' involvement was described as limited, but appeared to fulfil most participants' expectations. However, through provision of normalizing information, practical advice, and to some extent, emotional support, health care professionals had potential to influence strategies and resources used for dealing with taste and smell alterations. With this study, we further the understanding of how people deal with lung cancer-related taste and smell alterations and discuss the role of health care professionals for this process.
[Mh] MeSH terms primary: Lung Neoplasms/physiopathology
Olfaction Disorders/therapy
Taste Disorders/therapy
[Mh] MeSH terms secundary: Aged
Female
Humans
Interviews as Topic
Lung Neoplasms/complications
Male
Middle Aged
Olfaction Disorders/etiology
Qualitative Research
Taste Disorders/etiology
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE; RESEARCH SUPPORT, NON-U.S. GOV'T
[Em] Entry month:1802
[Cu] Class update date: 180223
[Lr] Last revision date:180223
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[Da] Date of entry for processing:180124
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.1371/journal.pone.0191117

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[PMID]: 29411323
[Au] Autor:Coluzzi I; Iossa A; Spinetti E; Silecchia G
[Ad] Address:Division of General Surgery and Bariatric Centre of Excellence, Department of Medical-Surgical Sciences and Biotechnologies, University of Rome "La Sapienza", Rome, Italy.
[Ti] Title:Alcohol consumption after laparoscopic sleeve gastrectomy: 1-year results.
[So] Source:Eat Weight Disord;, 2018 Feb 06.
[Is] ISSN:1590-1262
[Cp] Country of publication:Germany
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:INTRODUCTION: Laparoscopic sleeve gastrectomy (SG) represents, at present, the most performed bariatric procedure worldwide with excellent long-term results on weight loss and comorbidities control. After the gastrectomy procedure, together with hormonal modification, several changes in taste and habits occur, including the potential modification in alcohol consumption. The aim of this prospective study was to determine the frequency and the amount of alcohol use before and after SG using a modified version of the Alcohol Use Disorder Identification Test (AUDIT) at 1-year follow-up and eventually to evaluate relationships between different ages and sexes. MATERIALS AND METHODS: A total of 142 patients were prospectively enrolled and evaluated before and 1 year after SG with a modified AUDIT. The exclusion criteria were as follows: history of alcohol abuse, presence of psychopathology or cognitive impairments, diabetes mellitus type II decompensated, or previous gastrointestinal, liver, and pancreatic resective surgery. Subgroup analyses were performed between male and female and between under and over 40 years old. RESULTS: The median AUDIT score decreased from 2.70 (range 1-18) before surgery to 1.38 (range 1-7) after 1 year of SG, indicating a marked reduction in alcohol use. The most consumed alcoholic drink was beer (36.6%/n = 52) while after surgery the consumption of beer decreased considerably (21.1%/n = 30). The frequency of alcohol consumption also decreased: at baseline 45% of patients consumed alcoholic drinks "from 2 to 4 times per month", whereas 26 and 39.4% consumed alcohol "never" and "less than once a month," respectively. After surgery, nobody consumed more then six alcoholic drinks. No differences were found between the subgroups in terms of alcohol consumption and social behavior. CONCLUSIONS: The alcohol preference is modified and decreased 1 year after SG and this could be related to the strict nutritional follow-up and to the hormonal changes. Studies with large samples and long-term follow-up are needed to confirm our data. LEVEL OF EVIDENCE: IV.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1802
[Cu] Class update date: 180207
[Lr] Last revision date:180207
[St] Status:Publisher
[do] DOI:10.1007/s40519-018-0486-1


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