Database : MEDLINE
Search on : Terpenes [Words]
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[PMID]: 29523839
[Au] Autor:Butler JB; Freeman JS; Potts BM; Vaillancourt RE; Grattapaglia D; Silva-Junior OB; Simmons BA; Healey AL; Schmutz J; Barry KW; Lee DJ; Henry RJ; King GJ; Baten A; Shepherd M
[Ad] Address:School of Natural Sciences, University of Tasmania, Hobart, TAS, 7001, Australia. Jakob.Butler@utas.edu.au.
[Ti] Title:Annotation of the Corymbia terpene synthase gene family shows broad conservation but dynamic evolution of physical clusters relative to Eucalyptus.
[So] Source:Heredity (Edinb);, 2018 Mar 10.
[Is] ISSN:1365-2540
[Cp] Country of publication:England
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Terpenes are economically and ecologically important phytochemicals. Their synthesis is controlled by the terpene synthase (TPS) gene family, which is highly diversified throughout the plant kingdom. The plant family Myrtaceae are characterised by especially high terpene concentrations, and considerable variation in terpene profiles. Many Myrtaceae are grown commercially for terpene products including the eucalypts Corymbia and Eucalyptus. Eucalyptus grandis has the largest TPS gene family of plants currently sequenced, which is largely conserved in the closely related E. globulus. However, the TPS gene family has been well studied only in these two eucalypt species. The recent assembly of two Corymbia citriodora subsp. variegata genomes presents an opportunity to examine the conservation of this important gene family across more divergent eucalypt lineages. Manual annotation of the TPS gene family in C. citriodora subsp. variegata revealed a similar overall number, and relative subfamily representation, to that previously reported in E. grandis and E. globulus. Many of the TPS genes were in physical clusters that varied considerably between Eucalyptus and Corymbia, with several instances of translocation, expansion/contraction and loss. Notably, there was greater conservation in the subfamilies involved in primary metabolism than those involved in secondary metabolism, likely reflecting different selective constraints. The variation in cluster size within subfamilies and the broad conservation between the eucalypts in the face of this variation are discussed, highlighting the potential contribution of selection, concerted evolution and stochastic processes. These findings provide the foundation to better understand terpene evolution within the ecologically and economically important Myrtaceae.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1803
[Cu] Class update date: 180310
[Lr] Last revision date:180310
[St] Status:Publisher
[do] DOI:10.1038/s41437-018-0058-1

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[PMID]: 29414121
[Au] Autor:Merali Z; Cayer C; Kent P; Liu R; Cal V; Harris CS; Arnason JT
[Ad] Address:Royal's Institute of Mental Health Research, University of Ottawa, Ottawa, ON, Canada K1Z 6K4; School of Psychology, University of Ottawa, Ottawa, ON, Canada K1N 6N5; Scientific Director of Canadian Depression Research & Intervention Network (CDRIN), Canada.
[Ti] Title:Sacred Maya incense, copal (Protium copal - Burseraceae), has antianxiety effects in animal models.
[So] Source:J Ethnopharmacol;216:63-70, 2018 Apr 24.
[Is] ISSN:1872-7573
[Cp] Country of publication:Ireland
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:ETHNOPHARMACOLOGICAL RELEVANCE: The Maya have traditionally used copal, Protium copal, as incense during ceremonies since pre-Columbian times. Anecdotally, copal (when burned as incense), is thought to elicit mentally uplifting and calming effects. The main objective of this study was to determine whether the incense elicits anxiolytic-like behavior in animal models using rats. A second objective was to characterize active constituents and discern potential mechanism(s) of action, specifically the involvement of the GABAergic and endocannabinoid (eCB) systems. Despite the extensive Central American use of this resin, there are currently no known scientific behavioral or pharmacological studies done with the incense. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Quantification of the triterpenes in the copal resin and cold trapped incense was achieved by HPLC MS. Behavioral effects in rats were assessed using the elevated plus maze (EPM), social interaction (SI) test, conditioned emotion response (CER) and Novel object recognition (NOR) paradigms. Rats were exposed to burning copal (200 mg) over 5 min in a smoking chamber apparatus and then immediately tested in each behavioral paradigm. Follow-up SI tests were done using two antagonists flumazenil (1 mg/kg) and AM251 (1 mg/kg) administered systemically. Inhibition of MAGL (monoacylglycerol lipase) was measured by microplate assay with recombinant human enzyme and probe substrate. RESULTS: Phytochemical analysis revealed that copal resin and incense had high α- and -amyrins and low lupeol triterpene content. Exposure to Protium copal incense significantly reduced anxiety-like behavior in the SI and CER tests. In contrast, no anxiolytic effects were observed in the EPM. The CER effect was time dependent. Both flumazenil and AM251 blocked the anxiolytic activity of copal revealing the involvement of GABAergic and endocannabinoid systems. Copal, as well as the identified triterpenes, potently inhibited monoacylglycerol lipase (MAGL) activity in vitro (IC ≤ 811 ng/mL). CONCLUSIONS: This is the first study to show that copal incense from Protium copal elicits anxiolytic-like effects in fear and social interaction models as evidenced by a reduced learned fear behavior and an increase in active social interaction. It's high α and -amyrin content suggests behavioral effects may be mediated, in part, by the known action of these terpenes at the benzodiazepine receptor. Furthermore, P. copal's observed activity through the eCB system via MAGL offers a new potential mechanism underlying the anxiolytic activity.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1802
[Cu] Class update date: 180310
[Lr] Last revision date:180310
[St] Status:In-Process

  3 / 15887 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29412476
[Au] Autor:Bakela K; Dimakopoulou M; Batsou P; Manidakis N; Athanassakis I
[Ad] Address:Laboratory of Immunology, Department of Biology, University of Crete, Heraklion, Crete, Greece.
[Ti] Title:Soluble MHC class II-driven therapy for a systemic lupus erythematosus murine experimental invitro and invivo model.
[So] Source:Scand J Immunol;87(3), 2018 Mar.
[Is] ISSN:1365-3083
[Cp] Country of publication:England
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Taking into consideration the multiparametric nature of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), the severity and variability of symptoms and the lack of effective therapeutic approaches, this study took advantage of the recently described role of soluble major histocompatibility complex class II (sMHCII) molecules in maintaining tolerance to the organism and attempted to apply sMHCII proteins as a treatment to murine SLE experimental models invitro as well as invivo. After breaking tolerance to DNA invitro, which was accompanied by development of specific anti-dsDNA antibodies, syngeneic or allogeneic sMHCII molecules, purified from healthy mouse serum, could significantly reduce the specific antibody levels and drive the system towards immunosuppression, as assessed by specific marker analysis on T cells and cytokine production by flow cytometry and ELISA, respectively. The invivo experimental model consisted of pristane-induced SLE symptoms to BALB/c mice, which developed maximal levels of anti-dsDNA 2months after pristane inoculation. Syngeneic or allogeneic sMHCII administration could alleviate pristane-induced symptoms, significantly decrease specific anti-dsDNA antibody production and develop immunosuppression to the host, as manifested by increase of CD4+CTLA-4+ and CD4+CD25+ cell populations in the spleen. Thus, the results presented in this study introduced the ability of sMHCII proteins to suppress specific autoantigen response, opening new areas of research and offering novel therapeutic approaches to SLE with expanding features to other autoimmune diseases.
[Mh] MeSH terms primary: Antibodies, Antinuclear/immunology
Autoantigens/immunology
Histocompatibility Antigens Class II/immunology
Immune Tolerance/immunology
Immunotherapy/methods
Lupus Erythematosus, Systemic/immunology
Lupus Erythematosus, Systemic/therapy
T-Lymphocytes/immunology
[Mh] MeSH terms secundary: Animals
CD4 Antigens/metabolism
CTLA-4 Antigen/metabolism
Cells, Cultured
DNA/immunology
Disease Models, Animal
Immunosuppression
Interleukin-2 Receptor alpha Subunit/metabolism
Lupus Erythematosus, Systemic/chemically induced
Mice
Mice, Inbred BALB C
Spleen/cytology
Spleen/immunology
Terpenes/adverse effects
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Nm] Name of substance:0 (Antibodies, Antinuclear); 0 (Autoantigens); 0 (CD4 Antigens); 0 (CTLA-4 Antigen); 0 (Histocompatibility Antigens Class II); 0 (Il2ra protein, mouse); 0 (Interleukin-2 Receptor alpha Subunit); 0 (Terpenes); 26HZV48DT1 (pristane); 9007-49-2 (DNA)
[Em] Entry month:1803
[Cu] Class update date: 180309
[Lr] Last revision date:180309
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[Da] Date of entry for processing:180208
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.1111/sji.12644

  4 / 15887 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29367489
[Au] Autor:Ogura T; Sato T; Abe M; Okano T
[Ad] Address:Research & Development Headquarters, LION Corporation.
[Ti] Title:Small Angle X-ray Scattering and Electron Spin Resonance Spectroscopy Study on Fragrance Infused Cationic Vesicles Modeling Scent-Releasing Fabric Softeners.
[So] Source:J Oleo Sci;67(2):177-186, 2018 Feb 01.
[Is] ISSN:1347-3352
[Cp] Country of publication:Japan
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Industrially relevant systems for household and personal-care products often involve a large number of components. Such multiple component formulations are indispensable and effective for functionalization of the products, but may simultaneously provide more complex structural features compared to those in ideal systems comprising a smaller number of highly pure substances. Using cryogenic transmission electron microscopy (cryo-TEM), small angle X-ray scattering (SAXS), and electron spin resonance (ESR) spectroscopy, we have investigated effects of fragrance-incorporation into cationic vesicles on their bilayer structures and membrane-membrane interactions. Cationic vesicles were prepared from TEQ surfactant, whose major component was di(alkyl fatty ester) quaternary ammonium methosulfate, and fragrance components, l-menthol, linalool, and d-limonene, were infused into the vesicle membranes to model scent-releasing fabric softeners. The cryo-TEM images confirm formation of multilamellar vesicles (MLVs). Generalized indirect Fourier transformation (GIFT) analysis of the SAXS intensities based on the modified Caill structure factor model reveals that incorporation of a more hydrophobic fragrance component leads to a more pronounced increase of the surface separation (water layer thickness). Furthermore, the fragrance-infused systems show longer-range order of the bilayer correlations and enhanced undulation fluctuation of the membranes than those in the TEQ alone system. The spin-label ESR results indicate different restricted molecular motions in the TEQ bilayers depending on the labeled position and their marked changes upon addition of the fragrance components, suggesting different mixing schemes and solubilization positions of the fragrance molecules in the TEQ bilayers. The present data have demonstrated how the infused fragrance molecules having different hydrophobicity and molecular architectures into the cationic vesicles affect the membrane structures and the intermembrane interactions, which may provide useful information for precisely controlling a fragrance-releasing property.
[Mh] MeSH terms primary: Cyclohexenes/chemistry
Electron Spin Resonance Spectroscopy
Menthol/chemistry
Monoterpenes/chemistry
Odorants
Scattering, Small Angle
Terpenes/chemistry
X-Ray Diffraction
[Mh] MeSH terms secundary: Cations
Hydrophobic and Hydrophilic Interactions
Lipid Bilayers
Membranes, Artificial
Microscopy, Electron, Transmission
Organic Chemicals/chemistry
Quaternary Ammonium Compounds/chemistry
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Nm] Name of substance:0 (Cations); 0 (Cyclohexenes); 0 (Lipid Bilayers); 0 (Membranes, Artificial); 0 (Monoterpenes); 0 (Organic Chemicals); 0 (Quaternary Ammonium Compounds); 0 (Terpenes); 0 (fabric softeners); 1490-04-6 (Menthol); 9MC3I34447 (limonene); D81QY6I88E (linalool)
[Em] Entry month:1803
[Cu] Class update date: 180309
[Lr] Last revision date:180309
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[Da] Date of entry for processing:180126
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.5650/jos.ess17186

  5 / 15887 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 28455256
[Au] Autor:Kim JH; Cho CW; Kim HY; Kim KT; Choi GS; Kim HH; Cho IS; Kwon SJ; Choi SK; Yoon JY; Yang SY; Kang JS; Kim YH
[Ad] Address:College of Pharmacy, Chungnam National University, Daejeon 34134, Republic of Korea; Department of Horticultural and Crop Environment, National Institute of Horticultural and Herbal Science, RDA, Wanju, 55365, Republic of Korea; Advanced Radiation Technology Institute, Korea Atomic Energy Research I
[Ti] Title:α-Glucosidase inhibition by prenylated and lavandulyl compounds from Sophora flavescens roots and in silico analysis.
[So] Source:Int J Biol Macromol;102:960-969, 2017 Sep.
[Is] ISSN:1879-0003
[Cp] Country of publication:Netherlands
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:The enzyme α-glucosidase is a good drug target for the treatment of diabetes mellitus. Four minor flavonoids (1-4) from roots of Sophora flavescens showed the inhibitory activity, with IC values ranging from 11.00.3 to 50.61.3M, toward α-glucosidase. An enzyme kinetics analysis of them revealed that the compounds 1 and 4 were non-competitive, and compounds 2 and 3 were un-competitive inhibitors. For molecular docking, 3-dimensional structure of α-glucosidase was built by homology modeling. As the result, four compounds 1-4 were confirmed to interact into common binding site of α-glucosidase. In addition, all of the four prenylated and lavandulyl compounds (1-4) were abundant in an ethyl acetate fraction separated from a methanol extract, and the potential inhibitor (3) was extracted best using tetrahydrofuran.
[Mh] MeSH terms primary: Computer Simulation
Plant Extracts/pharmacology
Plant Roots/chemistry
Prenylation
Sophora/chemistry
Terpenes/chemistry
alpha-Glucosidases/metabolism
[Mh] MeSH terms secundary: Amino Acid Sequence
Glycoside Hydrolase Inhibitors/chemistry
Glycoside Hydrolase Inhibitors/metabolism
Glycoside Hydrolase Inhibitors/pharmacology
Molecular Docking Simulation
Plant Extracts/chemistry
Plant Extracts/metabolism
Protein Conformation
alpha-Glucosidases/chemistry
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Nm] Name of substance:0 (Glycoside Hydrolase Inhibitors); 0 (Plant Extracts); 0 (Terpenes); EC 3.2.1.20 (alpha-Glucosidases)
[Em] Entry month:1803
[Cu] Class update date: 180309
[Lr] Last revision date:180309
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[Da] Date of entry for processing:170430
[St] Status:MEDLINE

  6 / 15887 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29302834
[Au] Autor:Roth M; Hussain A; Cale JA; Erbilgin N
[Ad] Address:4-42 Earth Science Building, Department of Renewable Resources, University of Alberta, Edmonton, Canada.
[Ti] Title:Successful Colonization of Lodgepole Pine Trees by Mountain Pine Beetle Increased Monoterpene Production and Exhausted Carbohydrate Reserves.
[So] Source:J Chem Ecol;44(2):209-214, 2018 Feb.
[Is] ISSN:1573-1561
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Lodgepole pine (Pinus contorta) forests have experienced severe mortality from mountain pine beetle (MPB) (Dendroctonus ponderosae Hopkins) in western North America for the last several years. Although the mechanisms by which beetles kill host trees are unclear, they are likely linked to pine defense monoterpenes that are synthesized from carbohydrate reserves. However, how carbohydrates and monoterpenes interact in response to MPB colonization is unknown. Understanding this relationship could help to elucidate how pines succumb to bark beetle attack. We compared concentrations of individual and total monoterpenes and carbohydrates in the phloem of healthy pine trees with those naturally colonized by MPB. Trees attacked by MPB had nearly 300% more monoterpenes and 40% less carbohydrates. Total monoterpene concentrations were most strongly associated with the concentration of sugars in the phloem. These results suggest that bark beetle colonization likely depletes carbohydrate reserves by increasing the production of carbon-rich monoterpenes, and other carbon-based secondary compounds. Bark beetle attacks also reduce water transport causing the disruption of carbon transport between tree foliage and roots, which restricts carbon assimilation. Reduction in carbohydrate reserves likely contributes to tree mortality.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1801
[Cu] Class update date: 180309
[Lr] Last revision date:180309
[St] Status:In-Process
[do] DOI:10.1007/s10886-017-0922-0

  7 / 15887 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29377369
[Au] Autor:Rinkel J; Lauterbach L; Rabe P; Dickschat JS
[Ad] Address:Kekul-Institute of Organic Chemistry and Biochemistry, University of Bonn, Gerhard-Domagk-Strae 1, 53121, Bonn, Germany.
[Ti] Title:Two Diterpene Synthases for Spiroalbatene and Cembrene A from Allokutzneria albata.
[So] Source:Angew Chem Int Ed Engl;57(12):3238-3241, 2018 Mar 12.
[Is] ISSN:1521-3773
[Cp] Country of publication:Germany
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Two bacterial diterpene synthases from the actinomycete Allokutzneria albata were investigated, resulting in the identification of the structurally unprecedented compound spiroalbatene from the first and cembrene A from the second enzyme. Both enzymes were thoroughly investigated in terms of their mechanisms by isotope labeling experiments, site-directed mutagenesis, and variation of the metal cofactors and pH value. For spiroalbatene synthase, the pH- and Mn -dependent formation of the side product thunbergol was observed, which is biosynthetically linked to spiroalbatene.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1801
[Cu] Class update date: 180307
[Lr] Last revision date:180307
[St] Status:In-Data-Review
[do] DOI:10.1002/anie.201800385

  8 / 15887 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29485281
[Au] Autor:Ben Brahim S; Amanpour A; Chtourou F; Kelebek H; Selli S; Bouaziz M
[Ti] Title:Gas Chromatography-Mass Spectrometry-Olfactometry To Control the Aroma Fingerprint of Extra Virgin Olive Oil from Three Tunisian Cultivars at Three Harvest Times.
[So] Source:J Agric Food Chem;, 2018 Mar 05.
[Is] ISSN:1520-5118
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Gas chromatography-mass spectrometry-olfactometry was used for the analysis of volatile compounds and key odorants of three less studied Tunisian olive oil cultivars for the first time. A total of 42 aroma compounds were identified and quantified in extra virgin olive oils. The present study revealed that the most dominant volatiles in olive oil samples qualitatively and quantitatively were aldehydes and alcohols, followed by terpenes and esters. Indeed, chemometric analysis has shown a correlation between chemical compounds and sensory properties. The determination of aroma-active compounds of olive oil samples was carried out using aroma extract dilution analysis. A total of 15 aroma-active compounds were detected in the aromatic extract of extra virgin olive oil, of which 14 were identified. On the basis of the flavor dilution (FD) factor, the most potent aromatic active compound was hexanal (FD = 512) in Fakhari olive oil, (FD = 256) in Touffehi oils, and (FD = 128) in Jemri olive oil.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1802
[Cu] Class update date: 180305
[Lr] Last revision date:180305
[St] Status:Publisher
[do] DOI:10.1021/acs.jafc.7b06090

  9 / 15887 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29427589
[Au] Autor:Vieira AJ; Beserra FP; Souza MC; Totti BM; Rozza AL
[Ad] Address:So Paulo State University (UNESP), Institute of Biosciences, Department of Morphology, Botucatu, Brazil.
[Ti] Title:Limonene: Aroma of innovation in health and disease.
[So] Source:Chem Biol Interact;283:97-106, 2018 Mar 01.
[Is] ISSN:1872-7786
[Cp] Country of publication:Ireland
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Natural products obtained in dietary components may aid the prevention and treatment of a variety of diseases. Reports in the scientific literature have demonstrated that the consumption of terpenes is a successful alternative in the treatment of several diseases, triggering beneficial biological effects in clinical and preclinical studies. The monoterpene limonene is largely used in alimentary items, cleaning products, and it is one of the most frequent fragrances used in cosmetics formulation. The therapeutic effects of limonene have been extensively studied, proving anti-inflammatory, antioxidant, antinociceptive, anticancer, antidiabetic, antihyperalgesic, antiviral, and gastroprotective effects, among other beneficial effects in health. In this review, we collected, presented, and analyzed evidence from the scientific literature regarding the usage of limonene and its activities and underlying mechanisms involved in combating diseases. The highlighting of limonene applications could develop a useful targeting of innovative research in this field as well as the development of a limonene-based phytomedicine which could be used in a variety of conditions of health and disease.
[Mh] MeSH terms primary: Cyclohexenes/therapeutic use
Metabolic Syndrome/prevention & control
Terpenes/therapeutic use
[Mh] MeSH terms secundary: Analgesics/chemistry
Analgesics/pharmacology
Animals
Anti-Inflammatory Agents/chemistry
Anti-Inflammatory Agents/pharmacology
Anti-Inflammatory Agents/therapeutic use
Antineoplastic Agents, Phytogenic/chemistry
Antineoplastic Agents, Phytogenic/pharmacology
Antineoplastic Agents, Phytogenic/therapeutic use
Antioxidants/chemistry
Antioxidants/pharmacology
Cyclohexenes/chemistry
Cyclohexenes/pharmacology
Humans
Metabolic Syndrome/drug therapy
Metabolic Syndrome/pathology
Osteoarthritis/drug therapy
Oxidative Stress/drug effects
Plants/chemistry
Plants/metabolism
Terpenes/chemistry
Terpenes/pharmacology
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE; REVIEW
[Nm] Name of substance:0 (Analgesics); 0 (Anti-Inflammatory Agents); 0 (Antineoplastic Agents, Phytogenic); 0 (Antioxidants); 0 (Cyclohexenes); 0 (Terpenes); 9MC3I34447 (limonene)
[Em] Entry month:1803
[Cu] Class update date: 180305
[Lr] Last revision date:180305
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[Da] Date of entry for processing:180211
[St] Status:MEDLINE

  10 / 15887 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29216958
[Au] Autor:Guesmi F; Ben Hadj AS; Landoulsi A
[Ad] Address:Laboratory of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Faculty of Sciences of Bizerte, University of Carthage, Zarzouna 7021, Tunisia.
[Ti] Title:Investigation of Extracts from Tunisian Ethnomedicinal Plants as Antioxidants, Cytotoxins, and Antimicrobials.
[So] Source:Biomed Environ Sci;30(11):811-824, 2017 Nov.
[Is] ISSN:0895-3988
[Cp] Country of publication:Netherlands
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:OBJECTIVE: To determine the medicinal potential of various plants and their parts extracted with different solvents. METHODS: The total phenolic content of acetonitrile/water (60%-40%) (ACN/W) and aqueous (W) extract fractions was determined by high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC), and terpenic compounds were detected by gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS). Antioxidant activity of the samples was evaluated using 2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH) assay and -carotene bleaching method. Cell viability was investigated by thiazolyl blue tetrazolium bromide [3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol)-2-yl 2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide] (MTT) assay. The mechanisms involved in cytotoxic activity were investigated in a murine macrophage cell line (RAW 264.7) and cancer lines. RESULTS: Our findings show that 11 plant species exhibited biological activity. In addition, moderate antibacterial activity was reported against one or more of the tested bacterial strains at two concentrations: 300 g and 3 mg/disc. Furthermore, our data reveal that among all plants investigated, some extract and hydrophobic fractions were potent scavengers of the DPPH radical (6.78 g/mL < EC50 < 8.55 g/mL). Taken together, our results show that Nerium oleander (NOACN/W) and Pituranthos tortuosus (PTACN/W) were highly cytotoxic against RAW 264.7 cells with IC80 values of 0.36, and 1.55 g/mL, respectively. In contrast, murine macrophage cell lines had low growth and were significantly sensitive to water extracts of Thymus hirtus sp. algeriensis (THW), Lavandula multifida (LMW), and ACN/W extract of Erica multiflora (EMACN/W) at doses > 400, 47.20, and 116.74 g/mL, respectively. The current work demonstrates that RAW 264.7 cell proliferation was inhibited by samples in a dose-dependent manner. CONCLUSION: Our findings, validated through free radical scavenging activity, agar diffusion assay, and cytotoxicity of essential oils towards cancer cells, show that ethnomedicinal plants used in this work have a novel application as a tumor suppressor.
[Mh] MeSH terms primary: Anti-Bacterial Agents/pharmacology
Antineoplastic Agents, Phytogenic/pharmacology
Cytotoxins/pharmacology
Plant Extracts/pharmacology
Plants, Medicinal/chemistry
[Mh] MeSH terms secundary: Animals
Anti-Bacterial Agents/chemistry
Antineoplastic Agents, Phytogenic/chemistry
Bacteria/drug effects
Biphenyl Compounds
Cell Line
Cytotoxins/chemistry
Ethnobotany
Mice
Molecular Structure
Phenols/chemistry
Phenols/pharmacology
Picrates
Plant Extracts/chemistry
Terpenes/chemistry
Terpenes/pharmacology
Tunisia
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Nm] Name of substance:0 (Anti-Bacterial Agents); 0 (Antineoplastic Agents, Phytogenic); 0 (Biphenyl Compounds); 0 (Cytotoxins); 0 (Phenols); 0 (Picrates); 0 (Plant Extracts); 0 (Terpenes); DFD3H4VGDH (1,1-diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazyl)
[Em] Entry month:1803
[Cu] Class update date: 180305
[Lr] Last revision date:180305
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[Da] Date of entry for processing:171209
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.3967/bes2017.109


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