Database : MEDLINE
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[PMID]: 29362796
[Au] Autor:Bouillon K; Bertrand M; Bader G; Lucot JP; Dray-Spira R; Zureik M
[Ad] Address:Department of Epidemiology of Health Products, French National Agency for Medicines and Health Products Safety (ANSM), Saint-Denis, France.
[Ti] Title:Association of Hysteroscopic vs Laparoscopic Sterilization With Procedural, Gynecological, and Medical Outcomes.
[So] Source:JAMA;319(4):375-387, 2018 01 23.
[Is] ISSN:1538-3598
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Importance: Safety of hysteroscopic sterilization has been recently questioned following reports of general symptoms such as allergy, tiredness, and depression in addition to associated gynecological results such as pelvic pain, perforation of fallopian tubes or uterus, and unwanted pregnancy. Objective: To compare the risk of reported adverse events between hysteroscopic and laparoscopic sterilization. Design, Setting, and Participants: French nationwide cohort study using the national hospital discharge database linked to the health insurance claims database. Women aged 30 to 54 years receiving a first hysteroscopic or laparoscopic sterilization between 2010 and 2014 were included and were followed up through December 2015. Exposures: Hysteroscopic sterilization vs laparoscopic sterilization. Main Outcomes and Measures: Risks of procedural complications (surgical and medical) and of gynecological (sterilization failure that includes salpingectomy, second sterilization procedure, or pregnancy; pregnancy; reoperation) and medical outcomes (all types of allergy; autoimmune diseases; thyroid disorder; use of analgesics, antimigraines, antidepressants, benzodiazepines; outpatient visits; sickness absence; suicide attempts; death) that occurred within 1 and 3 years after sterilization were compared using inverse probability of treatment-weighted Cox models. Results: Of the 105 357 women included (95.5% of eligible participants; mean age, 41.3 years [SD, 3.7 years]), 71 303 (67.7% ) underwent hysteroscopic sterilization, and 34 054 (32.3%) underwent laparoscopic sterilization. During the hospitalization for sterilization, risk of surgical complications for hysteroscopic sterilization was lower: 0.13% for hysteroscopic sterilization vs 0.78% for laparoscopic sterilization (adjusted risk difference [RD], -0.64; 95% CI, -0.67 to -0.60) and was lower for medical complications: 0.06% vs 0.11% (adjusted RD, -0.05; 95% CI, -0.08 to -0.01). During the first year after sterilization, 4.83% of women who underwent hysteroscopic sterilization had a higher risk of sterilization failure than the 0.69% who underwent laparoscopic sterilization (adjusted hazard ratio [HR], 7.11; 95% CI, 5.92 to 8.54; adjusted RD, 4.23 per 100 person-years; 95% CI, 3.40 to 5.22). Additionally, 5.65% of women who underwent hysteroscopic sterilization required gynecological reoperation vs 1.76% of women who underwent laparoscopic sterilization (adjusted HR, 3.26; 95% CI, 2.90 to 3.67; adjusted RD, 4.63 per 100 person-years; 95% CI, 3.38 to 4.75); these differences persisted after 3 years, although attenuated. Hysteroscopic sterilization was associated with a lower risk of pregnancy within the first year of the procedure but was not significantly associated with a difference in risk of pregnancy by the third year (adjusted HR, 1.04; 95% CI, 0.83-1.30; adjusted RD, 0.01 per 100 person-years; 95% CI, -0.04 to 0.07). Risks of medical outcomes were not significantly increased with hysteroscopic sterilization compared with laparoscopic sterilization. Conclusions and Relevance: Among women undergoing first sterilization, the use of hysteroscopic sterilization was significantly associated with higher risk of gynecological complications over 1 year and over 3 years than was laparoscopic sterilization. Risk of medical outcomes was not significantly increased over 1 year or over 3 years. These findings do not support increased medical risks associated with hysteroscopic sterilization.
[Mh] MeSH terms primary: Hysteroscopy/adverse effects
Laparoscopy/adverse effects
Postoperative Complications/etiology
Sterilization, Tubal/methods
[Mh] MeSH terms secundary: Adult
Cohort Studies
Female
France
Humans
Middle Aged
Postoperative Complications/epidemiology
Pregnancy
Pregnancy, Unplanned
Reoperation/statistics & numerical data
Sterilization, Tubal/adverse effects
Treatment Failure
[Pt] Publication type:COMPARATIVE STUDY; JOURNAL ARTICLE; OBSERVATIONAL STUDY
[Em] Entry month:1801
[Cu] Class update date: 180311
[Lr] Last revision date:180311
[Js] Journal subset:AIM; IM
[Da] Date of entry for processing:180125
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.1001/jama.2017.21269

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[PMID]: 29522912
[Au] Autor:Wu SR; Kuo HC; Huang WC; Huang YF; Chiou YH; Chang YH; Nong BR
[Ad] Address:Department of Pediatrics, Kaohsiung Veterans General Hospital, Kaohsiung, Taiwan, ROC.
[Ti] Title:Incidence, clinical characteristics, and associated diseases in patients with immune thrombocytopenia: A nationwide population-based study in Taiwan.
[So] Source:Thromb Res;164:90-95, 2018 Mar 02.
[Is] ISSN:1879-2472
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:INTRODUCTION: Immune thrombocytopenia (ITP) is an immune-mediated disease; it has been reported to be associated with several diseases. The data on ITP in patients with hepatitis B, tuberculosis, or thyroid diseases are relatively scarce. In addition, these diseases are not rare in Taiwan, together with hepatitis C and Helicobacter pylori which are also related to ITP. METHODS AND MATERIALS: We identified 1223 ITP patients and characterized these patients between 2000 and 2013 from the National Health Insurance Research Database. The adult ITP patients were matched with non-ITP patients. RESULTS: The overall incidence of ITP was 2.59/100,000 person-years. The frequencies of hepatitis B and C in adult ITP patients were much higher than those indicated in previous studies. The frequencies of non-traumatic intracerebral hemorrhage and gastrointestinal bleeding during hospitalization among ITP patients were low. The diseases associated with increased risks of ITP included hepatitis B (OR = 18.70, 95% CI = 9.71-36.03), hepatitis C (OR = 54.43, 95% CI = 15.94-185.88), hepatitis B and hepatitis C (OR = 7.02, 95% CI = 1.47-33.56), tuberculosis (OR = 5.37, 95% CI = 2.72-10.61), Helicobacter pylori infection (OR = 5.93, 95% CI = 3.16-11.10), hyperthyroidism (OR = 3.43, 95% CI = 2.09-5.64), hypothyroidism (OR = 6.70, 95% CI = 2.35-19.13), and simple and unspecified goiter (OR = 2.68, 95% CI = 1.43-5.03). CONCLUSIONS: Surveying for the diseases which are frequent and related to increased risks of ITP among patients with newly diagnosed ITP should be considered.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1803
[Cu] Class update date: 180309
[Lr] Last revision date:180309
[St] Status:Publisher

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[PMID]: 29446579
[Au] Autor:Savchenkov MF; Efimova NV; Manueva RS; Nikolaeva LA; Shin NS
[Ti] Title:[Thyroid gland pathology in children population exposed to the combination of iodine deficiency and fluoride pollution of environment].
[So] Source:Gig Sanit;95(12):1201-5, 2016.
[Is] ISSN:0016-9900
[Cp] Country of publication:Russia (Federation)
[La] Language:rus
[Ab] Abstract:The article presents results of study of the impact of iodine deficiency and technogenic fluoride on the state of the thyroid gland in children. On the example of two districts of the city of Bratsk there were executed dynamic investigations (2002 and 2012), including the estimation of the pollution of ambient air and soil by fluorine compounds, levels of iodine intake by the body, the clinical examination of children aged from 5 to 7 years d and interviewing of their parents. In the course of the medical examination there were executed: physical examination by the pediatrician, endocrinologist, ultrasound examination of the thyroid gland, the determination both of serum hormone content by radioimmunoassay and urinary excretion offluorine and iodine. Concentrations of hydrogen fluoride and a solidfluorides in ambient air led to the accumulation offluoride ion in the soil. The iodine entering with drinking water and food, was established to provide only 37.5-50% of the daily requirement of iodine. Increased fluoride ion content in urine and milk teeth in children is associated with the concentrations of the fluorine-containing pollutants in the ambient air and soil. The fluoride pollution against the background of the natural iodine deficiency was established to increase the frequency of functional and morphological disorders of the thyroid gland in children.
[Mh] MeSH terms primary: Environmental Pollution
Iodine
Thyroid Diseases
[Mh] MeSH terms secundary: Child
Environmental Monitoring/methods
Environmental Pollution/adverse effects
Environmental Pollution/analysis
Environmental Pollution/prevention & control
Environmental Pollution/statistics & numerical data
Female
Fluorine Compounds/adverse effects
Fluorine Compounds/analysis
Health Status Disparities
Humans
Iodine/analysis
Iodine/deficiency
Male
Public Health/methods
Public Health/statistics & numerical data
Siberia/epidemiology
Thyroid Diseases/diagnosis
Thyroid Diseases/epidemiology
Thyroid Diseases/etiology
Thyroid Diseases/prevention & control
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Nm] Name of substance:0 (Fluorine Compounds); 9679TC07X4 (Iodine)
[Em] Entry month:1803
[Cu] Class update date: 180309
[Lr] Last revision date:180309
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[Da] Date of entry for processing:180216
[St] Status:MEDLINE

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[PMID]: 29431947
[Au] Autor:Lapko IV; Kiryakov VA; Pavlovskaya NA; Oshkoderov OA; Klimkina KV
[Ti] Title:[Choice of informative laboratory biomarkers for the early identification of changes in neurohumoral regulation and carbohydrate exchange in workers of the mining and mechanical engineering industry].
[So] Source:Gig Sanit;95(11):1061-5, 2016.
[Is] ISSN:0016-9900
[Cp] Country of publication:Russia (Federation)
[La] Language:rus
[Ab] Abstract:The diagnostic significance of hormones and integral indices of pituitary-adrenal, pituitary-thyroid and pituitary-gonadal system and carbohydrate metabolism (ACTH (corticotropin), aldosterone, cortisol, TSH (thyroid-stimulating hormone), free triiodothyronine (fT3), free thyroxine (fT4), luteinizing hormone (LH), follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH), total and free testosterone, insulin, integral pituitary-adrenal index (IPAI), the pituitary-thyroid index (PTI), indices of carbohydrate metabolism (Caro and HOMA-IR) was studied for the early diagnostics of disorders of neurohumoral regulation in workers of mining and mechanical engineering industries. The most informative indices, permitting to identify disorders of carbohydrate metabolism are established to be indices of insulin resistance (index Caro and index NOMA-IR) and the determination of insulin in serum. For the identification of changes in pituitary adrenal, pituitary-thyroid and pituitary-gonadal system in patients with vibration disease, sensory-neural hearing loss, comorbidity indexes IGNI, ITI, concentrations of LH and total testosterone are of the most diagnostically significance.
[Mh] MeSH terms primary: Adrenocorticotropic Hormone/blood
Follicle Stimulating Hormone/blood
Insulin/blood
Occupational Diseases
Thyrotropin/blood
[Mh] MeSH terms secundary: Adult
Biomarkers/blood
Carbohydrate Metabolism/physiology
Extraction and Processing Industry/methods
Extraction and Processing Industry/standards
Female
Humans
Hypothalamo-Hypophyseal System/metabolism
Male
Middle Aged
Occupational Diseases/blood
Occupational Diseases/diagnosis
Occupational Diseases/etiology
Occupational Diseases/prevention & control
Occupational Health
Pituitary-Adrenal System/metabolism
Reproducibility of Results
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Nm] Name of substance:0 (Biomarkers); 0 (Insulin); 9002-60-2 (Adrenocorticotropic Hormone); 9002-68-0 (Follicle Stimulating Hormone); 9002-71-5 (Thyrotropin)
[Em] Entry month:1803
[Cu] Class update date: 180309
[Lr] Last revision date:180309
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[Da] Date of entry for processing:180213
[St] Status:MEDLINE

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[PMID]: 29520558
[Au] Autor:Petrosino V; Motta G; Tenore G; Coletta M; Guariglia A; Testa D
[Ad] Address:ASL Salerno, Salerno, Italy. petrosino8@virgilio.it.
[Ti] Title:The role of heavy metals and polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) in the oncogenesis of head and neck tumors and thyroid diseases: a pilot study.
[So] Source:Biometals;, 2018 Mar 08.
[Is] ISSN:1572-8773
[Cp] Country of publication:Netherlands
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Previous literature has highlighted the mechanisms of molecular toxicity induced by substances such as arsenic, cadmium, chromium, nickel, lead, barium and PCBs. The research was carried out on 20 volunteers, all the patients gave their consent to the research: the aim of the study was to evaluate the presence of metals and PCBs in these different matrices (blood and hair), correlating the biochemical data to pathological conditions present, and also to the area in which patients resided. Various quantitative determinations were carried out on samples of blood and hair for 14 heavy metals and on blood samples for 12 PCBs. For the 11 patients the results indicated that blood levels for half of the 14 displayed heavy metals measured considerably higher compared to the reference values, whilst the levels measured in hair evidenced some positive values significantly higher than the maximum reference. Of the 12 PCBs assayed in blood some showed higher positive values compared to the maximum tabular reference (although there is no clear reference quantified in the WHO-2005 report). In the 9 healthy patients heavy metals in the blood were within the expected target range, with those showing positive results (≤3 out of 14 heavy metals for each patient) having values only slightly higher than the reference maximum. The levels of 14 heavy metals measured in hair were below thresholds, and levels for the 12 PCBs measured in blood showed negativity or positivity with values close to the minimum benchmarks. The analyses carried out on biological matrices have uncovered important and significant differences between healthy and unhealthy subjects, both qualitative and quantitative differences with respect to heavy metals and PCBs. All patients with head and neck cancer enlisted for the study had heavy metal and PCB blood levels at least twice the maximum reference level. The levels of heavy metals in hair were at least double the maximum reference. In contrast, all healthy volunteers enrolled showed no significant levels for either metals or PCBs.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1803
[Cu] Class update date: 180309
[Lr] Last revision date:180309
[St] Status:Publisher
[do] DOI:10.1007/s10534-018-0091-9

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[PMID]: 29472712
[Au] Autor:Sinha RA; Singh BK; Yen PM
[Ad] Address:Laboratory of Hormonal Regulation, Cardiovascular and Metabolic Disorders Programme, Duke-NUS Medical School, Singapore, Singapore.
[Ti] Title:Direct effects of thyroid hormones on hepatic lipid metabolism.
[So] Source:Nat Rev Endocrinol;, 2018 Feb 23.
[Is] ISSN:1759-5037
[Cp] Country of publication:England
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:It has been known for a long time that thyroid hormones have prominent effects on hepatic fatty acid and cholesterol synthesis and metabolism. Indeed, hypothyroidism has been associated with increased serum levels of triglycerides and cholesterol as well as non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD). Advances in areas such as cell imaging, autophagy and metabolomics have generated a more detailed and comprehensive picture of thyroid-hormone-mediated regulation of hepatic lipid metabolism at the molecular level. In this Review, we describe and summarize the key features of direct thyroid hormone regulation of lipogenesis, fatty acid -oxidation, cholesterol synthesis and the reverse cholesterol transport pathway in normal and altered thyroid hormone states. Thyroid hormone mediates these effects at the transcriptional and post-translational levels and via autophagy. Given these potentially beneficial effects on lipid metabolism, it is possible that thyroid hormone analogues and/or mimetics might be useful for the treatment of metabolic diseases involving the liver, such as hypercholesterolaemia and NAFLD.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE; REVIEW
[Em] Entry month:1802
[Cu] Class update date: 180309
[Lr] Last revision date:180309
[St] Status:Publisher
[do] DOI:10.1038/nrendo.2018.10

  7 / 39675 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29325052
[Au] Autor:Martnez-Hernndez R; Sampedro-Nez M; Serrano-Somavilla A; Ramos-Lev AM; de la Fuente H; Trivio JC; Sanz-Garca A; Snchez-Madrid F; Marazuela M
[Ad] Address:Department of Endocrinology, Hospital Universitario de la Princesa, Instituto de Investigacin Sanitaria Princesa, Universidad Autnoma de Madrid, Madrid, Spain.
[Ti] Title:A MicroRNA Signature for Evaluation of Risk and Severity of Autoimmune Thyroid Diseases.
[So] Source:J Clin Endocrinol Metab;103(3):1139-1150, 2018 Mar 01.
[Is] ISSN:1945-7197
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Context: Circulating microRNAs (miRNAs) are emerging as an interesting research area because of their potential role as novel biomarkers and therapeutic targets. Their involvement in autoimmune thyroid diseases (AITDs) has not been fully explored. Objective: To compare the expression profile of miRNAs in thyroid tissue from patients with AITD and controls, using next-generation sequencing, further validated our findings in thyroid and serum samples. Design: Twenty fresh-frozen thyroid tissues (15 from patients with AITD and 5 from controls) were used for miRNA next-generation sequencing. Thirty-six thyroid samples were recruited for the qRT-PCR validation test and 58 serum samples for further validation in peripheral blood. Results: Expression of several miRNAs that had been previously associated with relevant immunological functions was significantly dysregulated. Specifically, eight differentially expressed miRNAs (miR-21-5p, miR-142-3p, miR-146a-5p, miR-146b-5p, miR-155-5p, miR-338-5p, miR-342-5p, and miR-766-3p) were confirmed using qRT-PCR in thyroid samples, and three had the same behavior in tissue and serum samples (miR-21-5p, miR-142-3p, and miR-146a-5p). Furthermore, when the expression of these miRNAs was assessed together with five additional ones previously related to AITD in peripheral blood, the expression of five (miR-Let7d-5p, miR-21-5p, miR-96-5p, miR-142-3p, and miR-301a-3p) was significantly expressed in AITD and, in patients with Graves disease (GD), was correlated with a higher severity of disease, including active ophthalmopathy, goiter, higher antibody titers, and/or higher recurrence rates. Conclusions: The present findings identify a serum five-signature miRNA that could be an independent risk factor for developing AITD and a predisposition of a worse clinical picture in patients with GD.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1801
[Cu] Class update date: 180308
[Lr] Last revision date:180308
[St] Status:In-Data-Review
[do] DOI:10.1210/jc.2017-02318

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[PMID]: 29253182
[Au] Autor:Shimura H; Sobue T; Takahashi H; Yasumura S; Ohira T; Ohtsuru A; Midorikawa S; Suzuki S; Fukushima T; Suzuki S; Yamashita S; Ohto H; Thyroid Examination Unit of the Radiation Medical Center for the Fukushima Health Management Survey Group
[Ad] Address:Radiation Medical Science Center for the Fukushima Health Management Survey, Fukushima Medical University, Fukushima, Japan.
[Ti] Title:Findings of Thyroid Ultrasound Examination Within 3 Years After the Fukushima Nuclear Power Plant Accident: The Fukushima Health Management Survey.
[So] Source:J Clin Endocrinol Metab;103(3):861-869, 2018 Mar 01.
[Is] ISSN:1945-7197
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Context: Childhood thyroid cancer is of great concern after the Fukushima nuclear power plant accident. Baseline analytical data on thyroid ultrasound examination (TUE) in children are important for future studies. Objective: We analyzed the age and sex distribution of findings from the TUEs of children and adolescents in the Fukushima Health Management Survey (FHMS). Design, Setting, and Participants: From October 2011 through March 2014, 294,905 participants aged 18 years or younger at the time of the earthquake voluntarily had TUEs in the first round of the FHMS. A secondary confirmatory examination was performed in 2032 subjects. Age- and sex-dependent prevalence and size of thyroid cysts, nodules, and cancers were analyzed. Main Outcome Measures: Age, sex, and size distribution of findings were analyzed. Results: Thyroid cysts, nodules, and cytologically suspected cancers were detected in 68,009, 1415, and 38 male subjects and in 73,014, 2455, and 74 female subjects, respectively. There was an age-dependent increase in the detection rate of thyroid nodules and cancer, but that of cysts reached a peak at 11 to 12 years. Sex affected the prevalence of thyroid nodules and cancers after the onset of puberty, but only a small difference was exhibited in that of cysts. Conclusions: The thyroid cancer detection rate in Fukushima was clarified, and the proportion of individuals with thyroid nodules and cysts varied substantially by age. The results of this study will contribute to future epidemiological research on nodular thyroid diseases in children and adolescents.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1712
[Cu] Class update date: 180308
[Lr] Last revision date:180308
[St] Status:In-Data-Review
[do] DOI:10.1210/jc.2017-01603

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[PMID]: 29183642
[Au] Autor:Rodrguez Y; Rojas M; Gershwin ME; Anaya JM
[Ad] Address:Center for Autoimmune Diseases Research (CREA), School of Medicine and Health Sciences, Universidad del Rosario, Bogota, Colombia.
[Ti] Title:Tick-borne diseases and autoimmunity: A comprehensive review.
[So] Source:J Autoimmun;88:21-42, 2018 Mar.
[Is] ISSN:1095-9157
[Cp] Country of publication:England
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Tick-borne diseases (TBDs) are emerging and reemerging diseases transmitted by ticks, which portray wide heterogeneity and global distribution. TBDs may present acute clinical pictures that resemble those of autoimmune diseases (i.e., musculoskeletal symptoms, cutaneous involvement, neurologic impairment, renal failure, etc.), and in some cases infection is considered a triggering factor for autoimmunity (e.g., rheumatoid arthritis, autoimmune thyroid disease, vasculitides). The clinician should consider TBDs among the differential diagnoses when approaching autoimmune-like signs in areas of tick infestation. Epidemiological setting (e.g., endemic areas, seasons) and an accurate diagnostic approach (i.e., clinical history, physical examination and laboratory tests) are necessary to confirm TBDs. Further, control and prevention of TBDs is warranted. Research in the fields of ticks microbiome and vaccination (i.e., wildlife and humans) are ahead to control vector transmission and bacterial infection. This review offers a comprehensive update on TBDs and their relationship with autoimmunity.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE; REVIEW
[Em] Entry month:1711
[Cu] Class update date: 180309
[Lr] Last revision date:180309
[St] Status:In-Data-Review

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[PMID]: 29517438
[Au] Autor:French SJ; Garner MM; Kiupel M
[Ti] Title:HISTOPATHOLOGIC CHARACTERISTICS OF THYROID GLAND NEOPLASMS IN THOMSON'S GAZELLES ( EUDORCUS THOMSONII).
[So] Source:J Zoo Wildl Med;49(1):64-69, 2018 Mar.
[Is] ISSN:1042-7260
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Published reports of neoplasms in Thomson's gazelles ( Eudorcas thomsonii) are very rare, but thyroid tumors were the most common neoplasm of this species, accounting for 12% of reported pathologies in a 1998-2012 retrospective study of cases submitted for histologic review of grossly enlarged thyroid glands. This report describes the histological and immunohistochemical characteristics of thyroid neoplasms in 10 Thomson's gazelles from five different zoological collections. Neoplasms were submitted as biopsies from six gazelles or collected during necropsy from four gazelles. The most common clinical findings included a palpable mass on the ventral neck and progressive weight loss. Radiographic mineral density was detected in one of the neoplastic masses. Histologically, the neoplasms were classified as microfollicular thyroid adenoma ( n = 2), solid thyroid adenoma ( n = 2), papillary thyroid adenoma ( n = 1), and solid thyroid carcinoma ( n = 5). Neoplastic cells in all 10 neoplasms were positive for thyroid transcription factor 1 and thyroglobulin, but negative for calcitonin. While five cases had histologic features of malignancy, there was no evidence of metastatic disease either clinically (biopsies) or on necropsy. Numerous concurrent diseases, including cardiomyopathies and nephropathies, were present and led to choice for euthanasia in several cases.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1803
[Cu] Class update date: 180308
[Lr] Last revision date:180308
[St] Status:In-Data-Review
[do] DOI:10.1638/2017-0017R1.1


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