Database : MEDLINE
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[PMID]: 29519772
[Au] Autor:Wattanamethanont J; Kaewthamasorn M; Tiawsirisup S
[Ad] Address:Veterinary Pathobiology Program, The Veterinary Parasitology Unit, Department of Veterinary Pathology, Faculty of Veterinary Science, Chulalongkorn University, Bangkok 10330, Thailand; Animal Vector-Borne Disease Research Group, The Veterinary Parasitology Unit, Department of Veterinary Pathology, Faculty of Veterinary Science, Chulalongkorn University, Bangkok 10330, Thailand.
[Ti] Title:Natural infection of questing ixodid ticks with protozoa and bacteria in Chonburi Province, Thailand.
[So] Source:Ticks Tick Borne Dis;, 2018 Mar 05.
[Is] ISSN:1877-9603
[Cp] Country of publication:Netherlands
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Ixodid ticks are important vectors of tick-borne disease agents affecting humans and animals, with wildlife often serving as important reservoirs. This study examined protozoal and bacterial infection in questing ticks in forest habitats in Chonburi Province, Thailand in 2015, using PCR and DNA sequencing techniques. A total of 12,184 ticks were morphologically identified to species and a subset of ticks were confirmed by PCR, targeting the tick mitochondrial 16S rRNA gene. Tick species collected included Haemaphysalis lagrangei (92.8%), H. wellingtoni (0.1%), and Rhipicephalus microplus (7.0%). In total, 419 tick pools [ELM(1] [ST2] were examined by PCR amplification of a fragment of the 18S rRNA gene of Babesia and Theileria species, and the 16S rRNA gene of bacteria in the family Anaplasmataceae. Results revealed a tick infection rate for the tick pools of 57.0% (239/419) including four pathogens and one bacterial symbiont. The highest infection rate in H. lagrangei, H. wellingtoni, and R. microplus pools was recorded for Anaplasma spp. at 55.6% (233/419) including three Anaplasma species genotype groups Anaplasma spp. closely related to A. bovis, A. platys, and unidentified Anaplasma spp. Theileria spp. showed a lower infection rate in H. lagrangei at 4.3% (18/419) with three Theileria species genotypes closely related to T. cervi, T. capreoli, and unidentified Theileria spp. Only 0.2% (1/419) of H. lagrangei pools contained Babesia spp., Ehrlichia spp., or Wolbachia spp. [ELM(3] [ST4] These findings provided information on tick species in wildlife habitats and detected protozoa and bacteria in the ticks. The results suggest that these tick species are possible vectors for transmitting tick-borne disease agents in Thailand wildlife habitats.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1803
[Cu] Class update date: 180309
[Lr] Last revision date:180309
[St] Status:Publisher

  2 / 4888 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29473735
[Au] Autor:Grabowski JM; Offerdahl DK; Bloom ME
[Ad] Address:Biology of Vector-Borne Viruses Section, Laboratory of Virology , Rocky Mountain Laboratories, NIAID/NIH , 903 South Fourth Street , Hamilton , Montana 59840 , United States.
[Ti] Title:The Use of Ex Vivo Organ Cultures in Tick-Borne Virus Research.
[So] Source:ACS Infect Dis;4(3):247-256, 2018 Mar 09.
[Is] ISSN:2373-8227
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Each year there are more than 15 000 cases of human disease caused by infections with tick-borne viruses (TBVs). These illnesses occur worldwide and can range from very mild illness to severe encephalitis and hemorrhagic fever. Although TBVs are currently identified as neglected vector-borne pathogens and receive less attention than mosquito-borne viruses, TBVs are expanding into new regions, and infection rates are increasing. Furthermore, effective vaccines, diagnostic tools, and other countermeasures are limited. The application of contemporary technologies to TBV infections presents an excellent opportunity to develop improved, effective countermeasures. Experimental tick and mammal models of infection can be used to characterize determinants of infection, transmission, and virulence and to test candidate countermeasures. The use of ex vivo tick cultures in TBV research provides a unique way to look at infection in specific tick organs. Mammal ex vivo organ slice and, more recently, organoid cultures are additional models that can be used to elucidate direct tissue-specific responses to infection. These ex vivo model systems are convenient for testing methods involving transcript knockdown and small molecules under tightly controlled conditions. They can also be combined with in vitro and in vivo studies to tease out possible host factors and potential vaccine or therapeutic candidates. In this brief perspective, we describe how ex vivo cultures can be combined with modern technologies to advance research on TBV infections.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1802
[Cu] Class update date: 180309
[Lr] Last revision date:180309
[St] Status:In-Data-Review
[do] DOI:10.1021/acsinfecdis.7b00274

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[PMID]: 29429808
[Au] Autor:Lacasta A; Mwalimu S; Kibwana E; Saya R; Awino E; Njoroge T; Poole J; Ndiwa N; Pelle R; Nene V; Steinaa L
[Ad] Address:Animal and Human Health (AHH), International Livestock Research Institute (ILRI), P.O. Box 30709, 00100 Nairobi, Kenya. Electronic address: a.lacasta@cgiar.org.
[Ti] Title:Immune parameters to p67C antigen adjuvanted with ISA206VG correlate with protection against East Coast fever.
[So] Source:Vaccine;36(11):1389-1397, 2018 Mar 07.
[Is] ISSN:1873-2518
[Cp] Country of publication:Netherlands
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:East Coast fever (ECF) is a lymphoproliferative disease caused by the tick-transmitted protozoan parasite Theileria parva. ECF is one of the most serious cattle tick-borne diseases in Sub-Saharan Africa. We have previously demonstrated that three doses of the C-terminal part of the sporozoite protein p67 (p67C) adjuvanted with ISA206VG confers partial protection against ECF at a herd level. We have tested the efficacy of two doses of this experimental vaccine, as reducing the vaccination regimen would facilitate its deployment in the field. We reconfirm that three antigen doses gave a significant level of protection to severe disease (46%, ECF score < 6) when compared with the control group, while two doses did not (23%). Animals receiving three doses of p67C developed higher antibody titers and CD4 T-cell proliferation indices, than those which received two doses. A new panel of immune parameters were tested in order to identify factors correlating with protection: CD4 proliferation index, total IgG, IgG1, IgG2 and IgM half maximal titers and neutralization capacity of the sera with and without complement. We show that some of the cellular and humoral immune responses provide preliminary correlates of protection.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1802
[Cu] Class update date: 180309
[Lr] Last revision date:180309
[St] Status:In-Data-Review

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[PMID]: 29330092
[Au] Autor:Sas MA; Comtet L; Donnet F; Mertens M; Vatansever Z; Tordo N; Pourquier P; Groschup MH
[Ad] Address:Institute of Novel and Emerging Infectious Diseases, Friedrich-Loeffler-Institut, Federal Research Institute for Animal Health, Greifswald-Isle of Riems, Germany.
[Ti] Title:A novel double-antigen sandwich ELISA for the species-independent detection of Crimean-Congo hemorrhagic fever virus-specific antibodies.
[So] Source:Antiviral Res;151:24-26, 2018 Mar.
[Is] ISSN:1872-9096
[Cp] Country of publication:Netherlands
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Crimean-Congo hemorrhagic fever (CCHF) is a tick-borne disease in humans caused by the CCHF virus (CCHFV). The detection of anti-CCHFV antibodies in animals is used to reveal infection risk areas. Therefore a simple, quick and reliable multispecies assay for the detection of CCHFV-specific antibodies is needed. This work presents the development and validation of a novel CCHF double-antigen ELISA for the detection of anti-CCHFV nucleoprotein antibodies. The test requires 30l of serum, and results are obtained within 90min. As the ELISA is based on recombinant N-protein of the IbAr10200 virus, it can be run under standard biosafety conditions. For assay validation, sera from 95 cattle and 176 small ruminants from CCHF-endemic regions (origin: Albania, Cameroon, Kosovo, Former Yugoslav Republic of Macedonia, Mauritania, Pakistan, Turkey) served as a positive reference serum panel. The CCHF antibody status of the positive reference samples had been previously confirmed by two serological assays (species-adapted VectorBest ELISA and Euroimmun IFA). CCHFV strains belonging to three different clades are known to circulate in the countries where the positive samples originated. Sera from 402 cattle and 804 small ruminants from Germany and France served as the negative serum panel, as both countries are considered outside of the CCHFV endemic zone. Sera from monkeys, camels, rats, ferrets, raccoon dogs, raccoons, foxes, hares, pigs and humans were also tested, to determine the suitability of this novel ELISA for these species. All negative reference sera were confirmed by the CCHF double-antigen ELISA, indicating a specificity of 100%. 268 of 271 positive reference sera tested positive for CCHFV-specific antibodies, 8sensitivity of 99%9. Further analysis are needed to ensure a recognition of the IbAr10200 nucleoprotein by antibodies directed against all known CCHFV clades. This is planned to be realized with sera from other regions covering the three missing clades.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1801
[Cu] Class update date: 180309
[Lr] Last revision date:180309
[St] Status:In-Data-Review

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[PMID]: 29183642
[Au] Autor:Rodrguez Y; Rojas M; Gershwin ME; Anaya JM
[Ad] Address:Center for Autoimmune Diseases Research (CREA), School of Medicine and Health Sciences, Universidad del Rosario, Bogota, Colombia.
[Ti] Title:Tick-borne diseases and autoimmunity: A comprehensive review.
[So] Source:J Autoimmun;88:21-42, 2018 Mar.
[Is] ISSN:1095-9157
[Cp] Country of publication:England
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Tick-borne diseases (TBDs) are emerging and reemerging diseases transmitted by ticks, which portray wide heterogeneity and global distribution. TBDs may present acute clinical pictures that resemble those of autoimmune diseases (i.e., musculoskeletal symptoms, cutaneous involvement, neurologic impairment, renal failure, etc.), and in some cases infection is considered a triggering factor for autoimmunity (e.g., rheumatoid arthritis, autoimmune thyroid disease, vasculitides). The clinician should consider TBDs among the differential diagnoses when approaching autoimmune-like signs in areas of tick infestation. Epidemiological setting (e.g., endemic areas, seasons) and an accurate diagnostic approach (i.e., clinical history, physical examination and laboratory tests) are necessary to confirm TBDs. Further, control and prevention of TBDs is warranted. Research in the fields of ticks microbiome and vaccination (i.e., wildlife and humans) are ahead to control vector transmission and bacterial infection. This review offers a comprehensive update on TBDs and their relationship with autoimmunity.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE; REVIEW
[Em] Entry month:1711
[Cu] Class update date: 180309
[Lr] Last revision date:180309
[St] Status:In-Data-Review

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[PMID]: 28453842
[Au] Autor:Lipowski D; Popiel M; Perlejewski K; Nakamura S; Bukowska-Osko I; Rzadkiewicz E; Dzieciatkowski T; Milecka A; Wenski W; Ciszek M; Debska-Slizien A; Ignacak E; Cortes KC; Pawelczyk A; Horban A; Radkowski M; Laskus T
[Ad] Address:Department of Infectious Diseases, Warsaw Medical University, Warsaw, Poland.
[Ti] Title:A Cluster of Fatal Tick-borne Encephalitis Virus Infection in Organ Transplant Setting.
[So] Source:J Infect Dis;215(6):896-901, 2017 03 15.
[Is] ISSN:1537-6613
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Background: Tick-borne encephalitis virus (TBEV) infection has become a major health problem in Europe and is currently a common cause of viral brain infection in many countries. Encephalitis in transplant recipients, althrough rare, is becoming a recognized complication. Our study provides the first description of transmission of TBEV through transplantation of solid organs. Methods: Three patients who received solid organ transplants from a single donor (2 received kidney, and 1 received liver) developed encephalitis 17-49 days after transplantation and subsequently died. Blood and autopsy tissue samples were tested by next-generation sequencing (NGS) and reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). Results: All 3 recipients were first analyzed in autopsy brain tissue samples and/or cerebrospinal fluid by NGS, which yielded 24-52 million sequences per sample and 9-988 matched TBEV sequences in each patient. The presence of TBEV was confirmed by RT-PCR in all recipients and in the donor, and direct sequencing of amplification products corroborated the presence of the same viral strain. Conclusions: We demonstrated transmission of TBEV by transplantation of solid organs. In such a setting, TBEV infection may be fatal, probably due to pharmacological immunosuppression. Organ donors should be screened for TBEV when coming from or visiting endemic areas.
[Mh] MeSH terms primary: Brain/virology
Encephalitis Viruses, Tick-Borne/isolation & purification
Encephalitis, Tick-Borne/transmission
Organ Transplantation/adverse effects
Tissue Donors
[Mh] MeSH terms secundary: Adult
Autopsy
Donor Selection
Encephalitis, Tick-Borne/etiology
Fatal Outcome
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Poland
Postoperative Complications/etiology
RNA, Viral/blood
Sequence Analysis, RNA
[Pt] Publication type:CASE REPORTS; JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Nm] Name of substance:0 (RNA, Viral)
[Em] Entry month:1706
[Cu] Class update date: 180308
[Lr] Last revision date:180308
[Js] Journal subset:AIM; IM
[Da] Date of entry for processing:170429
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.1093/infdis/jix040

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[PMID]: 29513260
[Au] Autor:Sowula K; Skladzien J; Szaleniec J; Gawlik J
[Ad] Address:Otolaryngology Clinic, Jagiellonian University Collegium Medicum, Krakow, Poland; Head Department: Jacek Skladzien, PH, MD.
[Ti] Title:Otolaryngological symptoms in patients treated for tick-borne diseases.
[So] Source:Otolaryngol Pol;72(1):30-34, 2018 Feb 28.
[Is] ISSN:2300-8423
[Cp] Country of publication:Poland
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:infections are borreliosis (Lyme disease) and tick-borne encephalitis (TBE). Lately there is growing incidence of Bartonella, Babesia, Anaplasma and Brucella co-infections. The similarity between the symptoms of tick-borne diseases and other pathologies causes serious diagnostic issues. MATERIAL AND METHODS: 216 patients aged 18-55, who presented to the outpatient clinic for tick-borne diseases in the years 2014-2016, were enrolled in the study. The patients had been diagnosed with Lyme disease and co-infections. The principal diagnostic tests to confirm the infections included ELISA, Western-Blot and circulating immune complexes (CIC). RESULTS: In the group of 216 patients, 162 presented with otolaryngological symptoms. The most common complaint was tinnitus (76,5%) accompanied by vertigo and dizziness (53,7%), headache (39%), unilateral sensorineural hearing loss (16,7%). The patients also had tick-borne coinfections, among them the most common was Bartonella henselae (33,4%) and Bartonella quintana (13%). CONCLUSIONS: Otolaryngological symptoms are a common manifestation of tick-borne diseases. They are most frequently observed in Lyme disease and Bartonella spp. infections. The symptoms in the head and neck region are usually occur in chronic Lyme disease with predominant IgG antibodies nad VlsE antigen.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1803
[Cu] Class update date: 180307
[Lr] Last revision date:180307
[St] Status:In-Process
[do] DOI:10.5604/01.3001.0011.5948

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[PMID]: 29511073
[Au] Autor:Mishra N; Caciula A; Price A; Thakkar R; Ng J; Chauhan LV; Jain K; Che X; Espinosa DA; Montoya Cruz M; Balmaseda A; Sullivan EH; Patel JJ; Jarman RG; Rakeman JL; Egan CT; Reusken CBEM; Koopmans MPG; Harris E; Tokarz R; Briese T; Lipkin WI
[Ad] Address:Center for Infection and Immunity, Mailman School of Public Health, Columbia University, New York, New York, USA nm2641@cumc.columbia.edu wil2001@cumc.columbia.edu.
[Ti] Title:Diagnosis of Zika Virus Infection by Peptide Array and Enzyme-Linked Immunosorbent Assay.
[So] Source:MBio;9(2), 2018 Mar 06.
[Is] ISSN:2150-7511
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Zika virus (ZIKV) is implicated in fetal stillbirth, microcephaly, intracranial calcifications, and ocular anomalies following vertical transmission from infected mothers. In adults, infection may trigger autoimmune inflammatory polyneuropathy. Transmission most commonly follows the bite of infected mosquitoes but may also occur through sexual intercourse or receipt of blood products. Definitive diagnosis through detection of viral RNA is possible in serum or plasma within 10days of disease onset, in whole blood within 3weeks of onset, and in semen for up to 3months. Serological diagnosis is nonetheless critical because few patients have access to molecular diagnostics during the acute phase of infection and infection may be associated with only mild or inapparent disease that does not prompt molecular testing. Serological diagnosis is confounded by cross-reactivity of immune sera with other flaviviruses endemic in the areas where ZIKV has recently emerged. Accordingly, we built a high-density microarray comprising nonredundant 12-mer peptides that tile, with one-residue overlap, the proteomes of Zika, dengue, yellow fever, West Nile, Ilheus, Oropouche, and chikungunya viruses. Serological analysis enabled discovery of a ZIKV NS2B 20-residue peptide that had high sensitivity (96.0%) and specificity (95.9%) versus natural infection with or vaccination against dengue, chikungunya, yellow fever, West Nile, tick-borne encephalitis, or Japanese encephalitis virus in a microarray assay and an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) of early-convalescent-phase sera (2 to 3weeks after onset of symptomatic infection). The emergence of Zika virus (ZIKV) as a teratogen is a profound challenge to global public health. Molecular diagnosis of infection is straightforward during the 3-week period when patients are viremic. However, serological diagnosis thereafter of historical exposure has been confounded by cross-reactivity. Using high-density peptide arrays that tile the proteomes of a selection of flaviviruses to identify a ZIKV-specific peptide, we established two assays that enable sensitive and specific diagnosis of exposure to ZIKV. These assays may be useful in guiding clinical management of mothers at risk for potential exposure to ZIKV and enable insights into the epidemiology of ZIKV infections.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1803
[Cu] Class update date: 180307
[Lr] Last revision date:180307
[St] Status:In-Data-Review

  9 / 4888 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29231658
[Au] Autor:Frivik JO; Noraas S; Grankvist A; Wenners C; Quarsten H
[Ti] Title:En mann i 60-rene fra Srlandet med intermitterende feber. A man in his sixties from Southern Norway with intermittent fever.
[So] Source:Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen;137(23-24), 2017 12 12.
[Is] ISSN:0807-7096
[Cp] Country of publication:Norway
[La] Language:eng; nor
[Mh] MeSH terms primary: Anaplasmataceae Infections
Fever/virology
Tick-Borne Diseases
[Mh] MeSH terms secundary: Aged
Anaplasmataceae/isolation & purification
Anaplasmataceae Infections/complications
Anaplasmataceae Infections/diagnosis
Anaplasmataceae Infections/drug therapy
Anti-Bacterial Agents/therapeutic use
Asthenia/virology
Doxycycline/therapeutic use
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Norway
Tick-Borne Diseases/complications
Tick-Borne Diseases/diagnosis
Tick-Borne Diseases/drug therapy
[Pt] Publication type:CASE REPORTS
[Nm] Name of substance:0 (Anti-Bacterial Agents); N12000U13O (Doxycycline)
[Em] Entry month:1803
[Cu] Class update date: 180306
[Lr] Last revision date:180306
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[Da] Date of entry for processing:171213
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.4045/tidsskr.17.0353

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[PMID]: 29231626
[Au] Autor:Hasle G
[Ti] Title:Nye patogener, nye utfordringer. New pathogens, new challenges.
[So] Source:Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen;137(23-24), 2017 12 12.
[Is] ISSN:0807-7096
[Cp] Country of publication:Norway
[La] Language:eng; nor
[Mh] MeSH terms primary: Tick-Borne Diseases/epidemiology
[Mh] MeSH terms secundary: Animals
Humans
Zoonoses/epidemiology
[Pt] Publication type:EDITORIAL
[Em] Entry month:1803
[Cu] Class update date: 180306
[Lr] Last revision date:180306
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[Da] Date of entry for processing:171213
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.4045/tidsskr.17.0890


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